SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SAN SALVADOR 1542

Not any painting or drawing exist of the vessel SAN SALVADOR shown on this stamp, also a painting of drawing of Cabrillo is not found. The ship depict is chosen by the designer of the stamp, as a ship from that timeframe. It looks the designer has used the replica for his design.

The SAN SALVADOR was built as a wooden hulled sailing vessel for the discovery of the Northwest Passage.

SAN SALVADOR was the flagship of explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo (João Rodrigues Cabrilho in Portuguese). She was a 100-foot (30 m) full-rigged galleon with 10-foot (3.0 m) draft and capacity of 200 tons. She carried officers, crew, slaves, and a priest.
Explorations
In 1542 Cabrillo was the first European to explore the coast of present-day California. He had three ships: the 200-ton galleon SAN SALVADOR, the 100-ton La VICTORIA, and lateen-rigged, 26-oared SAN MIGUEL. The two ships were not the square-rigged galleons commonly used for crossing open ocean. Rather, they were built in Acajutla, El Salvador, and the ship SAN SALVADOR, was named after Pedro de Alvarado's newly founded city in western El Salvador, San Salvador, the ship SAN MIGUEL was named after the second newly founded city in eastern San Miguel, El Salvador, and the ship VICTORIA was named after the Victory of Pedro de Alvarado against the long and arduous battle against the Native American resistance in El Salvador. In 1540 the fleet sailed from Acajutla, El Salvador, and reached Navidad, Mexico on Christmas Day. While in Mexico, Pedro de Alvarado went to the assistance of the town of Nochistlán, which was under siege by hostile natives, and was killed when his horse fell on him, crushing his chest. Following Alvarado's death, the viceroy took possession of Alvarado's fleet. Part of the fleet was sent off to the Philippine Islands under Ruy Lopez de Villalobos and two of the ships were sent north under the command of Cabrillo. Navidad is some 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Manzanillo, Colima. A requirement of exploration ships was the ability to sail with ease into small harbors. The ships were rigged with triangular sails (lateen sail) supported by swept booms. This sail arrangement, a forerunner to the sails found in the modern-day fore-and-aft rig of sloops, ketches and yawls, made the craft more agile and gave them the ability to point higher into the wind than square riggers.
Departing from Navidad on 27 June 1542, Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay on 28 September. He went ashore and claimed the land for Spain. Continuing his explorations northward, he landed on Santa Catalina Island on 7 October and described nearby San Clemente Island. (He gave names to his discoveries, but all were renamed later.) He continued north as far as the Russian River, California before turning back to overwinter at Santa Catalina. Cabrillo died there of an infected injury on 3 January 1543. His second-in-command brought the ships and crew back to Navidad, arriving on 14 April 1543.
SAN SALVADOR replica
Starting in spring 2011 and concluding in 2015, the Maritime Museum of San Diego built a full-sized, fully functional, historically accurate replica of SAN SALVADOR. The ship was constructed in full public view at Spanish Landing park on Harbor Drive in San Diego. The keel was laid on 15 April 2011. The construction site, called "SAN SALVADOR Village", opened 24 June 2011 and was open to the public. The project gave people the opportunity to see an example of sixteenth century shipbuilding, which was the first modern industrial activity in the Americas. The replica galleon is 92 feet (28 m) long with a beam of 24 feet (7.3 m). When completed, SAN SALVADOR was launched on San Diego Bay and became part of the Museum's fleet of historic and replica ships. As of April 2015 construction was nearly completed, and a launch ceremony was planned for 19 April 2015. However, on April 8 the ceremony was postponed due to "unanticipated technical complications involving the movement and lifting of the ship". The ship was eventually moved by barge to a boatyard in Chula Vista. She made her public debut on 4 September 2015, leading a parade of tall ships for the start of San Diego's annual Festival of Sail. At that time she was powered by an auxiliary engine since she had not yet been fitted with sails. She will open for public tours starting in September 2016, in conjunction with the Maritime Museum's annual Festival of Sail. Later that month she is expected to start making coastal tours of the California coast.
Model of SAN SALVADOR
Cabrillo's flagship SAN SALVADOR has been described as having four masts: a square-rigged foremast, lateen-rigged main and mizzen-masts and an even smaller mizzen-type mast with a boom that swung well outboard, in the style of the modern-day yawl. La VICTORIA is described as having two masts, both lateen rigged. A model of SAN SALVADOR was built by Señor Manuel Monmeneu in association with the Naval Museum in Madrid, Spain. The model project was sponsored by the Portuguese-American Social and Civic Club of San Diego. This model depicts SAN SALVADOR more like La VICTORIA, with two major masts.

