SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

RINALDO HMS 1901

Built as a steel sloop under yard No 636 by Laird Bross, Birkenhead for the Royal Navy.
08 November 1898 laid down.
29 May 1900 launched as the HMS RINALDO one of the Condor-class.
Displacement 980 ton, dim. 62 x 9.9 x 3.51m draught, length bpp. 55 m.
Powered by 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 1,400 hp, twin shafts, speed 13 knots.
Range 3,000 mile by a speed of 10 knots. Bunker capacity 160 ton coal.
First barque rigged later altered to Barquentine and in the end complete removed.
Armament: 6 – QF 4 inch, 4 – QF 3pdr guns and 1 MG.
Crew 120-130.
26 November 1901 commissioned.

First used in South East Asia.
August 1904 she was given medical assistance to Brunei during an outbreak of smallpox there.
1914 Was she tender and training ship to HMS VIVID, Devonport Royal Naval Reserve.
When First World War broke out patrols along the Belgium Coast.
1915 In service on West, South and East Africa till May 1919.
07 May 1919 arrived at Plymouth from Africa.
? Decommissioned.
21 October 1921 sold to W. Thomas, Anglesey for scrapping.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
Sources: ships of the Royal Navy by J.J. Colledge. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Wikipedia. http://www.naval-history.net/OWShips-WW ... inaldo.htm

POLYNESIAN VOYAGE CANOE

The stamp has the inscription “The Polynesians the earliest of the Pacific explores”. And shows us a double hulled dug-out voyage canoe.
The Polynesian primary voyage craft was the double canoe made of two hulls connected by lashing crossbeams. The two hulls gave this craft stability and the capacity to carry heavy loads of migrating families and all their supplies and equipment, while a central platform laid over the crossbeams provided the needed working, living and storage space. Sails made of matting drove this ancient forerunner of the modern catamaran swiftly trough the seas, and long steering paddles enabled Polynesian mariners to keep it sailing on course.
A medium-size voyage canoe with a length of 50 to 60 feet could accommodate two dozen or so migrants, their food supplies, livestock and planting materials.

Grenada 1991 25c sg2224, scott1953.
Source: http://www.pbs.org/wayfinders/polynesian2.html

STONE FISHING

Stone fishing is a centuries-old tradition in Tahiti that is still occasionally practiced today. In the past, this particular method of fishing allowed small islands to catch enough fish to feed everyone in the community. Now, some of the islands still perform the ritual during grand occasions as a way to celebrate the tradition and invite everyone to partake in the feast that follows.
In French, the technique is called “la pêche aux cailloux.” In Tahitian, it’s known as “te tautai taora ofa’i” (tautai means “fishing instrument,” taora means “thrown,” and ofa’i is the Tahitian word for “stone”).

How Does it Work?
Stone fishing is similar to a cattle drive except the animals being “herded” are underneath the water. Powered by canoes, the locals start by beating the surface of the lagoon with heavy stones tied to ropes made of coconut fiber. This creates a frenzy that frightens the fish, coercing them toward the shore.
Once in shallow water, the canoes form a circle and drop a long line of coconut leaves around the perimeter. With a physical barrier in place, the fish are contained and therefore much easier to catch. Traditionally, the fish were collected in woven baskets made from coconut palms; but today, the fish are also sometimes speared.
The Island of Maupiti
Maupiti, a small island located west of Bora Bora, is home to approximately 1,200 inhabitants. Once every ten years, the entire population of the island takes part in a traditional stone fishing event with over 200 canoes on the water. Check out this video from the event in 2000. Although the narrative is in French, it will give you a great idea of what stone fishing is like.
The island’s most recent stone fishing celebration was the conclusion of a South Pacific UNESCO conference on sustainable development. Afterward, all the fish were released except for one caught by French Senator Richard Tuheiava, a Maupiti native.

French Polynesia 1991 25f/62f sg621/23, scott571/573.
Downloaded from: https://blog.tahiti.com/2012/07/17/gone ... ian-style/ b

NIGHT HAWK HMT

Built as a steam trawler under yard no 645 by Cochrane & Sons, Selby for Pioneer Steam Fishing Co. Ltd., Grimsby.
14 August 1915 launched as the NIGHT HAWK.
Tonnage 307 gross, 150 net, dim. 40.23 x 7.31 x 3.90m.
Powered by one 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine manufactured by C. D. Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull, 89 nhp, speed ?
January 1916 completed.

