SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

LANDING ANZAC COVE 25 April 1915

“Landing at Anzac Cove”, which shows the landing in Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, at the end 12,000 New Zealanders would arrive there.
In the foreground you can see a landings-boat, while in the background most probably are some troop transports, the image is too unclear to make out what it exactly is even the photo I found on the net is too unclear. By the photo where not ships names, only that the photo was taken on 25 April and shows that New Zealand and Australian troops landed.

MAHENO hospital ship

In 1915 New Zealand’s role in the First World War reached a new level. In near-impossible conditions the New Zealand Expeditionary Force took part in the Gallipoli campaign alongside our Australian neighbours. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) was formed and the spirits of Anzac lives on today.
First observed in 1916 and commemorated as an official day of remembrance, Anzac Day commemorates the landing of the troops at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915. 100 years on a new generation reflects on the events that occurred at Gallipoli, and remembers all New Zealanders who have served their country during times of conflict and peace.
The intention of the Gallipoli campaign was to open the Dardanelles strait to the Allied fleets, giving them access to the Ottoman capital of Constantinople to possibly force a Turkish surrender. After nine months of conflict, the ultimately unsuccessful campaign came to an end and the peninsula remained in its defenders hands.
The effects the Gallipoli campaign had on New Zealand and Australia were devastating. More than 8,700 Australians and more that 2,700 New Zealanders lost their lives fighting for King and Empire in this ambitious campaign. It was through this hardship that Anzac spirit was born a comradeship felt and remembered to this day with the annual observance of Anzac Day – 25 April.
Three stamps in this set are maritime related, the 80 c “landing at Anzac Cove”, which shows the landing in Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, at the end 12,000 New Zealanders would arrive there.
In the foreground you can see a landings-boat, while in the background most probably are some troop transports, the image is too unclear to make out what it exactly is even the photo I found on the net is too unclear. By the photo where not ships names, only that the photo was taken on 25 April and shows that New Zealand and Australian troops landed.
The other 80c stamp depict a stained glass window in the nurse’s memorial chapel in the grounds of Christchurch Hospital to commemorate the sinking of the troopship MARQUETTE. The stamp shows part of the stained glass with on the left a nurse from World War I and below her feet is the MARQUETTE depict. On the right is a nurse depict of World War II above the pyramids of Egypt.
The $2.50 shows use the New Zealand hospital ship MAHENO.
The New Zealand post gives by the stamp: When the Gallipoli campaign was being planned, few foresaw the need to provide hospital ships for the treatment and evacuation of the wounded. In July 1915, as causalities mounted, the MAHENO left Wellington for Egypt, with a matron, 13 nursing sisters, five medical officers and 61 orderlies among the personnel on board.

