SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

NIKOLAI VASILICVICH GOGUL

Guinea Bissau issued a set of stamps with inland steamships. Guinea Bissau is a country which supplies us with an avalanche of stamps each year.

Built in 1911 in Nizhny-Novgorod for service on the Northern Dvina River.
Length : 110 m, breadth 14 m, draught 1.4 m
Engines : Triple expansion with cylinders of 38, 61 and 110 cm and stroke of 110 cm and generating 380 hp and a normal top speed of 18 km/hour.
Rarely in use but is available for charter and in recent years has been chartered for cruises generally of 2-3 nights by a local travel agency. In 2010/11 she was under internal renovation costing 40 million roubles and returned to service in 2012 offering a 7-night river tour in June and a three-night trip in July from Archangelsk for the Pomor Tours company.
2018 In service. She is better known as N.V. GOGUL.

http://www.paddlesteamers.info/PaddleSteamerList.htm
Guinea Bissau 2009 600 FCFA sg?, scott?

PHILIPPE D'AUVERGNE

Jersey issued 1989 in a second set of stamps in the adventures of Captain Philippe ‘Auvergne, of the 6 stamps have two a maritime theme, the 30p and 32p.

The 30p stamp shows Mont Orgueil where D’Auvergne had his headquarters, with most probably a gun-boat and rowboat in the foreground leaving for a mission.

By 1795 much had happened in the Revolution and Captain Philippe D’Auvergne. Not having adopted him as promised when pressed in 1791 to settle the Bouillon succession the Duke nevertheless nominated Philippe D’Auvergne, the Assembly appointed him Prince-Successor and in February 1792 King George II of England gave him permission to accept in July, however with Louis XVI’s acceptance of the National Assembly’s new Constitution a worried Europe apposed the Revolution, the Jacobins rallied France and imprisoned the King and with his execution in January 1793 France was again at war with England. D’Auvergne appointed commander of the British Naval Squadron to protect Jersey against invasion attacks French shipping and gather intelligence moves his headquarters in the castle of Mont Orgueil on the islands east coast.

Himself Captain of the old HMS NONSUCH (1774) a ship-of-the line converted to a floating battery, with an armament as a floating battery of 20 – 68 pdr. carronades and 26 – 24 pdr. guns. D’Auvergne had also the grand-sounding gunboats LION. SURPRISE, BULLDOG, TIGER, EAGLE and REPULSE in his flotilla but such was their unseaworthy condition after 10 year of peace that he got rid of all within three months. Amongst replacements were the BRAVO, PLUMPER, SEAFLOWER and armed cutters and lugers, the best known being DAPHNE, ARISTOCRAT and ROYALIST. His duties were to guard the Channel Islands, to obtain early information from France of the enemy’s hostile movements, to establish and maintain links with the insurgents in Brittany and Normandy, and to succour French refugees.
of Church lands Many of the latter were priest and laymen expelled from France because of the Assembly’s decree following the takeover by the State, that the Bishops (now cut from 135 to 83 under the Civil Constitution of the Clergy) should be elected by their dioceses and the Priest by their perishes and all taken an oath to the constitution. The majority refused, and their banishment fuelled resistance movements in the North West of France. One of the more active refugees was the young François Rene Chateaubriand, later to achieve fame as an author, who told how Monsieur de Bouillon. D’Auvergne persuaded him not to cross to Brittany to mount ineffective resistance in caves and forests but to go to England and offer himself for more influential service.


The Jersey stamp issued in 1998 of 30p stamp shows us
32p: A ships boat landing with supplies somewhere on the French coast for the Chouans rebels
1798 Sees Captain D’Auvergne in command of the Jersey Naval Station actively engaged in Jersey’s maritime defence and attacks on French shipping in the Bay of St Malo but his greatest contribution is as “spymaster” for the English, gathering vital information and landing forged assignats or currency notes, arms, ammunition and Royalist Officers to aid the counter revolutionary groups in Normandy and Brittany. With over thousand men in his Jersey command and care of thousands of French Royalists refugees and Catholic clergy expelled from France, he has a tremendous task, Having seen the failure of the Vendée insurrections and the Royalist expedition to Quiberon he concentrate his support on the many smaller, highly effective Chouans rebels insurgent activities.

