SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SEAWOLF CLASS submarine

The class was built as a nuclear attack submarine by General Dynamics Electro Boat Co., Groton for the USA Navy. Of this class three were built commissioned between 1997 and 2005. The last JIMMY CARTER had another tonnage and dim.
Displacement 7,460 tons standard, 9,137 tons full load, dim. 1007.6 x 12.9 x 11m. (draught).
Powered by one S6W PWR nuclear reactor, 52,000 shp, one shaft, pumpjet propulsor, speed + 35 knots.
Range, unlimited, endurance, till food supplies run out.
Diving depth + 800 feet.
Armament: 8 – 26 inch torpedo tubes, 40 torpedoes, 50 missiles or 100 mines.
Crew 140.
More on this class of three ships is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf-class_submarine
2018 Al three are in active service.

I believe the USS CONNECTICUT is depict on this stamp. See photo and stamp. When I am correct the tugboat is the harbour tug USS NATCHITOCHES (799).

Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott?

«Allerton»- iron full-rigged ship

An iron full-rigged ship built in 1884 by Oswald, Mordaunt & Co., Southampton, as Yard No. 224. Dimensions 83,17×12,23×7,50 meters and 1936 tons under deck.
In 1885 the Captain J. Gyllencreutz was appointed.
In 1910 sold to owners in Valparaiso, Chile, for £ 2600 and converted into a hulk.
The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “The year is 1897 and the iron hull rigger "Allerton" makes her way up the East River, viewed from the piers of South Street. The last of the late afternoon sun just catches her toward her berth. The crew of the "Allerton" stands by on the fo-c'sle while some bystanders watch with perhaps some professional curiosity.” "Allerton" was typical of many latter day sailing ships being squeezed out of business by the competition with steam.
Somalia 2010;2500. Source:http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships/Merchant/Sail/A/Allerton(1884). http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist.

Boston Navy Yard

The earliest naval shipbuilding activities in Charlestown, Massachusettsacross the Charles River and Boston harbor to the north from the city of Boston , began during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The land for the Charlestown Navy Yard was purchased by the United States government in 1800 and the yard itself established shortly thereafter. The yard built the first US ship of the line , "USS Independence" , but was primarily a repair and storage facility until the 1890s, when it started to build steel ships for the "New Navy". By then, it was called the Boston Navy Yard. Forty-six ships have been constructed in the Boston Navy Yard, the first vessel launched being the sloop of war Frolic in 1813, and the latest the Whitney, a destroyer tender, launched in 1923. Additional vessels have been constructed for other governmental departments. No. 1 drydock, built of granite, completed in 1833 was the first drydock built in this country, and the first vessel to enter it was the famous frigate Constitution. The U. S. S. Constitution, or "Old Ironsides" as it is commonly referred to, was built by the act of Congress which authorized the building of six frigates in the year 1793. Work has commenced on the frigate at "Moulton's Point," former name of the navy yard, in 1794 and she was launched in 1797. This famous old ship participated in forty battles and never suffered defeat. In 1927 work of rebuilding her was undertaken at this yard. The necessary funds for the rebuilding were raised by popular subscription, in addition to an appropriation of three hundred thousand dollars authorized by Congress in 1930 to complete the work. In the late 1880s and 1890s, the Navy began expanding again bringing into service new modern steel hulled steam-powered warships and that brought new life to the Yard. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom.
Somalia 2010;2500.
Sources:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Navy_Yard. https://www.mca-marines.org/leatherneck ... e-barracks

DOLPHIN INS submarine

This stamp shows us a Dolphin class submarine of the Israeli Navy, the stamp is designed after a few design alternations were made in the design after a photo on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin-class_submarine and shows us the DOLPHIN the lead ship of her class.

Built as a submarine by Thyssen Nordsee Werke in Emden, Germany for the Israeli Navy.
07 October 1994 keel laid down.
12 April 1996 launched as the INS DOLPHIN.
Displacement 1,640 ton surface, 1,900 ton submerged, dim. 57.3 x 6.8 x 6.2m (draught).
Powered: Diesel electric by 3 diesels, 4,243 shp, 3,164 kW., one shaft, speed 20 knots.
Test depth more as 350m.
Armament: 6 – 533mm torpedo tubes and 4 – 650mm torpedo tubes. She has the capacity to carry anti-ship missiles, mines, decoys and stn Atlas wire-guided DM2A3 torpedoes. The surface-to—surface missile is the submarine launched Harpoon which delivers a 227 kg warhead to a range of 130 km at high subsonic speed.
Crew 35 and 10 additional.
She was fitted out at the HDW yard in Kiel, Germany, and completed on 31 July 1999.


2018 Still a unit of the Israeli Navy and in service.

Source: Wikipedia and internet.
Solomon Island 2016 $12 sg?, scott?

SEVERODVINSK (K-560) submarine

On this stamp issued by the Solomon Islands in 2016 four submarines are depict, of which one shows us one of the Russian Severodvinsk class, there is not a Severodvinsk class submarine in the Russian Navy, the SEVERODVINSK is a ship of the Yasen-class.

