SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

NIKOLAI VASILICVICH GOGUL

Guinea Bissau issued a set of stamps with inland steamships. Guinea Bissau is a country which supplies us with an avalanche of stamps each year.

Built in 1911 in Nizhny-Novgorod for service on the Northern Dvina River.
Length : 110 m, breadth 14 m, draught 1.4 m
Engines : Triple expansion with cylinders of 38, 61 and 110 cm and stroke of 110 cm and generating 380 hp and a normal top speed of 18 km/hour.
Rarely in use but is available for charter and in recent years has been chartered for cruises generally of 2-3 nights by a local travel agency. In 2010/11 she was under internal renovation costing 40 million roubles and returned to service in 2012 offering a 7-night river tour in June and a three-night trip in July from Archangelsk for the Pomor Tours company.
2018 In service. She is better known as N.V. GOGUL.

http://www.paddlesteamers.info/PaddleSteamerList.htm
Guinea Bissau 2009 600 FCFA sg?, scott?

PHILIPPE D'AUVERGNE

Jersey issued 1989 in a second set of stamps in the adventures of Captain Philippe ‘Auvergne, of the 6 stamps have two a maritime theme, the 30p and 32p.

The 30p stamp shows Mont Orgueil where D’Auvergne had his headquarters, with most probably a gun-boat and rowboat in the foreground leaving for a mission.

By 1795 much had happened in the Revolution and Captain Philippe D’Auvergne. Not having adopted him as promised when pressed in 1791 to settle the Bouillon succession the Duke nevertheless nominated Philippe D’Auvergne, the Assembly appointed him Prince-Successor and in February 1792 King George II of England gave him permission to accept in July, however with Louis XVI’s acceptance of the National Assembly’s new Constitution a worried Europe apposed the Revolution, the Jacobins rallied France and imprisoned the King and with his execution in January 1793 France was again at war with England. D’Auvergne appointed commander of the British Naval Squadron to protect Jersey against invasion attacks French shipping and gather intelligence moves his headquarters in the castle of Mont Orgueil on the islands east coast.

Himself Captain of the old HMS NONSUCH (1774) a ship-of-the line converted to a floating battery, with an armament as a floating battery of 20 – 68 pdr. carronades and 26 – 24 pdr. guns. D’Auvergne had also the grand-sounding gunboats LION. SURPRISE, BULLDOG, TIGER, EAGLE and REPULSE in his flotilla but such was their unseaworthy condition after 10 year of peace that he got rid of all within three months. Amongst replacements were the BRAVO, PLUMPER, SEAFLOWER and armed cutters and lugers, the best known being DAPHNE, ARISTOCRAT and ROYALIST. His duties were to guard the Channel Islands, to obtain early information from France of the enemy’s hostile movements, to establish and maintain links with the insurgents in Brittany and Normandy, and to succour French refugees.
of Church lands Many of the latter were priest and laymen expelled from France because of the Assembly’s decree following the takeover by the State, that the Bishops (now cut from 135 to 83 under the Civil Constitution of the Clergy) should be elected by their dioceses and the Priest by their perishes and all taken an oath to the constitution. The majority refused, and their banishment fuelled resistance movements in the North West of France. One of the more active refugees was the young François Rene Chateaubriand, later to achieve fame as an author, who told how Monsieur de Bouillon. D’Auvergne persuaded him not to cross to Brittany to mount ineffective resistance in caves and forests but to go to England and offer himself for more influential service.


The Jersey stamp issued in 1998 of 30p stamp shows us
32p: A ships boat landing with supplies somewhere on the French coast for the Chouans rebels
1798 Sees Captain D’Auvergne in command of the Jersey Naval Station actively engaged in Jersey’s maritime defence and attacks on French shipping in the Bay of St Malo but his greatest contribution is as “spymaster” for the English, gathering vital information and landing forged assignats or currency notes, arms, ammunition and Royalist Officers to aid the counter revolutionary groups in Normandy and Brittany. With over thousand men in his Jersey command and care of thousands of French Royalists refugees and Catholic clergy expelled from France, he has a tremendous task, Having seen the failure of the Vendée insurrections and the Royalist expedition to Quiberon he concentrate his support on the many smaller, highly effective Chouans rebels insurgent activities.

:) Source: Taken from the booklet, Jersey Post.
Jersey 1982 30p and 32p sg 504 and 505, scott 519 and 520.

LANDING CRAFT and SUPPLY BARGE (USS NAVY)

A few stamps shows us landing craft used during the landing at Tulagi on 07 August 1942. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... 3Tanambogo

On this small landing craft I have not any details, but most probably launched from troop-transport ships used during the landing.

The 1992 stamp issued by the Solomon Islands shows on the 80c a loaded supply barge on her way to the beach.