USA 1992 29c sg2751, scott2704.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Salva ... o%27s_ship)

GREAT LAKE VESSEL

The stamps issued by Canada in 1967 shows in the background and in a lock a unknown Great Laker. The Canadian Encyclopedia has the following entry on this ships:

Lake Carriers, or "lakers," are ships whose design is unique to the Great Lakes of N America. The lake carrier's long and flat shape reveals its basic purpose - to move bulk cargoes through the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY and Great Lakes, a total distance of almost 4000 km. The JOHN B AIRD, a typical modern Canadian lake carrier, was launched in 1983 by Collingwood Shipyards on Georgian Bay, is 219 m long and has a deadweight tonnage of 30 700 tonnes. Similar to an increasing number of lake carriers of its size which are fitted with cranes or conveyor belts, the JOHN B AIRD is a self-unloading lake carrier.
Ships of this size can carry one million bushels of wheat on a single voyage (27 000 tonnes#. Wheat and other feed grains account for about 40% of all cargoes carried by Canadian lake carriers, followed by coal, iron ore and limestone. The annual 9-month shipping season of the lake carriers does not include the winter months of late December to early March, when the seaway is closed and ice covers much of the Great Lakes.
Nearly all of the 162 Canadian and US lake carriers in service in 1994, down from 247 in 1984, belonged to member shipping companies of either the Canadian Shipowners' Assn #CSA) of Ottawa, with 106 ships and whose corporate na#e was changed in 1988 from the historic Dominion Marine Assn (DMA) founded in 1903; or the Lake Carriers' Assn formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1892, which owned the remainder.
The drop in the total gross registered tonnage (grt) of CSA member ships in service from 1 957 000 grt in 1984 to 1 637 000 grt in 1993 was a result of both severe reductions in the demand for raw materials such as iron ore by the recession-hit Canadian primary steel mills along the Great Lks, and an increase in the volume of grain transported by rail. As a result of the latter, annual grain cargoes carried by CSA member ships declined from 18.6 million t in 1984 to 9.6 million t in 1993.
During 1994 in response to the reduced use of their ships, CSA member firms created 2 joint holding companies to administer their ships' activities when in service. These 2 firms are Seaway Self Unloaders of St Catharines, made up of 17 self-unloading bulk carriers owned by Algoma Central Corp and Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd, and Seaway Bulk Carriers, with 11 bulk carriers from Canada Steamship Lines Inc plus 19 more from the smaller bulk carrier shipping companies in the CSA.
The modern Canadian lake carrier is the result of more than 100 years of continually changing Great Lakes ship design and modification Earlier types of cargo carriers on the Great Lakes, all of them built for the bulk transit of goods, included the exotically na#ed hermaphrodite barquentines of the age of sail and the whalebacks and canalers of the age of mechanical propulsion.
As becomes the na#e "hermaphrodite," which means having 2 opposite qualities, this class of sailing ship had 2 masts, with square-rigged sails on the foremast for manoeuvring in and out of dock and in narrow passages, and fore-and-aft rigged sails on the mainmast for speed. Except for their tall funnels and awkward deck structures, the whalebacks of the age of coal-fired steam engines, squat and broad-beamed, looked like the modern nuclear submarine.
The whalebacks were also called "pig boats" because their bows ended in a steel snout built above the water line. The later canalers were designed to fit snugly into the narrow locks of the old Welland Canal, linking Lakes Erie and Ontario and passing near St Catharines, and the canal system between Lk Ontario and Montreal which terminated at the Lachine Canal. The canaler was one-third the length of the JOHN B AIRD. In 1959 canalers were replaced in the wider and longer locks of the St Lawrence Seaway system by upper lakers, which had previously been restricted to the upper lakes above Niagara because of their size. These locks can take ships up to 222.5 m in length and 23.2 m in breadth.
Some of these larger carriers, though designed primarily for the inland lakes, have been built for both the coastal trade and deep-sea service and are called ocean lakers. This is not entirely a new trend since some earlier lakers were requisitioned to serve on the N Atlantic during WWII, and a few of them were sunk by German U-Boats.
The Great Lakes have been a graveyard for hundreds of ships, most of them lost during the age of sail between 1750 and 1870 in storms, fires and collisions. Despite their size, even modern lake carriers can be victims of severe ice conditions and storms. The tragic sinking on 10 Nov 1975 of the EDMUND FITZGERALD, a 222 m long US iron-ore carrier, was commemorated in song by Gordon LIGHTFOOT. After battling 7.5 m waves and record 125 km/h winds on Lk Superior, the ship suddenly plunged to the bottom with the loss of the entire crew of 29, including her experienced captain. See: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12821&p=13970&hilit=edmund#p13970

Canada 1967 4, 6 and 7c sg582, 601, 607 and 609, scott?. 1993 43c sg1566, scott1488.
Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia.

