VOLTAIRE 1911

Built as a battleship under yard No 1006 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France for the French Navy.
20 July 1907 laid down.
16 January 1909 launched as the VOLTAIRE one of the Danton Class.
Displacement 18.310 ton standard, 19,763 full load, dim. 144.9 x 25.8 x 9.2m. (draught)
Powered by four Parsons steam turbines, 22,500 shp., four shafts, speed 19 knots.
Armament: 2 x 2- 305mm/45 Modéle guns, 16 x 1 – 75mm/65 Modéle guns, 10 x 1 – 47 Hotchkiss guns, 2 – 450mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 681.
01 August 1911 completed.
VOLTAIRE was one of the six Danton class semi-dreadnought battleships built for the French Navy in the late 1900s. Shortly after World War I began, the ship participated in the Battle of Antivari in the Adriatic Sea and helped to sink an Austro-Hungarian protected cruiser. She spent most of the rest of the war blockading the Straits of Otranto and the Dardanelles to prevent German, Austro-Hungarian and Turkish warships from breaking out into the Mediterranean. VOLTAIRE was hit by two torpedoes fired by a German submarine in October 1918, but was not seriously damaged. After the war, she was modernized in 1923–25 and subsequently became a training ship. She was condemned in 1935 and later sold for scrap.
Design and description
Although the Danton-class battleships were a significant improvement from the preceding Liberté class, they were outclassed by the advent of the dreadnought well before they were completed. They were not well liked by the navy, although their numerous rapid-firing guns were of some use in the Mediterranean.
VOLTAIRE was 146.6 meters (481 ft 0 in) long overall and had a beam of 25.8 meters (84 ft 8 in) and a full-load draft of 9.2 meters (30 ft 2 in). She displaced 19,736 metric tons (19,424 long tons) at deep load and had a crew of 681 officers and enlisted men. The ship was powered by four Parsons steam turbines using steam generated by twenty-six Belleville boilers. The turbines were rated at 22,500 shaft horsepower (16,800 kW) and provided a top speed of around 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph). VOLTAIRE, however, reached a top speed of 20.7 knots (38.3 km/h; 23.8 mph) during her sea trials. She carried a maximum of 2,027 tonnes (1,995 long tons) of coal which allowed her to steam for 3,370 nautical miles (6,240 km; 3,880 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph).
VOLTAIRE’s main battery consisted of four 305mm/45 Modèle 1906 guns mounted in two twin gun turrets, one forward and one aft. The secondary battery consisted of twelve 240mm/50 Modèle 1902 guns in twin turrets, three on each side of the ship. A number of smaller guns were carried for defense against torpedo boats. These included sixteen 75 mm (3.0 in) L/65 guns and ten 47 mm (1.9 in) Hotchkiss guns. The ship was also armed with two submerged 450 mm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes. The ship's waterline armor belt was 270 mm (10.6 in) thick and the main battery was protected by up to 300 mm (11.8 in) of armor. The conning tower also had 300 mm thick sides.
Wartime modifications
During the war 75 mm anti-aircraft guns were installed on the roofs of the ship's two forward 240 mm gun turrets. During 1918, the mainmast was shortened to allow the ship to fly a captive kite balloon and the elevation of the 240 mm guns was increased which extended their range to 18,000 meters (20,000 yd).
Career
Construction of VOLTAIRE was begun on 26 December 1906 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée in La Seyne-sur-Mer and the ship was laid down on 20 July 1907. She was launched on 16 January 1909 and was completed on 1 August 1911. The ship was assigned to the Second Division of the 1st Squadron (escadre) of the Mediterranean Fleet when she was commissioned. The ship participated in combined fleet maneuvers between Provence and Tunisia in May–June 1913 and the subsequent naval review conducted by the President of France, Raymond Poincaré on 7 June 1913. Afterwards, VOLTAIRE joined her squadron in its tour of the Eastern Mediterranean in October–December 1913 and participated in the grand fleet exercise in the Mediterranean in May 1914.
World War I
In early August 1914, the ship cruised the Strait of Sicily in an attempt to prevent the German battlecruiser GOEBEN and the light cruiser BRESLAU from breaking out to the West. On 16 August 1914 the combined Anglo-French Fleet under Admiral Auguste Boué de Lapeyrère, including VOLTAIRE, made a sweep of the Adriatic Sea. The Allied ships encountered the Austro-Hungarian cruiser SMS ZENTA, escorted by the destroyer SMS ULAN, blockading the coast of Montenegro. There were too many ships for ZENTA to escape, so she remained behind to allow ULAN to get away and was sunk by gunfire during the Battle of Antivari off the coast of Bar, Montenegro. VOLTAIRE subsequently participated in a number of raids into the Adriatic later in the year and patrolled the Ionian Islands. From December 1914 to 1916, the ship participated in the distant blockade of the Straits of Otranto while based in Corfu. On 1 December 1916, some of her sailors, transported to Athens by her sister MIRABEAU, participated in the Allied attempt to ensure Greek acquiescence to Allied operations in Macedonia. VOLTAIRE spent part of 1917 through April 1918 based at Mudros to prevent GOEBEN from breaking out into the Mediterranean.
The ship was overhauled from May to October 1918 in Toulon. While returning to Mudros on 10 October, the ship was torpedoed by UB-48 off the island of Milos. Despite being struck by two torpedoes, she able to make temporary repairs at Milos before sailing to Bizerte for permanent repairs. VOLTAIRE was based in Toulon throughout 1919 and was modernized in 1922–25 to improve her underwater protection. The ship became a training ship in 1927 and was condemned in 1935.
She was later sold for scrap and broken up from May 1938.
Liberia 2014 $100 sg?, scott?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_battleship_Voltaire

