SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Anjou P.F.- Arctic explorer Admiral.

Peter F. Anjou (1796-1869) was from a family of French immigrants. Educated in the Marine Corps, released in 1815. Five years later he was appointed head of Ust-Yana polar expedition, which operated as part of a large expedition to study north-eastern coast of Siberia, under the leadership of Wrangell. Group of Anjou investigated Siberian Islands, studied the state of the ice in the Laptevs Sea. Composed primarily a relatively accurate map of the New Siberian Islands. The central island group of the Novosibirsk archipelago, cape and peninsula in the Sea of Japan., The cape in the sea Laptevs. It was named in his honor. In 1825-26 he participated in the description of the North and eastern coasts of the Caspian Sea and the west coast of the Aral Sea. The results of the expedition set out in "Notes of the Hydrographic Department" After returning from the Arctic served in the Navy, he participated in the liberation of Greece, in 1827 distinguished himself in the Battle of Navarino. Later he served on various ships of the Baltic Fleet. From 1844 - Rear Admiral, commander of the port of Kronstadt. In 1849 he appointed a member of the scientific committee of the sea. In 1855, promoted to vice-admiral and appointed director of the Department of Forests ship.
Russia 1996;750;FDC;SG?
Source: http://irkipedia.ru/content/anzhu_petr_fedorovich. http://www.navy.su/persons/01/anzhu.htm

CHESAPEAKE USS 1800

Built as a wooden frigate by Joshia Fox at the Gosport Naval Yard for the USS Navy.
27 March 1794 ordered.
December 1795 keel laid down.
02 December 1799 launched as the USS CHESAPEAKE, the first under that name in the USS Navy.
Tonnage 1,244 ton, dim. 46.5 (lpp) x 12.6 x 6.1m.
Armament; 29 – 18 pdr long guns, 18 – 32 pdr. carronades, 2 – 12pdr. long guns, 1 – 12pdr. carronade.
Crew 340.
22 May 1800 commissioned under command of Captain J Barron.

CHESAPEAKE sailed from Norfolk 6 June 1800 to join the squadron patrolling off the southern coast of the United States and in the West Indies during the Quasi-War with France. During this cruise, she took as prize the French privateer La JEUNE CREOLE on 1 January 1801. One of the handful of ships retained in the Navy at the close of the war, CHESAPEAKE was in ordinary at Norfolk during most of 1801, then was readied for her departure from Hampton Roads on 27 April 1802, bound for the Mediterranean as flagship for Commodore Richard V. Morris. Here she led in the blockade of Tripoli and convoyed American merchantmen until 6 April 1803, when she departed Gibraltar for America. Arriving at Washington Navy Yard 1 June, CHESAPEAKE was placed in ordinary.
As tension mounted over violations of American neutrality and the practice of impressment of American seamen by the British, CHESAPEAKE was prepared for patrol and convoy duty, and late in June 1807 stood out of Hampton Roads, passing a British squadron operating in the area to intercept French ships then at Annapolis. One of the squadron, HMS LEOPARD followed CHESAPEAKE to sea, and on 22 June, when CHESAPEAKE 's captain properly refused to allow search for British deserters, LEOPARD fired on the unready CHESAPEAKE , killing three men, wounding 18, including the captain, damaging the ship severely, and carried off four men. The frigate returned to Norfolk for repairs, and then with Captain Stephen Decatur in command, cruised off the New England coast enforcing the embargo laws.
With the outbreak of the War of 1812, for which CHESAPEAKE’s encounter with LEOPARD was one of a number of emotional preparations, CHESAPEAKE was outfitted at Boston for a lengthy Atlantic cruise. Between 13 December 1812 and 9 April 1813, she ranged from the West Indies to Africa, taking as prizes five British merchantmen, and through skilful seamanship, evading the pursuit of a British 74 gun warship.
At Boston, Captain J. Lawrence took command of CHESAPEAKE 20 May 1813, and on 1 June, put to sea to meet HMS SHANNON (38), the crack frigate whose written challenge had just missed CHESAPEAKE’s sailing. With a new untrained crew, Lawrence courageously but unwisely engaged SHANNON, and suffered the misfortune of having CHESAPEAKE’s rigging cut away in the early exchange of broadsides in such a manner that she lost maneuverability. Lawrence, himself, was mortally wounded, and was carried below. The valiant crew struggled to carry out their captain's last order, "Don't give up the ship!", but were overwhelmed. CHESAPEAKE was taken to Halifax for repairs, and later was taken into the Royal Navy. She was sold at Plymouth, England, in 1820, and broken up.
Wikipedia has more on her: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_CHESAPEAKE_(1799)
1.
Source: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
Antigua & Barbuda 2012 $2.75 sg?, scott? The HMS SHANNON is the ship in the foreground while the CHESAPEAKE is behind her.

