SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

AFTERGLOW

Built as a wooden steam-drifter by the yard of John Chambers at Lowestoft, G.B. for the British Admiralty.
The building program for this steam drifters commenced in May 1917, with an average cost for hull and machinery of £11.500.
Launched as the AFTERGLOW.
Tonnage 94 grt, dim. 94 x 20 x 10ft, length bpp. 86ft.
One 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine manufactured by Pollit & Wigzell at Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire, 270 ihp., one shaft, speed 9 knots.
07 October 1918 delivered to the Admiralty.

If she ever was used by the Admiralty I am not sure, First World War was almost finished when she was delivered, most probably laid up.
Early 1920 she arrived at the Falkland Islands for service as a patrol vessel to protect the Fur Seal Rookeries in the colony.
1931 Sold to the Falkland Islands & Dependencies Sealing Company and renamed PORT RICHARD.
From November 1939 hired by the Royal Navy and renamed HMS AFTERGLOW, and used as an armed patrol vessel around the Falkland Islands. Armed with 1-3pdr. gun.
August 1944 returned to owners, after she received damage in the shallow and treacherous Reef Channel at Saunders Island. Laid up in Stanley Harbour.
During a gale later she dragged ashore.
Her remains can today be seen on the beach close to the Stanley Market Garden.

Falkland Islands 2017 £1.22 sg?, scott?
Sources: Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. 2 by J.J. Colledge. Condemned at Stanley by John Smith. Falkland Island Post. Internet

ACTAEON barque 1838

The extraordinary voyages of 16th century seafarers transformed history as newly-developed deep water sailing ships, equipped with the mariner’s compass, enabled Europeans to venture beyond the horizon and scour the oceans for new land, dreams and gold. During one such voyage in 1592, to the Magellan Straits, the little recognized but most accomplished navigator, John Davis, in his ship, Desire, was storm-blown under bare poles amongst these apparently unknown and unpeopled islands. But it is likely that the archipelago had been quietly known about for years by the major sea powers, as an ill-defined cluster of blobs appear, vaguely positioned near the eastern end of the Magellan Strait, on maps from 1507 onwards. Amerigo Vespucci may well have seen them from the deck of a Portuguese ship as early as 1502.
The 700 islands, islets, rocks and reefs which comprise the Falklands are situated some 315 nautical miles down-wind and down-stream from Cape Horn. Battered by frequent gales and surrounded by strong currents, the Islands have always provided both peril and sanctuary for the seafarer. Over 180 ships are known to have met their end in the wild seas which surround the Falklands. Without doubt there will have been others which sank without trace.

During the 1850’s there was a sudden upsurge in sea-borne traffic around Cape Horn. Vessels trading in Californian and Australian gold, Chilean copper and Peruvian guano began calling into Stanley for repair and provisions. The nearest alternative port was Montevideo a thousand miles to the north. Some ships attempting to round the Horn were overloaded, some unseaworthy, and others simply unlucky. Many suffered severe battering and, riding the prevailing westerlies, limped back into harbour to lick their wounds. A few lame ducks never recovered. Others were deliberately wrecked and their cargoes sold by unscrupulous dealers. The growing port gained a notorious reputation and a flock of worn-out windjammers. Several are still stuck in the Stanley harbour mud. But time and tide and two pernicious sea worms, the teredo and the gribble, have hastened their demise and in many cases their crumbling woodwork has all but disappeared.
This issue depicts some of those vessels which finished their days beached along the Falklands’ shorelines. They remain an integral part of the Islands’ history and a reminder of the salty men who sailed in them.
(The name given on the stamp is wrong, it must be the ACTAEON.)

Built as a wooden cargo vessel in 1838 by John Harley at Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada for W. Locketts, Liverpool.
Launched as the ACTAEON.
Tonnage 561 ton, dim. 35.4 x 8.5 x 6.1m.
Lloyd’s gives in 1839 that she was ship rigged but in all the other Lloyds Registers she is given barque rigged.
1839 The first time mentioned in Lloyds Register Her first captain is given as G. Fielding, homeport Liverpool and on a voyage from Liverpool around Cape Horn, not a destination given.
1843 Her captain given as Faulkner.
1845 Her captain given as Joseph L. Duly and underway from Liverpool to New Orleans.
1850 Her captain given as High.
The 561-ton British barque ACTAEON arrived on 22nd January 1853 under the command of Captain Robertson. 156 days out from Liverpool and bound for San Francisco laden with coal, she put back into Stanley after failing to round Cape Horn and was subsequently scuttled after survey.

