SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DUTCH SHIP RUNNING OUT OF THE HARBOUR painting

This stamp is designed after a painting from the Flemish painter Andries van Eertvelt (1590-1655) see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andries_van_Eertvelt
The painting, “A Dutch ship running out of the harbour” is now in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, Great Britain.
The vessel depict is not identified, and will depict a Dutch war-cargo vessel of that time.

Paraguay 1972 50c sg?, scott 1431.

HYMAN G. RICKOVER SSN-709 (USA)

Built in 1981-'83 by General Dynamics Corporation, Groton, Connecticut for the US Navy.
laid down:24 July 1981, Launched:27 August 1983, Commissioned: 21 July 1984.
Los Angeles-class submarine, Displacement, Surfaced: 5748 t. Submerged: 6123 t. Length: 360', Beam: 33', Draft: 29', Speed, Surfaced 25 kn. Submerged 30+ kn. Depth limit 950'. Complement:129, Armament, four 21" torpedo tubes aft of bow can also launch Harpoon and Tomahawk ASM/LAM missiles & MK-48 torpedoes; Combat Systems, AN/BPS-5 surface search radar, AN/BPS-15 A/16 navigation and fire control radar, TB-16D passive towed sonar arrays, TB-23 passive "thin line" towed array, AN/BQG-5D wide aperture flank array, AN/BQQ-5D/E low frequency spherical sonar array, AN/BQS-15 close range active sonar (for ice detection); MIDAS Mine and Ice Detection Avoidance System, SADS-TG active detection sonar, Type 2 attack periscope (port), Type 18 search periscope (starboard), AN/BSY-1 (primary computer); UYK-7; UYK-43; UYK-44, WLR-9 Acoustic Intercept Receiver, ESM; Propulsion System, S6G nuclear reactor one propeller at 35,000 shp.
Decommissioned: 14 December 2006, fate: to be disposed of by submarine recycling.

USS HYMAN G. RICKOVER (SSN-709), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, pioneer of the nuclear Navy, and the only Los Angeles-class submarine not named after a United States city or town. It was initially to be named the USS PROVIDENCE however, following the retirement of Admiral Rickover, its name was reassigned prior to official christening. SSN-719 was later given the name USS PROVIDENCE.

The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on 10 December 1973 and her keel was laid down on 24 July 1981. She was launched on 27 August 1983 sponsored by the Admiral's wife, Mrs. Eleonore Ann Bednowicz Rickover (whose first name is found in a wide variety of spellings, including Eleanore, Elenore, and Eleanor; Eleonore is used on the Admiral's gravestone[1]).

The RICKOVER was commissioned on 21 July 1984 with Captain Fredrik Spruitenburg in command. A commemorative plaque honoring the ship's namesake was placed within the sub after commissioning with the poem "Admiral Rickover," an eight-line tribute by writer Ronald W. Bell. The poem appears below, provided by the author and with his permission:

ADMIRAL RICKOVER
Possessed of a purpose
He forged a path
Across a frontier
Untried and new
Clinging to his course
He met the task
Threescore and more
He served for you.

(USA 2000, 33 c. StG.?)
Internet.

TOKELAU TRANSPORT

Tokelau issued on 4 May 1983 six stamps showing means of transport in the Tokelau Islands. Tokelau consist of three atolls and the transport of goods and people is mostly over the water by vessels in 1983.

The outrigger canoe depict on the 5s stamp have not changed much over the centuries, and can still be seen on the beaches of Tokelau. The 5 Sene stamps shows a canoe returning under sail power from a fishing trip outside the reef. More wooden canoes are found on Atafu than on the other islands because according to legend the atoll was blessed with an abundance of kanava trees, the wood which is used for building the canoes. The kanava tree is sufficiently thick, durable, water resistant and hard, and canoes built of this wood can last over a hundred years.
The vaka depict on this stamp of Tokelau can be paddled or sailed, she is stepping a single forward-raking mast to which a triangular sail was set, lateen-fashion; lower edge boomed; forward part tacked near the bow.
Reported lengths 7 – 11m. More info on the type is given on:

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14019&p=16156&hilit=outrigger+canoe#p16156

