SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

25 YEARS OF DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS - ISRAEL-GREECE

The stamp shows us an imagination I believe of the designer of the stamp, from a cruise vessel and a container vessel. Thessaloniki port is depict on the left of the stamp, Haifa port on the right.

Israel–Greece Joint Issue - 25 Years of Diplomatic Relations
This year, 2015, marks the 25th anniversary of full diplomatic relations between Israel and Greece. Both are modern democratic states, Mediterranean neighbors, with common values representing the proud independence of two ancient nations. The two countries have forged a multidimensional partnership with wide-ranging cooperation in all fields reflecting our peoples' shared history, close cultural ties and common interests. This historic commemorative stamp symbolizes the close friendship between Israel and Greece as they strive to build a better future, working together to promote the progress and prosperity of our nations and our region.
Irit Ben Abba
Israeli Ambassador to Greece
The Jews of Thessaloniki stood facing the sea, while other Jewish communities throughout the Diaspora and in Eretz Israel lived with their backs to it.
Yitzhak Ben Zvi, one of the forefathers of the Zionist movement and later President of Israel, visited Thessaloniki in 1914 and was amazed by the Jewish command of the port: "On the eve of the Sabbath, even before sunset, all transport halts at the port. At once, all the Jewish sailors fill the port with their rowboats, dinghies and ships, all sailing to shore... Sabbath!"
Due to the deep economic ties between Thessaloniki and the sea, which reflected the Jewish power on the docks and beyond, the "pearl of the Aegean" became known as "Jerusalem of the Balkans", in other words – like a city in Israel whose Jewish residents were linked to nature and to physical labor.
The "Jewish muscle" exhibited on the docks of Thessaloniki led the Zionist leadership to include the Thessalonikians in the conquest of the sea in Eretz Israel. Between 1933 and1935 hundreds of Jewish dockworkers from Thessaloniki immigrated to Eretz Israel and helped to realize the national vision of Hebrew labor with their own hands in the key sea ports of Haifa and Jaffa. The routine daily work on the docks was both tedious and dangerous. During the Arab strike that broke out in 1936, Arab workers failed in their attempts to lock the gates of the Haifa and Jaffa ports. Haifa Port remained open thanks to the Thessalonikian dockworkers who continued to come to work despite the atmosphere of terror, and in Tel Aviv the Thessalonikians built the first Hebrew port, as an alternative to the striking Jaffa port. These heroic actions destroyed the Arab blockade of the transfer of goods, passengers and immigrants through the ports of Eretz Israel and garnered the Thessalonikians a place in the national pantheon for their key role in the realization of the Zionist vision during the period of the Jewish Yishuv as it moved toward statehood.
Dr. Shai Srougo
Researcher of Jewish Communities of the Mediterranean Region
Lecturer, Department of Jewish History, Haifa University
Description of the stamp
The stamp features Haifa Port as represented by a typical freighter and cranes, with the Baha'i Gardens on the slopes of Mt. Carmel in the background; and the Port of Thessaloniki as represented by a typical cruise ship and cranes, with the ancient white tower on the beach in the background.
The stamp tab features the 25 Years of Diplomatic Relations between Israel and Greece logo, designed by graphic artist and illustrator Kelly Matathia Covo.

Israel 2016 4s10 sg?, scott?
http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... e&id=25333