Falkland Islands 2017 31p sg?, scott?
Source: Falkland Island Post. Lloyds Registers1839-1854, http://wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?116487

Clipper ship Goolwa 1864.

"During the sixties the Orient Line came to be known in Australia for the remarkable speed of its beautiful little composite clippers". A magnificent clipper ship named the Goolwa has been launched from the building yard of Messrs Hall, Footdee, Aberdeen in 1864. The vessel is 717 tons register and will be classed 13 years as at Lloyd's. She will trade between London and Adelaide, Australia, and is the property of Messrs Anderson, Thomson and Co., London. She will be commanded by Captain Johnston. The Goolwa is a composite ship and has all the new and improved apparatus for swift sailing. South Australian Register, 29th November 1866: Left Adelaide, Goolwa, ship, 717 tons, A Johnston master, for London, 6 passengers, cargo - wool hides, bark, copper & wine. South Australian Register, 28th September 1869: Deaths - John Walter Douglas, aged 28, chief officer on ship Goolwa, washed overboard off Cape Horn, homeward bound from Adelaide. South Australian Register, 13th September 1869: Goolwa, ship, 717 tons, A. Johnston, departed Adelaide for London via Port Augusta (South Australia) to load wool. cargo tiles and copper. Sydney Morning Herald, 1st August 1872: Departed Newcastle, New South Wales, Goolwa, ship Johnston, for Wallaroo, South Australia with 900 tons coal. South Australian Register, 28th April 1875: Civil action heard at Port Adelaide - cause of action arose in 1873 when capt. Johnston was in ship Goolwa. Plaintiff, Mr Wilson, said he engaged to deliver 1000 pairs of parrots to Captain Johnston, when he arrived at port Augusta to hand over last 2 or 3 cages (670 pairs) the ship was gone and birds, in consequence of exposure, died. Mr Wilson claimed captain Johnston had told him the ship would leave on October 20th and that he was there on October 11th to deliver them. Captain Johnston claimed he had set no date for last delivery of birds, but had tried to contact Mr Wilson before sailing. Magistrate found for Captain Johnston. South Australian Register, 31st January 1880: Port Adelaide Police Court - R. W. Farquhar, steward, was charged by J. T. Torkelson, master of ship Goolwa, of refusing duty between 28th December and January 5th. He alleged steward would not weigh out flour to the crew, but estimated and on several occassions steward refused request to clean the cabin and told master to do it himself. Ordered to be imprisoned until rising of the court and to forfeit 5 days pay. Sydney Morning Herald, 3rd July 1880: Goolwa, ship, arrived London 30th June from Adelaide, 2nd March. South Australian Register, 16th April 1884: Adelaide Police Court - Capt. J. T. Torkelson stated his ship Goolwa belonged London and arrived at port Adelaide 3rd April. He alleged cook and steward had embezzled spirits, wines, beer and preserves valued at £3 from ship's stores. 2nd Officer at 12o'clock previous Saturday night had discovered them intoxicated near spirit locker, which was inspected and found to have been broken open. They were also seen trying to sell liquor to The Criterion Hotel. Sentenced to 12 weeks imprisonment. Clipper Goolwa was a hard driven fast ship in the Adelaide trade. She diappeared from the register in 1880. The design stamp is made after painting of William Foster.
Cameroun 2016;300f.SG?
Source:http://www.aberdeenships.com/single.asp?offset=1150&index=100158 http://www.19thcenturyshipportraitsinpr ... gd-oc.html

A 26 type submarine

30 June 2015 contract signed.
Of this two Swedish submarines Type A26 the first steel was cut on 04 October2015 by the SaabKockums yard, Sweden for the Swedish Navy.
Specifications:
Displacement surfaced 1,800 ton , submerged 1,900 ton, dim. 62 x 6.40 x 6m. (draught), height of boat 11 meter.
Diesel electric propulsion and Stirling AIP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air-indep ... propulsion Hp?, speed maximum underwater 12 knots.
Armament: 533mm and 400m torpedo tubes, 62 torpedoes or mines. A total payload of more as 15 - 53cm weapons is possible.
Test depth 200 meter.
Crew 26.
Endurance 45 days.
Completed ?