MAHENO was built as a passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 746 by Wm. Denny & Bros at Dumbarton, Scotland for the Union Company, Dunedin, New Zealand.
19 June 1905 launched as the MAHENO, named after a small north Otago township in the Southern Island of New Zealand.
Tonnage 5,282 gross, 3,318net, dim 122.04 x 15.2 x 9.4m.
Powered by three Parsons steam turbines 600 nhp, three shafts, speed 17.5 knots.
Passenger accommodation for 231 first class, 120 second and 67 3rd class passengers.
Cargo capacity 3,908 cubic metres.
Crew 113.
15 September 1905 Trials.
29 September 1905 delivered to owners. Building cost £141,967.
She sailed the same day from Glasgow with on board over 200 passengers bound for Australia and New Zealand, she sailed around the Cape of Good Hope and in Durban a further 170 passengers boarded there when she made a call for bunkers.
Her centre propeller was damaged during the voyage from Durban to Melbourne which reduced her speed.
08 November she arrived at Melbourne and after a stay of three days she proceeded to Sydney.
18 November she sailed from Sydney for her maiden voyage service where she was for designed the horseshoe service between Australia and New Zealand.
After a view voyages in the service she was in April 1906 transferred temporarily to the Vancouver service.
03 April she was fitted out for the first Pacific crossing in Sydney, sailed Sydney on the 16th and via Brisbane and Suva arriving in Vancouver on 07 May. Her return voyage was with calling the same ports. Then she made one other voyage to Vancouver and was back in Sydney on 08 September.
After arrival she was put again in the trans-Tasman service till the outbreak of World War I.
She was an enormous expensive ship by consuming lots of bunker coal, and in 1914 she was taken out of service and in Port Chalmers she was converted to a twin screw and two geared turbines, the middle shaft and propeller were removed.
September 1914 again in the horseshoe service. Her speed was slightly reduced but coal consumption had greatly reduced.
1915 Was she requisitioned by the New Zealand Government for conversion as a hospital ship. The work was done by Union Line staff in Port Chalmers.
25 May 1915 commissioned as a hospital ship for 515 patients.
10 July 1915 she sailed from Wellington bound for Egypt and the U.K. and returning with wounded soldiers. Al together she made nine voyages between New Zealand and U.K and Egypt from July 1915 till April 1919 only between Augusts to October 1916 she was used between France and England in the cross-channel service.
She carried in that time around 16,000 wounded men from the battlefield to safety in England.
26 April 1919 she had made her last voyage as hospital ship when she arrived in Dunedin, New Zealand.
She was refitted in Port Chalmers again for the service across the Tasman by the Union Line staff.
01 July 1917 the Union Steam Ship Company was taken over by the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O).
1921 She was placed in the direct service from Sydney to Auckland.
1923 Her homeport became Wellington.
December 1929 in the service from Wellington, Lyttelton, Dunedin and Bluff to Hobart and Melbourne. This route was operated during the summer months, while the rest of the year she was placed in other routes when needed.
Early 1935 out of service and laid up in Sydney.
Bought by Miyachi Kaisen KK, Osaka, Japan and her propellers were removed. Towed by the OONAH another ship bought by the same company, she left on 3 July 1935 the harbour of Sydney.
Five days later the two ships met stormy weather and the towline broke, the MAHENO drifted helpless with wind and current who drove her to Queensland coast and she grounded on the coast of Fraser Island.
The eight Japanese crew on board managed the next day to go ashore. A tug send out to look for her could not reach her due to the sea and weather.
Very quickly a wall of sand was built up on the seaward side of the wreck, and by inspection it was found that her back was broken and she was abandoned.
During World War II the wrack was used by the RAAF for target practice.
Till today some rusted remains of the ship can been found on Fraser Island.
More info is given on:
http://theesotericcuriosa.blogspot.co.n ... -made.html

New Zealand 2015 $2.50 sg?, scott? (the stamp is included in two mint sheets issued by the New Zealand Post.)

Source: Internet. New Zealand Post info leaflet. Passenger ships of Australia & New Zealand by Peter Plowman.

Ra II (Thor Heyerdahl’s Reed Boat) 1970

Heyerdahl (1914 – 2002) was a Norwegian adventurer and ethnographer with a background in zoology, botany, and geography. Thor Heyerdahl has long been interested in the history of early seafaring and has advocated that the oceans, far from being obstacles, could and can be safely crossed on relatively simple watercraft by following the natural conveyances of the winds and currents.

See Topic: “Thor Heyerdahl”

He became notable for his balsa raft (Kon-Tiki) expedition in 1947, in which he sailed 8,000 km (5,000 mi) across the Pacific Ocean in a hand-built balsa raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between separate cultures. This was linked to a diffusionist model of cultural development. Heyerdahl subsequently made other voyages designed to demonstrate the possibility of contact between widely separated ancient people.

