SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SOMALIA SAILING SHIPS 1994

Somalia used four stamps in 1994 which show sailing ships.

150 sh Viking ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360
350 sh Junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069
600 sh galleon. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11966
1400 sh Clipper ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13935

Somalia 1994 150/1400sh sg?, scott?

PORTLAND HMS (F-79)

Tristan da Cunha has a close affinity to the military and in particular the Navy, from the founding of the British community nearly 200 years ago, to the present day. As the world’s most remote inhabited island, visiting naval ships have always been a welcome sight and have provided much needed support for those living on Tristan da Cunha. With a population of just 254 islanders (January 2018) resident on Tristan the arrival of a ship’s crew can almost double the local population and is often a time of great excitement and celebration.

HMS PORTLAND arrived off Tristan 14 January 2017 from South Georgia and anchored offshore. The small harbour was too small for her but personnel were ferried to the island the following day, once the Harbour Master had assessed the swell and confirmed that it was a suitable day.

She had carried out a fishery protection patrol of Tristan’s waters – the sea is rich with crawfish, one of the island’s main sources of income – before dropping anchor for 24 hours in company with tanker RFA GOLD ROVER.

As always, the short visit assured islanders the mother country had not forgotten about them and allowed the sailors the rare chance to enjoy an island few people set foot on.
http://www.pobjoystamps.com/contents/en ... Ships.html

Built as a Type 23 frigate under yard no 1052 by BAE Systems Marine (YSL) Ltd., Scotstoun near Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
February 1996 ordered.
14 January 1998 laid down.
15 May 1999 launched as the HMS PORTLAND (F-79), christened by Lady Brigstocke.
Displacement 4,900 ton, dim. 133 x 16.3 x 7.3m. (draught)
Powered: CODLAG by four 2,025 shp Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators, two GEC electric motors, 4,000 shp. and two Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C, 31,100 shp. twin screws, speed in excess of 28 knots..
Range 7,500 mile by a speed of 15 knots.
Armament: Anti-Air missiles, 1 – 32 cell Sea Wolf GWS 26 VLS canisters for 32 missiles. Anti-ship missiles 2 – quad Harpoon launchers. Anti-submarine torpedoes, 2 – twin 12.75 inch (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes.
Guns: 1 – BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun.2 – 30mm DS30m Mk2 guns or 2 – 30mm DS30B guns. 2 – mini guns and 4 General purpose machine guns.
Accommodation for 205 persons, crew 185.
Carried 1 - Lynx HMAS or 1 – Westland Merlin HML, has a flight deck and enclosed hangar.
03 May 2001 commissioned.

HMS PORTLAND is a Type 23 frigate of the British Royal Navy. She is the eighth ship to bear the name and is the fifteenth and penultimate ship of the 'Duke' class of frigates, and is named for the (now extinct) Dukedom of PORTLAND, and more particularly for the 3rd Duke, who was Prime Minister.
Operational history
2000–2010
The ship was accepted into service by the Royal Navy on 15 December 2000 and was commissioned on 3 May the following year. Present at the commissioning ceremony was PORTLAND's sponsor Lady Brigstocke, wife of Admiral Sir John Brigstocke, a former Second Sea Lord; Lady Brigstocke launched the ship in 1999.
During sea trials PORTLAND attained a top speed of 30.8 knots (57.0 km/h), the fastest speed attained by any Type 23 frigate at that time
PORTLAND assisted in the search for men lost from a capsized yacht on 3 February 2007
She was deployed to the Caribbean for seven months in 2007, intercepting 3.5 tonnes of cocaine in cooperation with a United States Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) and conducting disaster relief in Belize following Hurricane Dean
In April 2008, PORTLAND visited Liverpool with HMS Mersey and berthed at the cruise liner terminal at Prince's Dock
In June 2009 while taking part in anti-piracy operations off the Horn of Africa, PORTLAND intercepted ten alleged pirates but because the suspects were not caught in the immediate act of piracy, the vessel was unable legally to detain them.
In late April 2010, PORTLAND relieved HMS YORK on the Atlantic Patrol Task (South.
2011–Present
June 2011 saw PORTLAND conducting night Naval Gunnery practice off Gibraltar in the Mediterranean. Towards the end of the month she sailed to Edinburgh to take part in Armed Forces Day. She is the first major warship in the Royal Navy to be commanded by a woman; Commander Sarah West assumed command of HMS PORTLAND on 21 May 2012. PORTLAND spent 2012 at Rosyth in a 50-week refit that saw her upgraded with Sonar 2087, new IT systems, Sea Wolf mid-life overhaul, gun replacements, galley refurbishment and accommodation improvements. She left Rosyth on 14 December 2012 for three months of sea trials.
In August 2013, she was announced as the Fleet Ready Escort for the next two months. She is due to participate in Exercise Joint Warrior 2013.
On 2 August 2014, she completed the 7 month task of the Atlantic Patrol ship.
Captain Simon Asquith assumed command of HMS PORTLAND in September 2014.
On 20 June 2016, PORTLAND departed Devonport for a nine-month patrol covering the Middle East and the South Atlantic Ocean. PORTLAND was the last Royal Navy ship to carry Radar 996 and was the last ship to conduct a Replenishment at Sea with RFA GOLD ROVER prior to the latter ship's decommissioning.

