SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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RDA tug

The tug depict on this stamp has the inscription RDA, not a tug exist so far I could find out under that name in Cuba.
R.D.A. means Republica Democratica Alemania (East Germany, DDR) Remolcador is Spanish for tug.
Most probably the tug was a present of East Germany to Cuba.
Have not any info on the tug.

Cuba 1965 10c sg1315, scott1062.
Sources: EWA.

13 DE MARZO

Built as a cargo (reefer) vessel under yard No 125 by Soc. Espanola de Const. Naval, Sestao (Bilbao), Spain for Empresa de Nav. Mambisa, Havana, Cuba.
Launched as the 13 DE MARZO.
Tonnage 9,390 grt, 3,693 nrt, 13,000 dwt, dim. 156.9 x 19.7 x 9.3m. (draught), length bpp. 143.3m.
Powered by one 6-cyl Sulzer 6 RD76 diesel,9,600 bhp., one shaft, speed 17 knots.
Cargo capacity: 612,052 cubic feet general cargo and 40,012 cubic feet reefer cargo.
August 1965 delivered to owners. Imo No 6517043.

After completing used in the service between Cuba to Hong Kong and China.
April 1991 sold, unknown owner, renamed MARZO, homeport Kingstown, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.
14 July 1991 arrived at Alang, India for scrapping by Goyal Traders.

Source: Miramar and Internet.
Cuba 1965 13c sg1316, scott1063.

Wooloomooloo –Clipper 1852

‘WOOLOOMOOLOO’ Built 1852. Wood ship of 627 Tons. Length; 154.7 ft. Breadth; 26.9 ft. Depth; 19.1 ft. Built at Aberdeen She was a member of the White Star line. Reg; Aberdeen. Master; Captain J.Ross. The clipper is named after the inner city of the eastern suburb of Sydney-«Woolloomooloo». Aberdeen Register of Ships (Aberdeen City Archives):Registered 27 September 1852,2 decks and half poopdeck and forecastle, 3 masts, standing bowsprit, female figurehead, Master Charles Stuart. Daily News, 27/10/1852 reports: Australian line of packets - for Sydney direct the splendid new Aberdeen clipper built ship WOOLOOMOOLOO, Charles Stewart Commander, now loading London Docks. This fine ship is expected to be one of the fastest in the Australian trade and has handsome accommodations for cabin Clipper begins flight passengers. 1853- Clipper begins voyage Aberdeen-Port Philipheads, Victoria, Australia. The Courier, Hobart, 2/3/1853, Quoting Sydney Herald, 19/2/1853: The WOOLOOMOOLOO - this beautiful clipper built vessel arrived yesterday after an excellent run of 87 days from Portsmouth. She is commanded by Captain Stuart, late of Prince of Wales, a gentleman well known in the Sydney trade... [She] sails remarkably fast, having been only 56 days from the line. She encountered very severe weather in the channel... but this her maiden voyage proves her to be all that could be wished... has on board £63,000 in specie for the various banks [during Australian Gold Rush]. (Source: Historic Australian Newspapers Online http://ndpbeta.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home)). WOOLOOMOOLOO sailed from Sydney 27 Feb 1854 for London. Melbourne Age, 06/09/1855 About this voyage : [extracts from letter from passenger Per Maidot Judah] After rounding the horn scarcely anything but head winds and calms. On one of these days we fell in with good ship WOOLOOMOOLOO. Captain Stewart and a passenger came aboard and took tea wit us. WOOLOOMOOLOO arrived home shortly after us. On arrival she collided with a steamer «FALCON (S.S.)», which did some damage to the ship and killed a sailor boy instantaneously. But for Captain Stewart stooping over he would have met a similar fate. The newspapers reported 1857: WOOLOOMOOLOO in voyage from Sydney for London, 40 miles west of Wilson's Promontory [Victoria] losed her main and mizzen masts. She was steering west with a fair wind. WOOLOOMOOLOO arrived London 11 Feb. 1858 from Sydney 17 Nov. 23/4/1858 the vessel altered from rig of ship to barque-rigged. Maitland Mercury, 03/08/1858: Sydney shipping, WOOLOOMOOLOO - this old favourite arrived yesterday after passage of 91 days, considerably protracted by very heavy gales experienced since making land and which forced her to come round Van Diemen's Land. No vessels sighted since leaving the channel. 18/5/1859 the vessel altered from rig of barque to ship-rigged. WOOLOOMOOLOO sailed from Glasgow 20 July for Sydney. (Arrived 13 Oct, 97 days from Greenock, Master Henry - Sydney M.H., 20/10/1860). Ipswich (Queensland) Herald, 19/07/1861: Arrived London 12 May. She would have arrived in ample time for the May sales had it not been for succession of light winds and calms. In spite of these line was crossed on 61st day and on 26 April ship was within 200 miles of Land's End. At this point light winds and occasional gales from east kept her back in spite of every exertion by the captain to get in in time. 1868-69, Master John Stewart (died on return to Tilbury after round trip to Australia). She was sold to the Spaniards and was wrecked in 1885.Aberdeen-Australia service. The design stamp is made after painting of Richard Barnett Spencer.
Tchad 2013;250f. Source: http://www.aberdeenships.com/single.asp ... ndex=99370. http://colonialtallshipsrayw1.blogspot. ... ndary.html