AZZURRA III (I-10)

The Yacht Club Costra Smeralda and backed by Prince Aga Khan did have four yachts at its disposal for the 1986 Louis Vuitton Cup in Perth, Australia the AZZURRA I (I 4), AZZURRA II (I 8), AZZURRA III (I 10) and AZZURRA IV (I 11).
For the Louis Vuitton races was chosen the AZZURRA III (I-10) as the official challenger, representing the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
She was built as a 12-metre class yacht by SAI Ambrosini , Passignano, Italy for Consorzio Italiana America’s Cup 83’ (Ganni Agnelli & Karim Aga Khan), Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Vallicelli.
1986 Launched as the AZZURRA III (I-10).
Displacement? , dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2,72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.

At the Louis Vuitton Races off Freemantle in 1986 under skipper Mauro Pelaschier she reached only the 11th ranking.
1987 Sold to G. Clausen, Hamburg, Germany and renamed FRATZZ.
1994 Sold to Jurgen Rohel, Hamburg and again renamed AZZURRA III.
2014 Still sailing, same name and owner.
Solomon Islands 1986 $1 sg570a, scott573j
Source: Various internet sites. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05391.html

AZZURRA (I-4) yacht 1981

The Grenada Grenadines stamp shows the yacht AZZURRA with the year 1981, not a sail no visible, four yachts with the name AZZURRA have been built in Italy between 1982 and 1986 the first was completed in 1982 as the AZZURRA (I 4). She took part in America Cup Races in 1983, likely she is depict.
AZZURRA (I 4) was built as a 12-metre class yacht by Off. Meccaniche Ing. Mario Cobau at Pesaro, Italy for the Consorzio Sfida Italiana America’s Cup 1983 (Gianni Agnelli &Karim Aga Khan.) Representing Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Valicelli.
19 July 1982 launched as the AZZURRA (I 4)
Displacement 25.650 tons, dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2.72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.
Sail area 166.65 m².
The AZZURRA (I 4) competed in the 1983 Louis Vuitton Cup races in Newport RI, she reached the semi-finals, finished third in the semi-finals.
Used then as trial horse for the Italian yachts for the America Cup Races in 1986/87
In 1987 was she not more sailing.
2014 On display at the Centro Sportivo of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo.
More info is given on: http://www.sy-pacificwave.com/Pages/Pac ... igree.aspx