2018 In service.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_PORTLAND_(F79). Miramar.
Tristan da Cunha 2018 45p sg?, scott?

YORK HMS (D98)

Built as a type 42 destroyer under yard no 111 by Swan Hunter, Wallsend, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
18 January 1980 laid down.
21 January 1982 launched as the HMS YORK. (D-98).
Displacement 5,200 ton, dim. 141.0 x 15.2m.
Powered: COGOG by two Rolls-Royce Olympus TM3B gas turbines, 50,000 shp and two Rolls Royce Tyne RM1C cruise gas turbines 5,340 shp, twin shafts, speed 30 knots by use of Olympus and 24 knots by use of Tyne.
Range 4,200 mile by a speed 14 knots.
Armament: 1 x twin Sea Dart missile launchers, 40 missiles. 1 – 4.5 inch Mk 8 gun. 2 – 20 mm Oerlikon guns, 2 – Phalanx close-in-weapon system (CIWS).
Crew 287.
Carried 1 Lynx HMAS helicopter.
09 August 1985 christened by Lady Gosling and the same day commissioned.

HMS YORK was a Batch III Type 42 destroyer of the Royal Navy. Launched on 20 June 1982 at Wallsend, Tyne and Wear and sponsored by Lady Gosling, YORK was the last Type 42 built. The ship's crest was the White Rose of York, and the "red cross with lions passant" funnel badge was derived from the coat of arms of the City of York. With a maximum speed of 34 knots (63 km/h; 39 mph), she was the Royal Navy's fastest destroyer.
Operational history
1985-
In the summer of 1990, HMS YORK was serving on a routine patrol in the Persian Gulf as part of The Armilla Patrol which had been undertaken by a series of Royal Navy warships over many years. On 2 August that year, Saddam Hussein's forces invaded Kuwait. Instead of heading off to the Far East and Australia for series of "waving the flag" port visits, she remained on patrol in the Persian Gulf for an extra three months. This period was conducted when at sea mostly on a war-ready footing, involving virtually everyone onboard working Defence Watches (basically six hours on, six off) round the clock.
2001-2010
In 2001, she tested a RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile.
In 2003, YORK took part in the invasion of Iraq providing air cover and area protection for the aircraft carrier HMS ARK ROYAL. In 2004, she was fitted with the MOD 1 variant of the mark 8 4.5-inch gun. She and EDINBURGH were the only two Type 42s to be so fitted.
In July 2006, YORK joined GLOUCESTER in evacuating British citizens from Beirut in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict making several trips in and out of Lebanon, ferrying evacuees to Cyprus.
In February 2010, YORK and the auxiliary WAVE RULER were deployed to the Falkland Islands coinciding with a period of increased tensions between the United Kingdom and Argentina over the former's plans to begin drilling for oil in the seas surrounding the islands.
2011-2012
In February 2011, YORK was deployed to Malta to assist in the evacuation of British nationals from Libya. On 21 April 2011, YORK arrived at the East Cove Military Port in the Falkland Islands, beginning patrol duties for the islands.
On 12 December 2011, YORK spotted the Russian aircraft carrier ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV with its carrier group northeast of Orkney, off the coast of northern Scotland, and shadowed the carrier for a week. This was the first time ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV had deployed near UK waters and the closest in 20 years that a Russian naval task group had deployed to the UK. She then sailed around the top of Scotland and into the Atlantic past western Ireland, where she conducted flying operations with her Sukhoi Su-33 Flanker jets and Kamov Ka-27 helicopters in international airspace.
On 13 April 2012, YORK fired the last ever operational Sea Dart missiles after a thirty-year career. As such YORK completed her career without the system being operational. YORK entered Portsmouth harbour for the final time on 20 September 2012, and was decommissioned on 27 September 2012. In August 2012, the ship was put up for sale.
09 August 2015 she arrived at Aliaga, Turkey and she was scrapped there by Leyal GS.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_YORK_(D98) Miramar.
Jersey 2018 Local Mail sg?, scott?