The whale boat depict on the 18 sene. Was a large heavy wooden vessel propelled by oars. It was the early method of conveying cargo and people and all kinds of cargo from shore to ship over the reef, and was only recently replaced by the aluminium whale boat. The boat shown on the stamp is preserved at Atafu. (A google search in 2017 could not find the whale boat.)
More on the whale boats is given: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14383

The 23 sene depict an aluminium whaleboat who replaced the wooden whale-boats. She are propelled by outboards engines, this boat is capable of conveying many people and all kind of cargo from ship to shore. Sea conditions are critical to cargo-handling, and it is not uncommon for boats to capsize in the surf or strike the reef.
The “alia” fishing boat on the 34 sene stamp is a catamaran twin hulled aluminium craft, now being (1983) introduced to the Tokelau fishing fleets. The stamp shows men preparing for night fishing. The first “alia” catamaran fishing craft was developed in Samoa and were built of plywood designed by the FAO in conjunction with a Danish-funded fisheries development project in the mid-1970s. Built by local yards in Samoa. The first 120 craft were constructed in plywood, thereafter several hundred more were built from welded aluminium in the early to mid-1980s for use as a fishing vessel in the South Pacific Islands. Most are used in Samoa and some were exported to other South Pacific Islands.
The catamarans are used for fishing near the coast and in the lagoons. The Tokelau “alias” have a length of 8.9 metre and are powered by a Johnson outboard engine with a power of 35 hp. she carries a standby outboard also from Johnson of 20 hp.
If she still are in service in 2017 I could not find out.

Source http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/y5121e/y5121e09.htm

The reefer vessel FRYSNA is depict on the 63 sene stamp: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8937&p=16923&hilit=frysna#p16923

The 75 sene stamp depicts the McKinnon (Goose) seaplane, who in 1983 made a monthly call at Tokelau from Samoa. As shown on the stamp she is a plane, when on the water she is a watercraft.

Source: New Zealand Philatelic Bulletin no 29 1983. Internet.
Tokelau 1983 5s/75s sg 91/96, scott?

Passover Hagggadah

Passover is a festival of freedom.

It commemorates the Israelites’ Exodus from Egypt, and their transition from slavery to freedom. The main ritual of Passover is the seder, which occurs on the first two night (in Israel just the first night) of the holiday — a festive meal that involves the re-telling of the Exodus through stories and song and the consumption of ritual foods, including matzah and maror (bitter herbs). The seder’s rituals and other readings are outlined in the Haggadah — today, many different versions of this Passover guide are available in print and online, and you can also create your own.

The central Passover practice is a set of intense dietary changes, mainly the absence of hametz, or foods with leaven. (Ashkenazi Jews also avoid kitniyot, a category of food that includes legumes.) In recent years, many Jews have compensated for the lack of grain by cooking with quinoa, although not all recognize it as kosher for Passover. The ecstatic cycle of psalms called Hallel is recited both at night and day (during the seder and morning prayers). Additionally, Passover commences a 49-day period called the Omer, which recalls the count between offerings brought to the ancient Temple in Jerusalem. This count culminates in the holiday of Shavuot, the anniversary of the receiving of the Torah at Sinai.

Matzah, or unleavened bread, is the main food of Passover. You can purchase it in numerous stores, or you can make your own. But the holiday has many traditional, popular foods, from haroset (a mixture of fruit, nuts, wine, and cinnamon) to matzah ball soup — and the absence of leavening calls upon a cook to employ all of his/her culinary creativity.

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/passover-2017/

CLARENCE CROCKETT (USA)