Solomon Islands 1992 30c sg734, scott 727a, 80c sg 742, scott 728e. 2005 $2.50 sg?, scott?
Grenada 1990 45c sg 2111, scott 1167.

QUINCY USS (CA-39)

Built as a cruiser under yard No 1449 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation’s Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts for the USA Navy.
15 November 1933 keel laid down.
19 June 1935 launched as the USS QUINCY (CA-39), one of the New Orleans class.
Displacement 10.299 ton standard, 12,500 ton full load. Dim. 179.2 x 18.8 x 7.16m (maximum draught), length bpp. 176.2m.
Powered by four Parsons reduction steam turbines, 107,000 shp, 80.000 kW, four shafts, speed 32.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 10.000 mile.
Armament: 9 – 8 inch guns, 8 – 5 inch AA guns, 2 – 3 pdr. saluting guns, 8 - 0.50 inch MG.
Carried four float-planes.
Crew 103 officers and 763 enlisted.
09 June 1936 commissioned.

QUINCY (CA-39) was laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., QUINCY, Mass., 15 November 1933; launched 19 June 1935; sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan,. and commissioned at Boston 9 June 1936, Capt. William Faulkner Amsden in command.
Soon after being assigned to Cruiser Division 8 Atlantic Fleet, QUINCY was ordered to Mediterranean waters 20 July 1936 to protect American interests in Spain during the height of the Spanish Civil War. QUINCY passed through the Straits of Gibraltar 26 July and arrived at Malaga, Spain, 27 July to assume her duties. While in Spanish waters she operated with an international rescue fleet that included the German pocket-battleships DEUTSCHLAND ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE and ADMIRAL SCHEER, QUINCY evacuated 490 refugees to Marseilles and Villefranche, France, before being relieved by RALEIGH 27 September.
QUINCY returned to the Boston Navy Yard 5 October for refit preparatory to final acceptance trials which were held 15-18 March 1937. She got underway for the Pacific 12 April to join Cruiser Division 7, transited the Panama Canal 23-27 April and arrived at Pearl Harbor 10 May.
QUINCY sortied with Cruiser Divisions Pacific Fleet 20 May on a tactical exercise which was the first of many such maneuvers that she participated in during 1937 and 1938. From 15 March-28 April, she engaged in important battle practice off Hawaii with the Pacific Fleet in Fleet Problem XIX. After an overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, QUINCY resumed tactical operations with her division off San Clemente, Calif. until her redeployment to the Atlantic 4 January 1939.
QUINCY transited the Panama Canal 13 January bound for Guantanamo Bay where she engaged in gunnery practice and amphibious exercises. She also took part in Fleet Problem XX with the Atlantic Fleet 13-26 February. QUINCY later made a South American good will tour 10 April-12 June, and upon returning to Norfolk, embarked reservists for three training cruises 9 July-24 August. She spent the remainder of 1939 on patrol in the North Atlantic due to the outbreak of World War II.
After overhaul at Norfolk until 4 May 1940, QUINCY again visited Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina, returning to Norfolk 22 September. She completed three more reserve training cruises 1 October-20 December.
QUINCY was occupied in Atlantic Fleet maneuvers and landing force exercises off Culebra Island, P.R. 3 February-1 April 1941. With the growth of hostilities in Europe, she was ordered to Task Group 2 and operated with WASP in the mid-Atlantic preserving U.S. neutrality 26 April-6 June. Later she operated with YORKTOWN and Task Group 28 until sailing for home 14 July.
On 28 July 1941 QUINCY sailed with Task Group 16 for Iceland on neutrality duty which included a patrol in the Denmark Straits 21-24 September. She returned to Newfoundland with a convoy 31 October. QUINCY then proceeded to Capetown, South Africa, via Trinidad, where she met a convoy which she escorted back to Trinidad 29 December 1941.
QUINCY returned 2.5 January 1942 to Icelandic waters on convoy duty with Task Force 15 and made a patrol in the Denmark Straits 8-11 March. She departed 14 March for the U.S. and an overhaul at the New York Navy Yard that lasted until the end of May.
QUINCY sailed for San Diego 5 June via the Panama Canal and arrived 19 June. She was then assigned to Task Force 18 as the flagship of Rear Admiral Norman R. Scott, Commander Cruisers.
QUINCY got underway for the South Pacific in July with other vessels assembling for the invasion of Guadalcanal.
Prior to the Marine assault on Guadalcanal 7 August, QUINCY destroyed several Japanese installations and an oil depot during her bombardment of Lunga Point. She later provided close fire support for the Marines during the landing.
While on patrol in the channel between Florida Island and Savo Island, in the early hours of 9 August 1942 QUINCY was attacked by a large Japanese naval force and sank after sustaining many direct hits with all guns out of action, which left 370 men dead and 167 wounded. She sank, bow first, at 02:38, being the first ship sunk in the area which was later known as Ironbottom Sound.
Rediscovery
QUINCY's wreck was discovered and explored by Robert Ballard and his crew in July and August of 1992.[ QUINCY sits upright in roughly 2,000 feet (610 m) of water. Her bow is missing forward of her number 1 turret, both forward turrets are trained to starboard, with turret 1 featuring a jammed gun, and one of turret 2's guns burst. Of the superstructure, the bridge is heavily damaged but intact, both funnels are missing, and the float plane hanger completely collapsed. QUINCY's stern is bent upwards aft of the number 3 turret, and heavily damaged by implosions.
Awards
QUINCY earned one battle star during World War II.

