SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SAN SALVADOR 1542

Not any painting or drawing exist of the vessel SAN SALVADOR shown on this stamp, also a painting of drawing of Cabrillo is not found. The ship depict is chosen by the designer of the stamp, as a ship from that timeframe. It looks the designer has used the replica for his design.

The SAN SALVADOR was built as a wooden hulled sailing vessel for the discovery of the Northwest Passage.

SAN SALVADOR was the flagship of explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo (João Rodrigues Cabrilho in Portuguese). She was a 100-foot (30 m) full-rigged galleon with 10-foot (3.0 m) draft and capacity of 200 tons. She carried officers, crew, slaves, and a priest.
Explorations
In 1542 Cabrillo was the first European to explore the coast of present-day California. He had three ships: the 200-ton galleon SAN SALVADOR, the 100-ton La VICTORIA, and lateen-rigged, 26-oared SAN MIGUEL. The two ships were not the square-rigged galleons commonly used for crossing open ocean. Rather, they were built in Acajutla, El Salvador, and the ship SAN SALVADOR, was named after Pedro de Alvarado's newly founded city in western El Salvador, San Salvador, the ship SAN MIGUEL was named after the second newly founded city in eastern San Miguel, El Salvador, and the ship VICTORIA was named after the Victory of Pedro de Alvarado against the long and arduous battle against the Native American resistance in El Salvador. In 1540 the fleet sailed from Acajutla, El Salvador, and reached Navidad, Mexico on Christmas Day. While in Mexico, Pedro de Alvarado went to the assistance of the town of Nochistlán, which was under siege by hostile natives, and was killed when his horse fell on him, crushing his chest. Following Alvarado's death, the viceroy took possession of Alvarado's fleet. Part of the fleet was sent off to the Philippine Islands under Ruy Lopez de Villalobos and two of the ships were sent north under the command of Cabrillo. Navidad is some 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Manzanillo, Colima. A requirement of exploration ships was the ability to sail with ease into small harbors. The ships were rigged with triangular sails (lateen sail) supported by swept booms. This sail arrangement, a forerunner to the sails found in the modern-day fore-and-aft rig of sloops, ketches and yawls, made the craft more agile and gave them the ability to point higher into the wind than square riggers.
Departing from Navidad on 27 June 1542, Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay on 28 September. He went ashore and claimed the land for Spain. Continuing his explorations northward, he landed on Santa Catalina Island on 7 October and described nearby San Clemente Island. (He gave names to his discoveries, but all were renamed later.) He continued north as far as the Russian River, California before turning back to overwinter at Santa Catalina. Cabrillo died there of an infected injury on 3 January 1543. His second-in-command brought the ships and crew back to Navidad, arriving on 14 April 1543.
SAN SALVADOR replica
Starting in spring 2011 and concluding in 2015, the Maritime Museum of San Diego built a full-sized, fully functional, historically accurate replica of SAN SALVADOR. The ship was constructed in full public view at Spanish Landing park on Harbor Drive in San Diego. The keel was laid on 15 April 2011. The construction site, called "SAN SALVADOR Village", opened 24 June 2011 and was open to the public. The project gave people the opportunity to see an example of sixteenth century shipbuilding, which was the first modern industrial activity in the Americas. The replica galleon is 92 feet (28 m) long with a beam of 24 feet (7.3 m). When completed, SAN SALVADOR was launched on San Diego Bay and became part of the Museum's fleet of historic and replica ships. As of April 2015 construction was nearly completed, and a launch ceremony was planned for 19 April 2015. However, on April 8 the ceremony was postponed due to "unanticipated technical complications involving the movement and lifting of the ship". The ship was eventually moved by barge to a boatyard in Chula Vista. She made her public debut on 4 September 2015, leading a parade of tall ships for the start of San Diego's annual Festival of Sail. At that time she was powered by an auxiliary engine since she had not yet been fitted with sails. She will open for public tours starting in September 2016, in conjunction with the Maritime Museum's annual Festival of Sail. Later that month she is expected to start making coastal tours of the California coast.
Model of SAN SALVADOR
Cabrillo's flagship SAN SALVADOR has been described as having four masts: a square-rigged foremast, lateen-rigged main and mizzen-masts and an even smaller mizzen-type mast with a boom that swung well outboard, in the style of the modern-day yawl. La VICTORIA is described as having two masts, both lateen rigged. A model of SAN SALVADOR was built by Señor Manuel Monmeneu in association with the Naval Museum in Madrid, Spain. The model project was sponsored by the Portuguese-American Social and Civic Club of San Diego. This model depicts SAN SALVADOR more like La VICTORIA, with two major masts.