This vessel is a 13.60m. (44.6')long two-sail bateau, or V-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop, commonly referred to as a skipjack. She was built in 1908 in Deep Creek, Virginia, and has sailed in the oyster-dredging fleet since then. She is built in typical Bay fashion using cross-planked construction methods. She has a beam of 4.48m. 14.7') and a depth of 0.91m. (3.0') with a net registered tonnage of 7. She carries a typical skipjack rig of jib-headed mainsail and large jib. The vessel has a longhead (clipper) bow and a square transom stern. The wooden hull is painted the traditional white and is sheathed with metal against ice at the waterline. This vessel has a longhead bow with a straight, slightly raking stem and a square, or transom, stern. The transom is steeply raking with the rudder hung outboard on pintles and a jig for the pushboat to the starboard side. There are guards on the hull to protect it from the dredges. The single mast is slightly raked aft and finished bright. The mast is rigged with double shrouds, adjusted by turnbuckles rather than the more traditional deadeyes, a forestay, and a jibstay. There is a topping lift leading to the end of the boom, which is jawed to the mast. Both mainsail and jib are furled by means of lazyjacks. The mainsail is jib-headed and laced to the boom. The large jib carries a club on its foot. The bowsprit, rigged with double chain bobstays and chain bowsprit shrouds. is slightly bowed down and is painted white. In addition to its sail rig the skipjack carries a motorized pushboat, suspended over the stern on davits. The vessel is flush-decked with several deck structures. These include: a wheel-box located against the after rail, a cabin trunk with an added "doghouse" with six small horizontal windows and a full-length door; and a small fore hatch. The cabin has a single round port on either side. There is a box covering the winder engines and a sampson post, with winch heads, on the foredeck. The deck is surrounded by a low pinrail atop a solid lograil forward, and a higher pinrail aft. The boat is open amidships where the dredges come aboard over rollers. Other gear includes oyster dredging equipment--dredges, winders, and winder engines. Significance: This vessel is significant as being one of the 36 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. Out of a fleet of hundreds of skipjacks that worked Bay waters in the early years of the 20th century, today only this small number remain to carry on the tradition of working sail. The skipjack evolved as a distinct type of Bay vessel in the 1890s as a cheaper-to-construct alternative to the earlier bugeyes and other traditional framed craft, in a period when shipbuilding costs were rising and the oyster catch was diminishing. The type was devised by enlarging (to 25' to 60') the hull of the ordinary, unframed, square-sterned Bay crabbing skiff, and giving it a deadrise bottom, a-deck, a cabin, and a sloop rig. The result--with its unframed, hard chine, cross-planked, V-bottom-proved inexpensive to build, easy to repair, and could be constructed by a competent house carpenter. Skipjacks were specifically designed as oyster dredge boats, with wide beams and low freeboard lending stability and providing a large working space on deck. The single masted rig, with sharp-headed mainsail and large jib, was easy to handle, powerful in light winds, and handy in coming about quickly for another pass over the oyster beds. CLARENCE CROCKETT is of interest as being one of the older skipjacks still dredging in the Chesapeake fleet. She was built in 1908 in Deep Creek, Virginia following traditional Bay-area design and construction methods. She has worked in the oyster-dredging fleet since her building and is presently based at Deal Island. The vessel is one of the 19 surviving working skipjacks to have been built previous to 1912, although, like the other members of the fleet, she has been much repaired over the years. A most recent addition includes an added "doghouse" with windows and a full-length door, an improvement designed to make the helm more comfortable for the skipper.

(USA 1988, 22 c. StG.2339)
Internet.

FLACH submarine 1866

The Santiago Times of 23 August 2007 has the following on the submarine FLACH:
Between 1864 and 1866 Chile and Peru fought Spain in a war that began when the later seized Peru’s guano-rich Chincha Islands. As part of the war effort, then Chilean President José Joaquín Pérez commissioned the construction of a submarine, only a few of which had ever been built anywhere in the world.

The president’s request actually resulted in two submarine prototypes; one designed and built by a man named Gustavo Heyermann, the other by Flach. Heyermann’s vessel, unfortunately, sank on its maiden voyage. FLACH’s sub, however, seemed to work quite well – at least during several days of initial testing.

Designed to protect Valapariso harbor from attack (the Spanish fleet in fact bombarded and leveled the city on Jan. 31, 1866), FLACH’s pedal-powered submarine was equipped with two cannons, one built right into the nose of the vessel. Built entirely of steel, it was 12.5 meters long, beam 1.5 meters and weighed an estimated 100 tons. Displacement ca 50 tons.

