SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

MASIRAH

Built as a cargo vessel under yard No 511 by Wm. Hamilton & Co. at the Glen yard Port Glasgow for T & J Brocklebank Ltd., Liverpool.
23 October 1956 launched as the MASIRAH the first of five sisterships.
Tonnage 8,733 grt, 10,530 dwt. Dim. 151.5 x 19.3 x 8.53m., length bpp.142.6m.
Powered by three geared Rowan steam turbines, 6,250 shp. one shaft, speed 15 knots.
Cargo capacity 548,479 cubic ft.
All the masts are of the Bipod type, has sixteen 10 ton derricks, two 5 ton derrick and one of 70 ton.
February 1957 delivered to owners.

Was used by the owner in his services from the United Kingdom to the Middle East and Far East and United States ports.
1968 Transferred to Cunard SS Co Ltd., Liverpool.
1972 Sold to Cia Maritima San Basilio SA, Piraeus, Greece and renamed EURYSTHENES.
On a voyage from Hamburg via Charleston to Yokohama with a general cargo she ran aground on Calantas Rock in the San Bernardino Strait of the east coast of the Philippines between Samar and Luzon Island on 25 April 1974.
After being refloated on 21 May she was towed to Manila where she was declared a constructive total loss due to the severity of the damage sustained and she was sold to Taiwan shipbreakers.
03 October 1974 she arrived at Kaohsiung and was broken up by Pai Chou Steel.

Uganda 2016 1000s sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Merchant Ships Vol VI 1957. Modern Shipping Disasters 1963-1987.

THÉO VAN RYSSELBERGHE painting MAN ON RUDDER

The stamp shows us a painting made by the Belgium painter Theo van Rysselberghe (1862-1926) and shows us a man on the helm of a partly visible sailing vessel, while in the background you can see what looks like a barque rigged vessel. Not any information on the ships depict.
More info is given on the painter by Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Th%C3%A9o ... sselberghe.

Belgium 1992 30f sg3132, scott1456.

WINSLOW HOMER painting BREEZING UP

Winslow Homer painting “Breezing up” shows us a catboat from Gloucester, Mass., the book Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft gives on the catboat used in that region of the USA as follows:
Developed in the mid-1800s for shoal waters fishing and lobstering along the shores of Cape Cod and became a widely used pleasure and racing craft. Characteristically shallow, very beamy, and cat rigged with a stout unstayed mast stepped well forward and fitted with a boomed gaff mainsail. Clinker or carvel built, plump stem, later tumble home; fine bow. Hollow waterline; shallow V-shaped midsection with transom stern, counter on some; high rounded bilges; strong sheer toward bow. Usually a large oval cockpit with high coaming, some open or half decked (the stamp shows a half decked catboat) often a cabin forward. Wide-bladed rudder on transom type, tiller used initially, later a wheel common, especially on pleasure boats. Centreboard with a high centreboard box, some have a full keel in lieu of a centreboard.
Reported lengths from 3 – 13.7m. beam almost half length; shallow draft.

In the background on the right side is a schooner under full sail shown, Gloucester was famous for the fishing schooners built there.

On the painting is given by Wikipedia.
Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) is an oil painting by American artist Winslow Homer. It depicts a catboat called the GLOUCESTER (If the craft was called GLOUCESTER or was she from the port of Gloucester, Mass is not clear.) chopping through that city's harbor under "a fair wind" (Homer's original title). Inside the boat are a man, three boys, and their catch.
Homer began the canvas in New York in 1873, after he had visited Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he first worked in watercolor. He used the sketches made there, of which the most closely related is Sailing the Catboat (1873), for the oil painting, which he worked on over three years. Infrared reflectography has revealed the many changes he made to the composition during this time, including the removal of a fourth boy near the mast and a second schooner in the distance. At one point the adult held both the sheet and the tiller, a position initially adapted from an oil study of 1874 titled The Flirt. The painting's message is positive; despite the choppy waves, the boaters look relaxed. The anchor that replaced the boy in the bow was understood to symbolize hope. The boy holding the tiller looks forward to the horizon, a statement of optimism about his future and that of the young United States.
The finished work indicates that the significant influence of Japanese art on Western painters in the 19th century also touched Homer, particularly in the compositional balance between the left (active) and right (sparse) halves. Homer had visited France in 1866 and 1867, and the influence of marine scenes by the French painters Gustave Courbet and Claude Monet is apparent as well. Not all of Homer's sea pictures are so benevolent as Breezing Up: he portrayed waves crashing ashore as did Courbet (see for example The Wave, c. 1869). Monet's relatively early paintings Seascape: Storm (1867) and The Green Wave (1866) show boats on somewhat turbulent seas.

