SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

KETCH rigged cargo vessel

The 200 SH SO stamp of the Somali Republic depict a modern top-sail ketch rigged cargo vessel.
She is a two masted trader and identified by the size and position of the mizzenmast which is shorter than the mainmast. Stepped mostly just behind the main boom of the mainmast as seen on the stamp.
The mizzen sail area is roughly one half that of the mainsail.
Both the ketch and the yawl have two masts, with the main mast foremost; the distinction being that a ketch has the mizzen mast forward of the rudder post, whereas on a yawl, it is aft of the rudder post. Compared to a ketch, a similar size yawl's mizzen sail is much smaller than the main, because of the limitations of the mizzen sheet. So on a ketch, the principal purpose of the mizzen sail is to help propel the vessel, while on a yawl, the smaller mizzen mainly serves the purposes of trim and balance. Yawls tend to have mainsails almost as large as those of comparable sloops.
A ketch may be distinguished from a cutter or a sloop by virtue of having two masts rather than one, though a ketch with two foresails is sometimes called a "cutter-rigged ketch".
Both the ketch and the yawl differ from the two-masted schooner, whose aft mainmast is taller than the foremast. (It follows that a schooner does not have a mizzen mast.) If a vessel has two masts of approximately the same height, the rig with the larger sail forward is called a ketch, while the rig with the larger sail aft is a schooner. The American two-masted schooner is rare in Europe, where the ketch rig is preferred.

Somalia Republic 1998 200SH sg?, scott?
Source: Wikipedia and internet sites.

ARMADALE CASTLE HMS 1903

The stamp gives the ARMADALE there was an Australian passenger ship built in 1909 with this name but she had only one funnel, while the stamp shows a two funnel vessel. Comparing stamp with photos the Union Castle liner ARMADALE CASTLE is depict.

Built as a passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 423 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd, Govan near Glasgow for the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. Ltd. London.
11 August 1903 launched as the ARMADALE CASTLE one sister the WALMER CASTLE.
Tonnage 12,973 gross, 7,263 net, dim. 173.76 x 19.65 x 11.88m., length bpp. 173.7m.
Powered by two 4-cyl. quadruple expansion steam engines manufactured by shipbuilder, 2.212 nhp.,(12,500 ihp.), twin shafts, speed 17 knots.
Passenger accommodation for 350 first, 200 second and 270 third class passengers.
Some of her holds were fitted out to carry reefer cargo.
November 1903 completed.

She replaced the SCOTT in the mail service between the U.K. and South Africa.
05 December 1903 maiden voyage from Southampton to Cape Town where she arrived on 22 December.
26 June 1904 she was the first mail ship to cross the bar at Durban.
1908 She carried the first shipment of citrus fruit from the Cape to the U.K.
02 August 1914 chartered as an Armed Merchant Cruiser (AMC) armed with 8 – 6 inch guns and commissioned as HMS ARMADALE CASTLE and stationed in the Cape.
September 1914 took part in the South West Africa campaign. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South-Wes ... a_campaign
1915 On patrol off German East Africa.
1916 Carried gold and specie worth £7 million from Simon’s Town to Halifax. N.S., Canada.
April 1917 after a refit her armament given as 8 – 6 inch and 2 – 6pdr. guns. And she joined the 10th Cruiser Squadron for blockade patrols between the Shetland Islands and Norway.
1918 Escort duties on South, North American and West African routes.
11 September 1919 decommissioned and returned to owners, after a reconditioning on the Clyde and her passenger accommodation altered to 261 first, 271 second and 274 third class.
10 April 1936 her last sailing from Cape Town for the U.K.
June 1936 sold to Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. Ltd., Blyth where she arrived on 12 June 1936 for scrapping.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.clydeships.co.uk http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Union Castle Line a fleet history by Peter Newall. Armed Merchant Cruisers 1878-1945 by Osborne, Spong & Grover.

