SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SUPERSPORT YACHT CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

THE AIRFOIL CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

SARIMANOK outrigger

In 1985 Bob Hobman built a. outrigger canoe the SARIMANOK made of a ghio tree and sails made entirely of vegetable elements, not a single nail was used. The outrigger was built mostly after plans of a Filipino “vinta” model.
Not any navigational instruments were on board, and the crew relied only on the stars to set course.
The name given to the outrigger was SARIMANOK she was named after a Sarimanok bird in Filipino Mindanao mythology, a reincarnation of a goddess who fell in love with a mortal man. Today it symbolized in the Filipino wealth and prestige.
From two books of which the quotations I got from Mr. Jung (with thanks) comes the following.

Madagascar - The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World by Peter Tyson pages 257-258.
I quote:
To find out, a Briton named Bob Hobman decided to build a replica of the king of boat the first Malagasy might have used and, in the manner of the Norwegian Thor Heyerdahl, try to sail it from Java to Madagascar, making no landfalls, using no modern navigation aids, and subsisting solely on foods the ancient Malagasy might have eaten. The 60-foot double outrigger canoe was built entirely of wood and bamboo, with palm-weave sails and rattan bindings instead of nails; it had no motor, radio or sextant. On June 3, 1985, the SARIMANOK, as the vessel was christened, set sail from Java. “They had an unending, horrible voyage,” Dewar told me. “There were problems with the boat. More or less continuous high seas, strong winds, and frequent storms. All the time they’re filming this damn thing, filming the boat falling to pieces and so forth.” After one stop on Cocos (Keeling) Island to let off a sick crew member (and bring on some tinned food), Hobman’s crew, against all odds, managed to go the distance to Madagascar in 49 days. But by then they had lost their ability to steer the craft, and they drifted past the northern tip of the island and into the Mozambique Channel. “On the boat they had this sealed, watertight container with a button,” Dewar told me. “If they pushed the button, it would turn on a radio beacon that would identify where they were and would send out a distress signal.” “Just like the original Malagasy might have had,” I said. “Exactly. Well, they finally gave up und pushed the button.” A French coast guard ship came out from the Comoros and towed them back to the island of Mayotte, where they promptly saddled with a hefty bill for the rescue. The crew then hired a local boat to tow the ailing craft to Madagascar, where, on September 5, the SARIMANOK finally came to rest on Nosy Be, on the beach by the Holiday Inn, “About a year later, a group of these people came back to try to raise money in Madagascar- which strikes one as a somewhat humorous effort- to refurbish the SARIMANOK and memorialize it,” Dewar said. “On of them gave a lecture in Diego Suarez while I was in town. He delivered it in English, with simultaneous translation, to a crowd of about 60, at least half of whom were under the age of 12. I think they left disappointed in terms of finding anyone to take care of the SARIMANOK.” But Jean-Aimé Rakotoarisoa, a leading Malagasy archeologist and a close friend of Dewar’s, had a different take on what the SARIMANOK voyagers had accomplished, Dewar told me. “They had done marvelous work, Jean-Aimé felt, solving problems that we archeologists had not been able to solve before. We now know that the first place settled in Madagascar was the Holiday Inn in Nosy Be, and we know that Americans must have settled the island first, because there we have proof: the built the Holiday Inn.”
Unquote.

Classic Ships of Islam: From Mesopotamia to the Indian Ocean von Dionysius Agius, page 103
I quote:
People of southeastern origin settled in Madagascar and the Comoro Islands in the second half of the first millennium CE; the language of Madagascar today is Malagasy of an Austronesian family with strong ties to Ma’anyan and the Borito languages of Borneo. How they reached Madagascar is interesting and something which has intrigued a number of scholars. One voyage, undertaken by Bob Hobman and his crew on 6 August 1985, proved that Neolithic navigators could have crossed over from Indonesia to Madagascar on an outrigger canoe, the SARIMANOK, a hollowed-out trunk of a huge ghio tree with sails woven from plant fibres. The voyage lasted 63 days.
Unquote.

The SARIMANOK is now in the Oceanographic Museum of Nosy Be, Malagasy.

Malagasy Republic 1987 60f, 150f sg 617/18
Cocos (Keeling) Islands 1987 36c sg160, scott?

BOM vessels

Gambia issued a set of stamps in 1991 for the 100th anniversary of the death of Vincent van Gogh 1853-1890.
One of this stamps shows use the “beach at Scheveningen during a calm day” painted in 1882 by van Gogh.
The three vessels on the painting on the beach are bom vessels for more info see. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11475&p=12256&hilit=panorama#p12256

Gambia 1991 1d.25 sg 1246, scott 1147.