JUNK fishing vessel

When recorded in 1924 Chinese junk “da tuo” (“Big Pull”) “Hong Kong Trawler” was the generic name given to large local fishing sailing junks in the waters around Hong Kong, Macau and Southern China with LOA (length overall) 72 – 86 feet (22 – 26.3 m) and beam upto 20 feet (6.4 m). This class includes junks ”xia jiu tuo” (in Cantonese “ha kau tuo”), ”qi bang tuo” (in Cantonese “chat pong tuo”), “zan zeng” or “heng zeng” (in Cantonese “cham chang” or “vang chang”).

Da Tuo is normally a gill-net trawler working fishing grounds where the seabed is smooth, flat sandy and rock free.

Traditionally fishermen are “tan ka” who lived onboard with their families. From October through May, the typhoon off-season, the larger junks would spend 7-10 days at sea at upto 100 nautical miles offshore working in pairs trawling a 250 foot (76 m) net..

http://www.greatmodelboat.com/hong-kong-junk-boats.htm
Hong Kong 1986 $5.00 sg524

SHANNON HMS 1806

Built as a wooden 5th Rate frigate by Josiah & Thomas Brindley, Frindsbury for the Royal Navy.
24 October 1803 ordered.
August 1804 laid down.
05 May 1806 launched as the HMS SHANNON one of the Leda Class.
Tonnage 1,065 ton burthen. Dim. 45.77 length of gundeck, 38.26 length of keel, beam 12.17, depth 3.94m.
Armament, upper deck 28 x 18pdrs, quarter deck 8 x 9pdrs; and 6 – 3pdrs.carronades, fo’c’sle 2 x 9 pdrs; and 2 x 32pdr. carronades.
Crew 284 when commissioned later increased to 300.
May 1806 commissioned under command of Captain Philip Broke.
03 August 1806 completed at Chatham.