CHARLES GLEYRE and painting "Lost Illusions"

Lost Illusions is a painting by Charles Gleyre and his student Leon Dussart, commissioned by William Thompson Walters in 1865.
History
Charles Gleyre was known as an artist of classic methods but romantic tastes who often modified heroism into idyllic scenes. However, in execution he was not considered romantic, due to his use of pale colors, his delicate drawing style, and uncertain light.[1] At the 1843 Salon (in Paris), Gleyre received praise for The Evening. In 1865, William T. Walters would commission a replica of the painting which was completed by Gleyre and Dussart and is now also known as Lost Illusions.
Composition
Lost Illusions depicts a vision Gleyre experienced one evening while on the banks of the Nile. It represents a despondent scene and uses softened tones. In the scene, an aging poet watches as a mysterious "bark" drifts away with his youthful illusions. The illusions are represented by maidens playing instruments and a cupid scattering flowers.
Off the Wall
Currently, Lost Illusions is being featured in Off the Wall, an open-air exhibition on the streets of Baltimore, Maryland. A reproduction of the painting, the original is part of The Walters Art Museum collection, was on display through January 2014 in O'Donnell Square. The National Gallery in London began the concept of bringing art out of doors in 2007 and the Detroit Institute of Art introduced the concept in the U.S.. The Off the Wall reproductions of the Walters' paintings are done on weather-resistant vinyl and include a description of the painting and a QR code for smart phones.

France 2016 1.60 Euro sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Illusions_(painting)

WINDSURFING RS:X board

The ancient Olympic Games were held over a period of 1500 years. The Games were reestablished in the late 19th century by Baron Pierre de Coubertin and the first modern Olympics took place in Athens in 1896.
Since then, the Olympic Games have been held regularly every four years, except during WWI and WWII.
The Summer Olympics constitute the largest event of any kind in the world.
The 31st modern Olympiad will commence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 5, 2016. This marks the first time that the Olympics have been hosted in South America.
Israel participated in the Olympic Games for the first time in Helsinki 1952. The infamous 1972 Munich games will eternally be mourned for the 11 members of the Israeli delegation who were murdered there - athletes, trainers and referees.
Israel won its first Olympic medal in Barcelona in 1992 and its first gold medal in Athens 2004.

Sailing - RS:X Windsurfing
Sailing is one of Israel's most prominent sports. The most prominent achievement in this field is the Olympic gold medal for windsurfing.
The RS:X windsurfer replaced the Mistral model in 2005. The RS:X was first used at the 2006 Israeli Championships and marked the transition to the younger generation of windsurfers: Gal Friedman, Olympic gold medalist from the Athens 2004 games (Mistral model) came in fourth, while Shahar Zubari won the competition. In the women's competition, Maayan Davidovich beat former World Champion Lee Korzits. Israel was represented at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing by Zubari and Davidovich, both of whom qualified for the medal sailings and Zubari even won a bronze medal.
Lee Korzits won four consecutive world championship titles and was ranked sixth in the London 2012 games. She is Israel’s most decorated athlete.
Israel will be represented at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games by Israeli windsurfers Maayan Davidovich and Shahar Zubari.
Smadar Pintov CEO, Israel Sailing Association.
Downloaded from: http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... t&id=28849