MARSHALL ISLAND CANOE

The canoe depict on this stamp most probably is a “kor kor” it shows the canoe in the foreground with in the background the night silhouette of Hong Kong. The other stamp in this sheet shows a junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069

Known as one of the fastest indigenous watercraft in the Pacific, the Marshall Islands outrigger canoe has over the years been fine-tuned to sail closer to the wind than any other modern sail craft in the world. Little has changed in the basic design of the outrigger canoes over the past 100 generations. In centuries past, the people of the Marshall Islands sailed upon ocean voyages of up to 500 miles as a matter of necessity, usually to access food. Today, sadly, canoes have been largely replaced by power boats, with most new canoes in Majuro being built for racing. Of the outer islands, only a few still use the canoes as part of their livelihood, with Ailuk Atoll being a prime example. While newly-built tradition-style outrigger canoes look extremely similar to the original boats, they are shaped not with the simple hand-hewn tools of the past, but with electric saws and planes. They are not rigged with a sail made from the fibers of the pandanus plant, but instead with modern fabrics, including tarps. Whatever their purpose, the very existence of the canoes is treasured by the community as a source of national pride.

The other sheet shows a silhouette by daylight of Hong Kong, with on the left stamp a “walap” viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5799&p=16754&hilit=walap#p16754
And the right stamp shows a Chinese junk.

Source: http://www.canoesmarshallislands.com/ca ... s-history/
Marshall Islands 1997 32c sgMS 789, scott 624a/624b.

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

The waters around the islands are rich in fish, whale and seal. Bird cliffs, promontories, islets and precipices are nesting places for many species of seabirds. It is therefore not surprising that coastal fishing and fowling  were quite a significant part of traditional Faroese working life.
Fowling with a pole-net is far more sustainable than other fowling methods. The fowler only catches one bird at a time and, moreover, he is able to sort out certain birds, for example puffins carrying small fry for their chicks. In addition, maiming birds by shooting is avoided. It has always been forbidden to use firearms in and near bird cliffs.

2018 Faroes Philatelic

DUGOUT on Rio Tieté

For the Lubrapex 95 exposition Brazil issued two stamps and a miniature sheet which mostly shows in margin fish, animals and birds living around or in Rio Tieté. One stamp in this miniature sheet shows us also a dugout canoe. I have tried to find a Brazilian name but so far I could find she are on this river called “canoa”. The canoe is partly covered and is rowed or poled.

Among the main Brazilian waterways, one of the most important is the Tietê-Paraná river. This basin is located between the South, Southeast and Central West regions. It is a very important waterway for the transportation of agricultural production in the states of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Goias and part of Rondônia, Tocantins and Minas Gerais

More info on the Rio Tieté is given by Wikipedia on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiet%C3%AA_River
Brazil 1995 084c sg2723, scott 2555 and 1.50r sgMS2724, scott2556b
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