:) Source: Taken from the booklet, Jersey Post.
Jersey 1982 30p and 32p sg 504 and 505, scott 519 and 520.

LANDING CRAFT and SUPPLY BARGE (USS NAVY)

A few stamps shows us landing craft used during the landing at Tulagi on 07 August 1942. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... 3Tanambogo

On this small landing craft I have not any details, but most probably launched from troop-transport ships used during the landing.

The 1992 stamp issued by the Solomon Islands shows on the 80c a loaded supply barge on her way to the beach.

Solomon Islands 1992 30c sg734, scott 727a, 80c sg 742, scott 728e. 2005 $2.50 sg?, scott?
Grenada 1990 45c sg 2111, scott 1167.

QUINCY USS (CA-39)

Built as a cruiser under yard No 1449 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation’s Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts for the USA Navy.
15 November 1933 keel laid down.
19 June 1935 launched as the USS QUINCY (CA-39), one of the New Orleans class.
Displacement 10.299 ton standard, 12,500 ton full load. Dim. 179.2 x 18.8 x 7.16m (maximum draught), length bpp. 176.2m.
Powered by four Parsons reduction steam turbines, 107,000 shp, 80.000 kW, four shafts, speed 32.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 10.000 mile.
Armament: 9 – 8 inch guns, 8 – 5 inch AA guns, 2 – 3 pdr. saluting guns, 8 - 0.50 inch MG.
Carried four float-planes.
Crew 103 officers and 763 enlisted.
09 June 1936 commissioned.