HSL 142

A new stamp issue commemorating the 75th anniversary of the RAF Search and Rescue Force is released by Jersey Post on 6 February 2016. The six stamps and Souvenir Sheet feature dramatic search and rescue scenes created by illustrator, Sharif Tarabay.
“In 1940, during The Battle of Britain, the British found that they were unprepared for a battle over the sea,” explains Chris Elligott, Philatelic Production Coordinator at Jersey Post. “It was clear that a better equipped and dedicated service was needed to recover airmen who had ditched or parachuted into the water and return them to their squadrons. As a result, the Air Ministry formed the Directorate of Air Sea Rescue to coordinate rescue efforts.”
The Air Sea Rescue Service was officially founded in February 1941 and adopted the motto, ‘The sea shall not have them.’ The six stamps in this issue depict specialised search and rescue vessels: a Lockheed Hudson aircraft responding to a distress flare, an air sea rescue high speed launch, a Supermarine Walrus seaplane rescuing two pilots in a dinghy, a Westland Whirlwind helicopter carrying out a winch rescue from a sinking boat, a Westland Wessex helicopter flying above a stormy sea and a Westland Sea King helicopter about to carry out a cliff rescue.
“Over the years, RAF Search and Rescue has provided a vital service, both in a military context and for civilians who have found themselves in emergency situations,” continues Mr Elligott. “We’re very happy to be able to commemorate such a significant anniversary with this set of stamps.”
http://www.jerseystamps.com/en/News/Detail/65
The set of stamps and the MS depict rescue from sea and coast, only one stamp the 57p I have more detail on, she depict the HSL 142.
Built under yard No 1631 as a High Speed Launch (HSL) by the Power Boat Company at Hythe, Southampton.
Ordered by the South African Air Force but taken over by RAF during building.
Displacement 21.5 ton, dim. 19.20 x 5.33 x 1.14m.
Hull mahogany.
Powered by 3 Napier Sea Lion diesel engines, each 500 bhp, speed 36 knots.
Armament: 2 - 0.303mm Vickers MG, 2 – 0.303mm Lewis MG.
Crew 9
1940 Completed as the HSL 142.
On completion and after trials, she was taken on charge by the RAF at Calshot on 15th November 1940 and within a month allocated to serve with No. 22 ASR unit from Grimsby in December the same year. Two months later in February 1941 she was transferred to operate with several of her sisters with No. 27 ASRU from Dover. The HSLs were kept very busy and some suffered damage.
HSL 142 was back at Calshot for repairs in August 1941 before being re-allocated for further service with 71 ASRU which was based at Gibraltar.
She was received at Gibraltar in November 1941 and joined sister HSL 181 in the area. HSL 142 saw out most of the war at Gibraltar but was returned to 43 Group for more repairs on the 31st May 1944, and then taken to 85 Maintenance Unit at Felixstowe in August the same year.
HSL 142 was officially written off charge by the RAF on the 17th April 1945, and kept in reserve until she was offered for disposal through the Admiralty Small Craft Sales on the 25th November 1946 at Felixstowe.

Her post-war career is very sketchy, but she ended up as a houseboat on the River Thames. The current owner took up the offer of bringing the HSL to the Marchwood facility in order that the safe site and the local expertise could be used for continued restoration of the craft. HSL 142 arrived in April 2000 and is currently owned by Mick Dent. He needs assistance to ensure the project is completed, however of late, unfortunately very little progress has been made.

2004 Was she broken up at Marchwood, only her transom survived and is now in the Merston Aircraft Museum Hal.

Jersey 2016 57p sg?, scott? MSsg ?, scott?

Source: http://www.tangmere-museum.org.uk/artef ... launch-142
http://www.bmpt.org.uk/other_boats_hist ... /index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_Two_63_ft_HSL

GIBRALTAR HMS 1894

Built as a cruiser under yard No 420 by Robert Napier & Sons, Govan East, Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
02 December 1889 keel laid down.
27 April 1892 launched as HMS GIBRALTAR, one of the Edgar class.
Displacement: 7,700 ton, dim. 118.1 x 18 x 7.3m. (draught).
Powered by two triple expansion steam engines, 12,000 hp, twin shafts, speed 19.5 knots.
Bunker capacity 1,250 ton coal (maximum).
Range by a speed of 10 knots, 10,000 mile.
Armament: 2 – 9.2 inch, 10 – 6 inch QF, 12 – 6 pdr, guns and 4 – 14 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 544.
01 November 1894 commissioned.

HMS GIBRALTAR, was an Edgar-class cruiser launched in 1892 for service in the Royal Navy. She was built and engineered by Messrs Napier of Glasgow. Of 7,700 loaded displacement, she was coal-fired with four double-ended cylindrical boilers driving two shafts. She could make 20 knots (37 km/h) with forced draught and 18 knots (33 km/h) with natural draught. She was a very good sea boat and an exceptional steamer.
During her early career she served mainly on foreign stations. In late 1899 she had a complete refit at Portsmouth dockyard. In March 1901 she was commissioned by Captain Arthur Limpus, with a complement of 544 officers and men, to take the place as flagship of Rear-Admiral Arthur Moore, who had been appointed Commander-in-Chief on the Cape Station. She arrived in Durban in early September 1901.
Despite her obsolescence, she saw service in the First World War, first with the 10th Cruiser Squadron on Northern Patrol and from 1915 as a depot ship for this group, based in the Shetland Islands. Two of her 6-in QF Mk I guns were dismounted from the cruiser and moved to Swarbacks Head on Vementry, a headland that overlooks the entrance to Swarbacks Minn between the islands of Vementry and Muckle Roe for shore based defence. The two guns still exist on this site and can be visited.
Future First Sea Lord John H. D. Cunningham served aboard her as a midshipman. Captain Ronald Arthur Hopwood, R.N. was in command 1913–1914, leaving at the start of the First World War.
GIBRALTAR was sold in August 1923 to John Cashmore Ltd for breaking up at Newport.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Gibraltar_(1892)

FOYLE HMT 1918

This stamp depict the HMT FOYLE but while she is depict on the stamp, I believe the intention was to depict the destroyer FOYLE who was in service in the Royal Navy during World War I. The HMT FOYLE was at that time not sailing under that name but carried the name JOHN EDMUND and she was just completed before the end of World War I.