USA 1992 29c sg2751, scott2704.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Salva ... o%27s_ship)

GREAT LAKE VESSEL

The stamps issued by Canada in 1967 shows in the background and in a lock a unknown Great Laker. The Canadian Encyclopedia has the following entry on this ships:

Lake Carriers, or "lakers," are ships whose design is unique to the Great Lakes of N America. The lake carrier's long and flat shape reveals its basic purpose - to move bulk cargoes through the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY and Great Lakes, a total distance of almost 4000 km. The JOHN B AIRD, a typical modern Canadian lake carrier, was launched in 1983 by Collingwood Shipyards on Georgian Bay, is 219 m long and has a deadweight tonnage of 30 700 tonnes. Similar to an increasing number of lake carriers of its size which are fitted with cranes or conveyor belts, the JOHN B AIRD is a self-unloading lake carrier.
Ships of this size can carry one million bushels of wheat on a single voyage (27 000 tonnes#. Wheat and other feed grains account for about 40% of all cargoes carried by Canadian lake carriers, followed by coal, iron ore and limestone. The annual 9-month shipping season of the lake carriers does not include the winter months of late December to early March, when the seaway is closed and ice covers much of the Great Lakes.
Nearly all of the 162 Canadian and US lake carriers in service in 1994, down from 247 in 1984, belonged to member shipping companies of either the Canadian Shipowners' Assn #CSA) of Ottawa, with 106 ships and whose corporate na#e was changed in 1988 from the historic Dominion Marine Assn (DMA) founded in 1903; or the Lake Carriers' Assn formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1892, which owned the remainder.
The drop in the total gross registered tonnage (grt) of CSA member ships in service from 1 957 000 grt in 1984 to 1 637 000 grt in 1993 was a result of both severe reductions in the demand for raw materials such as iron ore by the recession-hit Canadian primary steel mills along the Great Lks, and an increase in the volume of grain transported by rail. As a result of the latter, annual grain cargoes carried by CSA member ships declined from 18.6 million t in 1984 to 9.6 million t in 1993.
During 1994 in response to the reduced use of their ships, CSA member firms created 2 joint holding companies to administer their ships' activities when in service. These 2 firms are Seaway Self Unloaders of St Catharines, made up of 17 self-unloading bulk carriers owned by Algoma Central Corp and Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd, and Seaway Bulk Carriers, with 11 bulk carriers from Canada Steamship Lines Inc plus 19 more from the smaller bulk carrier shipping companies in the CSA.
The modern Canadian lake carrier is the result of more than 100 years of continually changing Great Lakes ship design and modification Earlier types of cargo carriers on the Great Lakes, all of them built for the bulk transit of goods, included the exotically na#ed hermaphrodite barquentines of the age of sail and the whalebacks and canalers of the age of mechanical propulsion.
As becomes the na#e "hermaphrodite," which means having 2 opposite qualities, this class of sailing ship had 2 masts, with square-rigged sails on the foremast for manoeuvring in and out of dock and in narrow passages, and fore-and-aft rigged sails on the mainmast for speed. Except for their tall funnels and awkward deck structures, the whalebacks of the age of coal-fired steam engines, squat and broad-beamed, looked like the modern nuclear submarine.
The whalebacks were also called "pig boats" because their bows ended in a steel snout built above the water line. The later canalers were designed to fit snugly into the narrow locks of the old Welland Canal, linking Lakes Erie and Ontario and passing near St Catharines, and the canal system between Lk Ontario and Montreal which terminated at the Lachine Canal. The canaler was one-third the length of the JOHN B AIRD. In 1959 canalers were replaced in the wider and longer locks of the St Lawrence Seaway system by upper lakers, which had previously been restricted to the upper lakes above Niagara because of their size. These locks can take ships up to 222.5 m in length and 23.2 m in breadth.
Some of these larger carriers, though designed primarily for the inland lakes, have been built for both the coastal trade and deep-sea service and are called ocean lakers. This is not entirely a new trend since some earlier lakers were requisitioned to serve on the N Atlantic during WWII, and a few of them were sunk by German U-Boats.
The Great Lakes have been a graveyard for hundreds of ships, most of them lost during the age of sail between 1750 and 1870 in storms, fires and collisions. Despite their size, even modern lake carriers can be victims of severe ice conditions and storms. The tragic sinking on 10 Nov 1975 of the EDMUND FITZGERALD, a 222 m long US iron-ore carrier, was commemorated in song by Gordon LIGHTFOOT. After battling 7.5 m waves and record 125 km/h winds on Lk Superior, the ship suddenly plunged to the bottom with the loss of the entire crew of 29, including her experienced captain. See: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12821&p=13970&hilit=edmund#p13970

