SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TOTTORI EXPO 1997

For the Japan Expo Tottori in 1997 the Japanese Post issued one stamp.

The design shows us a bow of a cruise ship or ferry most probably a stylized design of a ship by the designer of the stamp. With a pear blossom on the bow and below some symbols of Tottori Prefecture.

Japan 1997 80 yen sg?, scott2314

Christianity and the Ottoman Empire

THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE was a major threat to the hegemony of Christian Europe from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. The origins of the Ottoman dynasty lie in northwestern Anatolia, though it is difficult to say why they suddenly emerged as such a powerful force. One theory proposes that it was because they were strategically well placed to attack the Christian Byzantine Empire, and therefore attracted Muslim fighters who wished to wage holy war against Christianity. They first drove the Byzantines from Anatolia – which they achieved by 1338 – and in 1354 occupied Gallipoli, their first base in Europe, and the one from which they launched their drive into southeastern Europe. The greatest shock to Christian Europe came, however, with the fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans in 1453 . Many Byzantine scholars fled westward, particularly to Italy, and made a substantial contribution to the Renaissance. The first notable Christian victory was a sea battle at Lepanto (the Gulf of Corinth) on 7 October 1571 . The victorious army was that of the Holy League, a coalition of the Papal States, Genoa, Venice and Spain, originally put together in 1511 by Pope Julius II . At Lepanto the Holy League forces were led by Don John of Austria. The victory, though hailed as a great triumph by the Christians (the Pope established the Feast of the Holy Rosary on 7 October to mark the event), in effect altered little. The Ottoman Turks were not forced to withdraw from any territory. Тhey continued sea battles with Christians conquering new territories. The design stamp is made after painting of Cornelis Wael: "Sea battle between Christians and Turks". Cornelis de Wael was a Flemishpainter, engraver and merchant who was known for his sea battle scenes. Scenes of battles between Christian and Ottoman forces such as the present work were particularly popular. The artist did not depict a concrete battle, but a general picture of the sea battles that occurred during the creation of the Turkish empire. Here's how the battle for the island of Djerba is described: The Duke of Medinaseli expected to see the Turks in the middle of June, but at the end of May Ottoman galleys and galliots appeared near the coast of Tunisia and began to land on the island. The Janissaries immediately rushed into the battle, attacking the Christians loaded with ships. Combat ships of the Turks not only covered the landing of the landing, but also attacked the ships of the Spaniards and Italians, who were completely unprepared for the battle. The Christian was panic-stricken, and the mountains of valuable goods that were bought in the last month only aggravated the situation. None of the soldiers wanted to fight. While some tried at any cost to climb on some ship with their cargo, others resolutely stopped the maneuvers of traders and let their goods go overboard. In the sea, bales of wool, bales of leather, jugs of oil, even horses and camels were dropped. Clashes began between soldiers, on the one hand, and cargo owners, captains and crews of vessels, on the other.In this situation, the order of the Duke of Medinaseli about the loading of soldiers was not thought of anyway, especially since there was no evacuation plan. The first inhospitable Djerbu began to leave wage ships, whose owners were most interested in saving their capitals. Without entering into battle with the Turks, they tried to break free into the sea, and many of them succeeded. Much worse was the case with the ships of the regular fleet of the Holy Roman Empire, who could not evade the battle and fell under the powerful blow of the Ottoman fleet. 24 May 1560 ended the battle near the island of Djerba between the Ottoman fleet and the squadrons of Spain, Venice, Genoa, the Papal States, Savoy and Malta. The Turkish armada under the command of Piale Pasha scored a brilliant naval victory over the combined forces of the Christian fleet. As a result, the European powers lost more than half of their ships and at least 9,000 people. The Turkish flotilla lost only a few galliots and about a thousand soldiers. The victory at Djerba strengthened the sea dominance of the Ottomans in the Mediterranean and marked the power of the Ottoman Empire.
Rwanda 2017;650f;SG?
Source:www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t253/e2, e-minbar.com/facts/967-1560-srazhenie-u-ostrova-dzherba, еn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelis_de_Wael

LA GRANDIÉRE L 9034 (Fr.)

Built in 1985-'87 at Chantiers de Grand Quevilly (Rouen) for the French Navy, launched on 11-12-1985, commissioned 20-01-1987.
Landing ship, type 'Batral', displacement:770/1385 tons, Loa:80m. B:13m. Draft:2.38m. 2 SACM Wärtsilä UD 33 V12 M4 diesels:3600 hp. (2650 kW.) 2 shafts, 13 kn. max.16 kn. complement:52, armament: 2-81 mm. mortars, 2-20 mm. F2 mortars, 2-12.7 mm. machine guns, landingplatform for light helicopters, can transport 138 troops and 12 vehicles and beach them through a fore ramp.
Stationed in Reunion, 2016 decommissioned in Brest.

(TAAF 2017, €1.70, StG.?)
Internet.

