WAHINE (N.Z.)

Built in 1964-'65 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. Govan, Scotland, #830, for Union Steamship Co. of New Zealand, laid down 14-09-'64, launched 14-07-'65, commissioned 12-06-'66.
Completed by Fairfields (Glasgow) Ltd. on new contract signed 06-01-'66 following the collapse of the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. in October'65.
Ferry passenger/vehicles, Gt:8944, Nt:3951, Dw:1430, Loa:149m. (488') B:22m. (71') Depth:12.65m. (41'6") Draft:5.18m. (17') 4 boilers, 2 AEI turbo-alternators driving 2 AEI propulsion alternators:? hp. twin screw, 22 kn. 6 decks, complement:126, passengers daytime:1050, at night:927 in more than 300 1, 2, 3 and 4 persons cabins, 200 cars, IMO.6519584.
On 18-06-'66 she left Greenock, sailed via Panama Canal, arrived Wellington 24-07-'66, maiden voyage 01-08-'66 from Wellington to Lyttelton.

On the evening of 9 April 1968 she departed from Lyttelton for a routine overnight crossing, carrying 610 passengers and 123 crew.

Extreme weather conditions.
In the early morning of 10 April two violent storms merged over Wellington, creating a single extratropical cyclone that was the worst recorded in New Zealand's history. Cyclone Giselle was heading south after causing much damage in the north of the North Island. It hit Wellington at the same time as another storm that had driven up the West Coast of the South Island from Antarctica. The winds in Wellington were the strongest ever recorded. At one point they reached 275 kilometres per hour (171 mph) and in one Wellington suburb alone ripped off the roofs of 98 houses. Three ambulances and a truck were blown onto their sides when they tried to go into the area to rescue injured people.

As the storms hit Wellington Harbour, WAHINE was making her way out of Cook Strait on the last leg of her journey. Although there were weather warnings when she set out from Lyttelton, there was no indication that storms would be severe or any worse than those often experienced by vessels crossing the Cook Strait

At 05.50 hrs, with winds gusting at between 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph) and 155 kilometres per hour (96 mph) Captain Hector Gordon Robertson decided to enter harbour. Twenty minutes later the winds had increased to 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph), and she lost her radar. A huge wave pushed her off course and in line with Barrett Reef. Robertson was unable to turn her back on course, and decided to keep turning around and back out to sea.

For 30 minutes she battled into the waves and wind, but by 06.10 hrs she was not answering her helm and had lost control of her engines. At 0640 hrs she was driven onto the southern tip of Barrett Reef, near the harbour entrance less than a mile from shore. She drifted along the reef, shearing off her starboard propeller and gouging a large hole in her hull on the starboard side of the stern, beneath the waterline. Passengers were told that she was aground but there was no immediate danger. They were directed to don their lifejackets and report to their muster stations as a routine "precautionary measure".

The storm continued to grow more intense. The wind increased to over 250 kilometres per hour (160 mph) and she dragged her anchors and drifted into the harbour. At about 11.00 hrs, close to the western shore at Seatoun, her anchors finally held. At about the same time the tug TAPUHI reached her and tried to attach a line and bring her in tow, but after 10 minutes the line broke. Other attempts failed, but the deputy harbourmaster, Captain Galloway, managed to climb aboard from the pilot boat.

Throughout the morning, the danger of the ship sinking seemed to pass as the vessel's location was in an area where the water depth did not exceed 10 meters (30’), and the crew's worst-case scenario was the clean-up once the vessel either arrived in Wellington or had grounded in shallower water. There was indication that the ship would even sail again that evening as usual, albeit later than scheduled while the damage done by the reef was repaired.


At about 13.15 hrs the combined effect of the tide and the storm swung WAHINE around, providing a patch of clear water sheltered from the wind. As she suddenly listed further and reached the point of no return, Robertson gave the order to abandon ship. In an instance similar to what had occurred during the sinking of the Italian passenger liner ANDREA DORIA off the coast of New England in 1956, the severe starboard list left the four lifeboats on the port side useless: only the four on the starboard side could be launched.

The first starboard motor lifeboat, boat S1, capsized shortly after being launched. Those aboard were thrown into the water, and many were drowned in the rough sea, including two children and several elderly passengers. Survivor Shirley Hick, remembered for losing two of her three children in the disaster, recalled this event vividly, as her three-year-old daughter Alma had drowned in this lifeboat. Some managed to hold onto the overturned boat as it drifted across the harbour to the eastern shore, towards Eastbourne.

The three remaining standard lifeboats, which according to a number of survivors were severely overcrowded, did manage to reach shore. Lifeboat S2 reached Seatoun beach on the western side of the channel with about 70 passengers and crew, as did Lifeboat S4, which was severely overcrowded with over 100 people. Heavily overcrowded Lifeboat S3 landed on the beach near Eastbourne, about 3 miles (5 km) away on the opposite side of the channel.