Built as a navy minesweeper trawler under yard No 224 by Goole Shipbuilding & repairing Co. Ltd, Goole, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
1918 Launched as the HMT JOHN EDMUND she was one of the Mersey class.
Tonnage 328 gross, 131 net, dim. 45.1 x 7.2m., length bpp. 42.2m.
Powered by one triple expansion steam engine, manufactured by Campbell Gas Engine Co. Ltd. Halifax, 69 nhp., one shaft, speed 11 knots.
Armament 1 – 12pdr gun.
Crew ?
22 October 1918 completed.
1919 Registered in London.
1920 Renamed in HMT FOYLE (T48).
1921 Bought or leased by the new formed South African Navy and renamed HMSAS SONNEBLOM (sunflower). She was one of the first South African navy vessels.
When the “Great Depression” hit also South Africa, there was not any money for the navy and the Government was forced to hand back the ship to the U.K. government in 1934, where she was again renamed in FOYLE.
1938-1945 Can’t find anything on her WW II war history.
After the war sold by the Royal Navy to Thomas H. Scales & Son Ltd., Granton and refitted in a fishing trawler, renamed CRAMOND ISLAND GN 18.
1949 Sold to Oddson & Co. Ltd, Hull, renamed BRIMNES H 558.
09 January 1949 towed into Stromness, Orkney by the Islandic trawler RODULL, with five feet of water in the engine room.
January 1950 was she owned by Alexander Robertson Milne, Aberdeen.
06 April 1950 renamed HETTY MILNE A 648.
October 1954 sold for scrap, arrived 16 October1954 by the scrapyard of Jacques Bakker & Zn., Bruges, Belgium.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz and various internet sites.

ECLIPSE HMS 1904

Built as a protected cruiser by the Portsmouth Dockyard for the Royal Navy.
11 December 1893 keel laid down.
19 July 1894 launched as HMS ECLIPSE she was the lead ship of her class.
Displacement: 5,690 ton, dim.106.7 x 16.3 x 6.25m. (draught)
Powered by two inverted triple expansion steam engines, 9,600 ihp, twin shafts, speed 18.5 knots.
Armament: 5 – 6 inch QF, 6 – 4.7 inch QF, 6 – 3 pdr. QF guns and 3 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 450.
23 March 1897 commissioned.

HMS ECLIPSE was an Eclipse-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the mid-1890s.
Design
Eclipse -class second-class protected cruisers were preceded by the shorter Astraea-class cruisers. ECLIPSE had a displacement of 5,600 long tons (5,700 t; 6,300 short tons) when at normal load. It had a total length of 373 ft (114 m), a beam of 53 ft 6 in (16.31 m), a metacentric height of around 3 m (9 ft 10 in), and a draught of 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m). It was powered by two inverted triple-expansion steam engines which used steam from eight cylindrical boilers. Using normal draught, the boilers were intended to provide the engines with enough steam to generate 8,000 indicated horsepower (6,000 kW) and to reach a speed of 18.5 knots (34.3 km/h; 21.3 mph); using forced draft, the equivalent figures were 9,600 indicated horsepower (7,200 kW) and a speed of 19.5 knots (36.1 km/h; 22.4 mph). Eclipse -class cruisers carried a maximum of 1,075 long tons (1,092 t) of coal and achieved maximum speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) in sea trials.[2]
It carried five 40-calibre 6-inch (152 mm) quick-firing (QF) guns in single mounts protected by gun shields. One gun was mounted on the forecastle, two on the quarterdeck and one pair was abreast the bridge. They fired 100-pound (45 kg) shells at a muzzle velocity of 2,205 ft/s (672 m/s). The secondary armament consisted of six 40-calibre 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns; three on each broadside. Their 45-pound (20.4 kg) shells were fired at a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s).[5] It was fitted with three 18-inch torpedo tubes, one submerged tube on each broadside and one above water in the stern.[6] Its ammunition supply consisted of 200 six-inch rounds per gun, 250 shells for each 4.7-inch gun, 300 rounds per gun for the 12-pounders and 500 for each three-pounder. ECLIPSE had ten torpedoes, presumably four for each broadside tube and two for the stern tube.
Service
HMS ECLIPSE was launched in 1894 and completed in 1897. In 1899 she served in the Indian Ocean under the command of Captain P. W. Bush, as flagship of the East Indies Squadron.
Refit at Chatham from 1900-1901.
She was commissioned at Chatham dockyard in late May 1901, with a crew of 450 officers and men under the command of Captain Stokes, to relieve HMS HERMIONE on the China Station.
1904-1905 In reserve at Devonport.
1905-1906 Cadet training ship based at Bermuda, attached to the North America and West Indies station in the 4th Cruiser Squadron.
1906-1907 In reserve Portsmouth.
1907-1912 Attached to the Royal Navy College at Osborne.
1912-1913 Joined the new formed Third Fleet Reserve at Portsmouth.
1913-1914 Assigned to Devonport.
Early 1914 escorted the new Australian submarines AE 1 and AE 2 part way to Singapore.
By the outbreak of the war she joined the 12th Cruiser Squadron in the Western Channel, capturing two German merchant ships on 10 August and 10 September 1914.
Then reduced to accommodation ship for submarine flotillas from 1915-1918.
Laid up in Devonport 1918-1919.
August 1921 sold to G Cohen for breaking up.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_ECLIPSE_(1894) British Cruisers of the Victorian Era by Norman Friedman.