A26 is the project name of the next generation of submarines developed by Kockums for the Swedish Navy. First planned at the beginning of the 1990s, the project was called "U-båt 2000" and was intended to be ready by the late 1990s or early 2000. With the end of the Cold War the naval threat from the Soviet Union disappeared and the new submarine class was deemed unnecessary. The project lay dormant for years until the mid-2000s when the need for a replacement for the Södermanland class became apparent. Originally the Scandinavian countries had intended to collaborate on the Viking class, but Denmark's withdrawal from submarine operations meant that Kockums proceeded on their own.
In February 2014 the project was cancelled because of disagreements between Kockums's new German owners, ThyssenKrupp, and the Swedish government. ThyssenKrupp refused to send a complete offer to any potential buyer, and demanded that each one buyer pay for the entire development rather than sharing the cost. The cancellation resulted in the Kockums equipment repossession incident on 8 April 2014. As per protocol, The Swedish government repossessed all equipment belonging to Defence Materiel Administration (Sweden), as well as all secret blueprints and images, using an armed escort. By orders from a manager, Kockums staff tried to sabotage the repossession by locking the gates with the repossession crew and escort still inside.
Maritime Today on 18 March 2015 reported that the project was restarted after the Swedish government placed a formal order for two A26 submarines for a maximum total cost of SEK 8.2 bn (approximately US$945 Million as of 18 March 2015). According to the article, a Letter of Intent (LOI) had earlier been signed by Saab and FMV (The Swedish Defence Material Administration) in June 2014 regarding the Swedish Armed Forces’ underwater capability for the period 2015-2024. Saab has since acquired Kockums. The order in question for the two A26 submarines has been placed with what is now "SAAB Kockums." These are to be delivered no later than 2022.
Features
The new submarine project was intended to be an improved version of the Gotland class, which will be considered obsolete around 2015–17 according to Per Skantz, development co-ordinator at the Marine headquarters in Stockholm. The submarine would displace 1,900 tonnes and have a crew complement of between 17 and 31 men. The 2008–10 military budget memorandum to the Minister for Defence by the Supreme Commander Håkan Syrén would require the type to cost no more than the current Gotland class (about 1.5 billion SEK). The new submarine would have blue water capability, something earlier Swedish submarines have lacked. It would have been equipped with modified AIP stirling propulsion and GHOST (Genuine HOlistic STealth) technology, making the submarine extremely quiet. It will also be designed to withstand significant shock loads from underwater explosions and would be able to "Launch and recover vehicles" through its torpedo tubes. The submarine's sail would largely be composed of the same material that was used when constructing the Visby-class corvettes.
Orders
On 25 February 2010 Kockums AB signed a contract with the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) concerning the overall design phase of the next-generation submarine. Kockums CEO, Ola Alfredsson, stated that "This is an important first step, not only for Kockums, but for the Swedish Armed Forces as a whole. We shall now be able to maintain our position at the cutting edge of submarine technology, which is vital in the light of current threat scenarios."
The Norwegian Navy had shown interest in the project and could be interested to buy several submarines in the future. According to Kockums AB orders must be made by the end of 2010.
On 11 April 2010 the Swedish Defence minister Sten Tolgfors announced plans to acquire two new submarines to be commissioned in 2018–19 replacing the two submarines of the Södermanlands class. The plans also included a Mid-Life Upgrade program of two submarines of the Gotland class. Additional submarines could later be ordered to replace the Gotland class, however this will not be decided before 2020.
On 16 June 2010, the Swedish Parliament authorised the government to procure two new submarines. Kockums states that construction of two A26 submarines will generate about 170 jobs.
The first submarine was planned to be laid down by the end of 2012, but as of 2013 no submarines have yet been ordered. In September 2013 it was announced that the project had been delayed because of construction issues and the first submarine would not be ready before 2020.
Order cancelled and alternatives
On 27 February 2014 the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) cancelled its plans for ordering the A26 submarine from Kockums. According to FMV the new Kockum owner, the German company Thyssen Krupp has refused to allow Sweden to share the cost with any other nation, making the submarine too expensive. Sweden has instead approached Saab. Saab plans to rehire many of Kockums submarine engineers if they receive orders for a new submarine. As a result, Saab recruited top people from Kockums and issued a press release that the company was seeking employees for its naval division. In a letter to the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, FMV, the head of the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Division, Dr. Hans Atzpodien begs FMV to stop Saab from recruiting key personnel from Kockums. On 2 April 2014 the Swedish government officially terminated all talks about a deal with the ThyssenKrupp.
On 14 April 2014 about 200 employees had left Thyssen Krupp for Saab and it was reported that Saab and Thyssen Krupp had started to negotiate about selling Kockums. In June 2014 Thyssen Krupp agreed to sell Kockums to Saab.
On 22 July 2014 it was announced that Saab had bought Kockums from Thyssen Krupp for 340 million SEK. The new name will be Saab Kockums.
On 12 September 2014, Saab Kockums proposed a 4,000 ton variant of the A26, known as the type 612, for the Royal Australian Navy to replace their ageing Collins-class submarine which may lead to the project being brought back.
In December 2014 an agreement between Saab and Damen Shipyards was announced to jointly develop, offer and build next-generation submarines (based on the Type 612 design). Initially focused on replacing the four Walrus-class submarines currently in use by the Royal Netherlands Navy by 2025 combined with the still existing Swedish submarine requirements after cancellation of the previous A26 program.
During a visit to Kockums facilities on June 30, 2015 the Swedish defence minister, Peter Hultqvist, announced that two submarines will be ordered for a cost of 8.2 billion SEK (US$ 972 million), and that the submarines would be delivered by 2022.