Completed in the centennial year 1876, the painting was first exhibited at the National Academy of Design that year, then at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. By 1879, it had come to be known as Breezing Up, a title that was not the artist's but one which he did not seem to object to. A contemporary critic described the painting: "It is painted in [Homer's] customary coarse and negligé style, but suggests with unmistakable force the life and motion of a breezy summer day off the coast. The fishing boat, bending to the wind, seems actually to cleave the waves. There is no truer or heartier work in the exhibition." Another wrote, "Much has already been said in praise of the easy, elastic motion of the figures of the party in the sailboat, which is scudding along through blue water under 'a fair wind.' They sway with the rolling boat, and relax or grow rigid as the light keel rises or sinks upon the waves. Every person who has been similarly situated can recall how, involuntarily, his back stiffened or his knees bent as he felt the roll of the waves beneath him."
Today, Breezing Up is considered an iconic American painting, and among Homer's finest. The National Gallery of Art purchased the work in 1943, described by the institution's web site as "one of the best-known and most beloved artistic images of life in nineteenth-century America."

USA 1962 4c sg1210, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breezing_Up_(A_Fair_Wind)

ZANDVLIET LOCK

This stamp issue by Belgium in 1968 shows us the Zandvliet lock, with some ships the front one is a bulker given as the MINERAL GENT viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12128&p=13068#p13068 assisted by harbour tugs, the second one also a bulker is given as the MINERAL SERAING viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5867&p=13067&hilit=mineral+seraing#p13067 with her superstructure and bridge in the middle of the ship she is also assisted by a harbour tug, while on the river outside the lock there is a coaster. The coaster and harbour tugs are not identified..

Of the Zandvliet lock is given by Wikipedia:
Zandvliet Lock is a lock in the far north of the port of Antwerp . The lock is named after the village Zandvliet . She is 500 meters long and 57 meters wide and has a Second General Leveling (TAW) depth of 13.58 meters. The locks in the port of Antwerp protecting the closed infrastructure against tidal action of the river. Behind the locks, the water level is constant.
The Zandvlietsluis was in 1967 commissioned. The construction of this lock hit a wedge between the Groot Buitenschoor and Galgeschoor , two rare saltmarsh areas , of which there are now only 320 hectares of remaining in Belgium. Associated buildings were not completed in 1967. The opening of the new sea lock was from an economic point of view urgent, because at the Kruisschans, where the Boudewijn lock and Van Cauwelaert lock are situated could not cope more with the growing shipping traffic. Even with the Zandvlietsluis there was the problem of the ever increasing waiting time for ships to pass the locks, was not resolved.
Two bridges span the lock: the Frederik Hendrik Bridge over the lock gates on the River Scheldt side and Zandvliet Bridge over the lock gates on the harbor side.
The Zandvlietsluis was the largest sea lock in the world until 1989 till the Berendrecht lock , which is 11 meters wide, was opened.

Belgium 1968 6f sg2090
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zandvlietsluis

RONQUIERES SHIPLIFT

Belgium issued in 1968 a set of stamps of which the 10f shows inland canal barges and the shiplift in Ronouiéres. The inland canal barges are not identified.

The Ronquières Inclined Plane is a Belgian canal inclined plane on the Brussels-Charleroi Canal in the province of Hainaut in Wallonia that opened in April 1968[after a six-year construction period. It is located in the municipality of Braine-le-Comte, and takes its name from the nearby village of Ronquières.
The purpose of the construction was to reduce the delays imposed by the 14 locks (already reduced from 16 in the 19th century) which had hitherto been needed for the canal to follow the local topography.
Description
The Ronquières Inclined Plane has a length of 1,432 metres (4,698 ft) and lifts boats through 67.73 metres (222.2 ft) vertically. It consists of two large caissons mounted on rails. Each caisson measures 91 metres (299 ft) long by 12 metres (39 ft) wide and has a water depth between 3 and 3.70 metres (9.8 and 12.1 ft). It can carry one boat of 1,350 tonnes or many smaller boats within the same limits.
Each caisson has a 5,200-tonne counterweight running in the trough below the rails, which permits the caisson to be moved independently of the other. Each caisson is pulled by 8 cables wound by winches located at the top end of the inclined plane. Each cable is 1,480 metres (4,860 ft) long.
Each caisson can be moved between the two canal levels at a speed of 1.2 metres per second (3.9 ft/s), taking about 22 minutes.
It takes 50 minutes in total to pass through the 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) of the entire structure, including the raised canal bridge at the top end.