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/h ... CY-ii.html and Wikipedia.
Solomon Islands 1992 80c sg 740, scott 728c

MARE research vessel

Estonia issued in 2018 one stamp for the 50 year in service of the research vessel MARE.
The Estonia post gives by the stamp the following:
About 50 Years of the Research Vessel MARE of the Estonian Maritime Museum
The motor ship MARE is the first and hitherto only Estonian marine archaeological exploratory ship. The ship was built in 1968 in Mari El Republic, in the Zvenigovo shipyard as a MSTB-type fish trawler. Until 1982, the trawler was in use in the fishermen kolkhoz Pärnu Kalur. In 1982, the Estonian Maritime Museum acquired the motor ship MSTB-303 no longer needed by the fishermen and modified it in Miiduranna shipyard for submarine exploration purposes. It returned to service under the new name MARE and was used by the submarine archaeology club Vikaar. The ship turned out to be extremely suitable for submarine exploration. It has found and explored hundreds of sunken ships from World War I and II as well as found many historic ship wrecks dating back hundreds of years, the oldest of which is the “Maasilinna ship” from mid-16 century.
The now retired captain of the meritorious ship was Vello Mäss, a well-known scientist and submarine archaeologist.
https://www.wopa-plus.com/en/stamps/product/&pgid=43889
Built as a fishing vessel type MSTB by Zvenigovo yard, USSR for Kolkhoz Pärnur Kalur at Pärnur, USSR,
Launched as the MSTB 303.
Tonnage 50 ton, dim. 18.5 x 4.2 x 1.7m.
Powered by a Valmet diesel engine 612 DSIM, 310 hp, speed 8 knots.
Crew 3
1968 Delivered to owner, under Russian flag and registry.

Used for gillnet fishing in the Baltic.
1983 Sold to Eesti Meremuuseum, Tallinn, USSR and renamed MARE.
1992 Owned by the Estonian Government, Tallinn, Estonia and managed by Eesti Meremuuseum.
2018 Same name and owner, it will be the last summer season that the MARE will be used at sea, this fall she will be moored along the quay of the Eesti Meremuuseum and will be open for the public.

Source: Wikipedia and internet sites.
Estonia 2018 0.65 Euro, sg?, scott?

Sucevita Monastery

In 1585 the monastery of Sucevitsa was built, the outer walls of which were also decorated with frescoes. Like other monasteries, Sucevitsa combines elements of Byzantine and Gothic architecture, and frescoes use stories from the Old and New Testaments. Probably, it was the last monastery, decorated in this way. Frescoes date from the beginning of the 17th century. Sucevitsa differs from other monasteries in that here not only monks lived, but also knew. In 1969, the Romanian Post issued a stamp depicting a medieval carraсk ship depicted on a fresco of a monastery. For more details about carrack see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10705

Romania 1969;60b;SG3689. Source: https://omj.ru/culture/design/monastyri ... a-snaruzhi.
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GALLEON