Canada 1967 4, 6 and 7c sg582, 601, 607 and 609, scott?. 1993 43c sg1566, scott1488.
Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia.

Battle of Buceo

The Battle of Buceo was a decisive naval battle which took place on 14–17 May 1814, during the Argentine War of Independence between an Argentine fleet under William Brown and a Spanish fleet under Admiral Sienna off the coast of Montevideo, in today's Uruguay.
Five Spanish ships were burned and two were captured on 17 May. The other surrendered later and 500 prisoners were taken. Argentine forces lost four men killed in action and one ship. William Brown was given the rank of Admiral because of this victory.
Ships involved
Argentina (William Brown)
Hercules 32 (flag) viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8790&p=8834&hilit=hercules#p8834
Zephyr 18 (King)
Nancy 10 (Leech)
Julietta 7 (McDougald)
Belfast 18 (Oliver Russell)
Agreeable 16 (Lemare)
Trinidad 12 (Wack)
Spain (Sienna)[edit]
Hyena 18 (flag)
Mercurio 32
Neptuno 28 - Captured by Belfast 16 May
Mercedes 20
Palomo 18 - Captured 16 May
San Jose 16 - Captured 16 May
Cisne 12
6 schooners

M Class submarine

M CLASS.
They were ordered in place of the last four of the first group of steam-propelled K-class fleet submarines, K17-K21, the original orders being cancelled.
They were initially intended as coastal bombardment vessels, submarine monitors, but their role had been changed before detailed design begun. The intention was that merchant ships could be engaged at periscope depth or on the surface using the gun, rather than torpedoes. At that time torpedoes were considered ineffective against moving warships at more than 1,000 yards (900 m). A 12-inch gun fired at relatively short range would have a flat trajectory simplifying aiming, and few ships would be expected to survive a single hit.

The guns were 12-inch (305 mm) 40 calibre Mark IX guns from spares for the Formidable-class battleships. The mounting allowed them to elevate by 20 degrees, depress 5 degrees and train 15 degrees in either direction from the centre line. The weapon was normally fired from periscope depth using a simple bead sight on the end of the gun aligned with the target through the periscope at a range of around 1200 metres. The exposure time of the gun above the surface was around 75 seconds. The submarine had to surface to reload the gun, which would take about 3 minutes. In practice the concept was not very successful and only three of the four M-class boats ordered were completed, all between 1917 and 1918. M-class submarines are sometimes called submarine monitors.
M1 and M2 also had four 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes whilst M3 and M4 had 21-inch (533 mm) diameter tubes and were 3 metres longer to accommodate them.