Wikipedia give on the submarine:
FLACH was the first submarine designed and built in Chile in 1866. It was lost on a test run the same year, and is believed to lie on the seabed of the bay of Valparaiso.
History
The FLACH was built in 1866 at the request of the Chilean government, by Karl FLACH, a German engineer and immigrant. It was the fifth submarine built in the world and, along with a second submarine, was intended to defend the port of Valparaiso against attack by the Spanish navy during the Chincha Islands War. (The second vessel, built by Gustavo Heyermann, sank on its maiden voyage.)
Loss
On 3 May 1866, after several days of successful testing, Karl Flach, his son, and nine other Chilean and German crewmen boarded the submarine for another test run. During the test, the submarine sank for unknown reasons; it is now thought to lie at a depth of about 50 meters (164 feet) within the bay of Valparaiso. The FLACH was located two days after the sinking by seamen from the English frigate HMS LEANDER, and a diver named John Wallace was able to see and draw the wreck, which was buried nose-down in the bay's sediment. According to some contemporary sources, an attempt to raise the submarine failed because of its burial.
Present location
The Chilean Navy, with support from others, has searched for the submarine and intends to raise it after finding it, even though there is as yet no agreement on what to do with the remains of the eleven bodies thought to be inside. A finding of an object that appears to be the FLACH was reported in El Mercurio de Valparaiso on 25 April 2007. However, the finding has not been confirmed, because, as of August 2007, sediment still has to be cleared away from the object.

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FLACH_(submarine)
Comoro Islands 2008 300 fc sg?, scott?
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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Arturo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:07 pm

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Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC: Vereinigde Oost-Indische Comapagnie). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 (The date on the stamp 1626 is wrong).
She was a vessel of 600 tons (180' x 40') and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons and a number of bronze guns. She was one of a fleet of eight V.O.C. ships which set sail from Texel on 27 October 1628. In addition to the usual complement of sailors and soldiers, she carried a few passengers and a large consingment of silver. Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. A twentieth-century replica of the ship is also called the Batavia and can be visited in Lelystad, Netherlands.
On 27 October 1628, the newly built Batavia, commissioned by the Dutch East India Company, sailed from Texel for the Dutch East Indies, to obtain spices. It sailed under commandeur and opperkoopman (upper- or senior merchant) Francisco Pelsaert, with Ariaen Jacobsz serving as skipper. These two had previously encountered each other in Surat, India. Although some animosity had developed between them there, it is not known whether Pelsaert even remembered Jacobsz when he boarded Batavia. Also on board was the onderkoopman (under-or junior merchant) Jeronimus Cornelisz, a bankrupt pharmacist from Haarlem who was fleeing the Netherlands, in fear of arrest because of his heretical beliefs associated with the painter Johannes van der Beeck, also known as Torrentius.
During the voyage, Jacobsz and Cornelisz conceived a plan to take the ship, which would allow them to start a new life somewhere, using the huge supply of trade gold and silver then on board. After leaving Cape Town, where they had stopped for supplies, Jacobsz deliberately steered the ship off course, away from the rest of the fleet. Jacobsz and Cornelisz had already gathered a small group of men around them and arranged an incident from which the mutiny was to ensue. This involved molesting a high-ranking young female passenger, Lucretia Jans, in order to provoke Pelsaert into disciplining the crew. They hoped to paint his discipline as unfair and recruit more members out of sympathy. However, the woman was able to identify her attackers. The mutineers were then forced to wait until Pelsaert made arrests, but he never acted, as he was suffering from an unknown illness.

On 4 June 1629 the ship struck Morning Reef near Beacon Island, part of the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast. Of the 322 aboard, most of the passengers and crew managed to get ashore, although 40 people drowned. The survivors, including all the women and children, were then transferred to nearby islands in the ship's longboat and yawl. An initial survey of the islands found no fresh water and only limited food (sea lions and birds). Pelsaert realised the dire situation and decided to search for water on the mainland.

A group comprising Captain Jacobsz, Francisco Pelsaert, senior officers, a few crewmembers, and some passengers left the wreck site in a 30-foot (9.1 m) longboat (a replica of which has also been made), in search of drinking water. After an unsuccessful search for water on the mainland, they headed north in a danger-fraught voyage to the city of Batavia, now known as Jakarta. This journey, which ranks as one of the greatest feats of navigation in open boats, took 33 days and, extraordinarily, all aboard survived.
After their arrival in Batavia, the boatswain, a man named Jan Evertsz, was arrested and executed for negligence and "outrageous behaviour" before the loss of the ship (he was suspected to have been involved). Jacobsz was also arrested for negligence, although his position in the potential mutiny was not guessed by Pelsaert.