HOBIE CAT 16 catamaran yacht

The United Arabic Emirates issued in 1996 two stamps for the Hobie Cat 16 World’s Championship in Dubai in February 1996.
More as 300 yachts took part in this race.
Of the Hobie Cat 16 Wikipedia gives:
The catamaran yacht is designed by Hobie Alter and Phil Edwards in 1970.
Weight of hull 145 kg. Dim. 5.05 x 2.41m.
Total sail area 20m³
Crew 2.

The ISAF International Class Hobie 16 (H16) is a popular catamaran manufactured by the Hobie Cat Company for racing and day sailing. The craft was the driving force behind the popularization of beachcats and was recently inducted into the Sailing Hall Of Fame.
Introduced in 1972, the Hobie 16 is the second largest boat fleet in existence with over 135,000 boats built to date.
The boat is distinctly recognized for its asymmetric "banana" shaped hulls, designed to work without the need for daggerboards so the catamaran could be run up the beach without worry. The rudders kick up automatically by lifting up on the tiller crossbar.
The Hobie 16 is manufactured in France by the Hobie Cat company, and by the Hobie Cat of America company in the United States. Historically the French boats are preferred as they are perceived to be built to tighter tolerances.
The Hobie 16 normally carries two sails, the mainsail and the jib. There is a kit to allow an H16 to fly a spinnaker but this is only class legal for youth racing.
Each hull has two pylons (the forward ones are vented to allow the pressure inside the hull to equalise) and the frame fits onto these pylons. The frame consists of four aluminium alloy beams which slot into four aluminium alloy corner castings and are secured with rivets. The trampoline slots along the inside of the beams and is tensioned by rope or shock cord. Racers commonly epoxy the beams into the castings to boost rigidity because the flexing of the boat as it rides over waves saps power. Equally, the joints may be packed with aluminium sheet cut from drink cans; this method facilitates disassembly.
Earlier masts were one piece, of aluminium alloy, but were changed to two pieces with a non-conductive composite fiberglass tip (known as "comptip"), after a few people in the United States of America were electrocuted trying to raise masts under power lines and their families sued Hobie Cat. The mast foot casting forms a ball which steps into a cup-shaped shoe riveted onto the forward crossmember and there is a Teflon disk separating the two. The downward compressive force from the mast is partially carried by the crossmember and partially by a stainless steel compression post and tensioned tie rod assembly called a "dolphin striker".
The Hobie 16 is noted for its particularly robust construction. While this is of great benefit when launching and recovering in waves, and in close quarters racing where contact is not uncommon, the Hobie 16 does weigh more than some other boats of similar type, notably the Dart 18.
The H16 may be equipped with two trapeze wires either side to allow both the helm and crew to trapeze. "Cat seats" can be fitted to allow disabled sailors to sail the H16 without too much penalty.
The rudder assembly consists of a rudder on each hull fitted to a Hobie-patented automatically releasing stock comprising a casting, a cam, and a spring-loaded plunger. This allows the rudders to spring up when they hit ground, to avoid damage. The system can be troublesome until the correct tension is set on the spring. The rudders are connected to two short tillers which are in turn attached via a ball and socket joint to a connecting rod called the tiller bar. The tiller attaches to the centre of the tiller bar and is typically extendable for operation while trapezing.
The mainsheet has a maximum of a 6:1 purchase and has a traveller that allows movement over the entire aft crossmember of the frame. The jib sheets are of a 2:1 purchase and attach on the front beams with their own two travellers.
The boat has a 3:1 purchase downhaul (upgradable to 6:1) to tension the mainsail and an outhaul (standard 1:1, upgradable to 2:1) to flatten the mainsail along the boom. Both the mainsail and jib are fully battened.
Tuning
In most situations, the H16 mast is raked back as far as possible. You are limited by the distance between the boom and the rear crossmember and the distance between the clew of the jib and the jibsheet blocks. The cut of the jib was changed to allow further rake and low profile jib and mainsheet blocks are essential.
For maximum speed, the windward hull should be flying and skipping along the surface of the water. H16s do not beat particularly well, nor do they sail directly downwind particularly well. They are, however, proficient at reaching, so if in doubt, sailors are encouraged to sail at more reaching angles.
H16s at speed in choppy waters are prone to "pitch-pole". This is where the leeward bow digs into the back of a wave and if the main is not de-powered immediately and the crew's weight isn't back far enough, the boat is liable to trip head over heels. The pitch-poling tendency of the Hobie 16 results from a number of design factors; the relatively large sail area to hull length ratio and the flat top of the hulls are particular contributors. Crews are advised to keep their body weight as far back as possible in strong winds when sailing at angles between a broad reach and true reach; to this end it is advisable for the heavier crew member to act as helm. When beating, pitch-poles are less common and weight can be brought forward to aid angle of point.
Righting
Turtling can be prevented. The mast is supposed to be sealed, so it floats. However, Hobies have been at the forefront of the use of a streamlined blimp-like float that attaches to the top of the mast.[A]
When an H16 capsizes, it will normally lie on its side as the mast is sealed and positively buoyant. It is imperative that at least one of the crew immediately get onto the righting line to prevent the boat turtling as it is more difficult to recover from that position. With all sheets released, the crew stand on the lower hull. The bows of the boat should be pointing into the wind and the crew can facilitate this by shifting their weight forward along the hull which will allow the wind to push on the trampoline and 'windvane' the boat head to wind. The crew then lean back on the righting line ready to grab the bottom of the boat as it comes up to prevent it from capsizing to the other side.
It is far more difficult for one person to right an H16 without using additional equipment such as a righting bag or some device to slacken the shrouds.
In practice it is not always possible to align the capsized boat with bows pointing into wind, particularly in the presence of waves. If the boat is righted from a position where the mast is to some degree upwind of the hull, the boat’s inertia, coupled with the wind pressure, can cause it to immediately capsize in the opposite direction. The crew can mitigate this tendency by grabbing hold of the dolphin striker on the windward side of the boat as it passes through the horizontal position. In the interests of safety the crew must be prepared to release the dolphin striker and allow the boat to capsize for a second time if it appears that they are in danger of being lifted clear of the water.
A Hobie 16 can be brought onto its side from a fully inverted or ‘turtled’ position by a single crew member with relative ease. The technique involves one crew member climbing aboard one of the upturned hulls and sitting or standing as close to the rear as possible. Thanks to low buoyancy towards the rear of the boat, this should cause the hull to sink; the diagonally opposite front corner will rise clear of the water and the boat will come up onto its side. The conventional capsize recovery...