RS:X sailboard was made after a design by One Design, Neil Pryde, the designers are Jean Bouldoires & Robert Stroj and the board is made of GRP & Carbon.
Dim. 2.86 x 0.93m.
Hull weight 15.5 kg.
The mast height different between a male and female sailer, male 5.2m., female 4.9m. and also the sail area, male 9.5m², female 4.9m².
RS:X is a windsurfing discipline selected by the ISAFto replace the Mistral One Design Class class for the 2008 Summer Olympics. The discipline has similarities to formula windsurfing - mainly in that the equipment used was designed to allow windsurfing in low and moderate wind conditions with good performance.
RS:X equipment includes a board with a daggerboard, and a sail of a specified size. The board measures 286 cm in length and 93 cm in width. Unlike formula boards, it is quite heavy - 15.5 kg, which is almost twice that of regular competition formula boards, but is very similar to the weight of Raceboards such as the previous Olympic board, Mistral One Design Class. Although the Mistral board has a weight of 17 kg ready to sail, the RS:X board weighs more than 19 kg.
The RS:X seems to be a compromise between traditional Raceboards which work well in 5-35 knots, and Formula boards which go fast in 12-30 knots, and has shown itself to be competitive with past Raceboards in the medium wind range.
The shape and design of the RS:X sail is based on that of the Neil Pryde formula windsurfing sail RS4.

Israel 2016 4s10 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RS:X

JUPITER HMS 1897

Built as a battleship under yard no 273 by James & George Thomson, Clydebank, Scotland for the Royal Navy.
26 April 1894 laid down.

18 November 1895 launched as the HMS JUPITER one of the Majestic-class.
Displacement 14,820 ton, dim. 128.3 x 22.9 x 8.2m. (draught) Length bpp 118.9m.
Powered by 2 – 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, 12,000 ihp, twin shafts, speed 17 knots.

Armament: 4 – 12 inch Mk Viii, 12 – QF 6 inch, 16 – 12pdr., 12 – 3 pdr QFguns and 5 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.

February 1897 transferred to Chatham for completion.
Crew 672.

08 June 1897 completed.

HMS JUPITER was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1897, she was assigned to the Channel Fleet until 1905. After a refit, she was temporarily put in reserve before returning to service with the Channel Fleet in September 1905. In 1908 and rendered obsolete by the emergence of the dreadnought type of battleships, she once again returned to the reserve, this time with the Home Fleet. After another refit, she had a spell as a gunnery training ship in 1912.
Following the outbreak of World War I, JUPITER served with the Channel Fleet and then as a guard ship on the River Tyne. She was dispatched to Russia in February 1915 to serve as an icebreaker, clearing a route to Arkhangelsk while the regular icebreaker was undergoing a refit. She underwent her own refit later in 1915 and once completed, was transferred to the Suez Canal Patrol. She returned to England late 1916, and spent the remainder of the war based at Devonport. She was scrapped in 1920.
Design
Main article: Majestic-class battleship
HMS JUPITER was laid down by J & G Thomson, Clydebank at Clydebank on 26 April 1894 and launched on 18 November 1895. In February 1897 she was transferred to Chatham Dockyard, where she was completed in May 1897. The ship was 421 feet (128 m) long overall and had a beam of 75 ft (23 m) and a draft of 27 ft (8.2 m). She displaced up to 16,060 t (15,810 long tons; 17,700 short tons) at full combat load. Her propulsion system consisted of two 3-cylinder triple expansion engines powered by eight coal-fired cylindrical boilers. By 1907–1908, she was re-boilered with oil-fired models. Her engines provided a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) at 10,000 indicated horsepower (7,500 kW). The Majestics were considered good seaboats with an easy roll and good steamers, although they suffered from high fuel consumption. She had a crew of 672 officers and enlisted men.