Battle of Buceo

The Battle of Buceo was a decisive naval battle which took place on 14–17 May 1814, during the Argentine War of Independence between an Argentine fleet under William Brown and a Spanish fleet under Admiral Sienna off the coast of Montevideo, in today's Uruguay.
Five Spanish ships were burned and two were captured on 17 May. The other surrendered later and 500 prisoners were taken. Argentine forces lost four men killed in action and one ship. William Brown was given the rank of Admiral because of this victory.
Ships involved
Argentina (William Brown)
Hercules 32 (flag) viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8790&p=8834&hilit=hercules#p8834
Zephyr 18 (King)
Nancy 10 (Leech)
Julietta 7 (McDougald)
Belfast 18 (Oliver Russell)
Agreeable 16 (Lemare)
Trinidad 12 (Wack)
Spain (Sienna)[edit]
Hyena 18 (flag)
Mercurio 32
Neptuno 28 - Captured by Belfast 16 May
Mercedes 20
Palomo 18 - Captured 16 May
San Jose 16 - Captured 16 May
Cisne 12
6 schooners

M Class submarine

M CLASS.
They were ordered in place of the last four of the first group of steam-propelled K-class fleet submarines, K17-K21, the original orders being cancelled.
They were initially intended as coastal bombardment vessels, submarine monitors, but their role had been changed before detailed design begun. The intention was that merchant ships could be engaged at periscope depth or on the surface using the gun, rather than torpedoes. At that time torpedoes were considered ineffective against moving warships at more than 1,000 yards (900 m). A 12-inch gun fired at relatively short range would have a flat trajectory simplifying aiming, and few ships would be expected to survive a single hit.

The guns were 12-inch (305 mm) 40 calibre Mark IX guns from spares for the Formidable-class battleships. The mounting allowed them to elevate by 20 degrees, depress 5 degrees and train 15 degrees in either direction from the centre line. The weapon was normally fired from periscope depth using a simple bead sight on the end of the gun aligned with the target through the periscope at a range of around 1200 metres. The exposure time of the gun above the surface was around 75 seconds. The submarine had to surface to reload the gun, which would take about 3 minutes. In practice the concept was not very successful and only three of the four M-class boats ordered were completed, all between 1917 and 1918. M-class submarines are sometimes called submarine monitors.
M1 and M2 also had four 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes whilst M3 and M4 had 21-inch (533 mm) diameter tubes and were 3 metres longer to accommodate them.

M1 was the only one to enter service before the end of World War I but did not see action. She was captained during her sea trials by experienced submariner Commander Max Horton after his return from the Baltic, and was later lost with all hands while on exercise in the English Channel near Start Point in Devon after a collision with a Swedish collier, SS Vidar, on 12 November 1925. The wreck of M1 was discovered by a diving team led by Innes McCartney in 1999 at a depth of 73 metres. Later that year the wreck was visited again by Richard Larn and a BBC TV documentary crew, and the resulting film was aired in March 2000.
HMS M2
M2 was converted to a seaplane carrier in 1925, a hangar replacing the gun turret. She was lost off Chesil Beach on 26 January 1932. It is thought that the hangar door was opened prematurely. M2 lies in much shallower water, 32 metres deep with the top of the conning tower only 20 metres below the surface at low tide. She is a popular attraction for local scuba divers with as many as six boats anchored above her on busy days.
M3 was converted to a minelayer in 1927 with stowage for 100 mines, primarily to test the mine-handling equipment of the Grampus class. The mines were carried on a conveyor belt which ran along her upper deck and covered over by an enlarged casing. The mines were laid through a door at the stern. She was scrapped in 1932 after the trials had been completed.
M4 was broken up before completion.
In 1924 all three completed members of the class were used to test hull camouflage to reduce the visibility of submarines from aircraft—M1 was painted grey-green, M2 dark grey and M3 was painted dark blue.

