SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.

BAOBAO canoe

The “BAOBAO” or “boopaa” used in the Tonga Islands, central Pacific, it is a roughly hewn single outrigger paddling canoe used for fishing inshore or just outside the reefs. Detail vary somewhat from island to island. Dugout hull, slight tumble home to sides; bottom rounded transversely with rocker fore-and-aft, with stern ending above the waterline. Solid vertical ends; break in the sheer line near ends. Two or three straight booms lashed atop the gunwales, cross to the pointed float. Booms and float attached by pairs of over-crossed stanchions, or by double U-shaped flexible withes.
Carries 1-4 people, length 3 – 5m, and depth 0.31 – 0.38m.

Gilbert & Ellice Islands 1939 1½d sg 45, scott 42 and 2d sg 46, scott? 5d sg sg 49, scott 46.1956 2d sg 66, scott? and 5d sg 69, scott? and 10sh sg 75, scott? 1971 35c sg 184, scott? and 35c sg192, scott? 1975 35c sg 259, scott?
Gilbert Islands 1976 2c sg 5, scott?, and 35c sg 20, scott? and 35c sg
Source: Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

NIGHT FISHING IN GILBERT & ELLICE ISLANDS

Night fishing in low lying coral atolls of the Gilbert Islands appears to provide an ideal environment for flying-fish, which are abundant in the deeper water outside the reefs during the day or night.
The flying-fish is used for eating but also for bait to catch, shark, swordfish, tuna, etc.
The stamp shows the night fishing with flares. The best time is during new moon and full moon and the ensuing three days.
When the people on the island decide to go fishing during the night, the canoes are made ready and the young children and women are told to make the flares from fallen dry coconut fronds, rolled together, the flare has a length of about 9 feet, and each canoe needs around 12 flares.
The scoop net is about three feet long and two feet wide and bound on a pole with a length of eight to 12 feet.
The canoe on the stamp is one of the “baobao” type and has a crew of four. After launching the canoe in the water she is heading late afternoon out of the lagoon passing the surf and waiting till the moon is raising and the flares are lighted, the flying-fish is heading for the light and the net is brought down over or before the fish and only the experienced men can handle the scoop net, during the fishing during full moon the canoe moved forward.
The canoe has flares aboard for fishing around four hours, and the average catch for a canoe is around the 60 fish.

Much more info is given on: http://www.jps.auckland.ac.nz/document? ... lt&target=
More info on the baobao is given: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15857

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 35c sg184, scott?

WOMEN OF THE BOUNTY

Mauatua, Faahotu, Mareva, Puarei, Tetuahitea,Teehuteatuaonoa, Teio, Teraura, Tevarua, Tinafanaea, Toofaiti, Vahineatua, Sully ...
These are the names of the twelve women and the little girl who were on board of the BOUNTY when the ship arrived in January 1790 off the island “Hitiaurevareva” now known as Pitcairn. It is to these women whose names have been forgotten, eclipsed by the history of their mutinous companions, whom this stamp pays homage. Removed from their families and friends, forced companions of sometimes violent men, they nevertheless patiently built the life of the community of this lost island off the Gambier archipelago, making the choices they considered best for the well-being of their children. On the spot, they recognized edible plants, those which can be braided for the roofs, those which heal, and those which are beaten to make “tapa”, a precious stuff in their islands. In 1790,the death of two of these “vahine” triggered a series of violent events which only stopped three years later, but, these strong women defended their independence in times of crisis, even by trying to leave the island where their companions had killed each other. Thanks to one of them, Teehuteatuaonoa, we know more about the circumstances in which the community of Pitcairn was born. She delivered her version of the story, their attempt to settle on Tupua'i (or Tubuai island), and on their precipitous departure from Tahiti until their arrival and their settlement in their new home land away from the British bloodhounds. Their retreat was finally discovered in 1808 by Mayhew Folger, captain of the TOPAZ,who met John Adams, the last surviving mutineer, 19 years after the famous mutiny. Teehuteatuaonoa finally managed to leave the island of Pitcairn in 1817 on board of the whaler SULTAN leaving for Chile. She, the Pitcairn rebel without descendants, finally found Tahiti where she is buried ... In 1838, these women ahead of their time are the first in the world to vote, 70 years before the now famous suffragettes.
It is for these Polynesian women forgotten by history that this stamp about the Vahine of the BOUNTY is dedicated... Josiane Teamotuaitau, PhD in Polynesian Civilization This joint issue with Pitcairn islands illustrates the party
evening where the twelve vahine and little Sully went on the BOUNTY which was anchored in the bay of Matavai. Pitcairn islands on the same theme "Women of the BOUNTY" issues
a series of three stamps illustrating the day after partying away from Tahiti, the firing of the BOUNTY condemning the vahines to stay on the island, and life resuming its course
on this lost rock in the Pacific.

http://www.tahitiphilatelie.com/details ... 017&id=317
French Polynesia 2017 1.40F sg?, scott?