WAHINE launched her life rafts, but waves up to 6 metres (20’) high capsized some of them and many people were killed. She sank in 38’ (12 m) of water, forcing hundreds of passengers and crew into the rough sea. When the weather cleared, the sight of her foundering in the harbour urged many vessels to race to the scene, including the ferry GMV ARAMOANA, tugs, fishing boats, yachts and small personal craft. They rescued hundreds of people. Over 200 passengers and crew reached the rocky shore of the east side of the channel, south of Eastbourne. As this area was desolate and unpopulated, many survivors were exposed to the elements for several hours while rescue teams tried to navigate the gravel road down the shoreline. It was here that a number of bodies were recovered.
At about 14.30 hrs WAHINE rolled completely onto her starboard side.
Some of the survivors reached the shore only to die of exhaustion or exposure. Fifty-one people died at the time, and two more died later from their injuries, 53 victims in all. Most of the victims were middle-aged or elderly, but included three children; they died from drowning, exposure or injuries from being battered on the rocks. Forty-six bodies were found; 566 passengers were safe, as were 110 crew, and six were missing.

Early hopes that she could be salvaged were abandoned when the magnitude of structural damage became clear. As the wreck was a navigational hazard, preparations were made over the next year to refloat her and tow her into Cook Strait for scuttling. However a similar storm in 1969 broke up the wreck, and it was dismantled (partly by the HIKITIA floating crane) where it lay.

(New Zealand 2018)
Various websites

MILGEM PROJECT

Turkey issued 6 stamps in 2017 which shows us material used by the Turkish Defence Force, one stamp shows us a corvette in use by the Turkish Navy, not a name or pennant no is given or visible on the stamp only that she is one of the “Milgem Project”.

The lead ship of this class is the HEYBELIADA (F 511) which was built by the Tuzla Naval Shipyard in Istanbul for the Turkish Navy.
26 July 2005 laid down.
27 September 2008 launched as TGL HEYBELIADA (F511) one of the Ada class corvettes.
Displacement 2,340 ton, dim. 99.56 x 14.40 x 3.89m. (draught)
Powered: CODAG by two diesel engines and one gas turbine, 42,430 shp (31,640 kW), twin shafts, speed 29 knots maximum.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 3,500 mile.
Armament: 1 – 76mm OTO Melara Super Rapid gun. 2 – 12.7mm Aselsan STAMP gun. 8 – Harpoon anti-surface missiles, 21 – RAM (PDMS) anti aircraft missiles and 2 – 324mm Mk.32 triple launchers for Mk.46 torpedoes,
Carries ? S-70B Seahawk ASW helicopters and a unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) , fitted out with landing platform and hangar.
Crew 93 but has accommodation for 106 persons.
27 September 2011 commissioned.

TCG HEYBELIADA (F-511) is the lead ship of the Ada-class ASW corvettes of the Turkish Navy. HEYBELIADA was named after Heybeliada Island, where the Turkish Naval High School is located. Heybeliada Island is part of the Prince Islands archipelago in the Sea of Marmara, to the southeast of Istanbul.
Designed, developed and built by the Tuzla (Istanbul) Naval Shipyard as a part of the MILGEM project, it was laid down on 22 January 2007, launched on 27 September 2008, and commissioned on 27 September 2011.
History
Istanbul Naval Shipyard Command started construction of HEYBELIADA on 22 January 2007. Sailed out for initial sea trials in 2008, she was officially commissioned by the Turkish Navy and entered navy service on 27 September 2011. Since her commissioning, her longest voyage has been 2013 Mediterranean cruise. This journey took the vessel to the ports of Alexandria, Tripoli, Libya, Algiers, La Goulette, Casablanca, and Durres. Throughout the vagaries of her service career, the vessel has received the moniker the "Ghost of the Seas".
Description
HEYBELIADA has a displacement of 2,300 long tons (2,340 t), is 99.56 m (326.6 ft) in length, 14.4 m (47 ft) in beam, and has a draft of 3.89 m (12.8 ft). She is powered by two diesel engines and a gas turbine, with a power of 31,640 kilowatts (42,430 hp), driving two propellers, and is capable of speeding up to 29 knots (54 km/h; 33 mph). She has a range of 3,500 nautical miles (6,500 km) at 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph), and has an endurance of 21 days with logistical support and ten days while operating autonomously. She has a crew of 93, with space for up to 106
HEYBELIADA is equipped with GENESIS combat management system that controls search and navigation radars, electronic warfare suits, weapons, countermeasures, communication devices, underwater and onboard sensors. The ship is armed with a single 76-millimetre (3 in) OTO Melara gun, two ASELSAN STAMP 12.7-millimetre (0.50 in) guns, eight Harpoon missiles, 21 Rolling Airframe Missiles and two 324-millimetre (12.8 in) Mark 32 triple launchers for Mark 46 torpedoes. Electronic warfare systems include a dedicated EW radar, laser/RF systems, ASW jammers, and an SSTD system. Communication and navigation systems involve satellite communication, X-band, navigation, fire control and LPI radar, ECDIS, GPS and LAN infrastructure. The radar suite is the SMART-S Mk2, built by Thales. The ship is fitted with sonar developed by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. The whole platform is managed by an advanced integrated platform management system.
The ship is capable of carrying Sikorsky S-70 helicopter or unmanned aircraft, along with the associated armaments, 20 tons of JP-5 aircraft fuel, aerial refueling systems and maintenance facilities.
2018 In service.