Grenada Grenadines 1987 70c sg861, scott864.
Source: Internet and http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05384.html

AUSTRALIA KA 5 yacht 1977

AUSTRALIA KA 5 was built Steve E.Ward Co., Cove Harbor, Western Australia for the America Cup Challenge ’77 Ltd. (Alan Bond), Yanchep Western Australia.
Designed by Ben Lexcen & Johan Valentijn.
February 1977 launched as the AUSTRALIA KA 5.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 19.81 x 3.71 x 2.74m. (draught), length on waterline 13.71 m.
Sail area: 160 m².

AUSTRALIA (KA-5) is an Australian 12-metre-class America's Cup racing yacht that twice challenged unsuccessfully for the America's Cup in 1977 and 1980. Designed by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn for Alan Bond, Australia failed to win a single race against the 1977 defender, COURAGEOUS (US-26), but managed to win one race against the 1980 defender, FREEDOM (US-30). Australia resides in Sydney, Australia, and is currently located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.
Design and Construction
AUSTRALIA was designed during 1976 by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn. Both men spent seven months experimenting with 1/9th scale models in the University of Delft test tank in the Netherlands.
AUSTRALIA is a conventional design and has been described as a "Courageous-style boat".It has v-shaped mid-ship sections, a low freeboard, large bustle and a low aft run finishing in a wide U-shaped transom. Its fore overhang is very narrow and round shaped in its lowest part. The cockpits are shallow, keel is thin and the ballast is placed very low. The elliptical mast is made in extruded aluminum. AUSTRALIA was approximately 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb) lighter than COURAGEOUS and it was hoped that by lowering the freeboard and taking a penalty on length, AUSTRALIA would prove faster than the US boat.
AUSTRALIA was built by Steve Ward in Perth and launched in February 1977. AUSTRALIA then sailed in sea trials against Alan Bond's 1974 challenger, SOUTHERN CROSS (KA-4), off Yanchep in Western Australia. The older boat remained a trial horse for AUSTRALIA during the 1977 America's Cup series
1977 America's Cup challenge
For the 1977 America's Cup, AUSTRALIA went to Newport and raced against the 1970 Australian challenger, GRETEL II (KA-3), the Swedish entrant, SVERIGE (S-3), and the French challenger, FRANCE (F-1), led by Baron Bich. Eventually, AUSTRALIA won the right to challenge for the Cup by defeating SVERGE 4–0.
However AUSTRALIA lost to the US defender, CCOURAGEOUS, 4–0. Ben Lexcen, who initially stayed in Australia during the challenge, went to Newport an was disappointed to find that AUSTRALIA had a poor-quality mast from SOUTHERN CROSS and that AUSTRALIA's sails were flat, heavy and of poor quality. AUSTRALIA was never really competitive and COURAGEOUS won the series easily.
1980 America's Cup challenge
Initially, Alan Bond suggested dropping AUSTRALIA and designing a new boat for the 1980 series. Ben Lexcen, however, was convinced that AUSTRALIA's hull – with a few modifications – was a good design and that its performance would improve with a new rig and sails. The hull had its keel made sharper at the bottom, and the bustle was lowered slightly and made larger to help improve the steering.
AUSTRALIA’s competitors for challenging the Americans were: SVERIGE, back for a second time; FRANCE III (F-3), a new yacht for Baron Bich, and the British challenger LIONHEART (K-18). LIONHEART was a fast boat, partly because it was fitted with a ‘bendy' mast which hooked aft several feet at its tip giving it 10 per cent extra unmeasured sail area on its main sail. In light winds, that gave the British boat a strong advantage.
Seeing the British boat's speed, the AUSTRALIA camp decided to copy the mast. The ‘bendy' rig added to AUSTRALIA’s speed and it became a very competitive boat defeating the US defender FREEDOM (US-30) in the second race of the series. However, the late adoption of the ‘bendy' mast meant that AUSTRALIA’s crew were experimenting with the newly cut sails and lacked the necessary confidence in them to win. In any case, the ‘bendy' mast was only effective in light winds. In the final two races, the wind blew hard enough to cancel out whatever advantage it gave AUSTRALIA and FREEDOM won the series convincingly 4–1.
After 1980
Following the 1980 challenge, AUSTRALIA was sold to the British "Victory" syndicate headed by Peter de Savary. Renamed ‘'TEMERAIRE, the boat became a trial-horse for VICTORY 82 (K-21) and VICTORY 83 (K-22) for the 1983 America's Cup that was ultimately won by AUSTRALIA II (KA-6)
In 1985, Australia returned to Sydney after being bought by Syd Fisher in 1985 to be the trail horse for Fisher's "East Australia America's Cup Defence" syndicate defender, STEAK AND KIDNEY (KA-14). Australia was eventually refitted as a charter boat in 2004 and was acquired by the Australia 12m Historic Trust in 2011
Today, Australia is located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.