QUINCY (CA-39) was laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., QUINCY, Mass., 15 November 1933; launched 19 June 1935; sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan,. and commissioned at Boston 9 June 1936, Capt. William Faulkner Amsden in command.
Soon after being assigned to Cruiser Division 8 Atlantic Fleet, QUINCY was ordered to Mediterranean waters 20 July 1936 to protect American interests in Spain during the height of the Spanish Civil War. QUINCY passed through the Straits of Gibraltar 26 July and arrived at Malaga, Spain, 27 July to assume her duties. While in Spanish waters she operated with an international rescue fleet that included the German pocket-battleships DEUTSCHLAND ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE and ADMIRAL SCHEER, QUINCY evacuated 490 refugees to Marseilles and Villefranche, France, before being relieved by RALEIGH 27 September.
QUINCY returned to the Boston Navy Yard 5 October for refit preparatory to final acceptance trials which were held 15-18 March 1937. She got underway for the Pacific 12 April to join Cruiser Division 7, transited the Panama Canal 23-27 April and arrived at Pearl Harbor 10 May.
QUINCY sortied with Cruiser Divisions Pacific Fleet 20 May on a tactical exercise which was the first of many such maneuvers that she participated in during 1937 and 1938. From 15 March-28 April, she engaged in important battle practice off Hawaii with the Pacific Fleet in Fleet Problem XIX. After an overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, QUINCY resumed tactical operations with her division off San Clemente, Calif. until her redeployment to the Atlantic 4 January 1939.
QUINCY transited the Panama Canal 13 January bound for Guantanamo Bay where she engaged in gunnery practice and amphibious exercises. She also took part in Fleet Problem XX with the Atlantic Fleet 13-26 February. QUINCY later made a South American good will tour 10 April-12 June, and upon returning to Norfolk, embarked reservists for three training cruises 9 July-24 August. She spent the remainder of 1939 on patrol in the North Atlantic due to the outbreak of World War II.
After overhaul at Norfolk until 4 May 1940, QUINCY again visited Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina, returning to Norfolk 22 September. She completed three more reserve training cruises 1 October-20 December.
QUINCY was occupied in Atlantic Fleet maneuvers and landing force exercises off Culebra Island, P.R. 3 February-1 April 1941. With the growth of hostilities in Europe, she was ordered to Task Group 2 and operated with WASP in the mid-Atlantic preserving U.S. neutrality 26 April-6 June. Later she operated with YORKTOWN and Task Group 28 until sailing for home 14 July.
On 28 July 1941 QUINCY sailed with Task Group 16 for Iceland on neutrality duty which included a patrol in the Denmark Straits 21-24 September. She returned to Newfoundland with a convoy 31 October. QUINCY then proceeded to Capetown, South Africa, via Trinidad, where she met a convoy which she escorted back to Trinidad 29 December 1941.
QUINCY returned 2.5 January 1942 to Icelandic waters on convoy duty with Task Force 15 and made a patrol in the Denmark Straits 8-11 March. She departed 14 March for the U.S. and an overhaul at the New York Navy Yard that lasted until the end of May.
QUINCY sailed for San Diego 5 June via the Panama Canal and arrived 19 June. She was then assigned to Task Force 18 as the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman R. Scott, Commander Cruisers.
QUINCY got underway for the South Pacific in July with other vessels assembling for the invasion of Guadalcanal.
Prior to the Marine assault on Guadalcanal 7 August, QUINCY destroyed several Japanese installations and an oil depot during her bombardment of Lunga Point. She later provided close fire support for the Marines during the landing.
While on patrol in the channel between Florida Island and Savo Island, in the early hours of 9 August 1942 QUINCY was attacked by a large Japanese naval force and sank after sustaining many direct hits with all guns out of action, which left 370 men dead and 167 wounded. She sank, bow first, at 02:38, being the first ship sunk in the area which was later known as Ironbottom Sound.
Rediscovery
QUINCY's wreck was discovered and explored by Robert Ballard and his crew in July and August of 1992.[ QUINCY sits upright in roughly 2,000 feet (610 m) of water. Her bow is missing forward of her number 1 turret, both forward turrets are trained to starboard, with turret 1 featuring a jammed gun, and one of turret 2's guns burst. Of the superstructure, the bridge is heavily damaged but intact, both funnels are missing, and the float plane hanger completely collapsed. QUINCY's stern is bent upwards aft of the number 3 turret, and heavily damaged by implosions.
Awards
QUINCY earned one battle star during World War II.

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/h ... CY-ii.html and Wikipedia.
Solomon Islands 1992 80c sg 740, scott 728c

MARE research vessel

Estonia issued in 2018 one stamp for the 50 year in service of the research vessel MARE.
The Estonia post gives by the stamp the following:
About 50 Years of the Research Vessel MARE of the Estonian Maritime Museum
The motor ship MARE is the first and hitherto only Estonian marine archaeological exploratory ship. The ship was built in 1968 in Mari El Republic, in the Zvenigovo shipyard as a MSTB-type fish trawler. Until 1982, the trawler was in use in the fishermen kolkhoz Pärnu Kalur. In 1982, the Estonian Maritime Museum acquired the motor ship MSTB-303 no longer needed by the fishermen and modified it in Miiduranna shipyard for submarine exploration purposes. It returned to service under the new name MARE and was used by the submarine archaeology club Vikaar. The ship turned out to be extremely suitable for submarine exploration. It has found and explored hundreds of sunken ships from World War I and II as well as found many historic ship wrecks dating back hundreds of years, the oldest of which is the “Maasilinna ship” from mid-16 century.
The now retired captain of the meritorious ship was Vello Mäss, a well-known scientist and submarine archaeologist.
https://www.wopa-plus.com/en/stamps/product/&pgid=43889
Built as a fishing vessel type MSTB by Zvenigovo yard, USSR for Kolkhoz Pärnur Kalur at Pärnur, USSR,
Launched as the MSTB 303.
Tonnage 50 ton, dim. 18.5 x 4.2 x 1.7m.
Powered by a Valmet diesel engine 612 DSIM, 310 hp, speed 8 knots.
Crew 3
1968 Delivered to owner, under Russian flag and registry.