JOHN GLENN (T-ESD-2)

Built as an Expeditionary Transfer Dock under yard No 542 by National Steel (NASSCO), San Diego for the Military Sealift Command in the USA.
27 May 2013 ordered.
17 April 2012 laid down.
15 September 2013 launched as the USNS JOHN GLENN (T-ESD-2) one of the Montford Point class vessel of which 5 will be built.
Displacement 34,500 ton, tonnage 58,265 grt, 77,021 dwt, dim. 239.3 x 50.0m, length bpp. 232.2m
Powered diesel electric by four MAN/H&W medium speed diesels, diesel electric plant 24 MW, twin screws, speed 15 knots. A 2 MW azimuth bow thruster. Range by a speed of 15 knots, 9,500 mile.
Carried 3 Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) and can carry 2 MH-53 helicopters.
12 March 2014 in service.

USNS JOHN GLENN (T-ESD-2), (formerly MLP-2) is a United States Navy Expeditionary Transfer Dock ship named in honor of John Glenn, a Naval Aviator, retired United States Marine Corps colonel, veteran of World War II and the Korean War, astronaut, and United States senator.
Design
The Expeditionary Transfer Dock is a new concept, part of the Maritime Prepositioning Force of the future. To control costs, the ships will not be built to combat vessel standards and are designed primarily to support three military hovercraft (such as the Landing Craft Air Cushion), vehicle staging with a sideport ramp and large mooring fenders. A decision was made to eliminate helicopter capability and ship-to-ship transfer of heavy equipment. The propulsion motors are of British design and build. Power conversion company Converteam was selected as the supplier of Integrated Power Systems with the award of an additional contract to design and supply the electric power, propulsion and vessel automation system.
An auxiliary support ship, its role would be a seagoing pier for friendly forces in case accessibility to onshore bases are denied. Such flexibility would be useful following natural disasters and for supporting US Marines once they are ashore. The ESD in its basic form possesses a core capability set that supports a vehicle staging area, side port ramp, large mooring fenders and up to three landing craft air cushioned vessel lanes.
Construction
The ship's keel was laid down on 17 April 2012 at the National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) shipyard in San Diego, California. It was christened on 2 February 2014 and was attended by John Glenn and his family. Other Navy and Marine guest speakers that attended the ceremony include Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisitions) Sean Stackley, Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert, and Lieutenant General John A. Toolan.
The JOHN GLENN was delivered in 2014 to the Military Sealift Command's Maritime Prepositioning Force. As an ESD, the ship is under the command of the United States Navy's Military Sealift Command, and thus will not be commissioned into the US Navy (hence her designation prefix, "USNS").The ship will undergo further construction additions at the Vigor Shipyard in Portland, Oregon.
Ship re-designation
Effective 4 September 2015, U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus officially announced the creation of a new ship designation, "E" for expeditionary support. Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) will be called Expeditionary Fast Transport, or EPF; the Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) will be called Expeditionary Transfer Dock, or ESD; and the Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) variant of the MLP will be called Expeditionary Mobile Base, or ESB. The new designation was pursuant to a memorandum sent to Secretary Mabus from Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert dated 31 August 2015.