HMS SHANNON was a 38-gun Leda-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1806 and served in the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. She won a noteworthy naval victory on 1 June 1813, during the latter conflict, when she captured the American Navy's USS CHESAPEAKE in a singularly bloody battle.
Career
Josiah and Thomas Brindley built SHANNON at Frindsbury in Kent and launched her on 5 May 1806. She spent her first seven years under the command of Captain Philip Broke, who was transferred from DRUID and took command of SHANNON in June that year.
Home waters
SHANNON was quickly put into service. She formed part of a squadron under Commodore Owen that was patrolling off the French port of Boulogne. On 8 October she took part in the bombardment of the town using Congreve rockets.
Her next task was sailing in 1807 with MELEAGER to protect the whale fishery off Greenland. Despite encountering ice on 7 May 1807, they were able to push through, reaching the southern part of Spitsbergen on 17 June. There the two ships surveyed the Bay of Magdalena, at a latitude of 80°N. They eventually reached a latitude of 80° 6' N before the ice stopped them. They then turned westwards and reached the coast of Greenland on 23 July. The island of Shannon is named after the ship. SHANNON spent the early autumn cruising from Shetland. She then left, returning to Yarmouth by the end of September, where she cruised off the Downs. She put into Spithead on 28 September to refit.
By the end of 1807, France had invaded Portugal, and SHANNON joined Sir Samuel Hood's expedition against Madeira. The British took the island without firing a shot. Captain Broke then escorted the transports that had accompanied the fleet back to England, where they arrived on 7 February 1808. SHANNON put into Plymouth before returning to patrolling in the Channel.
On 20 July SHANNON was in company with SURINAM and ÉCLAIR when they captured COMET. Then on 21 August, SHANNON was in company with SURINAM and MARTIAL when they captured ESPOIR.
In November 1808, SHANNON took the French frigate THÉTIS in tow. AMETHYST had shortly before captured THÉTIS, which later entered service as HMS BRUNE.
SHANNON spent 1809 with the Channel Fleet and on 27 January captured the French 14-gun privateer cutter POMMEREUIL Broke sent the prize into Plymouth.
On 1 June 1811, SHANNON returned to Plymouth and was put into the dock where her hull was re-coppered. After this was completed, she sailed for Portsmouth to complete her refitting and resupplying in preparation for being assigned to foreign service.
The American coast
Broke and SHANNON were ordered to sail for North America as tensions between Britain and the United States escalated in the run-up to what would become the War of 1812. SHANNON sailed from Portsmouth and arrived in Halifax on 24 September 1811 after a journey of 45 days.
On 5 July 1812 Broke took command of a squadron consisting of SHANNON, AFRICA, BELVIDERA, AEOLUS and later GUERRIERE. Vice-Admiral Herbert Sawyer then ordered him to carry out a blockade of American ports.
Broke's first success came on 16 July when he captured the 16-gun American brig NAUTILUS s off Sandy Hook. NAUTILUS had been on a cruise from New York.
Later in the evening, the squadron spotted and gave chase to USS CONSTITUTION as she sailed from Chesapeake Bay to New York. The chase lasted some 65 hours, during which both pursued and pursuers had to tow and warp. BELVIDERA eventually managed to come within gunshot of CONSTITUTION on the afternoon of 17 July, but a lucky breeze blew up, and CONSTITUTION's clean bottom allowed her to make good her escape.
SHANNON's next duty was to meet a convoy homebound from Jamaica. An American squadron under Commodore John Rodgers had sailed to intercept it. SHANNON ensured the convoy safely passed the Great Banks, before she returned to the American coast. She put into Halifax on 20 September to take on provisions. Sir John Warren arrived while she was in port, and took up the post of Commander in Chief of the North America and West Indies Station. He then despatched SHANNON with the schooner BREAM to rescue the crew and offload the money being carried by the frigate HMS BARBADOES, which had been wrecked on Sable Island.[4] While carrying out this mission, SHANNON encountered and subsequently captured an enemy privateer schooner, Wily REYNARD on 11 October, that she took back to Halifax with her.
On 31 October, while SHANNON was cruising with TENEDOS, NYMPHE and CURLEW, Broke captured the American privateer brig THORN. THORN was armed with eighteen long 9-pounder guns and had a crew of 140 men. She was three weeks out of Marblehead on her first cruise. Sent to Halifax with a prize crew, THORN was subsequently purchased and renamed as the Nova Scotia privateer brig SIR JOHN SHERBROOKE.
Sir John Warren was at Bermuda during the winter of 1812, and left Broke in command of the Royal Navy squadrons operating on the coasts of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and New England. In December Broke took the SHANNON and escorted a homebound convoy half way across the Atlantic, returning to North America by sailing round the Azores. In 1813, Captain Oliver arrived on the station aboard the 74-gun third rate VALIANT, and took command from Captain Broke. Broke continued to deploy with his squadron until SHANNON and TENEDOS became separated from them in a gale. They decided to steer for Boston, reaching the port on 2 April. Having observed the activity in the port, they returned to their squadron and reported the presence of the American frigates CONGRESS, PRESIDENT and CONSTITUTION. In their absence, CHESAPEAKE had entered the harbour through the eastern channel.
Captain Capel aboard HOGUE ordered SHANNON and TENEDOS to watch the port from close inshore, while the rest of the squadron cruised in the offing. On 16 May SHANNON and TENEDOS chased a large armed ship under American colours, and forced her to run aground near Cape Ann Town. SHANNON anchored close to the grounded ship and fired a few shots to disperse a number of militiamen who were assembling. Lieutenant George Watt of SHANNON then managed to bring the ship off the shore without loss. She was the French corvette-built privateer INVINCIBLE, of 16 guns, originally named INVINCIBLE NAPOLEON. HMS MUTINE had captured INVINCIBLE NAPOLEON in the Bay of Biscay but the American privateer ALEXANDER had retaken her. A prize crew from SHANNON sailed INVINCIBLE for Halifax but the American privateer TEAZER captured her again and sent her into Portland, Maine.
On 25 March SHANNON took on stores of water and provisions from TENEDOS, which was then detached, with orders to rejoin the SHANNON on 14 June.
Fighting the CHESAPEAKE
Issuing a challenge
During his long period in command of SHANNON, Broke had drilled his crew to an extremely high standard of naval gunnery.
"The weekly routine at sea was for the watch on deck to be exercised at the great guns on Monday and Tuesday forenoons, and in the afternoons the first division of the watch was exercised at small arms. Wednesday and Thursday forenoons saw the watch on deck at the carronades, and in the afternoons the second division of the watch at small...