Dominica 1987 $3 sg1055, scott1017. (The yacht in the background carries a sail No but hard to read can she be the SVERIGE (S3)?)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05360.html

COLUMBIA US 16 yacht 1958

COLUMBIA a 12-metre class yacht built by Nevins, City Island for New York Yacht Club (Sears-Cunningham Syndicate), New York.
She was built for the America’s Cup 1958 races and designed by Olin Stephens.
1958 Launched as the COLUMBIA US 16.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 20.19 x 3.61 x 2.80m. (draught), length on waterline 14.30m.
Sail area 169.55 m².

In the defender series the COLUMBIA competed against three other USA yachts during the summer of 1958 and she was the winner.
The COLUMBIA under skipper Briggs Cunningham she was the defender of the cup against the British yacht SCEPTRE.
The 1958 America Cup Race was sailed off Newport, Rhode Island from 20 September till 26 September. The COLUMBUS won all 4 races, and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
She took also part in the defender trials for the 1962, 1964 and 1967 America’s Cup competitions.
1960 Sold to Paul Shields, New York.
1964 Sold to Thomas Douglas, Newport Beach Ca.
1975 Sold to Swedish Syndicate for the America Cup, Goteborg, Sweden, she kept her name COLUMBIA.
First half of 1976 sold to Handelsbolaget Modern Boating, Goteborg.
Second half of 1976 sold to Pelle Petterson, Lars Wiglund, Stellan Westerdahl, Goteborg.
1978 Sold to Xaver Rouget-Luchaire (Societe des Regates Rochelaises, La Rochelle, France, not renamed.
1985 Sold to Bernard Pollet, Cannes, France.
1997 Sold to Paul Gardener and Bill Collins, Newport, RI, USA.
2000 Sold to Alain Hanover & Daniel Hanover, Newport RI.
2014 Restored to her old glory she is now for charter and races at Newport RI, same name and owners.

Grenada 1987 10c sg1611, scott1479.
Grenadines of Grenada 1992 $1 sg1582, scott1479
Solomon Island 1986 30c sg570a, scott?

Source: Wikipedia. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05327.html

Krill trawler transhipping to a reefer

The new 'Fisheries' stamp issue was released on 01 May 2008. The issue is the first in a series entitled “The Waters of South Georgia” and comprises four stamps and a First Day Cover.

The waters around South Georgia teem with marine life, thanks to the rich mixing of cold and warm currents at the polar front. Krill, the basic building block of the Southern Ocean’s biology, gathers in large swarms and is fed upon by larger fish, penguins and marine mammals. The deep waters around the Island are home to strange species, which only in the last few decades have become a target for fishermen.

Conserving the rich diversity and abundant fish stocks is the first objective of the Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. Protecting the seas is expensive, with Patrol Vessel costs running over £2m per annum, and research costs nearing £1m. To fund this work, the Government allows carefully controlled and responsible fishing vessels to operate annually under licence. The fees from the sale of these licences provide the majority of the territory’s revenue.