2017 In service. IMO No 9647526.

Gabon 2017 650F sgMS?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USNS_John_Glenn_(T-ESD-2)

DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH packet ship

The stamp shows the packet vessel DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH ca 1802, there were two packet ships under that name, both owned and commanded by the famous packet captain John Bull.
The first built in 1801, the second built in 1806.
The stamp has the year 1802 on it, at that time the DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH (1) was in service in the Falmouth packet service.
Lloyds Registry of 1803 gives that she was owned by J. Ball (most probably wrongly given by Lloyds and was it J.Bull.), commanded by J. Ball? (Bull). 180 ton and built in Dartmouth.
It is given that she made voyages in the Packet service to the West Indies.
14 November 1803 sailed Falmouth for New York, made a call in the Scilly for bad weather, sailed from there on 27th November and arrived New York 17 January 1804, returned Falmouth 05 March 1804, that voyage under command of Capt. J. Bull.

July 1804 the DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH was captured by a French privateer, a musket ball passed during the action through Bull’s mouth knocking out two of his teeth and injuring his jaw. Before leaving his mouth to lodge in the mast. After the battle Bull retrieved the ball as a souvenir.
Lloyds Registry 1804 does not mentioned her more.
27 July 1804 the ARABELLA Packet arrived in the Leeward Islands with the news that the DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH was captured and carried in at Guadeloupe where she was fitted out as a privateer with 20 guns, other source gives 16 long French 6 pounders and a crew of 140.
Renamed in La DAME AMBERT.

After sailing from Guadeloupe she sighted the British warship HMS LILLY of the action is given by Wikipedia:
HMS LILLY was off the coast of Georgia in the afternoon of 14 July 1804 when she sighted two vessels. She sailed towards them but by sunset was only able to determine that one was a ship and the other a smaller vessel, possibly the larger vessel's prize. In the morning the larger vessel could be seen towing the smaller. As LILLY approached, the larger vessel dropped her tow and sailed to engage LILLY.
The enemy vessel proceeded to stay by LILLY's stern and to use her long guns at ranges LILLY's carronades could not match. The fire from the enemy vessel killed Compton and so damaged LILLY's rigging that she lost her ability to manoeuvre. Seeing that the enemy vessel was preparing to board, Lieutenant Samuel Fowler, who was now in command, wanted to surrender, but the warrant officers objected. As the two vessels came alongside LILLY was finally able to fire a broadside, which the French returned, and French fire killed Fowler. The British repelled several French attempts to board but eventually the French prevailed. LILLY's casualties were Compton and Fowler killed, and 16 men wounded.
The French vessel was La DAME AMBERT, a privateer of 16 guns. DAME AMBERT had been the British packet MARLBOROUGH (or MARLBORO, DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH or GENERAL MARLBOROUGH prior to her capture.
The French put their British prisoners onto a prize vessel and sent them into Hampton Roads. Once in America, a number of the British seamen deserted.

Could not find the fate of the La DAME AMBERT.

Belize 1985 25c sg848, scott? (The painting made by Jean_Basptista Henri Durand-Brager shows the action between HMS LILLY and La DAME AMBERT.)
Source: Internet and Lloyds Registry.

TAE GAK BONG (North Korea)

Built in 1983 by Chongjin Shipyard for Ocean Maritime Management, Pyongyang.
General Cargo, Gt:6587, Dw:9854, Loa:130,95m. B:18,40m. Draft:8m. IMO.8729884, call sign HMBO.
15-05-2009 renamed DAE GAK BONG.

North Korean freighter Dae Gak Bong abandoned, no news on vessel or crew fate
Monday, December 17, 2012
North Korean general cargo vessel Dae(Tae) Gak Bong issued distress signal on Dec 9 12 in position 41-29N 131-02E, some 50 miles off North Korean coast, Japan sea. Disabled vessel was adrift after engine failure and total blackout. MRCC Vladivostok relayed information to North Korean authorities. Notices to Mariners on Dec 15 reported that the 24 crew left the vessel on a life raft. No other information as to the fate of crew or vessel available.