More info on the Milgem Project is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MILGEM_project

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OTO_Melara_76_mm
Turkey 2017 3.70 + 10 Kuras sg?, scott?

PASSING CAPE HORN

Chile issued in 1995 one stamp for the 51st World Congress of Cap Horner’s in Valparaiso, Chile from 21 – 26 October 1995.
The Cap Horn Association was at that time a dwindling society of Cape Horner’s who did pass Cape Horn on a sailing cargo ship. Cape Horner’s is the name given to those mariners who have rounded Cape Horn under sail.
The Cape Horner’s Society accept nowadays also seaman from yachts who has passed the cape as member, and the society is still active.
The stamp designed by Luis Ruiz-Tagle shows a sailing cargo vessel during bad weather passing Cape Horn, which is in the background, with some crew standing on the main mast yard horses to furl a sail. Below an albatross is flying around, which is characteristic for the area.
The vessel is not identified, and must be one of the thousands Cape Horner’s who has passed the cape.

More info on Cape Horn is given:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn

Source: Internet.
Chile 1995 250p sg 1630, scott 1148.

USS DESTROYER World War II

St Kitts issued in 1995 four stamps for the 50th Anniversary of the end of World War II, one of this stamps shows us an “escort destroyer” of the USA Navy.

By comparing photos of the USS escort destroyers World War II and the stamp the only class which is almost identical with the vessel depict on the stamp is the Evarts or Buckley class. Both classes are almost identical, only the Buckley class was significantly longer. The stamp shows us a vessel from the starboard bow, and from the stamp I can’t clearly make out which type is depict.
Which vessel of this classes is depict is unknown, many were built during World War II in sections in factories around the USA and then assembled on a yard.
The U.K. in a lend lease act used during the war many of this destroyers.

Sources: Internet.
St Kitts 1995 $8 sg 438, scott 392

USA CAR FERRY around 1900

This stamp issued by the USA and designed by Richard Schlecht of Arlington, Virginia is based on ferry boats sailing on the Hudson River by New York around 1900, he used primarily the NEWARK built in 1902 and her sister the CHICAGO built in 1901. The two double ended ferries were sisters but did have minor differences.
The NEWARK was built as a double decker car-ferry under yard no 138 by T.S. Marvel in Newburg, NY for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co, in New York.
Launched as NEWARK.
Tonnage 1,308 ton, dim. 58.7 (bpp.) x 14.0m.
Powered by a triple expansion steam engine, 750 hp.
July 1902 completed.
Used in the service between New Jersey and Manhattan.
1949 Transferred to de Delaware-New Jersey Ferry Co. in Wilmington, DE. Not renamed.
September 1951 broken up in Baltimore.

Her sister was built under yard No 177 by Burlee Shipbuilding & Dry-dock Co, Mariner’s Harbour for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. New York.
Launched as the CHICAGO.
Tonnage 1,334 ton, dim. 58.9 (bpp.) x 14.0m.
Same type of engine only her horse powered was 700 hp.
1901 Completed.

Same service as the NEWARK.
1949 Transferred to Delaware New Jersey Ferry Co, Wilmington, DE not renamed.
1951 Transferred to the State of Delaware, Wilmington, not renamed.
May 1952 scrapped by Patapsco Scrap Co., Baltimore.

Source: Internet and http://www.miramarshipindex.nz
USA 1990 32c sg 2481, scott 2466.

SOMALIA SAILING SHIPS 1994

Somalia used four stamps in 1994 which show sailing ships.

150 sh Viking ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360
350 sh Junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069
600 sh galleon. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11966
1400 sh Clipper ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13935

Somalia 1994 150/1400sh sg?, scott?

PORTLAND HMS (F-79)

Tristan da Cunha has a close affinity to the military and in particular the Navy, from the founding of the British community nearly 200 years ago, to the present day. As the world’s most remote inhabited island, visiting naval ships have always been a welcome sight and have provided much needed support for those living on Tristan da Cunha. With a population of just 254 islanders (January 2018) resident on Tristan the arrival of a ship’s crew can almost double the local population and is often a time of great excitement and celebration.