The ship was armed with four BL 12-inch Mk VIII guns in twin turrets, one forward and one aft. The turrets were placed on pear-shaped barbettes; six of her sisters had the same arrangement, but her sisters CAESAR and ILLUSTRIOUS and all future British battleship classes had circular barbettes. JUPITER also carried twelve QF 6-inch /40 guns. They were mounted in casemates in two gun decks amidships. She also carried sixteen QF 12-pounder guns and twelve QF 2-pounder guns. She was also equipped with five 18 in (460 mm) torpedo tubes, four of which were submerged in the ship's hull, with the last in a deck-mounted launcher. JUPITER and the other ships of her class had 9 inches (229 mm) of Harvey armour, which allowed equal protection with less cost in weight compared to previous types of armour. This allowed JUPITER and her sisters to have a deeper and lighter belt than previous battleships without any loss in protectionThe barbettes for the main battery were protected with 14 in (360 mm) of armor, and the conning tower had the same thickness of steel on the sides. The ship's armored deck was 2.5 to 4.5 in (64 to 114 mm) thick. ....
Operational history
HMS JUPITER was commissioned on 8 June 1897 at Chatham Dockyard for service in the Channel Fleet. She was present at both the Fleet Review at Spithead for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria on 26 June 1897 and the Coronation Fleet Review for King Edward VII on 16 August 1902. Captain John Durnford was appointed in command in October 1899, followed by Captain Sir Archibald Berkeley Milne from December 1900. In March 1901 she visited Cork. On 1 January 1905, the Channel Fleet became the new Atlantic Fleet, making her an Atlantic Fleet unit. She was paid off at Chatham on 27 February 1905 to undergo a refit there, and her Atlantic Fleet service ended when she emerged from refit and was commissioned at Chatham into the Portsmouth Reserve on 15 August 1905. JUPITER was commissioned for service in the new Channel Fleet on 20 September 1905. This service ended on 3 February 1908 when she was paid off. By this time, JUPITER had been surpassed in the role of front-line battleship by the new "all-big-gun" dreadnought battleships inaugurated by HMS DREADNOUGHT in 1906.[
On 4 February 1908, JUPITER was recommissioned for reserve service in the Portsmouth Division of the new Home Fleet with a nucleus crew. She was flagship of the division from February to June 1909 and later second flagship of the 3rd Division, Home Fleet. During this service, she underwent refits at Portsmouth in 1909–1910, during which she received fire control equipment for her main battery, and 1911–1912. From June 1912 to January 1913 she served as a seagoing gunnery training ship at the Nore. In January 1913 she was transferred to the 3rd Fleet, and was based at Pembroke Dock and Devonport.
World War I
When World War I broke out in August 1914, JUPITER was transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet. During this service, she covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In late October 1914, JUPITER was reassigned to serve alongside her sister ship MAJESTIC as a guard ship at the Nore. On 3 November 1914, JUPITER and MAJESTIC left the Nore and relieved their sister ships HANNIBAL and MAGNIFICENT of guard ship duty on the Humber. In December 1914, JUPITER moved on to guard ship duty on the Tyne. On 5 February 1915, JUPITER was detached from her guard ship duty to serve temporarily as an icebreaker at Arkhangelsk, Russia, while the regular icebreaker there was under refit. In this duty, JUPITER made history by becoming the first ship ever to get through the ice into Arkhangelsk during the winter; her February arrival was the earliest in history there. Tsar Nicholas II authorised the striking and issue of medals commemorating the feat to all officers, petty officers and seamen (class 1, 2 and 3 respectively).
JUPITER left Arkhangelsk in May 1915 to return to the Channel Fleet, and was paid off at Birkenhead on 19 May 1915. She then began a refit by Cammell Laird there that lasted until August 1915. Her refit completed, JUPITER was commissioned at Birkenhead on 12 August 1915 for service in the Mediterranean Sea on the Suez Canal Patrol. On 21 October 1915, she was transferred to the Red Sea to become guard ship at Aden and flagship of the Senior Naval Officer, Red Sea Patrol. She was relieved of flagship duty by the troopship RIM NORTHBROOK of the Royal Indian Marine on 9 December 1915 and returned to the Suez Canal Patrol for Mediterranean service. This lasted from April to November 1916, with a home port in Port Said, Egypt.
JUPITER left Egypt on 22 November 1916 and returned to the United Kingdom, where she was paid off at Devonport to provide crews for antisubmarine vessels. She remained at Devonport until April 1919, in commission as a special service vessel and auxiliary patrol ship until February 1918, when she was again paid off. After that she became an accommodation ship. In April 1919, JUPITER became the first Majestic-class ship to be placed on the disposal list. She was sold for scrapping on 15 January 1920, and on 11 March 1920 was towed from Chatham to Blyth to be scrapped by Hughes Bolckow at Derwenthaugh on the River Tyne....