M1 was the only one to enter service before the end of World War I but did not see action. She was captained during her sea trials by experienced submariner Commander Max Horton after his return from the Baltic, and was later lost with all hands while on exercise in the English Channel near Start Point in Devon after a collision with a Swedish collier, SS Vidar, on 12 November 1925. The wreck of M1 was discovered by a diving team led by Innes McCartney in 1999 at a depth of 73 metres. Later that year the wreck was visited again by Richard Larn and a BBC TV documentary crew, and the resulting film was aired in March 2000.
HMS M2
M2 was converted to a seaplane carrier in 1925, a hangar replacing the gun turret. She was lost off Chesil Beach on 26 January 1932. It is thought that the hangar door was opened prematurely. M2 lies in much shallower water, 32 metres deep with the top of the conning tower only 20 metres below the surface at low tide. She is a popular attraction for local scuba divers with as many as six boats anchored above her on busy days.
M3 was converted to a minelayer in 1927 with stowage for 100 mines, primarily to test the mine-handling equipment of the Grampus class. The mines were carried on a conveyor belt which ran along her upper deck and covered over by an enlarged casing. The mines were laid through a door at the stern. She was scrapped in 1932 after the trials had been completed.
M4 was broken up before completion.
In 1924 all three completed members of the class were used to test hull camouflage to reduce the visibility of submarines from aircraft—M1 was painted grey-green, M2 dark grey and M3 was painted dark blue.

Wikipedia

ANKARAN HPL-21 (Sri Lanka)

The first two XFAC (Extra Fast Attack Craft) were ordered from Ramta, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) on 02 December 1996. Two more being built at the Goa SY. This is the latest version of an Israeli fast patrol craft, also acquired by the Sri Lankan Navy. An additional 15 are projected, some possibly for the Coast Guard. XFAC is designed for putting to sea in the shortest possible time for day-night coastal surveillance and reconnaissance, co-ordinated sea-air search & rescue (SAR) operations, beach insertion and/or extraction of commando forces and high speed interception of small, manoeuvrable intruder craft over territorial waters. XFAC incorporates the most modern structural, hydro-dynamic and propulsion features and a proven combat record in all aspects. The ASD propulsion system provides the XFAC with the excellent shallow water capability, including beaching, exceptional manoeuvring & survivability, high redundancy, rapid acceleration and de-acceleration, high stability and excellent sea-keeping qualities.

Displacement:60 tons full Load, L:25.40m. B:5.67m. Draft:1.10m. 2 diesel engines:4570 hp. and 2 Arneson ASD articulating surface drives, maximum speed:45 kn. maximum range:700 nm. at 42 kn. complement:10 (incl. 1 officer)

Weapons: 1-Oerlikon 20mm gun and 2-12.7mm MGs.
Weapons Control: Elop MSIS optronic low-light-level surveillance and weapons direction device, which enables the vessel to accurately destroy small high-speed crafts and engage light shore defence. Goa SY Ltd. states that the Super Dvoras are fitted the Mk.20 naval stabilized gun system.
Radar: Surface; Koden, I-band.

Originally the main armament of the Super Dvora Mark II design was the Oerlikon 20 mm cannon which were manually operated. At present all Super Dvora Mark II types have been modified to allow for the installation of Typhoon 25-30 mm stabilized cannon which can be slaved to state-of the art mast-mounted, day/night, long-range electro-optic systems. In addition to its main armament, Super Dvora Mark IIs carry heavy or light machine guns, depending on the operational requirements.
Sri Lankan Navy Super Dvora Mark IIs carry additional weapon systems such as automatic grenade launchers and PKM general purpose machine guns.

(Sri Lanka 2000, 3.50 r. StG.?)
Internet.