Used for gillnet fishing in the Baltic.
1983 Sold to Eesti Meremuuseum, Tallinn, USSR and renamed MARE.
1992 Owned by the Estonian Government, Tallinn, Estonia and managed by Eesti Meremuuseum.
2018 Same name and owner, it will be the last summer season that the MARE will be used at sea, this fall she will be moored along the quay of the Eesti Meremuuseum and will be open for the public.

Source: Wikipedia and internet sites.
Estonia 2018 0.65 Euro, sg?, scott?

Sucevita Monastery

In 1585 the monastery of Sucevitsa was built, the outer walls of which were also decorated with frescoes. Like other monasteries, Sucevitsa combines elements of Byzantine and Gothic architecture, and frescoes use stories from the Old and New Testaments. Probably, it was the last monastery, decorated in this way. Frescoes date from the beginning of the 17th century. Sucevitsa differs from other monasteries in that here not only monks lived, but also knew. In 1969, the Romanian Post issued a stamp depicting a medieval carraсk ship depicted on a fresco of a monastery. For more details about carrack see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10705

Romania 1969;60b;SG3689. Source: https://omj.ru/culture/design/monastyri ... a-snaruzhi.
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ADMELLA

The full index of our ship stamp archive

ADMELLA

Postby shipstamps » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:14 am


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Built as passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 19 by Laurence Hill & Comp. , Inch Green, Glasgow for the Adelaide & Melbourne Steam Packet Co at Port Adelaide, Australia.
17 September 1857 launched under the name ADMELLA, named after the three colonial towns she sailed between, Adelaide, Melbourne and Launceston.
Tonnage 392 (old measure) 209 tons (new act). Dim. 188 x 24 x 13.6ft.
One 300 hp steam engine, one two-bladed propeller.

When completed and after trials were made in the Firth of Clyde her two-bladed propeller was disconnected and put in the hold, and she made the passage to Australia under canvas.
She had a main saloon panelled with plate glass and mirrors, with a library and crimson velvet fittings.
Steerage accommodation forward of the hold, and second class on the quarterdeck.
Cargo space for 392 tons cargo.
When she arrived in Australia she inaugurated a steamer service between the three ports she was named after.
August she made the first voyage in this service under command of Capt. Hugh MacEwan, she made also sometimes a call at Warrnambool and Portland in route.
Captain MacEwan and the ADMELLA were a popular combination with passengers. Capt. MacEwan had been at sea for thirty years, the last five in command of steamers. He was a teetotaller who had gained the reputation of being a cautious navigator

What started as an exciting trip for 113 passengers and crew bound for the Melbourne’s Champion Sweepstakes in 1859, turned into a deadly sea battle in which men, women and children languished on a reef for more than eight days, with only 24 of them surviving.