She was built as a nuclear attack submarine by SevMash at Arkhangelskaya oblast, Severodvinsk for the Russian Navy.
1993 Laid down.
15 June 2010 launched as the SEVERODVINSK (K-560) one of the Yasen-class.
Displacement 5,800-7,700-9,500 ton surface, 8,200-13,800 submerged. Dim. 120 x 15 x 8.4m. (draught)
Powered by 1 KPM type pressurized water reactor ?kW, speed 20 knots surfaced, 28 knots (silent) submerged and maximum speed submerged 35 knots.
Armament: 8 – VL.S equipped silos for either 32 (8 x 4) Oniks or 40 (8 x 4) Kalibr-PI anti-ship, anti-submarine and land attack submarines launched weapon. Kh-10 cruise missiles. 10 torpedo tubes (8 x 650mm and 2 x 533mm).
Crew 90.
30 December 2013 commissioned. A unit of the Northern Russian Fleet.

K-560 SEVERODVINSK is a Yasen-class submarine nuclear attack submarine of the Russian Navy. The construction of the submarine started in 1993 and was first planned to be launched in 1998. However budgetary problems delayed the construction for years, and it was only launched on 15 June 2010. SEVERODVINSK began sea trials on 12 September 2011. The submarine returned from her first voyage by 6 October 2011.
SEVERODVINSK's torpedo-launching systems have been fitted behind the compartment of the central station.[
Trials and Operational History
On 7 November 2012, the boat (while submerged) successfully launched a Kalibr cruise missile (anti-ship version) at a sea target in the White Sea. Later that same month the submarine successfully test fired two additional (land attack) cruise missiles. The first land attack SLCM was launched on 26 November 2012 from a surfaced position and a second two days later from a submerged position.
SEVERODVINSK was handed over to the Navy in late December 2013. The flag-raising ceremony was held on 17 June 2014 marking its introduction into the Russian Navy.[
In November 2014 the submarine successfully tested its rescue capsule which surfaced from a depth of 40 metres (130 ft) with five crew members inside.
SEVERODVINSK became combat-ready in early 2016. At the end of April 2016 and in August 2017, K-560 conducted drills using 3M14 missiles.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_s ... verodvinsk
Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott 2080a.

NIKOLAI VASILICVICH GOGUL

Guinea Bissau issued a set of stamps with inland steamships. Guinea Bissau is a country which supplies us with an avalanche of stamps each year.

Built in 1911 in Nizhny-Novgorod for service on the Northern Dvina River.
Length : 110 m, breadth 14 m, draught 1.4 m
Engines : Triple expansion with cylinders of 38, 61 and 110 cm and stroke of 110 cm and generating 380 hp and a normal top speed of 18 km/hour.
Rarely in use but is available for charter and in recent years has been chartered for cruises generally of 2-3 nights by a local travel agency. In 2010/11 she was under internal renovation costing 40 million roubles and returned to service in 2012 offering a 7-night river tour in June and a three-night trip in July from Archangelsk for the Pomor Tours company.
2018 In service. She is better known as N.V. GOGUL.

http://www.paddlesteamers.info/PaddleSteamerList.htm
Guinea Bissau 2009 600 FCFA sg?, scott?
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

A GLIMPSE OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE VIKING AGE

The full index of our ship stamp archive

A GLIMPSE OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE VIKING AGE

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 16, 2014 8:12 pm

tmp13F.jpg
Click image to view full size
The stamp in the margin shows us two boats used in that time at the Faroer Islands and one used for daily use and fishing, the other under construction and in the background on the right a Viking longboat under sail.

Where people spend any amount of time, they leave traces, including the remains of the buildings they once erected in their settlements. Most domestic waste was thrown out of the door, where it remained unless anything that might be edible was eaten by domestic animals such as cats, dogs and pigs. It is this detritus that can give posterity an insight into what it was like to live in the past. If this knowledge is to be gained, however, such material relics must undergo archaeological investigation.

On the farms around the Faroe Islands the people of the Viking Age lived off what the land, both the infields and outlying pasture, could produce together with what could be caught at sea, landed from the coast and hunted in the mountains.

The kitchen utensils used in the households of the period were partly of domestic and partly of foreign origin. The imported goods were either produced abroad or made from foreign raw materials, i.e. materials that were not found locally on the islands. These included utensils and implements made from soapstone, e.g. vessels and pots, which were more or less bowl-shaped and were used for cooking. They varied greatly in size from less than 20 cm to around 50 cm in diameter. As the same types of vessel found on the Faroe Islands are also found in Norway, it is natural to assume that such goods were imported from Norway. Another possibility is Shetland, where soapstone is also found as a raw material.