History
14.8.1915: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.645) for The Pioneer Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby as NIGHT HAWK.
1.1.1916: Registered at Grimsby (GY822).
3.1.1916: Completed (Alick (Alec) Black, manager).
2.1916: Sold to The Grimsby Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (George E. J. Moody, manager).
3.1916: Requisitioned for war service as a minesweeper (1-6pdr HA) (Ad.No.1936). Employed on escort duties. Based Devonport.
By 12.3.1919: Returned to owner at Grimsby.
1926: Sir George E. J. Moody appointed manager.
7.2.1934: On an Icelandic trip off Isafjord sustained damage after striking an ice flow.
1.1939: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, manager).
1.6.1940: Requisitioned for war service as an auxiliary patrol vessel (P.No.FY.1858) (Hire rate £86.19.8d/month).
10.1940: Fitted out as a minesweeper. Based Plymouth with M/S Group 76.
8.1941: Sold to North Star Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Aberdeen.
22.9.1941: Grimsby registry closed.
25.9.1941: Registered at Aberdeen (A517).
1944: Employed on auxiliary patrol duties.
1944: Sold to Parkholme Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood (Harvey Wilfred Wilson, Grimsby, manager). Aberdeen registry closed. Registered at Grimsby (GY15).
1945: Sold to Milford Fisheries Ltd, Milford Haven (Owen W. Limbrick, manager).
8.1946: Returned to owner.
24.8.1948: Landed at Fleetwood (Skipper Arthur Harvey) after nine day trip on herring, 1,350 boxes grossed £2,250.
6.1954: Laid up at Milford due to NCB further increase in price of bunker coal.
29.6.1956: Alongside in Milford. Two men scalded by steam when boiler door joint blew.
2.1959: Sold to Jacques Bakker en Zonen, Bruges for breaking up.
25.2.1959: Last landing at Milford.
28.2.1959: Sailed Milford for Zeebruges.
2.3.1959: Delivered Bruges, and broken up by J. Bakker & Zonen at Zelzate, Belgium, at that time she carried still the name NIGHT HAWK.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
http://www.fleetwood-trawlers.info/inde ... hawk-gy15/ http://www.llangibby.eclipse.co.uk/milf ... t_hawk.htm

Padi.Bangladesh

Padi is used for transportation of red clay for pottery in the Barisal area. Heavy block ends, both tall and truncat¬ed on top. Very low freeboard amidships. Covered area over most of the hull. Quarter rudder. Mast stepped in forward third. Crew of 2. Length ca. 13m.

Bangladesh2013;100,0; Ms.SG? Source: A Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra.

Panshi Bangladesh/India

Water-taxi, fishing boat, ferryboat, and produce carrier of the Ganges River and Delta. Carvel planking fastened with staples; sides teak, bottom ironwood; rounded hull without keel. Long, overhanging spoon bow and stern formed from heavy, squared stem and sternpost; bow low, stern higher and broader. Generally undecked except at the ends. Those carrying jute and rice have a large, built-up house; cargo area lined with tin sheets; sides and roof of bamboo. Passenger panshis have a cabin with sides of wood or tin; a large type may be called a kuthir-pansi. Steered with either an oar or tall, balanced rudder; steering platform built above the cabin. Rowed by 6 oarsmen seated forward,poled,or sailed, setting 1-2 square sails. Average 5-6 in crew: Reported lengths 6-20m; West Bengal fishing panshi length 8.2m, beam 2.28m, depth 0.9m; shallow draft. The Pabna panshi is a long, narrow boat used in local: boat races.

Bangladesh2013;100,0; Ms.SG? Source: A Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra.
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William And John

The full index of our ship stamp archive

William And John

Postby john sefton » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:45 pm

SG1086.jpg
SG1086
Click image to view full size
SG538.jpg
SG538
Click image to view full size
WILLIAM AND JOHN. Ship which carried settlers to the island in 1625.

The vessel depicted is not the WILLIAM AND JOHN but most probably a Dutch fluyt, a ships type which around that time was used by the Dutch merchant marine in large numbers. (see index for the details of the fluyt.)
The Dutch were calling already before 1625 at Barbados and via sources from the Dutch West India Company in Zeeland the Anglo-Dutch merchant William Courteen sent two ships to Barbados.
One of the ships was the WILLIAM AND JOHN or some sources given JOHN AND WILLIAM.
There is not any information on the ship, and the stamp design on the 1994 stamp depicts her “with a certain amount of Licence”.

Besides privateering by the Dutch, the search for salt was the mean drive for the Dutch, when they were sending out ships to the Caribbean to look for salt. They needed large quantities of salt for their fishing fleet to cure herring and other fish caught in the North Sea, and in the country for the preservation of meat
When the Dutch were under Spanish control salt could easily be obtained in Spain and Portugal, but when the ties were broken between the two countries on the end of the 16th century, other sources for salt were needed.
The Dutch found it at Punta del Araya on the coast of Venezuela.
The Spanish did not like this trade and many clashes took place there between the Dutch and Spanish ships
When in 1621 the Dutch West India Company (WIC) was formed, the outward cargo for these ships to the Caribbean and South America was all kind of merchandise while the homeward cargo was many times salt.
Around 1623 around 800 Dutch vessels were used in the trade from the Zeven Provincien to the Caribbean.

In 1625 the British Captain John Powel visited Barbados, and he took possession of the Island for England.

When he returned in the U.K. his employer William Courteen decided to send out British settlers to Barbados.
80 Settlers under the leadership of Henry Powel a brother of John left England on board two ships of which one was the WILLIAM AND JOHN.
20 February 1627 they arrived on the west coast of Barbados, were the settlers landed they named the place Jamestown after King James.

They brought with them 10 black slaves captured on the outward voyage from a Portuguese ship, and also all the equipment needed to begin a new colony.

Barbados 1975 4c sg538, scott?. 1994 $1.10 sg1086, scott883.

Source; Various web-sites. The Caribbean People by Lennox Honeychurch.

Auke Palmer.
john sefton
 
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