Wikipedia

ANKARAN HPL-21 (Sri Lanka)

The first two XFAC (Extra Fast Attack Craft) were ordered from Ramta, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) on 02 December 1996. Two more being built at the Goa SY. This is the latest version of an Israeli fast patrol craft, also acquired by the Sri Lankan Navy. An additional 15 are projected, some possibly for the Coast Guard. XFAC is designed for putting to sea in the shortest possible time for day-night coastal surveillance and reconnaissance, co-ordinated sea-air search & rescue (SAR) operations, beach insertion and/or extraction of commando forces and high speed interception of small, manoeuvrable intruder craft over territorial waters. XFAC incorporates the most modern structural, hydro-dynamic and propulsion features and a proven combat record in all aspects. The ASD propulsion system provides the XFAC with the excellent shallow water capability, including beaching, exceptional manoeuvring & survivability, high redundancy, rapid acceleration and de-acceleration, high stability and excellent sea-keeping qualities.

Displacement:60 tons full Load, L:25.40m. B:5.67m. Draft:1.10m. 2 diesel engines:4570 hp. and 2 Arneson ASD articulating surface drives, maximum speed:45 kn. maximum range:700 nm. at 42 kn. complement:10 (incl. 1 officer)

Weapons: 1-Oerlikon 20mm gun and 2-12.7mm MGs.
Weapons Control: Elop MSIS optronic low-light-level surveillance and weapons direction device, which enables the vessel to accurately destroy small high-speed crafts and engage light shore defence. Goa SY Ltd. states that the Super Dvoras are fitted the Mk.20 naval stabilized gun system.
Radar: Surface; Koden, I-band.

Originally the main armament of the Super Dvora Mark II design was the Oerlikon 20 mm cannon which were manually operated. At present all Super Dvora Mark II types have been modified to allow for the installation of Typhoon 25-30 mm stabilized cannon which can be slaved to state-of the art mast-mounted, day/night, long-range electro-optic systems. In addition to its main armament, Super Dvora Mark IIs carry heavy or light machine guns, depending on the operational requirements.
Sri Lankan Navy Super Dvora Mark IIs carry additional weapon systems such as automatic grenade launchers and PKM general purpose machine guns.

(Sri Lanka 2000, 3.50 r. StG.?)
Internet.

SAILING VESSEL OF THE 17 or 18th Century

This Hungary stamp issued in 1981 is designed after a label issued in Austria in 1933 for the Internationale Stamp Fair in Vienna.
It shows us a sailing vessel from around the 17th and 18th century, she carries a spritsail which disappears on sailing ships after the 18th century. She is a two-masted vessel, square rigged on the foremast and (but it is not so clear) lateen rigged on the after-mast. Have not more info on the ship depict.

Hungary 1981 5fo sg?, scott2696d.
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ADMELLA

The full index of our ship stamp archive

ADMELLA

Postby shipstamps » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:14 am


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Built as passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 19 by Laurence Hill & Comp. , Inch Green, Glasgow for the Adelaide & Melbourne Steam Packet Co at Port Adelaide, Australia.
17 September 1857 launched under the name ADMELLA, named after the three colonial towns she sailed between, Adelaide, Melbourne and Launceston.
Tonnage 392 (old measure) 209 tons (new act). Dim. 188 x 24 x 13.6ft.
One 300 hp steam engine, one two-bladed propeller.

When completed and after trials were made in the Firth of Clyde her two-bladed propeller was disconnected and put in the hold, and she made the passage to Australia under canvas.
She had a main saloon panelled with plate glass and mirrors, with a library and crimson velvet fittings.
Steerage accommodation forward of the hold, and second class on the quarterdeck.
Cargo space for 392 tons cargo.
When she arrived in Australia she inaugurated a steamer service between the three ports she was named after.
August she made the first voyage in this service under command of Capt. Hugh MacEwan, she made also sometimes a call at Warrnambool and Portland in route.
Captain MacEwan and the ADMELLA were a popular combination with passengers. Capt. MacEwan had been at sea for thirty years, the last five in command of steamers. He was a teetotaller who had gained the reputation of being a cautious navigator

What started as an exciting trip for 113 passengers and crew bound for the Melbourne’s Champion Sweepstakes in 1859, turned into a deadly sea battle in which men, women and children languished on a reef for more than eight days, with only 24 of them surviving.