Households used earthenware as well as soapstone vessels. Based on the information available, it is impossible to say whether the early settlers, or Landnamsmen as they are called, were already using earthenware when they arrived on the islands. There is a great deal to indicate, however, that earthenware became part of domestic life during the Viking Age, i.e. in the late 10th – 11th century. This is interesting in terms of cultural history, because back in Norway earthenware had been completely abandoned in favour of soapstone vessels, a practice that the Northmen brought with them as they travelled west. These earthenware vessels are all unglazed, shaped by hand, generally by coiling and without a wheel, and fired at a low temperature. There seems to be considerable variation in shape, with bowl-shaped, hemispherical and bucket-shaped vessels having been found. There is also considerable variation in size, with the opening varying between about 18 and 30 cm, for example, and the height between around 10 and 20 cm. Food encrustation on the inside indicates that the earthenware vessels were used for the preparation of food. However, no remains have been found that might have been linked to earthenware productionitself, e.g. kilns, but it is easy to imagine earthenware vessels being fired in the hearth.

The exciting investigations into animal bones that have taken place in recent years have provided an insight into the animal husbandry of the past and the resources exploited in the Viking Age. It has been established that pigs were widely kept in addition to sheep and cattle, while compared with other locations in the North Atlantic, seabirds accounted for a very large proportion of the diet on the Faroe Islands.

Rooms were illuminated by means of oil lamps, which might have been no more than hollowed-out stones. But there are also examples of lamps being carved from tuff, a soft, volcanic rock that was easy to carve, which is why such lamps often had various forms of simple decoration.

In addition to the above types of kitchen utensil made from stone, the people also used a lot of different vessels made from wood, including turned wooden vessels and small, carved rectangular vessels or bowls. Staves and heads from large and small crozed wooden vessels have also been found. The many finds of twisted juniper stems are characteristic of the remains of older settlements. Juniper grew locally when people and animals took possession of the islands. The stems have been found in many different lengths and thicknesses, and were used as handles for wooden vessels or as ropes, for example. Wooden pins of varying sizes have also been found. Some of then are frequently interpreted as being so-called “sausage skewers” and others as being spindles used for working with wool.

Apart from food preparation, other important indoor chores included wool processing. Finds of spindle whorls and warp weights bear witness to this activity. The spindle whorls, which can be of basalt or tuff, are often also made from fragments of broken soapstone pots. Weights were required for work on verticallooms. Some special forms of warp weight made of drilled slate for hanging seem to have been imported, but ordinary basalt stones with a groove round the outside were also widely used.

In daily work both indoors and out cutting implements such as knives and scythes, for example, were indispensable, and they had to be kept sharp. The number of whetstones found bears witness to this. They were made from both clay slate and mica schist – even whole blanks of the raw material for whetstones have been found. This is another example of goods that had to be imported from Norway.

Hay was produced for animal feed. But grain was also grown on the Faroe Islands, with the grain of the Viking Age being six-rowed barley. This had to be ground, which was done using millstones of relatively soft mica schist characterised by hard red garnets inclusions. This raw material is found at Hardanger in West Norway. Studies have shown that this area had large quarries that produced schist for making millstones for export as long ago as the Viking Age.

The fields were not the only place where work was done. Sinkers testify to the importance of fishing. These might be made from soapstone, which frequently turned out to have been reworked from vessel fragments. But it was most usual, perhaps, to use large and small pebbles with a groove round the outside to secure the line to.

Apart from the knives previously mentioned, metal artefacts include iron locks, rivets and fish hooks of various sizes. The metal finds frequently occur in very small fragments such as bronze plates with rivets attached, which may have been rim or opening hardware for wooden vessels, for example. The quitefrequent finds of slag may also be the result of forging to do with the utensils already mentioned.

In visualising how people on the Faroe Islands dressed during the Viking Age, we must make do with drawing comparisons with what is known from other locations in the North Atlantic, but there are several finds to indicate that people quite liked to dress up. There is, for example, evidence of objects that can be described as personal accessories – ornaments such as bone combs, for example, both single and double. People wore necklaces and bracelets with both amber beads and silver- or gold-coated glass beads. They also wore silver rings, fine bronze buckles and ring pins, which they attached to their clothes.

Leisure activities and children’s games clearly also played an important role in everyday life in the Viking Age. In addition to gaming pieces, half a game board has been found with “Nine Men’s Morris” on one side and the Old Norse game of “Hneftafl” on the other. Finely carved horses and toy boats were made for the children, with examples being found at the Viking Age farm in Kvívík and the summer settlement at Argisbrekka near the village of Eiði.

Just as in other locations in the North Atlantic the art of writing was also practised on the Faroe Islands in the Viking
Age. Several artefacts made of both wood and stone with engraved runes were found during the excavation of dwellings in Eiði and Leirvík, for example.

The imported materials provide clear evidence that the Viking Age population on the Faroe Islands was not isolated to any great extent. Such materials clearly indicate quite close contact with the outside world, as likely as not in the form of trading relations both with the inhabitants’ old homeland, with communication doubtlessly originating in Bergen, and the other Norse settlements in the areas to the south of the Faroe Islands.

Faroer Island 2005 7.50 Kr. SgMS?, scott?

Source: Faroer Post
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 5464
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Anatol, Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot] and 40 guests