Icarus HMS 1936

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Icarus HMS 1936

Postby john sefton » Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:38 am

Icarus.jpg
Click image to view full size
Name: HMS ICARUS
Builder: John Brown and Company, Clydebank, Scotland, Laid down: 9 March 1936, Launched: 26 November 1936, Commissioned: 1 May 1937, Decommissioned: 29 August 1946, Identification: Pennant number: D03, Fate: Scrapped 1946
General characteristics: (as built)
Class and type: I-class destroyer, Displacement: 1,370 long tons (1,390 t) (standard), 1,888 long tons (1,918 t) (deep load), Length: 323 ft (98.5 m), Beam: 33 ft (10.1 m), Draught: 12 ft 5 in (3.8 m), Installed power: 34,000 shp (25,000 kW), Propulsion: 2 shafts, Parsons geared steam turbines, 3 Admiralty 3-drum water-tube boilers, Speed: 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph), Range: 5,530 nmi (10,240 km; 6,360 mi) at 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph), Complement: 145, Sensors and processing systems: ASDIC, Armament: 4 × 1 - 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns, 2 × 4 - 0.5-inch (12.7 mm) machine guns, 2 × 5 - 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes, 20 × depth charges, 1 rail and 2 throwers, 60 × Mines.
Service record
Commanders: Colin Maud, Operations: North Sea 1939, Atlantic 1939-44, Narvik 1940, Norway 1940-41, Dunkirk 1940, Bismarck Action 1941, Arctic 1941-43, Malta Convoys 1942, Normandy 1944, English Channel 1945.
Victories: Sank U-45, U-35 (1939), U-744 (1944), U-1199 (1945)
HMS ICARUS was an I-class destroyer that served with the Royal Navy in World War II.
On 29 November 1939, ICARUS sighted the German U-boat U-35 between the Shetland Islands and Bergen (Norway), but was unable to launch an effective attack because her ASDIC (sonar) was out of commission. Fellow destroyers Kingston and Kashmir were called to the scene, and ICARUS departed. Kingston was able to launch a successful depth charge attack, forcing the U-boat to surface and scuttle itself.
ICARUS participated in the Norwegian campaign in 1940, first capturing the 8,514 ton German supply ship ALSTER (brought to the UK and renamed EMPIRE ENDURANCE) on 11 April and then taking part in the Second Battle of Narvik on 13 April 1940.
In early May 1941, the British Admiralty was on the alert that the Bismarck might attempt to break out into the North Atlantic; so ICARUS was ordered to Scapa Flow for possible deployment against the Germans. On 22 May, just after midnight, ICARUS sailed along with the destroyers ACHATES, ANTELOPE, ANTHONY, ECHO, and ELECTRA, escorting the battlecruiser HOOD and the battleship PRINCE OF WALES to cover the northern approaches. The intention was that the force would refuel in Hvalfjord, Iceland, and then sail again to watch the Denmark Strait.
On the evening of 23 May, the weather deteriorated. At 20:55 hrs., Admiral Lancelot Holland aboard the HOOD signalled the destroyers "If you are unable to maintain this speed I will have to go on without you. You should follow at your best speed." At 02:15 on the morning of 24 May, the destroyers were ordered to spread out at 15 miles (24 km) intervals to search to the north. At about 05:35, the German forces were sighted by the HOOD, and shortly after, the Germans sighted the British ships. Firing commenced at 05:52. At 06:01, HOOD took a 38 centimetres (15 in) shell from Bismarck in the after magazine, which caused a massive explosion, sinking the ship within 2 minutes. ELECTRA and the other destroyers were about 60 miles (97 km) away at the time.
Upon hearing that the HOOD had sunk, ELECTRA raced to the area, arriving about 2 hours after the HOOD went down. They were expecting to find many survivors, and rigged scrambling nets and heaving lines, and placed life belts on the deck where they could be quickly thrown in. From the 94 officers and 1,321 ratings aboard the HOOD, just three survivors were found. ELECTRA rescued them, and continued searching. Shortly thereafeter, ICARUS and Anthony joined in the search, and the three ships searched the area for more survivors. No more were found, only driftwood, debris, and a desk drawer filled with documents. After several hours searching, they left the area.
She participated and in Operation Pedestal, escorting a convoy to Malta in August 1942.
ICARUS was involved in many important events of World War II, Dunkirk, Spitzbergen, and numerous Atlantic and Russian convoys.
ICARUS sank four German U-boats: On 14 October 1939 she participated in sinking of U-45 in the Western Approaches with destroyers Inglefield, Ivanhoe and Intrepid.
On 29 November 1939 U-35 was scuttled by its crew in the North Sea, after a depth charge attack from ICARUS, Kingston and Kashmir. All 43 hands on board survived.
On 6 March 1944 she sank U-744 while in company with the corvette Kenilworth Castle, the Canadian frigate St. Catharines, corvettes Fennel and Chilliwack and destroyers Chaudiere and Gatineau in the North Atlantic.
On 21 January 1945 she sank U-1199 while in company with the corvette Mignonette in the English Channel near the Isles of Scilly.
A long-time captain of ICARUS, Colin Maud, was the Juno beach master at the D-day landings; in the film 'The Longest Day' he was played by Kenneth More, complete with bulldog.
Lieutenant-Commander John Simon Kerans, famous for his part in sailing HMS AMETHYST, down the Yangtze River, a feat made famous in the film Yangtse Incident, also served in ICARUS as "number one".
July – August 1945. Transferred to 3rd Submarine Flotilla in place of HM Sloop BRIDGEWATER. Deployed for training of submarine crews in Clyde area.
HMS ICARUS continued her submarine training role until November 1945 when she was detached to take part in Operation DEADLIGHT (destruction of surrendered U-Boats). In January 1946 the ship escorted U3515 to Libau in the Baltic for handing over to USSR. After her return to Clyde she resumed submarine training duties until July 1946 when she paid-off and was reduced in the Reserve. This ship was placed on the Disposal List and sold to BISCO for demolition by South of Scotland Shipbreakers. She arrived in tow at the shipbreaker’s yard in Troon on 29th October 1946.
Sources Wikipedia.
http://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono ... ICARUS.htm.
Mr P Crichton
john sefton
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: aukepalmhof, Baidu [Spider], D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen, Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot] and 11 guests