Djibouti 2016 280FD sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A26_submarine + Internet.

035 type submarine

Built as a submarine type 035 by Wuchang at Wuhan for the Chinese Navy.
Three were launched with pennant No 231, 232 and 342, 231 got on fire before delivery and was scrapped.
Displacement 2.110 ton submerged, dim. 76 x 7.6 x 7.6m, draught 5.1m.
Powered by one type E390ZC diesel engine, 5,200 hp, speed 18 knots submerged.
Test depth 300m.
Crew 57.
Armament 6 - 533mm torpedo tubes.
1975 and 1979 completed.

2017 Both submarine of this class were stricken.

The Type 035 submarine (NATO reporting name: Ming-class) is a class of diesel-electric submarines of the People's Liberation Army Navy. The Type 035 is a heavily improved redesign of the older Type 033 Romeo-class submarine, which were built in China from 1962 to 1984.
Background
In 1963, under the 1950 Sino-Soviet Treaty of Friendship, Alliance and Mutual Assistance, the Soviet Union passed to China the necessary design details in order to produce Romeo-class submarines.[2] The Chinese variant became known as the Type 033 Romeo-class, of which China built a total of 84 between 1962 and 1984.
During 1970s, China's ambition to create an indigenous submarine industry lead to the commissioning of Wuhan Ship Development and Design Institute (701 Institute) to design and build an improved submarine based on the Type 033 hull, named the Type 035 Ming-class. Two Type 035 boats were complete by 1974.
Variants
Type 035: First unit of the Ming class submarine, with construction of 2 units begun simultaneously in October 1969 in Wuchang Shipyard. The general designer was Mr. Wei Xumin The most significant difference between Type 035 Ming class and Type 033 Wuhan class is that the former is driven by a single shaft instead of twin shafts of the latter. Trials completed in October 1974 and this first unit (original pennant number 162, but later changed to 232) built at Wuchang Shipyard entered Chinese service in the following month.
Boats of the class 035
The following are the pennant numbers of each boat, according to their type:
Type 035 Ming-class (ES5C): 232 and 342 both are stricken.

Djibouti 2016 280fd sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_035_submarine http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz

CARIBE SUN fast ferry

Monserrat issued a stamp in 2016? which give, that the ferry SEA ACCESS is depict, not any vessel under that name exit and by searching around on the internet I am sure the fast ferry CARIBE SUN is depict.
She is not more in service since April 2016 between Montserrat and Antigua, and later that year replaced by the JADEN SUN.
Built as a twin hull fast ferry under yard No 320 by Lindstol Skibs og Baatbyggeri AS, Risor, Norway for Fylkesbaatane I Sogn og Fjordane, Florø, Norway.
10 September 2001 laid down.
12 April 2002 launched as the FJORDTROLL.
Tonnage 308 grt, 30 dwt, dim. 31.70 x 9.44 x 2.30m. (draught).
Powered by two MTU 12V396 TE74L diesel engines, each 1,500 kW, servogear propellers, maximum speed 36 knots.
Passengers 194.
19 July 2002 delivered to owners.

Sold in 2013 to Caribe Transport Ltd. Tortola, Virgin Islands and renamed CARIBE SUN.
Used in the service between Montserrat to Antigua till April 2016.
2017 For sale at Grenada. Imo No 9259434.

Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz and internet.
Montserrat 2016?, $3.50 sg?, scott?
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