MARINE PROTECTED AREA

The Marine Protected Area of South Georgia & Sandwich Islands was instituted on February 23, 2012, covering a total of 20,431 square kilometres of the Southern Ocean, including all the shelf seas (<200m deep). All bottom fishing, apart from the certain types of long-line toothfish fishery (75p stamp) is banned throughout the Protected Area

65p ~ 'Surveillance'. Fisheries Protection Vessel Pharos SG, and king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9161&p=9326&hilit=pharos#p9326 65p ~ 'Tourism'. Visiting cruise ship and elephant seals, not any information or details on the cruise ship.
75p ~ 'Fisheries'. Fishing boats long-line fishing for Patagonian toothfish (permitted only between 700m and 2000m) viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15589
75p ~ 'Scientific Monitoring'. Grey-headed albatross chick on a scale
£1 ~ 'Pelagic Abundance'. Antarctic krill, lantern fish, and squid
£1.20 ~ 'Benthic Diversity'. Array of benthic fauna, including kelp, sea stars, sea anemone

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2012. Sg?
Source: South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2012

handline fishing sampan

This stamp shows us a sampan used as a handline fishing vessel, details of a sampan you can find in the index, otherwise I have not any detail on this vessel.

Handline fishing, or handlining, is a fishing technique where a single fishing line is held in the hands. It is not be confused with handfishing. One or more fishing lures or baited hooks are attached to the line. A hook, fishing lure, or a fishing jig and many times a weight and/or a fishing float can be attached to the line. Handlining is among the oldest forms of fishing and is commonly practiced throughout the world today.
The fishing bait can be still fished, trolled or jigged up and down in a series of short movements. Often handling is done close to the bottom of the body of water but can also be done near or on the surface.

Salt Water Handlining
Ocean handlining is often used to catch groundfish and squid but other species are sometimes caught, including pelagic fish. Sea handlining a good way to catch larger oceanic fish.

Freshwater Handlining
Handlining is also used for catching fresh water fish. Panfish, walleyes, and other freshwater game fish can be caught using handlining fishing techniques. Handlining can be practiced from the shore or from a fishing boat. Walleye anglers practice handlining over moderately deep water in a drifting boat. Handlining is also practiced by ice fishing anglers.

Handlining Techniques
A jigging motion can be used to attract fish which are normally caught while trying to strike the lure but they can also be snagged by the hooks as they investigate the jigged lure. The lure can also be fished motionless and the angler feels for the bait to be picked up by a fish and then sets the hook after waiting for the fish to fully take the bait. After a strike occurs the hook is set and then the fish is hauled in and the caught fish is removed.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handline_fishing
Hong Kong 1986 50c sg521, scott?
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William And John

The full index of our ship stamp archive

William And John

Postby john sefton » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:45 pm

SG1086.jpg
SG1086
Click image to view full size
SG538.jpg
SG538
Click image to view full size
WILLIAM AND JOHN. Ship which carried settlers to the island in 1625.

The vessel depicted is not the WILLIAM AND JOHN but most probably a Dutch fluyt, a ships type which around that time was used by the Dutch merchant marine in large numbers. (see index for the details of the fluyt.)
The Dutch were calling already before 1625 at Barbados and via sources from the Dutch West India Company in Zeeland the Anglo-Dutch merchant William Courteen sent two ships to Barbados.
One of the ships was the WILLIAM AND JOHN or some sources given JOHN AND WILLIAM.
There is not any information on the ship, and the stamp design on the 1994 stamp depicts her “with a certain amount of Licence”.

Besides privateering by the Dutch, the search for salt was the mean drive for the Dutch, when they were sending out ships to the Caribbean to look for salt. They needed large quantities of salt for their fishing fleet to cure herring and other fish caught in the North Sea, and in the country for the preservation of meat
When the Dutch were under Spanish control salt could easily be obtained in Spain and Portugal, but when the ties were broken between the two countries on the end of the 16th century, other sources for salt were needed.
The Dutch found it at Punta del Araya on the coast of Venezuela.
The Spanish did not like this trade and many clashes took place there between the Dutch and Spanish ships
When in 1621 the Dutch West India Company (WIC) was formed, the outward cargo for these ships to the Caribbean and South America was all kind of merchandise while the homeward cargo was many times salt.
Around 1623 around 800 Dutch vessels were used in the trade from the Zeven Provincien to the Caribbean.

In 1625 the British Captain John Powel visited Barbados, and he took possession of the Island for England.

When he returned in the U.K. his employer William Courteen decided to send out British settlers to Barbados.
80 Settlers under the leadership of Henry Powel a brother of John left England on board two ships of which one was the WILLIAM AND JOHN.
20 February 1627 they arrived on the west coast of Barbados, were the settlers landed they named the place Jamestown after King James.

They brought with them 10 black slaves captured on the outward voyage from a Portuguese ship, and also all the equipment needed to begin a new colony.

Barbados 1975 4c sg538, scott?. 1994 $1.10 sg1086, scott883.

Source; Various web-sites. The Caribbean People by Lennox Honeychurch.

Auke Palmer.
john sefton
 
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