CAESAR HMS 1898

Built as a battleship by the Portsmouth Navy Yard at Portsmouth for the Royal Navy.
25 March 1895 keel laid down.
02 September 1896 launched as the HMS CAESAR one of the Majestic class.
Displacement 14,890 ton light, 16,060 full load, dim. 128.3 x 22.9 x 8.2m. (draught). Length bpp. 118.9m.
Powered by two 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 12,000 hp. twin shafts, speed 17.5 knots maximum.
Armament: 4 -12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 16 – 12 pdr, 12 – 3 pdr. and 5 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 672.
13 January 1898 commissioned.

HMS CAESAR was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Roman military and political leader Julius Caesar. The ship was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, starting with her keel laying in March 1895. She was launched in September 1896 and was commissioned into the fleet in January 1898. She was armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (300 mm) guns and a secondary battery of twelve 6-inch (150 mm) guns. The ship had a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph).
CAESAR served with the Mediterranean Fleet after a brief stint in the Channel Fleet. In 1905, she resumed service with a now re-organised Channel Fleet and was also part of the Atlantic Fleet for a time. In the service of the Home Fleet from 1907, she was placed in reserve in 1912. Following the outbreak of World War I, CAESAR returned to the Channel Fleet before being transferred to the North America and West Indies Station in 1915 after a brief spell as a guard ship at Gibraltar. From 1918 to 1919 she served as a depot ship, firstly in the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas and then the Black Sea, in support of naval operations against the Bolsheviks. In this latter role, she was the last of the pre-dreadnought battleships to see service outside the United Kingdom. Returning to England in 1920, she was decommissioned and sold for scrap in 1921.
CAESAR was 421 feet (128 m) long overall and had a beam of 75 ft (23 m) and a draft of 27 ft (8.2 m). She displaced up to 16,060 tonnes (15,810 long tons; 17,700 short tons) at full combat load. Her propulsion system consisted of two 3-cylinder triple expansion engines powered by eight coal-fired cylindrical boilers. By 1907–1908, she was re-boilered with oil-fired models. Her engines provided a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) at 10,000 indicated horsepower (7,500 kW). The Majestics were considered to have handled well, with an easy roll, although they suffered from high fuel consumption. She had a crew of 672 officers and enlisted men.
The ship was armed with four BL 12-inch Mk VIII guns in twin turrets, one forward and one aft. The turrets were placed on circular barbettes, unlike six of her sisters, which retained earlier pear-shaped barbettes.[1][2] CAESAR also carried twelve QF 6-inch /40 guns. They were mounted in casemates in two gun decks amidships. She also carried sixteen QF 12-pounder guns and twelve QF 2-pounder guns. She was also equipped with five 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes, four of which were submerged in the ship's hull on the broadside, with the last in a deck-mounted launcher on the stern. CAESAR and the other ships of her class had 9 inches (229 mm) of Harvey armour, which allowed equal protection with less cost in weight compared to previous types of armour. This allowed CAESAR and her sisters to have a deeper and lighter belt than previous battleships without any loss in protection. The barbettes for the main battery were protected with 14 in (360 mm) of armour, and the conning tower had the same thickness of steel on the sides. The ship's armoured deck was 2.5 to 4.5 in (64 to 114 mm) thick.
Service history