Source:...

RINALDO HMS 1901

Built as a steel sloop under yard No 636 by Laird Bross, Birkenhead for the Royal Navy.
08 November 1898 laid down.
29 May 1900 launched as the HMS RINALDO one of the Condor-class.
Displacement 980 ton, dim. 62 x 9.9 x 3.51m draught, length bpp. 55 m.
Powered by 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 1,400 hp, twin shafts, speed 13 knots.
Range 3,000 mile by a speed of 10 knots. Bunker capacity 160 ton coal.
First barque rigged later altered to Barquentine and in the end complete removed.
Armament: 6 – QF 4 inch, 4 – QF 3pdr guns and 1 MG.
Crew 120-130.
26 November 1901 commissioned.

First used in South East Asia.
August 1904 she was given medical assistance to Brunei during an outbreak of smallpox there.
1914 Was she tender and training ship to HMS VIVID, Devonport Royal Naval Reserve.
When First World War broke out patrols along the Belgium Coast.
1915 In service on West, South and East Africa till May 1919.
07 May 1919 arrived at Plymouth from Africa.
? Decommissioned.
21 October 1921 sold to W. Thomas, Anglesey for scrapping.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
Sources: ships of the Royal Navy by J.J. Colledge. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Wikipedia. http://www.naval-history.net/OWShips-WW ... inaldo.htm
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Mtendere

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Mtendere

Postby john sefton » Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:21 pm

SG730.jpg
SG730
Click image to view full size
Lake Malawi is approximately 575km long and up to 80km wide. It forms part of the Great Rift Valley with steep and precipitous slopes in places. It is the third largest lake in Africa and amongst the twelve largest lakes in the world. The deepest part of the lake, at the northern end, is 213 metres below sea level or 701 metres deep. The lake surface covers an area of nearly 23,000 square kilometres, which is approximately 20% of the total area of the Republic of Malawi.
Ships have been operated on Lake Malawi by Malawi Railways since 1931 and vessels have been able to connect with the rail system at Chipoka since 1935. However, because of the exposed nature of the lake shore at Chipoka the headquarters of the Lake Service were developed at Monkey Bay, the nearest sheltered bay about 45 kilometres almost due east of Chipoka.
Built in 1935, the first modern ship to operate commercially on Lake Malawi was the MV MPASA. At that time the facilities at Chipoka were very scant and there were no services at any of the ports of call. The complete redevelopment of Chipoka was completed in 1979 whilst proper harbour installations were first provided at Chilumba in the northern region in 1973.
Improvements have also been made at Monkey Bay including in 1975 the provision of a slipway.

The MV MTENDERE entered service in October 1980, she was the first vessel to provide seating accommodation for all passengers. In her first full year of service she carried 70,000 passengers but two years later this had increased to nearly 100,000. The vessel operates a weekly schedule serving the major ports and many smaller ones; she also serves the islands of Likoma and Chizuniulu.

Log Book September 1985

Malawi SG730
john sefton
 
Posts: 1682
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm

Re: Mtendere

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Aug 05, 2014 8:40 pm

2014 mtendere.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in sections as a ferry under yard No 1415 by Schlichting Werft, Travemünde, Germany for the Malawi Railways Ltd. The ship was paid by the German Government as aid to the Malawian Government.
The sections arrived at Lake Malawi on 25 July 1980 were the sections again were fitted together.
03 October 1980 completed as the MTENDERE.
Tonnage 924 grt, dim. 50.7 x 9.7 x 2.4m. (draught)
Two diesel engines each 498 hp, speed 11.5 knots.

Malawi 2014 K100 sg?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 4658
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am


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