See Topic: “Kon Tiki”

In 1969 and 1970, Heyerdahl built two boats from papyrus and attempted to cross the Atlantic Ocean from Morocco in Africa. Based on drawings and models from ancient Egypt, the first boat, named Ra (after the Egyptian Sun god), was constructed by boat builders from Lake Chad using papyrus reed obtained from Lake Tana in Ethiopia and launched into the Atlantic Ocean from the coast of Morocco. The Ra crew included Thor Heyerdahl (Norway), Norman Baker (USA), Carlo Mauri (Italy), Yuri Senkevich (USSR), Santiago Genoves (Mexico), Georges Sourial (Egypt) and Abdullah Djibrine (Chad). Only Heyerdahl and Baker had sailing and navigation experiences. After a number of weeks, Ra took on water after its crew made modifications to the vessel that caused it to sag and break apart after sailing more than 6440 km (4000 miles). The crew was forced to abandon Ra some hundred miles before Caribbean islands and was saved by a yacht.

See Topic: “Reed Boat”

The following year, 1970, another similar vessel, Ra II (depicted on the stamps), was built of papyrus by Demetrio, Juan and Jose Limachi from Lake Titicaca in Bolivia and likewise set sail across the Atlantic from Morocco, this time with great success. The crew was mostly the same; only Djibrine had been replaced by Kei Ohara from Japan and Madani Ait Ouhanni from Morocco. The boat reached Barbados, thus demonstrating that mariners could have dealt with trans-Atlantic voyages by sailing with the Canary Current. Also in terms of survivability, the reed boat is equal, if not better, to most any boat used by Europeans during the early centuries of exploration. The Ra II is now in the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo, Norway.

The book The Ra Expeditions and the film documentary Ra (1972) were made about the voyages. Apart from the primary aspects of the expedition, Heyerdahl deliberately selected a crew representing a great diversity in race, nationality, religion and political viewpoint in order to demonstrate that at least on their own little floating island, people could cooperate and live peacefully. Additionally, the expedition took samples of marine pollution and presented their report to the United Nations.

Barbados 1979, S.G.?, Scott: 489.

Norway 2004, Inland Mail.

Source: Wikipedia

MOSAIC OF SAN MARCO IN VENICE

This stamp issued of L25 by the Vatican in 1972, shows us a Venetian merchant ship from around 800 in which the body of the apostle St Mark is transported from Alexandria to Venice. Have not any info on the depicted vessel but below is given the voyage from Alexandria to Venice what I did find on the internet. The stamp is designed after a mosaic in the basilica of San Marco in Venice.
The two L1.50 stamps shows us an early map of Venice, with some ships types of that time frame, while the L180 stamp depict the Basilica of San Marco in Venice.
The Myth of St. Mark
The myth that is frequently referenced to in the decoration of the Basilica of San Marco is the finding of St. Mark’s body and the continued reaffirmation of his relationship to Venice. The relics of St. Mark are documented as arriving in Venice in 828. The narrative of the myth is told in the Translatio, a document that has an unclear development but dates to 1050 and introduced the story of how St. Mark came to Venice. The Translatio also proclaimed the divine right of Venetians to hold Mark’s relics. The myth begins with two Venetian merchants, Tribunus and Rusticus, who removed the body of St. Mark from the saints tomb in Alexandria.
Two Alexandrian monks Stauracius and Theodorus were acting as custodians to the relic. The story continues, in a manner to justify the commercial connection between Venetian Christians and Muslims in Alexandria, that the ship of Tribunus and Rusticus had been blown off their original course causing them to land in Alexandria. This is incongruous to the Venetian mentality of the 11th century that did not seem to mind who they traded with as long as the Venetian state benefitted in the end. The merchants discovered that the Khalif of Alexandria was planning on destroying the relics and the church the relics were housed in. Tribunus and Rusticus then persuaded the monks to allow them to take the relics thereby saving them. The monks and the merchants swapped Mark’s body with that of St. Claudia.
Then they hid St. Mark’s body in a container on board their ship and placed pork on top of the container to stop Muslim Guards from finding the stolen relic. During the journey back to Venice the merchants experienced miracles. These miracles took the form of a quick return home, the saving of a sceptic in the city of Umago in Istria from a demon and St. Mark saving the merchant’s ship from wrecking during a storm. Another alleged miracle occurred when St. Mark’s body was received in Venice. While the body of the saint was being brought to the palace of the Doge, Justinian Partecipacius, the relic became to heavy for the clergy members to carry whereupon the Doge promised to build a church for them, which would eventually become San Marco.