The ADMELLA left port Adelaide on Friday 5 August 1859 with a crew of 26; picking up passengers at the Semaphore jetty. One deck were six racehorses, carried in boxes. After passage through Backstairs Passage at midday, the vessel part-owner, Captain MacEwan, took his departure from the lighthouse on Cape Willoughby and set a course to pass well offshore from the reefs of Cape Jaffa, 100 miles south-eastwards. This track exposed the ship to the full force of the prevailing winter westerly’s, and the heavy swell, backed by thousands of miles of Southern Ocean, which creates unpredictable currents. The next landfall was the low sandy coastline from which a reliable position fix would not be possible until the new lighthouse on Cape Northumberland was sighted about 180 miles away. It was the captain’s practice to keep within sight of the land whenever possible during daylight and to set a course about 15 miles offshore at night. At 4 p.m., with Cape Willoughby about 32 miles astern, the swell from the south-west caused the ADMELLA to roll heavily, causing one of the horses to fall in its stall. The ship was hove to and headed into the swell for an hour to get the horse back on its feet and to make everything secure for the night. Although the weather remained fine, the swell persisted. At midnight the ADMELLA should have been off Rivoli Bay and a slight alternation in course was made to converge with the land, and to ensure that the Cape Northumberland light would be sighted at its maximum range of 18 miles.
Lighting in the south-west heralded worsening weather. At 4 a.m., Captain MacEwan, believing the ship to be at least 16 miles offshore and Cape Northumberland light just over the horizon, made an other slight alternation of course inshore. He then retired to his cabin leaving the mate, helmsman and look-out on the bridge. Less than an hour later a slight jolt caused the first mate to order the course to be altered to seaward, but the ADMELLA had grounded on the jagged pinnacles of Carpenter Rocks at Cape Banks some 16 miles inshore from her estimated position. As Captain MacEwan scrambled back to the bridge and ordered the lifeboats cleared away, the ADMELLA broke into three sections at the watertight bulkheads. Many passengers and crew drowned as the ship broke up, but a large number managed to take refuge on the forward and after sections which remained almost intact, with decks above water, listing 45 degrees.
The midship section however, collapsed and left engines and boilers exposed to the rolling surf. The two midship lifeboats had been lost, one smashed by the falling funnel. Those who had been clearing the lifeboats, including the captain, swam to the after section. While swinging the after lifeboat the forward fall was let go and the boat hung vertically on its after fall before the davit broke and the boat floated away. Then the mainmast crashed overboard, taking with it several who sought refuge in the rigging. Heavy seas broke over the wreck, leaving only four lifeboats out of ADMELLA’s extensive lifesaving equipment. Twelve of the latest swimming belts, which had been stowed below decks, were apparently lost in the darkness; nobody had any idea where the ship had been wrecked. But as daylight broke, it revealed low sand hills about a mile away with no signs of habitation. When tiers of heavily breaking surf, each successive sea threatened the wreck with complete destruction. When the main boom was swept away, the captain jumped into the sea after it, as it would have been invaluable in constructing a raft. Almost drowned he was pulled back to the doubtful safety of the after section, which had now swung round over the reef. Sixty feet away the forward section was being pounded even more mercilessly. Two men more had been washed overboard, leaving about 40 men, women and children clinging precariously to it. All the horses seemed to have managed to swim ashore, but attempts by several passengers to either swim, or paddle on wreckage, failed. With great excitement another steamship was sighted approaching from the sea. It was recognized as the ADMELLA’s sister ship HAVILAH, bound for Adelaide. But flags and urgent ringing of the bell failed to attract her attention. As darkness fell on the first day of the wreck, false hopes were again raised by a steamer’s lights seen approaching from the north-west. It was the P&O liner BOMBAY, caught in the same treacherous current that had carried the ADMELLA too close inshore. Unfortunately, those on the wreck had no means of showing lights or making signals. The BOMBAY narrowly missed the rocks and steamed on, unaware of their fate.
Sunday 7 August dawned calm and clear. A passenger marooned on the forward section, Captain Harris, another shipmaster, realized that this section would soon disintegrate. He signalled those on the after section to make contact by line. He and about 13 other managed to gain the relative safety of the after section. But of the 20 left on the forepart who were to weak or afraid to make the attempt, none of them survived. There were now about 70 people on the after section. Captain Harris dived into the flooded storerooms and recovered some supplies, which provided a bit of essential sustenance. Then with the only tool available, a meat chopper, several of the survivors managed to build a raft. Two seamen, Leach and Knapman, volunteered to man it. After three hazardous hours, the raft emerged from the breakers, and the two seamen washed up on the beach exhausted. After a brief rest they stumbled along the sand hills across creeks and swamps to Cape Northumberland lighthouse to report the wreck to the lighthouse keeper.
He immediately set off for the nearest homestead to borrow a horse. But as luck would have it, he had not ridden far before he was thrown off.

Monday morning brought bitter could and increasing seas breaking over the wreck. Some shelter was afforded in the cabins, but there was not enough space for all and several died of from exposure.