PEARL DIVING in BAHRAIN

Bahrain issued in 1996 four stamps for the pearl diving which took place in the waters off Bahrain, three stamps shows a dhow of a very recent type and mostly the diving is done now by recreational diving.

Pearl diving in Bahrain was first mentioned in Assyrian texts dating to 2000 BC, referring to "fish eyes" from Dilmun (the ancient name of Bahrain). Bahrain (as Tylos, Bahrain's Greek name) was mentioned by Pliny to have been, "famous for the vast number of its pearls".The golden age of pearling is stated to have been between the 1850s to 1930, when pearls were more precious than diamonds and had attracted jewelers like Jacques Cartier to the country. There were around 30,000 pearl divers by the end of 1930, as pearling was the principal industry in Bahrain prior to the discovery of oil in 1932. After the collapse of the pearling industry, most divers switched to the newly founded oil sector.
Until the pearl diving industry dried up, workers dived without any specialized diving gear. Clutching a weighted rope, they were lowered into the water and held their breath as they collecting promising-looking oysters on the shallows of the sea floor. In the early 1900s, around 30,000 divers braved this work
Currently, the trading of cultured pearls in Bahrain is prohibited. Few pearl divers remain today.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain_Pearling_Trail Internet.
Bahrain 1996 80/250f sg 571/74 scott 468/471

Battle of Medway 1667

Raid on the Medway, (12–14 June 1667). The Dutch raid on the dockyards in the Medway in 1667 was one of the deepest humiliations ever visited upon England and the Royal Navy. Although the material losses inflicted were grave, even more painful was the public proof that the English were powerless to defend their own coastline.
Since the Second Anglo-Dutch War began in 1665, England had suffered a string of misfortunes, including the Great Plague and the Great Fire of London. King Charles II was broke and had no money to pay sailors or dockworkers. England was seeking peace desperately, but the Dutch government leader, Johann de Witt, wanted a crushing victory so he could impose punitive terms. His brother, Cornelis de Witt, was given command of a fleet that first sailed to the mouth of the Thames and then shifted southward, taking Sheerness on the Medway and sailing inland toward the dockyard at Chatham.
The English blocked the navigable channel with a chain stretched from shore to shore, but Dutch engineers made short work of this obstacle. Beyond the chain, English ships with skeleton crews lay defenseless. Three "great ships"—the largest naval vessels—were scuttled hastily; a fourth, Royal Charles, was seized by the Dutch. The only resistance came from shore batteries. Nonetheless, De Witt and his captains were nervous, hardly believing the ease of their success, and on 14 June they withdrew, taking Royal Charles with them as a trophy. The other ships they had captured were burned.
The shock of the action was great. Diarist Samuel Pepys, then secretary to the admiralty, thought the monarchy would fall. In fact, peace was made with limited advantage to the Dutch. England’s desire for revenge helped motivate another Anglo-Dutch War the following decade. Losses: English, 13 ships; Dutch, no ships. For more details about battle of Medway see: Wikipedia.
The design stamp is made after painting of Cevin Clarkson.
Rwanda 2017;400f;SG? Source:www.britannica.com/event/Raid-on-the-Medway
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