Vatican 1972 L25 sg ?, scott?
http://venice11.umwblogs.org/the-myth-of-st-mark/

SPARTIATE HMS

Built in 1797 at Toulon Naval Dockyard for the French Navy as SPARTI.
Ship of the Line, 'Téméraire' class, Displacement:1869 tons, L.battery deck:57m. B:14,71m. D:6,65m. Armament:74 guns of different caliber, complement:700
in 1798 she participated in the battle of the Nile, where she was one of the 9 ships were hijacked by the British, 02-08-1798 renamed HMS SPARTIATE.
In 1805 she took part in the battle of Trafalgar, along with HMS MINOTAUR they overpowered the Spanish NEPTUNO (80 guns) 3 dead and 20 wounded.
She returned to Plymouth for Repair to 02-1806 and was then added to the Channel Fleet and took part in the blockade of Rochefort, in 1808 in the Mediterranean Sea.
In 1842 converted into a hulk, 1857 demolished.
(B.I.O.T. 2005, 2x £1,10, StG.?)2nd ship of the right.
Internet.

Spirit of Australia (World’s Fastest Powerboat) 1974

Spirit of Australia is a wooden speedboat built in a Sydney backyard, by Ken Warby, that broke and set the world water speed record on 8 October 1978.

Ken Warby designed, built and drove Spirit of Australia to a phenomenal 511 km/h in the 1970s...and his world record stil stands today. Built in a Sydney backyard in the 1970s the world's fastest boat Spirit of Australia is now a permanent feature at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

On 8 October 1978, Ken Warby drove the Spirit of Australia on the Tumut River near the Blowering Dam in Australia to a speed of 317.596 mph (511.11 km/h). She was powered by a Westinghouse J34 jet engine. The engine was developed by the Westinghouse Electric Company in the late 1940s and was used for jet fighters and other aircraft. The Spirit of Australia is displayed permanently at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Darling Harbour, Sydney, New South Wales.

Starting in the early 1990s, Ken Warby built a second jet boat Aussie Spirit powered with a fresh Westinghouse J34, but he never made a record attempt with it. As of 2013 Ken and his son Dave are working on a new boat Spirit of Australia II with plans for an attempt at the water speed record. This time they acquired two Rolls-Royce Orpheus 803 jet engines which are both lighter and more powerful.

By 1974 Spirit of Australia was launched and he was ready to start his first trials. Warby climbed into the cockpit and proved he had a great success - setting an Australian record of 267km/h, but a long way short of the 458.98 km/h world record.

Warby continued to trial his boat, gradually increasing his Australian record. On 20 November 1977 he first succeeded in breaking the world record, with a speed of 464.44 km/h, but shy of breaking the 500 km/h barrier he was ultimately seeking.

It wasn't until a year later, on 8 October 1978, that Ken smashed his own world record with an amazing time of 511.11 km/h on Blowering Dam near Tumut, NSW - setting a new world waterspeed record which has never been beaten.

Since 1978 there have been a number of attempts at breaking Warby's world waterspeed record. None has succeeded, some have been fatal.

Antigua 1987, S.G.?, Scott: 1025.

Source: Wikipedia.
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Blankney HMS

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Blankney HMS

Postby john sefton » Sun Aug 29, 2010 3:04 pm

SG616.jpeg
SG616
Click image to view full size
Hunt class Type2 Destroyer, built by John Brown.
Launched 19th December 1940.
Armament 6-4in/45 Quickfire MkVI HA 3x2 4-2pdr pompom.
Compliment 168.
Broken up 1959.
Detail Derek Mabbs.
Gibraltar SG616.
john sefton
 
Posts: 1644
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm

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