As news of the wreck finally reached the nearest post office 20 miles away at Mount Gambier, the disaster was reported by telegraph to Adelaide and Melbourne, and people from the surrounding countryside began to converge on the beach near Carpenter Rocks with food and clothing. Seas were now smooth and a quantity of wreckage had come ashore. But there were no means at hand with which to attempt a rescue. The nearest lifeboat was 100 miles away at Portland.
Twenty miles away, at the lighthouse, there was a small boat. The only thing that could be done that night was to send for the boat and to light a fire on the beach to encourage the marooned survivors. By the time the lighthouse boat arrived at 3 a.m., a badly damaged boat, which had washed ashore from the wreck, had been repaired on the beach. But rising seas precluded any launching of either craft until five o’clock in the afternoon and both of those attempts proved futile.
In the meantime the steamer CORIO arrived with a pilot boat with which to make the rescue attempt. But all she could do was heave to for the night and hope for improved weather in the morning. At this point the 40 to 50 remaining survivors had been languishing on the wreck for five days. From seawards the CORIO approached to within 200 yards of the after section. Guided from the CORIO the pilot boat rowed towards a gap in the reef, but after half an hour’s struggle, had to give up the attempt. Seeing another hope of rescue fade. Harris tried to urge the survivors to apply their weakening efforts to building another raft, this time from the mizzen gaff and two cabin doors. But during an argument over who would man the raft, it drifted away.
Captain Harris, too exhausted to do any more, died before the day was done.
Germien, the lighthouse keeper, and Thomas, the pilotboat coxswain, made another attempt to launch their boats from the beach that evening, and an another attempt in the morning, ending in boat boats being swamped in deteriorating westerly weather. With the CORIO being unable to approach to within less than a mile of the wreck and coal running short, Captain Quin decided to make a dash to Robe for replenishment.
Just as the CARIO headed north-westwards, the LADY BIRD, a 309 ton steamer owned by the Henty Brothers, came to from the east, sighting what remained of the ADMELLA. Not far away was the steamer ANT, which had also been sent from Robe to assist in the rescue. In what must have seemed like an endless succession of bad luck to be doomed survivors another attempt at rescue failed, as a rocket line was fired from a lifeboat but nobody on board the ADMILLA was able to take it. No further rescue attempts were made that day. During the night rain relieved the survivors thirst, but they had now been without adequate food or drink for a week.
Saturday 13 August, brought moderated weather. From the beach, Germein launched another rescue attempt with two boats. This time, both boats weathered the surf and approached close to the wreck. The pilot boat made another unsuccessful attempt to pass a line, and Germein’s boat was washed clean over the remains of the ADMILLA’s engines. But riding back on another roller, he rejoined the pilot boat, and this time, a line was secured by one of the survivors on the wreck. Germein managed to get three passengers, including Captain MacEwan to make the perilous transfer to one of the boats. Seeing ANT and the LADY BIRD coming in close they rowed for the beach. Germein went back for another passenger, but unfortunately he drowned when the boat capsized while landing. Then the Portland lifeboat and the whaleboat repeated the manoeuvre of the previous day, assisted by a boat from the ANT. This time the line was taken and secured to the wreck, and 18 men and one woman were rescued in the end, only 24 survived out of the 113 who had taken passage on the ADMELLA at Adelaide eight days previously

The court of Inquire decided that the ADMELLA had experienced a strong in-shore set and that the BOMBAY was fortunate in not having also ended her days on Carpenter Rocks. More efficient means of inserting watertight bulkheads into steamships was recommended, noting that the ADMELLA had broken into three sections at the rows of the bulkhead rivet holes.
Captain MacEwan was absolved from any blame for the disaster, but was criticized for not having taken regular soundings when his position was uncertain. Cen Afr Rep SG1014

Source: Australian Coastal Shipping by Barry Pemberton. Hazards of the Sea by Capt. John Noble. Some web-sites.
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Re: ADMELLA

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri May 19, 2017 6:45 pm

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Dhufar 1977, 5 B. StG.?
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