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GALLEON

Postby aukepalmhof » Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:25 am

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A galleon was a large, multi-decked sailing ship used primarily by European states from the 16th to 18th centuries. Whether used for war or commerce, they were generally armed with the demi-culverin type of cannon.
The term "galleon" had been in use long before the ship type that it now technically refers to came into existence. Just like the term "frigate", the term "galleon" was originally applied to certain types of war galleys in the Middle Ages. The Annali Genovesi mentions galleons of 80, 64 and 60 oars used for speed in battle and on missions of exploration, in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. It is very likely that the galleons and galliots mentioned in the accounts of the crusades were, in fact, the same vessels. Later, when the term started to be applied to sail only vessels, it simply meant, like the term "man of war", a powerfully fitted out war vessel. Thus, some of the early ocean going "galleons" were designated galleons because of their use and not because of their design.
The galleon was an ocean going ship type which evolved from the carrack in the second half of 16th century. A lowering of the forecastle and elongation of the hull gave galleons an unprecedented level of stability in the water, and reduced wind resistance at the front, leading to a faster, more maneuverable vessel. The galleon differed from the older types primarily by being longer, lower and narrower, with a square tuck stern instead of a round tuck, and by having a snout or head projecting forward from the bows below the level of the forecastle. In Portugal at least, carracks were usually very large ships for their time (often over 1000 tons), while galleons were mostly under 500 tons, although the Manila galleons were to reach up to 2000 tons. With the introduction of the galleon in Portuguese India Armadas over the course of the late 1520s and the 1530s, carracks gradually began to be less armed and became almost exclusively cargo ships (which is why the Portuguese Carracks were pushed to such large sizes), leaving any fighting to be done to the galleons. One of the largest and most famous of Portuguese galleons was the SAO JOAO BAPTISTA (nicknamed Botafogo, 'spitfire'), a 1,000-ton galleon built in 1534, said to have carried 366 guns. Carracks also tended to be lightly armed and used for transporting cargo in all the fleets of other Western European states, while galleons were purpose-built warships, and were stronger, more heavily armed, and also cheaper to build (5 galleons could cost around the same as 3 carracks) and were therefore a much better investment for use as warships or transports. There are nationalist disputes about its origins and development, but each Atlantic sea power built types suited to their needs, while constantly learning from their rivals. It was the Spanish captain and naval architect, Álvaro de Bazán, who designed the definitive model of the galleon in the 1550s.
The galleon was powered entirely by wind, using sails carried on three or four masts, with a lateen sail continuing to be used on the last (usually third and fourth) masts. They were used in both military and trade applications, most famously in the Spanish treasure fleet, and the Manila Galleons. They helped fuel the new world exploration by providing a means for transport of goods between the new world and the Iberian peninsula. They were the driving force behind much 15th and 16th century exploration. In fact, galleons were so versatile that a single vessel may have been refitted for wartime and peacetime roles several times during its lifespan. The galleon was the prototype of all square rigged ships with three or more masts for over two and a half centuries, including the later full rigged ship.
The principal warships of the opposing English and Spanish fleets in the 1588 confrontation of the Spanish Armada were galleons, with the modified English "race built" galleons developed by John Hawkins proving decisive, while the capacious Spanish galleons, designed primarily as transports, showed great endurance in the battles and in the great storms on the voyage home; most survived the ordeal.
Galleons were constructed from oak (for the keel), pine (for the masts) and various hardwoods for hull and decking. Hulls were usually carvel-built. The expenses involved in galleon construction were enormous. Hundreds of expert tradesmen (including carpenters, pitch-melters, blacksmiths, coopers, shipwrights, etc.) worked day and night for months before a galleon was seaworthy. To cover the expense, galleons were often funded by groups of wealthy businessmen who pooled resources for a new ship. Therefore, most galleons were originally consigned for trade, although those captured by rival states were usually put into military service.
The most common gun used aboard a galleon was the demi-culverin, although gun sizes up to demi-cannon were possible.
Because of the long periods often spent at sea and poor conditions on board, many of the crew sometimes perished during the voyage; therefore advanced rigging systems were developed so that the vessel could be sailed home by an active sailing crew a fraction of the size aboard at departure.
The most distinguishing features of the galleon include the long beak, the lateen-rigged mizzenmasts, and the square gallery at the stern off the captain's cabin. In larger galleons, a fourth mast was added, usually a lateen-rigged mizzen, called the bonaventure mizzen.
The galleon continued to be used into the 18th century, by which time purpose-built vessels such as the fluyt, the brig and the full rigged ship, both as a trading vessel and ship of the line, rendered it obsolete for trade and warfare respectively.
The oldest known scale drawings in England are in a manuscript called "Fragments of Ancient Shipwrightry" made in about 1586 by Mathew Baker, a master-shipwright. This manuscript, held at the Pepysian Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge, provides an authentic reference for the size and shape of typical English galleons built during this period. Based on these plans, the Science Museum, London has built a 1:48 scale model ship that is an exemplar of galleons of this era.
Cuba 1972 4c sg1981
Cyprus 2011 0.22 Euro sg?, scott?
Ghana 1957 1s3d sg183, scott?
Grenada Grenadines 1995 $5 sgMS2087, scott1791.
Macao 1993 4.50p sg823, scott714.
Portugal 1995 sg?, scott?
Philippines 1984 6p sg1852, scott?
Solomon Islands 2012 $9 sg?, scott?
Togo 1968 5f and 30f sg588 and 591 scott 641 and 644 (the vessel in the background is a Viking longboat.)
Guinea 2012 750f sg?, scott2069a.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galleon
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Re: GALLEON

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri May 08, 2015 9:27 pm

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Mexico 1998 $7.40 sg?, scott?
Laos 1990 100k sg1191, scott1014.
Cambodia 1990 80c sg1115, scott1081.
St Thomas & Prince 1979 1Dh sg?, scott535.
Macao 1990 50A/6.5ptc, sg733/36, scott630/33 MSsg737 scott634.
Peru 1989 230i on 300s sg 1703, scott ?
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