Quotas for fishing are set annually by the international body the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and take into account the size of the stock and also any other species of wildlife which depend on the fish for food to make sure that the ecosystem is not unbalanced by commercial fishing.
Source: South Georgia & and South Sandwich Islands post

The four ships have been identified as.
50p ARGOS FROYANES.
60p ROBERT M LEE.
85p The krill trawler and reefer both not identified at anchor in Cumberland Bay, South Georgia.
£1.05 Research vessel PHAROS SG

RANGER J5 yacht 1937

Built as a steel hulled J-class yacht by the Bath Iron Works, Bath for Harold S. Vanderbilt, built as a defender of the 1937 America Cup.
Designed by William Starling Burgess & Olin J. Stephens.
11 May 1937 launched as the RANGER J5. Christened by Mrs. Vanderbilt.
Displacement 166 tons, dim. 41.20 x 6.40 x 4.57m. (draught), length on waterline 26.52m.
Sail area 701.05m².

In the Preliminary Tests she won almost every race against other USA yachts and she was chosen to defend the America Cup Races at Rhode Island in 1937.
She won under skipper Harold S. Vanderbilt all four races from 31 July till 5 August against the British yacht ENDEAVOUR II and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
The rest of the summer of 1937 was she used for races and was very successful.
21 May 1941 the RANGER was sold for scrap for US$ 12,000 to the L & Z Corporation of Fall River, Mass.

Grenadines of Grenada 1992 75c sg1581, scott1478.
Solomon Islands 18c sg570a, scott
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 18&lang=en
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William And John

The full index of our ship stamp archive

William And John

Postby john sefton » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:45 pm

SG1086.jpg
SG1086
Click image to view full size
SG538.jpg
SG538
Click image to view full size
WILLIAM AND JOHN. Ship which carried settlers to the island in 1625.

The vessel depicted is not the WILLIAM AND JOHN but most probably a Dutch fluyt, a ships type which around that time was used by the Dutch merchant marine in large numbers. (see index for the details of the fluyt.)
The Dutch were calling already before 1625 at Barbados and via sources from the Dutch West India Company in Zeeland the Anglo-Dutch merchant William Courteen sent two ships to Barbados.
One of the ships was the WILLIAM AND JOHN or some sources given JOHN AND WILLIAM.
There is not any information on the ship, and the stamp design on the 1994 stamp depicts her “with a certain amount of Licence”.

Besides privateering by the Dutch, the search for salt was the mean drive for the Dutch, when they were sending out ships to the Caribbean to look for salt. They needed large quantities of salt for their fishing fleet to cure herring and other fish caught in the North Sea, and in the country for the preservation of meat
When the Dutch were under Spanish control salt could easily be obtained in Spain and Portugal, but when the ties were broken between the two countries on the end of the 16th century, other sources for salt were needed.
The Dutch found it at Punta del Araya on the coast of Venezuela.
The Spanish did not like this trade and many clashes took place there between the Dutch and Spanish ships
When in 1621 the Dutch West India Company (WIC) was formed, the outward cargo for these ships to the Caribbean and South America was all kind of merchandise while the homeward cargo was many times salt.
Around 1623 around 800 Dutch vessels were used in the trade from the Zeven Provincien to the Caribbean.

In 1625 the British Captain John Powel visited Barbados, and he took possession of the Island for England.

When he returned in the U.K. his employer William Courteen decided to send out British settlers to Barbados.
80 Settlers under the leadership of Henry Powel a brother of John left England on board two ships of which one was the WILLIAM AND JOHN.
20 February 1627 they arrived on the west coast of Barbados, were the settlers landed they named the place Jamestown after King James.

They brought with them 10 black slaves captured on the outward voyage from a Portuguese ship, and also all the equipment needed to begin a new colony.

Barbados 1975 4c sg538, scott?. 1994 $1.10 sg1086, scott883.

Source; Various web-sites. The Caribbean People by Lennox Honeychurch.

Auke Palmer.
john sefton
 
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