PENDOLARE CONCEPT BOAT

Of the “pendolare concept boat” I can only find that it is a Granata Design from Palmetto Bluff, USA and a photo of the design, but not any detail on the design so most probably the design was not a seller and it stayed on the design board.

Gambia 2000 8d sg?, scott?

FERRY SEA COASTER CONCEPT

When you look carefully to this stamp you can see that the name ROCKET II is painted mid-ships on the hull, the stamp gives that a “ferry sea coaster concept” is shown. The stamp shows I believe a ship drawing of the design, but actually the ship is the ISLAND ROCKET II.

She was built in 1997 for the Island Express Boat Lines, Sandosky, OH by the Air Ride Craft Inc. Miami.
Delivered as the ISLAND ROCKET II.
Tonnage 32 grt, 25 nrt, dim. 64.70 x 19.20 x 6.5ft.
Powered by?

On the "home-grown" design front, the new Surface Effect Ship (SES) catamaran ferry ISLAND ROCKET II will begin service this summer on Lake Erie for owner Island Express Boat Lines, Ltd., Sandusky, Ohio.
"We were looking for something with a little more speed and a little more passenger comfort," Island Express general manager Brad Castle told Marine Log, "and this certainly fit the bill."
At full load, Castle says the 149-passenger ISLAND ROCKET II should reach cruising speeds in the "mid-40 knot range" and still be comfortable for passengers. It will combine with Island Express Boat Lines' other ferry, the ISLAND ROCKET I, to offer regular service from Sandusky to Kelleys Island to Put-in-Bay.
Based on the Seacoaster design from inventor Don Burg, president of Air Ride Craft, Inc., Miami, the 72 ft ISLAND ROCKET II integrates the best features of an SES and a catamaran. Like other SESs, the Seacoaster rides on a pressurized air cushion created under the vessel, which carries some 75 to 90% of its weight, greatly reducing the wetted area hull friction. This means that an SES normally needs much less propulsive power--about half--of that required for similar size monohulls or catamarans at speeds of 25 knots and up. For operators, this translates into fuel and power savings, a smooth ride in rough seas, and better wake characteristics at high speeds.
While SES craft are nothing new, the Seacoaster design has attracted some interest among other operators. One of those is Dan Yates, owner of the PORTLAND SPIRIT, as well as two other dinner boats in Portland, Ore. Yates has been exploring the possibility of creating a network of water taxis and fast ferries that would connect downtown Portland with Vancouver, Wash., via the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. The concept would involve possibly five ferries in the 100 passenger range.
"The designs are out there," says Yates, "but I don't want to be an innovator in technology. Rather, I want to use technology in an innovative way." But because of political and operational hurdles, he believes the effort could take two more years to come to fruition. "There's a strong light rail contingent," says Yates, "and there's also a lot of debris in the river. My dinner boats get their props banged every so often by 125 ft trees floating down the river," says Yates. ML

http://m.marinelog.com/DOCS/hisp.html

2005 The last I can find on the net that she was in a service in Florida and for sale. At that time still owned by the same owner, under USA Flag and registry IMO Number D1058181.

https://cgmix.uscg.mil/PSIX/PSIXSearch.aspx
Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?
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Orduna I (liner)

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Orduna I (liner)

Postby john sefton » Thu Dec 09, 2010 9:20 am

SG418.jpg
SG418
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SG263.jpg
SG263
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SS Orduna was an ocean liner built in 1913-14 by Harland & Wolff in Belfast for the Pacific Steam Navigation Company. After two voyages she was chartered to Cunard Line. In 1921 she went to the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, then being resold to the PSNCo in 1926. Her sister ships were the RMSP Orbita and SS Orca.
She provided transatlantic passenger transport, measured approximately 15,500 gross tons, and was 550.3 ft x 67.3 ft.

First World War.
Orduna was pressed into service as an auxiliary cruiser and troop transport in the First World War running from Halifax, Canada to Liverpool with notables such as Quentin Roosevelt on board.
In January 1915 Orduna rescued the Russian crew of the sailing ship Loch Torridon, which had sprung a leak while transporting timber off the west coast of Ireland. Later in 1915, en-route for New York, Orduna was targeted by a U-boat. The torpedo failed to hit the ship, which arrived safely.
In 1918 Orduna collided with the 4,406 ton steamer Konkary, carrying a cargo of ballast from Queenstown to Trinidad. Konkary was lost in the accident.