Belgium 1968 10f sg2091, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronqui%C3 ... ined_plane

WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIP 2016

Monaco issued in 2016 1 stamp for the World Rowing Coastal Championship which will take place in October in Monaco. The stamp shows us quad rowing boat with four rowers and 1 coxswain. The boat have a length of maximum 10.70m, with a weight of 150 kg.

A coxed four is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for four persons who propel the boat with sweep oars and is steered by a coxswain.
The crew consists of four rowers, each having one oar, and a cox. There are two rowers on the stroke side (rower's right hand side) and two on the bow side (rower's left-hand side). The cox steers the boat using a rudder and may be seated at the stern of the boat where there is a view of the crew or in the bow (known as a bowloader). With a bowloader, amplification is needed to communicate with the crew which is sitting behind, but the cox has a better view of the course and the weight distribution may help the boat go faster. When there is no cox, the boat is referred to as a "coxless four".
Racing boats (often called "shells") are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material (usually carbon-fibre reinforced plastic) for strength and weight advantages. Fours have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw and to help the rudder. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat. If the boat is sculled by rowers each with two oars the combination is referred to as a quad scull. In a quad scull the riggers apply forces symmetrically. A sweep oared boat has to be stiffer to handle the unmatched forces, and so requires more bracing, which means it has to be heavier than an equivalent sculling boat. However most rowing clubs cannot afford to have a dedicated large hull with four seats which might be rarely used and instead generally opt for versatility in their fleet by using stronger shells which can be rigged for either as fours or quads.
"Coxed four" is one of the classes recognized by the International Rowing Federation. It was one of the original events in the Olympics but was dropped in 1992

Mónaco 2016 2.00 Euro sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweep_(rowing)
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Mtendere

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Mtendere

Postby john sefton » Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:21 pm

SG730.jpg
SG730
Click image to view full size
Lake Malawi is approximately 575km long and up to 80km wide. It forms part of the Great Rift Valley with steep and precipitous slopes in places. It is the third largest lake in Africa and amongst the twelve largest lakes in the world. The deepest part of the lake, at the northern end, is 213 metres below sea level or 701 metres deep. The lake surface covers an area of nearly 23,000 square kilometres, which is approximately 20% of the total area of the Republic of Malawi.
Ships have been operated on Lake Malawi by Malawi Railways since 1931 and vessels have been able to connect with the rail system at Chipoka since 1935. However, because of the exposed nature of the lake shore at Chipoka the headquarters of the Lake Service were developed at Monkey Bay, the nearest sheltered bay about 45 kilometres almost due east of Chipoka.
Built in 1935, the first modern ship to operate commercially on Lake Malawi was the MV MPASA. At that time the facilities at Chipoka were very scant and there were no services at any of the ports of call. The complete redevelopment of Chipoka was completed in 1979 whilst proper harbour installations were first provided at Chilumba in the northern region in 1973.
Improvements have also been made at Monkey Bay including in 1975 the provision of a slipway.

The MV MTENDERE entered service in October 1980, she was the first vessel to provide seating accommodation for all passengers. In her first full year of service she carried 70,000 passengers but two years later this had increased to nearly 100,000. The vessel operates a weekly schedule serving the major ports and many smaller ones; she also serves the islands of Likoma and Chizuniulu.

Log Book September 1985

Malawi SG730
john sefton
 
Posts: 1679
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm

Re: Mtendere

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Aug 05, 2014 8:40 pm

2014 mtendere.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in sections as a ferry under yard No 1415 by Schlichting Werft, Travemünde, Germany for the Malawi Railways Ltd. The ship was paid by the German Government as aid to the Malawian Government.
The sections arrived at Lake Malawi on 25 July 1980 were the sections again were fitted together.
03 October 1980 completed as the MTENDERE.
Tonnage 924 grt, dim. 50.7 x 9.7 x 2.4m. (draught)
Two diesel engines each 498 hp, speed 11.5 knots.

Malawi 2014 K100 sg?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 4724
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am


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