The ADMELLA left port Adelaide on Friday 5 August 1859 with a crew of 26; picking up passengers at the Semaphore jetty. One deck were six racehorses, carried in boxes. After passage through Backstairs Passage at midday, the vessel part-owner, Captain MacEwan, took his departure from the lighthouse on Cape Willoughby and set a course to pass well offshore from the reefs of Cape Jaffa, 100 miles south-eastwards. This track exposed the ship to the full force of the prevailing winter westerly’s, and the heavy swell, backed by thousands of miles of Southern Ocean, which creates unpredictable currents. The next landfall was the low sandy coastline from which a reliable position fix would not be possible until the new lighthouse on Cape Northumberland was sighted about 180 miles away. It was the captain’s practice to keep within sight of the land whenever possible during daylight and to set a course about 15 miles offshore at night. At 4 p.m., with Cape Willoughby about 32 miles astern, the swell from the south-west caused the ADMELLA to roll heavily, causing one of the horses to fall in its stall. The ship was hove to and headed into the swell for an hour to get the horse back on its feet and to make everything secure for the night. Although the weather remained fine, the swell persisted. At midnight the ADMELLA should have been off Rivoli Bay and a slight alternation in course was made to converge with the land, and to ensure that the Cape Northumberland light would be sighted at its maximum range of 18 miles.
Lighting in the south-west heralded worsening weather. At 4 a.m., Captain MacEwan, believing the ship to be at least 16 miles offshore and Cape Northumberland light just over the horizon, made an other slight alternation of course inshore. He then retired to his cabin leaving the mate, helmsman and look-out on the bridge. Less than an hour later a slight jolt caused the first mate to order the course to be altered to seaward, but the ADMELLA had grounded on the jagged pinnacles of Carpenter Rocks at Cape Banks some 16 miles inshore from her estimated position. As Captain MacEwan scrambled back to the bridge and ordered the lifeboats cleared away, the ADMELLA broke into three sections at the watertight bulkheads. Many passengers and crew drowned as the ship broke up, but a large number managed to take refuge on the forward and after sections which remained almost intact, with decks above water, listing 45 degrees.
The midship section however, collapsed and left engines and boilers exposed to the rolling surf. The two midship lifeboats had been lost, one smashed by the falling funnel. Those who had been clearing the lifeboats, including the captain, swam to the after section. While swinging the after lifeboat the forward fall was let go and the boat hung vertically on its after fall before the davit broke and the boat floated away. Then the mainmast crashed overboard, taking with it several who sought refuge in the rigging. Heavy seas broke over the wreck, leaving only four lifeboats out of ADMELLA’s extensive lifesaving equipment. Twelve of the latest swimming belts, which had been stowed below decks, were apparently lost in the darkness; nobody had any idea where the ship had been wrecked. But as daylight broke, it revealed low sand hills about a mile away with no signs of habitation. When tiers of heavily breaking surf, each successive sea threatened the wreck with complete destruction. When the main boom was swept away, the captain jumped into the sea after it, as it would have been invaluable in constructing a raft. Almost drowned he was pulled back to the doubtful safety of the after section, which had now swung round over the reef. Sixty feet away the forward section was being pounded even more mercilessly. Two men more had been washed overboard, leaving about 40 men, women and children clinging precariously to it. All the horses seemed to have managed to swim ashore, but attempts by several passengers to either swim, or paddle on wreckage, failed. With great excitement another steamship was sighted approaching from the sea. It was recognized as the ADMELLA’s sister ship HAVILAH, bound for Adelaide. But flags and urgent ringing of the bell failed to attract her attention. As darkness fell on the first day of the wreck, false hopes were again raised by a steamer’s lights seen approaching from the north-west. It was the P&O liner BOMBAY, caught in the same treacherous current that had carried the ADMELLA too close inshore. Unfortunately, those on the wreck had no means of showing lights or making signals. The BOMBAY narrowly missed the rocks and steamed on, unaware of their fate.
Sunday 7 August dawned calm and clear. A passenger marooned on the forward section, Captain Harris, another shipmaster, realized that this section would soon disintegrate. He signalled those on the after section to make contact by line. He and about 13 other managed to gain the relative safety of the after section. But of the 20 left on the forepart who were to weak or afraid to make the attempt, none of them survived. There were now about 70 people on the after section. Captain Harris dived into the flooded storerooms and recovered some supplies, which provided a bit of essential sustenance. Then with the only tool available, a meat chopper, several of the survivors managed to build a raft. Two seamen, Leach and Knapman, volunteered to man it. After three hazardous hours, the raft emerged from the breakers, and the two seamen washed up on the beach exhausted. After a brief rest they stumbled along the sand hills across creeks and swamps to Cape Northumberland lighthouse to report the wreck to the lighthouse keeper.
He immediately set off for the nearest homestead to borrow a horse. But as luck would have it, he had not ridden far before he was thrown off.