SAILING VESSEL OF THE 17 or 18th Century

This Hungary stamp issued in 1981 is designed after a label issued in Austria in 1933 for the Internationale Stamp Fair in Vienna.
It shows us a sailing vessel from around the 17th and 18th century, she carries a spritsail which disappears on sailing ships after the 18th century. She is a two-masted vessel, square rigged on the foremast and (but it is not so clear) lateen rigged on the after-mast. Have not more info on the ship depict.

Hungary 1981 5fo sg?, scott2696d.
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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Arturo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:07 pm

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Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC: Vereinigde Oost-Indische Comapagnie). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 (The date on the stamp 1626 is wrong).
She was a vessel of 600 tons (180' x 40') and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons and a number of bronze guns. She was one of a fleet of eight V.O.C. ships which set sail from Texel on 27 October 1628. In addition to the usual complement of sailors and soldiers, she carried a few passengers and a large consingment of silver. Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. A twentieth-century replica of the ship is also called the Batavia and can be visited in Lelystad, Netherlands.
On 27 October 1628, the newly built Batavia, commissioned by the Dutch East India Company, sailed from Texel for the Dutch East Indies, to obtain spices. It sailed under commandeur and opperkoopman (upper- or senior merchant) Francisco Pelsaert, with Ariaen Jacobsz serving as skipper. These two had previously encountered each other in Surat, India. Although some animosity had developed between them there, it is not known whether Pelsaert even remembered Jacobsz when he boarded Batavia. Also on board was the onderkoopman (under-or junior merchant) Jeronimus Cornelisz, a bankrupt pharmacist from Haarlem who was fleeing the Netherlands, in fear of arrest because of his heretical beliefs associated with the painter Johannes van der Beeck, also known as Torrentius.
During the voyage, Jacobsz and Cornelisz conceived a plan to take the ship, which would allow them to start a new life somewhere, using the huge supply of trade gold and silver then on board. After leaving Cape Town, where they had stopped for supplies, Jacobsz deliberately steered the ship off course, away from the rest of the fleet. Jacobsz and Cornelisz had already gathered a small group of men around them and arranged an incident from which the mutiny was to ensue. This involved molesting a high-ranking young female passenger, Lucretia Jans, in order to provoke Pelsaert into disciplining the crew. They hoped to paint his discipline as unfair and recruit more members out of sympathy. However, the woman was able to identify her attackers. The mutineers were then forced to wait until Pelsaert made arrests, but he never acted, as he was suffering from an unknown illness.

On 4 June 1629 the ship struck Morning Reef near Beacon Island, part of the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast. Of the 322 aboard, most of the passengers and crew managed to get ashore, although 40 people drowned. The survivors, including all the women and children, were then transferred to nearby islands in the ship's longboat and yawl. An initial survey of the islands found no fresh water and only limited food (sea lions and birds). Pelsaert realised the dire situation and decided to search for water on the mainland.

A group comprising Captain Jacobsz, Francisco Pelsaert, senior officers, a few crewmembers, and some passengers left the wreck site in a 30-foot (9.1 m) longboat (a replica of which has also been made), in search of drinking water. After an unsuccessful search for water on the mainland, they headed north in a danger-fraught voyage to the city of Batavia, now known as Jakarta. This journey, which ranks as one of the greatest feats of navigation in open boats, took 33 days and, extraordinarily, all aboard survived.
After their arrival in Batavia, the boatswain, a man named Jan Evertsz, was arrested and executed for negligence and "outrageous behaviour" before the loss of the ship (he was suspected to have been involved). Jacobsz was also arrested for negligence, although his position in the potential mutiny was not guessed by Pelsaert.

Batavia's Governor General, Jan Coen, immediately gave Pelsaert command of the Sardam to rescue the other survivors, as well as to attempt to salvage riches from the Batavia's wreck. He arrived at the islands two months after leaving Batavia, only to discover that a bloody mutiny had taken place amongst the survivors, reducing their numbers by at least a hundred.