HMS PORTLAND arrived off Tristan 14 January 2017 from South Georgia and anchored offshore. The small harbour was too small for her but personnel were ferried to the island the following day, once the Harbour Master had assessed the swell and confirmed that it was a suitable day.

She had carried out a fishery protection patrol of Tristan’s waters – the sea is rich with crawfish, one of the island’s main sources of income – before dropping anchor for 24 hours in company with tanker RFA GOLD ROVER.

As always, the short visit assured islanders the mother country had not forgotten about them and allowed the sailors the rare chance to enjoy an island few people set foot on.
http://www.pobjoystamps.com/contents/en ... Ships.html

Built as a Type 23 frigate under yard no 1052 by BAE Systems Marine (YSL) Ltd., Scotstoun near Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
February 1996 ordered.
14 January 1998 laid down.
15 May 1999 launched as the HMS PORTLAND (F-79), christened by Lady Brigstocke.
Displacement 4,900 ton, dim. 133 x 16.3 x 7.3m. (draught)
Powered: CODLAG by four 2,025 shp Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators, two GEC electric motors, 4,000 shp. and two Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C, 31,100 shp. twin screws, speed in excess of 28 knots..
Range 7,500 mile by a speed of 15 knots.
Armament: Anti-Air missiles, 1 – 32 cell Sea Wolf GWS 26 VLS canisters for 32 missiles. Anti-ship missiles 2 – quad Harpoon launchers. Anti-submarine torpedoes, 2 – twin 12.75 inch (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes.
Guns: 1 – BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun.2 – 30mm DS30m Mk2 guns or 2 – 30mm DS30B guns. 2 – mini guns and 4 General purpose machine guns.
Accommodation for 205 persons, crew 185.
Carried 1 - Lynx HMAS or 1 – Westland Merlin HML, has a flight deck and enclosed hangar.
03 May 2001 commissioned.

HMS PORTLAND is a Type 23 frigate of the British Royal Navy. She is the eighth ship to bear the name and is the fifteenth and penultimate ship of the 'Duke' class of frigates, and is named for the (now extinct) Dukedom of PORTLAND, and more particularly for the 3rd Duke, who was Prime Minister.
Operational history
2000–2010
The ship was accepted into service by the Royal Navy on 15 December 2000 and was commissioned on 3 May the following year. Present at the commissioning ceremony was PORTLAND's sponsor Lady Brigstocke, wife of Admiral Sir John Brigstocke, a former Second Sea Lord; Lady Brigstocke launched the ship in 1999.
During sea trials PORTLAND attained a top speed of 30.8 knots (57.0 km/h), the fastest speed attained by any Type 23 frigate at that time
PORTLAND assisted in the search for men lost from a capsized yacht on 3 February 2007
She was deployed to the Caribbean for seven months in 2007, intercepting 3.5 tonnes of cocaine in cooperation with a United States Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) and conducting disaster relief in Belize following Hurricane Dean
In April 2008, PORTLAND visited Liverpool with HMS Mersey and berthed at the cruise liner terminal at Prince's Dock
In June 2009 while taking part in anti-piracy operations off the Horn of Africa, PORTLAND intercepted ten alleged pirates but because the suspects were not caught in the immediate act of piracy, the vessel was unable legally to detain them.
In late April 2010, PORTLAND relieved HMS YORK on the Atlantic Patrol Task (South.
2011–Present
June 2011 saw PORTLAND conducting night Naval Gunnery practice off Gibraltar in the Mediterranean. Towards the end of the month she sailed to Edinburgh to take part in Armed Forces Day. She is the first major warship in the Royal Navy to be commanded by a woman; Commander Sarah West assumed command of HMS PORTLAND on 21 May 2012. PORTLAND spent 2012 at Rosyth in a 50-week refit that saw her upgraded with Sonar 2087, new IT systems, Sea Wolf mid-life overhaul, gun replacements, galley refurbishment and accommodation improvements. She left Rosyth on 14 December 2012 for three months of sea trials.
In August 2013, she was announced as the Fleet Ready Escort for the next two months. She is due to participate in Exercise Joint Warrior 2013.
On 2 August 2014, she completed the 7 month task of the Atlantic Patrol ship.
Captain Simon Asquith assumed command of HMS PORTLAND in September 2014.
On 20 June 2016, PORTLAND departed Devonport for a nine-month patrol covering the Middle East and the South Atlantic Ocean. PORTLAND was the last Royal Navy ship to carry Radar 996 and was the last ship to conduct a Replenishment at Sea with RFA GOLD ROVER prior to the latter ship's decommissioning.

2018 In service.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_PORTLAND_(F79). Miramar.
Tristan da Cunha 2018 45p sg?, scott?
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