HMS CAESAR was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, with her keel laying taking place on 25 March 1895. She was launched on 2 September 1896, and completed in January 1898.[2] The ship was commissioned at Portsmouth on 13 January to serve in the Mediterranean Fleet. Before leaving for the Mediterranean, she was attached temporarily to the Channel Fleet to serve in home waters. In May 1898, CAESAR departed the United Kingdom for her Mediterranean service, undergoing a refit at Malta in 1900–01. Captain George Callaghan was appointed to command her on 21 December 1901, succeeding Captain John Ferris. She ended her Mediterranean service in October 1903, paying off at Portsmouth on 6 October 1903 to begin a refit. Her refit completed, CAESAR was commissioned at Portsmouth on 2 February 1904 to relieve her sister ship HMS MAJESTIC as flagship of the Channel Fleet. When the Channel Fleet became the Atlantic Fleet as a result of a reorganisation on 1 January 1905, CAESAR became flagship of the Atlantic Fleet. She was relieved of this duty in March 1905, becoming 2nd Flagship of the new Channel Fleet (which had been the Home Fleet prior to the reorganisation).
On 3 June 1905, CAESAR collided with and sank the barque AFGHANISTAN off Dungeness, suffering significant damage; her bridge wings were carried away and the boats, davits, and net booms on her port side were badly damaged. CAESAR was refitted at Devonport to repair the damage. CAESAR became Flagship, Rear Admiral, Home Fleet, in December 1905. She was relieved of this duty in February 1907 and transferred back to the Atlantic Fleet to become its temporary flagship. She served in this role until May 1907. On 27 May 1907, CAESAR was recommissioned for service in the Devonport Division of the new Home Fleet, which had been formed in January 1907. During this service she underwent a refit at Devonport in 1907–08. In May 1909, CAESAR transferred to the Nore, temporarily serving as the flagship of Vice Admiral, 3rd and 4th Divisions, Home Fleet. In April 1911 she transferred to Devonport to serve in the 3rd Division, Home Fleet. On 16 January 1911, CAESAR was rammed by the barque EXCELSIOR in fog at Sheerness, suffering no serious damage. In March 1912, CAESAR was placed in commissioned reserve with a nucleus crew as part of the 4th Division, Home Fleet.
At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, CAESAR was brought back into full commission and transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet; the squadron was charged with the defence of the English Channel. During this service she helped in transporting the Plymouth Marine Division from Plymouth to Ostend, Belgium, and covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In December 1914, CAESAR was detached from the 7th Battle Squadron and transferred to Gibraltar to serve as guard ship and gunnery training ship there. In July 1915, she transferred to the North America and West Indies Station, serving as guard ship and gunnery training ship at Bermuda and patrolling the Atlantic.
Her North America and West Indies Station service ended in September 1918, when CAESAR was transferred to relieve HMS ANDROMACHE (the old second-class cruiser and former minelayer HMS LATONA) as flagship of the Senior Naval Officer, British Adriatic Squadron, at Corfu, the last British pre-dreadnought to serve as a flagship. In September 1918, CAESAR went to Malta for refit as a depot ship, during which she was equipped with repair shops and with leisure facilities such as recreation rooms and reading rooms. This conversion completed, she took up duties in October 1918 at Mudros as depot ship for the British Aegean Squadron. In January 1919 she was transferred to Port Said, Egypt, for service as a depot ship there. In June 1919, CAESAR transited the Dardanelles and transferred to the Black Sea, where she served as a depot ship for British naval forces operating against the Bolsheviks during the Russian Revolution. In this service she became the last British pre-dreadnought to serve operationally overseas. CAESAR returned to the United Kingdom in March 1920, paid off at Devonport on 23 April 1920, and was placed on the disposal list. She was sold to...
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Blankney HMS

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Blankney HMS

Postby john sefton » Sun Aug 29, 2010 3:04 pm

SG616.jpeg
SG616
Click image to view full size
Hunt class Type2 Destroyer, built by John Brown.
Launched 19th December 1940.
Armament 6-4in/45 Quickfire MkVI HA 3x2 4-2pdr pompom.
Compliment 168.
Broken up 1959.
Detail Derek Mabbs.
Gibraltar SG616.
john sefton
 
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