Jeronimus Cornelisz, who had been left in charge of the survivors, was well aware that if that party ever reached the port of Batavia, Pelsaert would report the impending mutiny, and his position in the planned mutiny might become apparent. Therefore, he made plans to hijack any rescue ship that might return and use the vessel to seek another safe haven. Cornelisz even made far-fetched plans to start a new kingdom, using the gold and silver from the wrecked Batavia. However, to carry out this plan, he first needed to eliminate possible opponents.

Cornelisz's first deliberate act was to have all weapons and food supplies commandeered and placed under his control. He then moved a group of soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to nearby West Wallabi Island, under the false pretence of searching for water. They were told to light signal fires when they found water and they would then be rescued. Convinced that they would be unsuccessful, he then left them there to die.

Cornelisz then had complete control. The remaining survivors would face two months of unrelenting butchery and savagery.

With a dedicated band of murderous young men, Cornelisz began to systematically kill anyone he believed would be a problem to his reign of terror, or a burden on their limited resources. The mutineers became intoxicated with killing, and no one could stop them. They needed only the smallest of excuses to drown, bash, strangle or stab to death any of their victims, including women and children.

Cornelisz never committed any of the murders himself, although he tried and failed to poison a baby (who was eventually strangled). Instead, he used his powers of persuasion to coerce others into doing it for him, firstly under the pretence that the victim had committed a crime such as theft. Eventually, the mutineers began to kill for pleasure, or simply because they were bored. He planned to reduce the island's population to around 45 so that their supplies would last as long as possible. In total, his followers murdered at least 110 men, women, and children.

Although Cornelisz had left the soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to die, they had in fact found good sources of water and food on their islands. Initially, they were unaware of the barbarity taking place on the other islands and sent pre-arranged smoke signals announcing their finds. However, they soon learned of the massacres from survivors fleeing Cornelisz' island. In response, the soldiers devised makeshift weapons from materials washed up from the wreck. They also set a watch so that they were ready for the mutineers, and built a small fort out of limestone and coral blocks.

Cornelisz seized on the news of water on the other island, as his own supply was dwindling and the continued survival of the soldiers threatened his own success. He went with his men to try to defeat the soldiers marooned on West Wallabi Island. However, the trained soldiers were by now much better fed than the mutineers and easily defeated them in several battles, eventually taking Cornelisz hostage. The mutineers who escaped regrouped under a man named Wouter Loos and tried again, this time employing muskets to besiege Hayes' fort and almost defeated the soldiers.

But Wiebbe Hayes' men prevailed again, just as Pelsaert arrived. A race to the rescue ship ensued between Cornelisz's men and the soldiers. Wiebbe Hayes reached the ship first and was able to present his side of the story to Pelsaert. After a short battle, the combined force captured all of the mutineers.

Pelsaert decided to conduct a trial on the islands, because the Saardam on the return voyage to Batavia would have been overcrowded with survivors and prisoners. After a brief trial, the worst offenders were taken to Seal Island and executed. Cornelisz and several of the major mutineers had both hands chopped off before being hanged. Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were maroonedon mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland. However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.

The remaining mutineers were taken to Batavia for trial. Five were hanged, while several others were flogged. Cornelisz's second in command, Jacop Pietersz, wasbroken on the wheel, the most severe punishment available at the time.

Captain Jacobsz, despite being tortured, did not confess to his part in planning the mutiny and escaped execution due to lack of evidence. What finally became of him is unknown. It is suspected that he died in prison in Batavia.

A board of inquiry decided that Pelsaert had exercised a lack of authority and was therefore partly responsible for what had happened. His financial assets were seized, and he died a broken man within a year.

On the other hand, the common soldier Wiebbe Hayes was hailed as a hero. The Dutch East India Company promoted him to sergeant, and later to lieutenant, which increased his salary fivefold.

Of the original 341 people on board the Batavia, only 68 made it to the port of Batavia.