Batavia's Governor General, Jan Coen, immediately gave Pelsaert command of the Sardam to rescue the other survivors, as well as to attempt to salvage riches from the Batavia's wreck. He arrived at the islands two months after leaving Batavia, only to discover that a bloody mutiny had taken place amongst the survivors, reducing their numbers by at least a hundred.

Jeronimus Cornelisz, who had been left in charge of the survivors, was well aware that if that party ever reached the port of Batavia, Pelsaert would report the impending mutiny, and his position in the planned mutiny might become apparent. Therefore, he made plans to hijack any rescue ship that might return and use the vessel to seek another safe haven. Cornelisz even made far-fetched plans to start a new kingdom, using the gold and silver from the wrecked Batavia. However, to carry out this plan, he first needed to eliminate possible opponents.

Cornelisz's first deliberate act was to have all weapons and food supplies commandeered and placed under his control. He then moved a group of soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to nearby West Wallabi Island, under the false pretence of searching for water. They were told to light signal fires when they found water and they would then be rescued. Convinced that they would be unsuccessful, he then left them there to die.

Cornelisz then had complete control. The remaining survivors would face two months of unrelenting butchery and savagery.

With a dedicated band of murderous young men, Cornelisz began to systematically kill anyone he believed would be a problem to his reign of terror, or a burden on their limited resources. The mutineers became intoxicated with killing, and no one could stop them. They needed only the smallest of excuses to drown, bash, strangle or stab to death any of their victims, including women and children.

Cornelisz never committed any of the murders himself, although he tried and failed to poison a baby (who was eventually strangled). Instead, he used his powers of persuasion to coerce others into doing it for him, firstly under the pretence that the victim had committed a crime such as theft. Eventually, the mutineers began to kill for pleasure, or simply because they were bored. He planned to reduce the island's population to around 45 so that their supplies would last as long as possible. In total, his followers murdered at least 110 men, women, and children.

Although Cornelisz had left the soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to die, they had in fact found good sources of water and food on their islands. Initially, they were unaware of the barbarity taking place on the other islands and sent pre-arranged smoke signals announcing their finds. However, they soon learned of the massacres from survivors fleeing Cornelisz' island. In response, the soldiers devised makeshift weapons from materials washed up from the wreck. They also set a watch so that they were ready for the mutineers, and built a small fort out of limestone and coral blocks.

Cornelisz seized on the news of water on the other island, as his own supply was dwindling and the continued survival of the soldiers threatened his own success. He went with his men to try to defeat the soldiers marooned on West Wallabi Island. However, the trained soldiers were by now much better fed than the mutineers and easily defeated them in several battles, eventually taking Cornelisz hostage. The mutineers who escaped regrouped under a man named Wouter Loos and tried again, this time employing muskets to besiege Hayes' fort and almost defeated the soldiers.

But Wiebbe Hayes' men prevailed again, just as Pelsaert arrived. A race to the rescue ship ensued between Cornelisz's men and the soldiers. Wiebbe Hayes reached the ship first and was able to present his side of the story to Pelsaert. After a short battle, the combined force captured all of the mutineers.

Pelsaert decided to conduct a trial on the islands, because the Saardam on the return voyage to Batavia would have been overcrowded with survivors and prisoners. After a brief trial, the worst offenders were taken to Seal Island and executed. Cornelisz and several of the major mutineers had both hands chopped off before being hanged. Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were maroonedon mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland. However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.

The remaining mutineers were taken to Batavia for trial. Five were hanged, while several others were flogged. Cornelisz's second in command, Jacop Pietersz, wasbroken on the wheel, the most severe punishment available at the time.

Captain Jacobsz, despite being tortured, did not confess to his part in planning the mutiny and escaped execution due to lack of evidence. What finally became of him is unknown. It is suspected that he died in prison in Batavia.

A board of inquiry decided that Pelsaert had exercised a lack of authority and was therefore partly responsible for what had happened. His financial assets were seized, and he died a broken man within a year.

On the other hand, the common soldier Wiebbe Hayes was hailed as a hero. The Dutch East India Company promoted him to sergeant, and later to lieutenant, which increased his salary fivefold.