In September 1789 after the mutiny and while staying briefly on Tahiti, Fletcher Christian became concerned that some of his men were ready to rebel against him. Spurred also by fear of discovery and arrest from Britain, he made a hurried departure. He and 8 members of the BOUNTY crew sailed from Tahiti with 6 Polynesian men, 12 Polynesian women and a baby girl.

Searching for a new home took four months until uncharted Pitcairn was sighted on 15 January 1790. A decision was made on 23 January to burn the BOUNTY and the fate of all to remain on the island was sealed. The women consorts soon adopted a survival mode by growing crops, fishing, making tapa for warmth and clothing and ensuring Tahitian culture remained an integral part of Pitcairn�s identity through music and dance.

Pauline Reynolds in her "Textile History" article* writes how the production of tapa and gifting "reveals information regarding their social, ritual and innovative activities, and their contribution to the BOUNTY/Pitcairn story". This activity was exclusively a female role but one that gave them a degree of power, status and prestige (depending on the fineness of the cloth). It also provided an outlet for their creative talents and helped bind social relationships.

In addition to clothing the community, the tapa made by the BOUNTY Women also made fine tapa for traditional gifting to seafaring visitors. This gave the women an important role in Pitcairn daily life. Also adds Reynolds, "The making and felting of cloth by the women of the Pitcairn community was symbolic of the binding and weaving of relationships, particularly amongst the women and their children". Their innovative designs and experimentation led to unique Pitcairn tapa cloths which are different to those from Tahiti (French Polynesia) and very recognisable today.

The production of tapa enabled the women to meet regularly and, while speaking in their native tongue, share gossip and stories, as well as frustrations. The work was hard and time consuming but helped develop their strength and athleticism which helped their survival.

Reynolds concludes that the BOUNTY women were "active agents in their community, playing a dynamic role in shaping the social landscape".

*Tapa Cloths and Beaters: Tradition, Innovation and the Agency of the BOUNTY Women in Shaping a New Culture on Pitcairn Island from 1790 to 1850. � Pauline Reynolds, 2016.

http://www.stamps.gov.pn/
Pitcairn Island 2017 $1.80/2.80 sgMS?, scott?.

NET FISHING at GILBERT & ELLICE ISLAND

The stamp shows us net fishing in the lagoon from a canoe, the most common types of fishing in the Gilbert & Ellice Islands in the lagoon is net-, line- or shell fishing.
The nylon net is about 20 to 30 feet long, 2 – 3 feet high and used by 3 or 4 fishermen, two for setting the net, while the other is disturbing the water to chase the fish in the net.
The canoe is a “Wa” canoe without sail and rigging: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8600

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 2c sg 174, scott?
Tuvalu 1976 2c sg20, scott?
Source: Management of Marine Resources in Kiribati By Roniti Teiwaki
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

ADMELLA

The full index of our ship stamp archive

ADMELLA

Postby shipstamps » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:14 am


Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size
Built as passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 19 by Laurence Hill & Comp. , Inch Green, Glasgow for the Adelaide & Melbourne Steam Packet Co at Port Adelaide, Australia.
17 September 1857 launched under the name ADMELLA, named after the three colonial towns she sailed between, Adelaide, Melbourne and Launceston.
Tonnage 392 (old measure) 209 tons (new act). Dim. 188 x 24 x 13.6ft.
One 300 hp steam engine, one two-bladed propeller.

When completed and after trials were made in the Firth of Clyde her two-bladed propeller was disconnected and put in the hold, and she made the passage to Australia under canvas.
She had a main saloon panelled with plate glass and mirrors, with a library and crimson velvet fittings.
Steerage accommodation forward of the hold, and second class on the quarterdeck.
Cargo space for 392 tons cargo.
When she arrived in Australia she inaugurated a steamer service between the three ports she was named after.
August she made the first voyage in this service under command of Capt. Hugh MacEwan, she made also sometimes a call at Warrnambool and Portland in route.
Captain MacEwan and the ADMELLA were a popular combination with passengers. Capt. MacEwan had been at sea for thirty years, the last five in command of steamers. He was a teetotaller who had gained the reputation of being a cautious navigator

What started as an exciting trip for 113 passengers and crew bound for the Melbourne’s Champion Sweepstakes in 1859, turned into a deadly sea battle in which men, women and children languished on a reef for more than eight days, with only 24 of them surviving.