During Admiralty surveys of the Abrolhos Islands on the north-west coast in April 1840, Captain Stokes of HMS Beagle reported that:
On the south west point of an island the beams of a large vessel were discovered, and as the crew of the Zeewyk, lost in 1728, reported having seen a wreck of a ship on this part, there is little doubt that the remains were those of the Batavia, Commodore Pelsart, lost in 1629. We in consequence named our temporary anchorage Batavia Road, and the whole group Pelsart Group.

However, Stokes appears to have confused the wreck of the Zeewyk for that of the Batavia. In the 1950s, historian Henrietta Drake-Brockman, who had learnt of the story due to her association with the children of the Abrolhos Islands guano merchant F. C. Broadhurst, son of Charles Edward Broadhurst, argued from extensive archival research and translations by E. D. Drok, that the wreck must lie in the Wallabi Group of islands. Surveyor Bruce Melrose and diving journalist Hugh Edwards agreed with the theory. In association with Drake-Brockman, Edwards organised a number of search expeditions near Beacon Island in the early 1960s and narrowly missed locating the site. After Edwards provided his research to them, and after being led to the place by Abrolhos rock lobster-fisherman Dave Johnson (who had seen an anchor from his boat while setting lobster pots), on 4 June 1963 Max and Graham Cramer with Greg Allen became the first to dive on the site. Its location, together with those of the VOC ship Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon) and the English East India CompanyTriall (Tryal), in the early 1960s, led to the formation of the Departments of Maritime Archaeology and Materials Conservation and Restoration at the Western Australian Museum.

In 1972, the Netherlands transferred all rights to Dutch shipwrecks on the Australian coasts to Australia. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle, Australia. Others are held by the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton. These two museums presently share the remains: a replica stone arch is held in The Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries, which was intended to serve as a stone welcome arch for the city of Batavia and the actual stone arch is held in the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; the original timbers from the ship's hull are held at the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries. While a great deal of materials have been recovered from the wreck-site, the majority of the cannons and anchors have been left in-situ. As a result, the wreck remains one of the premier dive sites on the West Australian coast and is part of the museum's wreck trail, or underwater "museum-without-walls" concept.

A replica of the Batavia was built at the Bataviawerf (Batavia Wharf) in Lelystad in the Netherlands. The project lasted from 1985 to 7 April 1995, and was conducted as an employment project for young people under master-shipbuilder Willem Vos. The shipyard is currently reconstructing another 17th century ship. In contrast to the merchant ship Batavia, Michiel de Ruyters' flagship, the Zeven Provinciën, See topic: De Zeven Provincien ( ship of the line).

The Batavia replica was built with traditional materials, such as oak and hemp, and using the tools and methods of the time of the original ship's construction. For the design, good use was made of the remains of the original ship in Fremantle (and of the Vasa in Stockholm), as well as historical sources, such as 17th century building descriptions (actual building plans weren't made at the time), and prints and paintings by artists (who,at the time, generally painted fairly true to nature),of similar ships.

On 25 September 1999, the new Batavia was transported to Australia by barge, and moored at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. In 2000, Batavia was the flagship for the Dutch Olympic Team during the 2000 Olympic Games. During its stay in Australia, the ship was towed to the ocean once, where it sailed on its own. On 12 June 2001, the ship returned to the Batavia werf in Lelystad, where it remains on display to visitors. On the evening of 13 October 2008, a fire ripped through the wharf. The museum's workshops, rigging loft, block shop, offices, part of a restaurant and the entire hand-sewn suit of sails of the ship were lost to the blaze, however the replica of "De Zeven Provinciën" nearby was undamaged. The moored Batavia was never in danger.

Burkina Faso, 1999, S.G.?, Scott: 1134.
Source: Wikipedia
Arturo
 
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:02 pm

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Batavia
Niger2014;750f;SG? Djibouti2013;400f;SG? Malawi2013;SG?
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Dec 30, 2015 7:57 pm

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Germany Postmark 2015. Most probably depict the replica of the BATAVIA.
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:00 pm

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(New Earth ???)
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 pm

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Batavia 1628. Djibouti 2015;1000f.
Anatol
 
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