Of the original 341 people on board the Batavia, only 68 made it to the port of Batavia.

During Admiralty surveys of the Abrolhos Islands on the north-west coast in April 1840, Captain Stokes of HMS Beagle reported that:
On the south west point of an island the beams of a large vessel were discovered, and as the crew of the Zeewyk, lost in 1728, reported having seen a wreck of a ship on this part, there is little doubt that the remains were those of the Batavia, Commodore Pelsart, lost in 1629. We in consequence named our temporary anchorage Batavia Road, and the whole group Pelsart Group.

However, Stokes appears to have confused the wreck of the Zeewyk for that of the Batavia. In the 1950s, historian Henrietta Drake-Brockman, who had learnt of the story due to her association with the children of the Abrolhos Islands guano merchant F. C. Broadhurst, son of Charles Edward Broadhurst, argued from extensive archival research and translations by E. D. Drok, that the wreck must lie in the Wallabi Group of islands. Surveyor Bruce Melrose and diving journalist Hugh Edwards agreed with the theory. In association with Drake-Brockman, Edwards organised a number of search expeditions near Beacon Island in the early 1960s and narrowly missed locating the site. After Edwards provided his research to them, and after being led to the place by Abrolhos rock lobster-fisherman Dave Johnson (who had seen an anchor from his boat while setting lobster pots), on 4 June 1963 Max and Graham Cramer with Greg Allen became the first to dive on the site. Its location, together with those of the VOC ship Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon) and the English East India CompanyTriall (Tryal), in the early 1960s, led to the formation of the Departments of Maritime Archaeology and Materials Conservation and Restoration at the Western Australian Museum.

In 1972, the Netherlands transferred all rights to Dutch shipwrecks on the Australian coasts to Australia. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle, Australia. Others are held by the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton. These two museums presently share the remains: a replica stone arch is held in The Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries, which was intended to serve as a stone welcome arch for the city of Batavia and the actual stone arch is held in the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; the original timbers from the ship's hull are held at the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries. While a great deal of materials have been recovered from the wreck-site, the majority of the cannons and anchors have been left in-situ. As a result, the wreck remains one of the premier dive sites on the West Australian coast and is part of the museum's wreck trail, or underwater "museum-without-walls" concept.

A replica of the Batavia was built at the Bataviawerf (Batavia Wharf) in Lelystad in the Netherlands. The project lasted from 1985 to 7 April 1995, and was conducted as an employment project for young people under master-shipbuilder Willem Vos. The shipyard is currently reconstructing another 17th century ship. In contrast to the merchant ship Batavia, Michiel de Ruyters' flagship, the Zeven Provinciën, See topic: De Zeven Provincien ( ship of the line).

The Batavia replica was built with traditional materials, such as oak and hemp, and using the tools and methods of the time of the original ship's construction. For the design, good use was made of the remains of the original ship in Fremantle (and of the Vasa in Stockholm), as well as historical sources, such as 17th century building descriptions (actual building plans weren't made at the time), and prints and paintings by artists (who,at the time, generally painted fairly true to nature),of similar ships.

On 25 September 1999, the new Batavia was transported to Australia by barge, and moored at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. In 2000, Batavia was the flagship for the Dutch Olympic Team during the 2000 Olympic Games. During its stay in Australia, the ship was towed to the ocean once, where it sailed on its own. On 12 June 2001, the ship returned to the Batavia werf in Lelystad, where it remains on display to visitors. On the evening of 13 October 2008, a fire ripped through the wharf. The museum's workshops, rigging loft, block shop, offices, part of a restaurant and the entire hand-sewn suit of sails of the ship were lost to the blaze, however the replica of "De Zeven Provinciën" nearby was undamaged. The moored Batavia was never in danger.

Burkina Faso, 1999, S.G.?, Scott: 1134.
Source: Wikipedia
Arturo
 
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:02 pm

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Batavia
Niger2014;750f;SG? Djibouti2013;400f;SG? Malawi2013;SG?
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Dec 30, 2015 7:57 pm

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Germany Postmark 2015. Most probably depict the replica of the BATAVIA.
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:00 pm

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(New Earth ???)
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 pm

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Batavia 1628. Djibouti 2015;1000f.
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