The ADMELLA left port Adelaide on Friday 5 August 1859 with a crew of 26; picking up passengers at the Semaphore jetty. One deck were six racehorses, carried in boxes. After passage through Backstairs Passage at midday, the vessel part-owner, Captain MacEwan, took his departure from the lighthouse on Cape Willoughby and set a course to pass well offshore from the reefs of Cape Jaffa, 100 miles south-eastwards. This track exposed the ship to the full force of the prevailing winter westerly’s, and the heavy swell, backed by thousands of miles of Southern Ocean, which creates unpredictable currents. The next landfall was the low sandy coastline from which a reliable position fix would not be possible until the new lighthouse on Cape Northumberland was sighted about 180 miles away. It was the captain’s practice to keep within sight of the land whenever possible during daylight and to set a course about 15 miles offshore at night. At 4 p.m., with Cape Willoughby about 32 miles astern, the swell from the south-west caused the ADMELLA to roll heavily, causing one of the horses to fall in its stall. The ship was hove to and headed into the swell for an hour to get the horse back on its feet and to make everything secure for the night. Although the weather remained fine, the swell persisted. At midnight the ADMELLA should have been off Rivoli Bay and a slight alternation in course was made to converge with the land, and to ensure that the Cape Northumberland light would be sighted at its maximum range of 18 miles.
Lighting in the south-west heralded worsening weather. At 4 a.m., Captain MacEwan, believing the ship to be at least 16 miles offshore and Cape Northumberland light just over the horizon, made an other slight alternation of course inshore. He then retired to his cabin leaving the mate, helmsman and look-out on the bridge. Less than an hour later a slight jolt caused the first mate to order the course to be altered to seaward, but the ADMELLA had grounded on the jagged pinnacles of Carpenter Rocks at Cape Banks some 16 miles inshore from her estimated position. As Captain MacEwan scrambled back to the bridge and ordered the lifeboats cleared away, the ADMELLA broke into three sections at the watertight bulkheads. Many passengers and crew drowned as the ship broke up, but a large number managed to take refuge on the forward and after sections which remained almost intact, with decks above water, listing 45 degrees.
The midship section however, collapsed and left engines and boilers exposed to the rolling surf. The two midship lifeboats had been lost, one smashed by the falling funnel. Those who had been clearing the lifeboats, including the captain, swam to the after section. While swinging the after lifeboat the forward fall was let go and the boat hung vertically on its after fall before the davit broke and the boat floated away. Then the mainmast crashed overboard, taking with it several who sought refuge in the rigging. Heavy seas broke over the wreck, leaving only four lifeboats out of ADMELLA’s extensive lifesaving equipment. Twelve of the latest swimming belts, which had been stowed below decks, were apparently lost in the darkness; nobody had any idea where the ship had been wrecked. But as daylight broke, it revealed low sand hills about a mile away with no signs of habitation. When tiers of heavily breaking surf, each successive sea threatened the wreck with complete destruction. When the main boom was swept away, the captain jumped into the sea after it, as it would have been invaluable in constructing a raft. Almost drowned he was pulled back to the doubtful safety of the after section, which had now swung round over the reef. Sixty feet away the forward section was being pounded even more mercilessly. Two men more had been washed overboard, leaving about 40 men, women and children clinging precariously to it. All the horses seemed to have managed to swim ashore, but attempts by several passengers to either swim, or paddle on wreckage, failed. With great excitement another steamship was sighted approaching from the sea. It was recognized as the ADMELLA’s sister ship HAVILAH, bound for Adelaide. But flags and urgent ringing of the bell failed to attract her attention. As darkness fell on the first day of the wreck, false hopes were again raised by a steamer’s lights seen approaching from the north-west. It was the P&O liner BOMBAY, caught in the same treacherous current that had carried the ADMELLA too close inshore. Unfortunately, those on the wreck had no means of showing lights or making signals. The BOMBAY narrowly missed the rocks and steamed on, unaware of their fate.
Sunday 7 August dawned calm and clear. A passenger marooned on the forward section, Captain Harris, another shipmaster, realized that this section would soon disintegrate. He signalled those on the after section to make contact by line. He and about 13 other managed to gain the relative safety of the after section. But of the 20 left on the forepart who were to weak or afraid to make the attempt, none of them survived. There were now about 70 people on the after section. Captain Harris dived into the flooded storerooms and recovered some supplies, which provided a bit of essential sustenance. Then with the only tool available, a meat chopper, several of the survivors managed to build a raft. Two seamen, Leach and Knapman, volunteered to man it. After three hazardous hours, the raft emerged from the breakers, and the two seamen washed up on the beach exhausted. After a brief rest they stumbled along the sand hills across creeks and swamps to Cape Northumberland lighthouse to report the wreck to the lighthouse keeper.
He immediately set off for the nearest homestead to borrow a horse. But as luck would have it, he had not ridden far before he was thrown off.