Between the wars.
In April 1923 she was involved in another rescue, transporting the crew of the barquentine Clitha, which had been abandoned and set on fire, to England after they had been rescued by the schooner Jean Campbell.
In 1925, Dean James E. Lough of the Extra-Mural Division of the New York University chartered Orduna for the transport of 213 students to France, with lectures taking place on board.

In 1938 the Orduna was used for the third and final 'Peace Cruise', carrying 460 Scouters and Guiders, including Robert and Olave Baden-Powell, and their daughter Heather, on a cruise to Iceland, Norway, Denmark and Belgium. Orduna left Liverpool on 8 August, returning on 25 August via Dover.
Robert Baden-Powell was too ill to leave the ship during the voyage, but parties of local Scouts visited him on the ship at most of the stops, while the Scouters and Guiders on the ship took the opportunity to tour local landmarks and attend receptions. During the stop at Reykjavik on Thursday, 11 August, during which Orduna moored beside the German cruiser Emden, a party from the Scouts of Iceland brought some rock on board so that Baden-Powell could still 'set foot in Iceland'. The Orduna called at Trondheim, Norway, on 15 August, Copenhagen, Denmark on 18 August, and Belgium on Sunday 21 August, before returning to England.

Second World War
During the 1939 "Voyage of the Damned" affair, where German Jewish refugees were refused entry into Cuba, the United States and Canada, Orduna was refused permission to land 40 refugees at Havana.
With the need for military transport in the Second World War, in 1941 she was put into service by the British government as a troopship. Another task during the Second World War was that of an evacuation transport. Military transport continued until 1949.

Post-Second World War
In 1947 conditions for troops returning from Port Said in Egypt on the Orduna, said to include overcrowding and poor food, were raised with the Secretary of State for War.

Demise
Orduna was decommissioned and laid up in November 1950 and dismantled the following year in Dalmuir, Scotland.
Wikipedia
Bermuda SG418 Chile SG263
john sefton
 
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Re: Orduna I (liner)

Postby john sefton » Thu Dec 09, 2010 9:37 am

This well‑known P.S.N.C. liner was launched at Belfast in 1913. She was chartered by the Cunard company to maintain their Liverpool‑New York service when war broke out in 1914, and she remained on the service until the end of hostilities. From 1918 to 1921 she was on the P.S.N. Company's South American service. In 1921 she was transferred to the Royal Mail Line's Hamburg ‑ Southampton ‑ Cherbourg ‑ New York service, continuing on this run until 1927.


In 1923 she made the first Welsh‑speaking cruise from Liverpool to the Norwegian fjords, a chart of the voyage being placed in the Welsh National Museum at Cardiff.


At the commencement of hostilities in 1939 the Orduna was in Liverpool preparing to sail. She left two days afterwards with a full passenger list and completed her voyage without escort for most of the way. She was one of the lucky ships of the war, for despite continuous service in many seas she did not encounter enemy action either from sea, land or air.


Following the collapse of France in 1940, the Orduna was chosen as the repatriation ship and sailed from Liverpool on July 26 with a full complement of French nationals on board and was fully illuminated in accordance with the Hague Convention. In 1941 she commenced her trooping career and by the middle of 1943 the Orduna had made four voyages to the Middle East and one to Bombay, via Freetown, the Cape and Durban, including a short trip in April to Reykjavik, Iceland. After the capture of Madagascar she carried the Vichy Governor and his staff from Tamatave to Durban, while on the same voyage some 500 French naval officers and ratings from Suez were on board, proceeding to the United Kingdom to join the Free French forces.


After the recapture of Abyssinia the steamer embarked part of the West African Division (Nigerian
Regiment) at Berbera. They had been through the whole of the Abyssinian campaign, and the Orduna took them to Durban for transhipment to Lagos. Before the last stages of operations in Italy, the Orduna was engaged between Oran and Naples carrying white and coloured U.S.A. troops for the advance on Rome, and on the voyage she had on board a complete unit of coloured troops. On another occasion she had no less than thirteen nationalities on board.
In August, 1945, the Orduna was commodore vessel for the Malaya Invasion Force, and after Japan's collapse embarked Allied prisoners‑of‑war and internees at Rangoon, leaving there on September 20 for Liverpool with 1,714 of these passengers on board. She received a great ovation at her home port on arrival, a fitting climax to her war career. The prisoners‑of‑war presented a scroll to the master bearing the following inscription: "To Capt. J. Williams, officers and crew, S.S. Orduna, in recognition of a happy voyage home from the Far East, from returning British prisoners‑of war and internees. September! October, 1945."

Sea Breezes November 1946
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