Monday morning brought bitter could and increasing seas breaking over the wreck. Some shelter was afforded in the cabins, but there was not enough space for all and several died of from exposure.

As news of the wreck finally reached the nearest post office 20 miles away at Mount Gambier, the disaster was reported by telegraph to Adelaide and Melbourne, and people from the surrounding countryside began to converge on the beach near Carpenter Rocks with food and clothing. Seas were now smooth and a quantity of wreckage had come ashore. But there were no means at hand with which to attempt a rescue. The nearest lifeboat was 100 miles away at Portland.
Twenty miles away, at the lighthouse, there was a small boat. The only thing that could be done that night was to send for the boat and to light a fire on the beach to encourage the marooned survivors. By the time the lighthouse boat arrived at 3 a.m., a badly damaged boat, which had washed ashore from the wreck, had been repaired on the beach. But rising seas precluded any launching of either craft until five o’clock in the afternoon and both of those attempts proved futile.
In the meantime the steamer CORIO arrived with a pilot boat with which to make the rescue attempt. But all she could do was heave to for the night and hope for improved weather in the morning. At this point the 40 to 50 remaining survivors had been languishing on the wreck for five days. From seawards the CORIO approached to within 200 yards of the after section. Guided from the CORIO the pilot boat rowed towards a gap in the reef, but after half an hour’s struggle, had to give up the attempt. Seeing another hope of rescue fade. Harris tried to urge the survivors to apply their weakening efforts to building another raft, this time from the mizzen gaff and two cabin doors. But during an argument over who would man the raft, it drifted away.
Captain Harris, too exhausted to do any more, died before the day was done.
Germien, the lighthouse keeper, and Thomas, the pilotboat coxswain, made another attempt to launch their boats from the beach that evening, and an another attempt in the morning, ending in boat boats being swamped in deteriorating westerly weather. With the CORIO being unable to approach to within less than a mile of the wreck and coal running short, Captain Quin decided to make a dash to Robe for replenishment.
Just as the CARIO headed north-westwards, the LADY BIRD, a 309 ton steamer owned by the Henty Brothers, came to from the east, sighting what remained of the ADMELLA. Not far away was the steamer ANT, which had also been sent from Robe to assist in the rescue. In what must have seemed like an endless succession of bad luck to be doomed survivors another attempt at rescue failed, as a rocket line was fired from a lifeboat but nobody on board the ADMILLA was able to take it. No further rescue attempts were made that day. During the night rain relieved the survivors thirst, but they had now been without adequate food or drink for a week.
Saturday 13 August, brought moderated weather. From the beach, Germein launched another rescue attempt with two boats. This time, both boats weathered the surf and approached close to the wreck. The pilot boat made another unsuccessful attempt to pass a line, and Germein’s boat was washed clean over the remains of the ADMILLA’s engines. But riding back on another roller, he rejoined the pilot boat, and this time, a line was secured by one of the survivors on the wreck. Germein managed to get three passengers, including Captain MacEwan to make the perilous transfer to one of the boats. Seeing ANT and the LADY BIRD coming in close they rowed for the beach. Germein went back for another passenger, but unfortunately he drowned when the boat capsized while landing. Then the Portland lifeboat and the whaleboat repeated the manoeuvre of the previous day, assisted by a boat from the ANT. This time the line was taken and secured to the wreck, and 18 men and one woman were rescued in the end, only 24 survived out of the 113 who had taken passage on the ADMELLA at Adelaide eight days previously

The court of Inquire decided that the ADMELLA had experienced a strong in-shore set and that the BOMBAY was fortunate in not having also ended her days on Carpenter Rocks. More efficient means of inserting watertight bulkheads into steamships was recommended, noting that the ADMELLA had broken into three sections at the rows of the bulkhead rivet holes.
Captain MacEwan was absolved from any blame for the disaster, but was criticized for not having taken regular soundings when his position was uncertain. Cen Afr Rep SG1014

Source: Australian Coastal Shipping by Barry Pemberton. Hazards of the Sea by Capt. John Noble. Some web-sites.
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Re: ADMELLA

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri May 19, 2017 6:45 pm

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Dhufar 1977, 5 B. StG.?
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