Monday morning brought bitter could and increasing seas breaking over the wreck. Some shelter was afforded in the cabins, but there was not enough space for all and several died of from exposure.

As news of the wreck finally reached the nearest post office 20 miles away at Mount Gambier, the disaster was reported by telegraph to Adelaide and Melbourne, and people from the surrounding countryside began to converge on the beach near Carpenter Rocks with food and clothing. Seas were now smooth and a quantity of wreckage had come ashore. But there were no means at hand with which to attempt a rescue. The nearest lifeboat was 100 miles away at Portland.
Twenty miles away, at the lighthouse, there was a small boat. The only thing that could be done that night was to send for the boat and to light a fire on the beach to encourage the marooned survivors. By the time the lighthouse boat arrived at 3 a.m., a badly damaged boat, which had washed ashore from the wreck, had been repaired on the beach. But rising seas precluded any launching of either craft until five o’clock in the afternoon and both of those attempts proved futile.
In the meantime the steamer CORIO arrived with a pilot boat with which to make the rescue attempt. But all she could do was heave to for the night and hope for improved weather in the morning. At this point the 40 to 50 remaining survivors had been languishing on the wreck for five days. From seawards the CORIO approached to within 200 yards of the after section. Guided from the CORIO the pilot boat rowed towards a gap in the reef, but after half an hour’s struggle, had to give up the attempt. Seeing another hope of rescue fade. Harris tried to urge the survivors to apply their weakening efforts to building another raft, this time from the mizzen gaff and two cabin doors. But during an argument over who would man the raft, it drifted away.
Captain Harris, too exhausted to do any more, died before the day was done.
Germien, the lighthouse keeper, and Thomas, the pilotboat coxswain, made another attempt to launch their boats from the beach that evening, and an another attempt in the morning, ending in boat boats being swamped in deteriorating westerly weather. With the CORIO being unable to approach to within less than a mile of the wreck and coal running short, Captain Quin decided to make a dash to Robe for replenishment.
Just as the CARIO headed north-westwards, the LADY BIRD, a 309 ton steamer owned by the Henty Brothers, came to from the east, sighting what remained of the ADMELLA. Not far away was the steamer ANT, which had also been sent from Robe to assist in the rescue. In what must have seemed like an endless succession of bad luck to be doomed survivors another attempt at rescue failed, as a rocket line was fired from a lifeboat but nobody on board the ADMILLA was able to take it. No further rescue attempts were made that day. During the night rain relieved the survivors thirst, but they had now been without adequate food or drink for a week.
Saturday 13 August, brought moderated weather. From the beach, Germein launched another rescue attempt with two boats. This time, both boats weathered the surf and approached close to the wreck. The pilot boat made another unsuccessful attempt to pass a line, and Germein’s boat was washed clean over the remains of the ADMILLA’s engines. But riding back on another roller, he rejoined the pilot boat, and this time, a line was secured by one of the survivors on the wreck. Germein managed to get three passengers, including Captain MacEwan to make the perilous transfer to one of the boats. Seeing ANT and the LADY BIRD coming in close they rowed for the beach. Germein went back for another passenger, but unfortunately he drowned when the boat capsized while landing. Then the Portland lifeboat and the whaleboat repeated the manoeuvre of the previous day, assisted by a boat from the ANT. This time the line was taken and secured to the wreck, and 18 men and one woman were rescued in the end, only 24 survived out of the 113 who had taken passage on the ADMELLA at Adelaide eight days previously

The court of Inquire decided that the ADMELLA had experienced a strong in-shore set and that the BOMBAY was fortunate in not having also ended her days on Carpenter Rocks. More efficient means of inserting watertight bulkheads into steamships was recommended, noting that the ADMELLA had broken into three sections at the rows of the bulkhead rivet holes.
Captain MacEwan was absolved from any blame for the disaster, but was criticized for not having taken regular soundings when his position was uncertain. Cen Afr Rep SG1014

Source: Australian Coastal Shipping by Barry Pemberton. Hazards of the Sea by Capt. John Noble. Some web-sites.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: ADMELLA

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri May 19, 2017 6:45 pm

admella0001.jpg
Click image to view full size
admella f.jpg
Click image to view full size
Dhufar 1977, 5 B. StG.?
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:46 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 72 guests

cron