(North Korea 1994, 30 ch. StG.?)
Internet.
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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Arturo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:07 pm

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Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC: Vereinigde Oost-Indische Comapagnie). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 (The date on the stamp 1626 is wrong).
She was a vessel of 600 tons (180' x 40') and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons and a number of bronze guns. She was one of a fleet of eight V.O.C. ships which set sail from Texel on 27 October 1628. In addition to the usual complement of sailors and soldiers, she carried a few passengers and a large consingment of silver. Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. A twentieth-century replica of the ship is also called the Batavia and can be visited in Lelystad, Netherlands.
On 27 October 1628, the newly built Batavia, commissioned by the Dutch East India Company, sailed from Texel for the Dutch East Indies, to obtain spices. It sailed under commandeur and opperkoopman (upper- or senior merchant) Francisco Pelsaert, with Ariaen Jacobsz serving as skipper. These two had previously encountered each other in Surat, India. Although some animosity had developed between them there, it is not known whether Pelsaert even remembered Jacobsz when he boarded Batavia. Also on board was the onderkoopman (under-or junior merchant) Jeronimus Cornelisz, a bankrupt pharmacist from Haarlem who was fleeing the Netherlands, in fear of arrest because of his heretical beliefs associated with the painter Johannes van der Beeck, also known as Torrentius.
During the voyage, Jacobsz and Cornelisz conceived a plan to take the ship, which would allow them to start a new life somewhere, using the huge supply of trade gold and silver then on board. After leaving Cape Town, where they had stopped for supplies, Jacobsz deliberately steered the ship off course, away from the rest of the fleet. Jacobsz and Cornelisz had already gathered a small group of men around them and arranged an incident from which the mutiny was to ensue. This involved molesting a high-ranking young female passenger, Lucretia Jans, in order to provoke Pelsaert into disciplining the crew. They hoped to paint his discipline as unfair and recruit more members out of sympathy. However, the woman was able to identify her attackers. The mutineers were then forced to wait until Pelsaert made arrests, but he never acted, as he was suffering from an unknown illness.

On 4 June 1629 the ship struck Morning Reef near Beacon Island, part of the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast. Of the 322 aboard, most of the passengers and crew managed to get ashore, although 40 people drowned. The survivors, including all the women and children, were then transferred to nearby islands in the ship's longboat and yawl. An initial survey of the islands found no fresh water and only limited food (sea lions and birds). Pelsaert realised the dire situation and decided to search for water on the mainland.

A group comprising Captain Jacobsz, Francisco Pelsaert, senior officers, a few crewmembers, and some passengers left the wreck site in a 30-foot (9.1 m) longboat (a replica of which has also been made), in search of drinking water. After an unsuccessful search for water on the mainland, they headed north in a danger-fraught voyage to the city of Batavia, now known as Jakarta. This journey, which ranks as one of the greatest feats of navigation in open boats, took 33 days and, extraordinarily, all aboard survived.
After their arrival in Batavia, the boatswain, a man named Jan Evertsz, was arrested and executed for negligence and "outrageous behaviour" before the loss of the ship (he was suspected to have been involved). Jacobsz was also arrested for negligence, although his position in the potential mutiny was not guessed by Pelsaert.

Batavia's Governor General, Jan Coen, immediately gave Pelsaert command of the Sardam to rescue the other survivors, as well as to attempt to salvage riches from the Batavia's wreck. He arrived at the islands two months after leaving Batavia, only to discover that a bloody mutiny had taken place amongst the survivors, reducing their numbers by at least a hundred.

Jeronimus Cornelisz, who had been left in charge of the survivors, was well aware that if that party ever reached the port of Batavia, Pelsaert would report the impending mutiny, and his position in the planned mutiny might become apparent. Therefore, he made plans to hijack any rescue ship that might return and use the vessel to seek another safe haven. Cornelisz even made far-fetched plans to start a new kingdom, using the gold and silver from the wrecked Batavia. However, to carry out this plan, he first needed to eliminate possible opponents.

Cornelisz's first deliberate act was to have all weapons and food supplies commandeered and placed under his control. He then moved a group of soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to nearby West Wallabi Island, under the false pretence of searching for water. They were told to light signal fires when they found water and they would then be rescued. Convinced that they would be unsuccessful, he then left them there to die.

Cornelisz then had complete control. The remaining survivors would face two months of unrelenting butchery and savagery.

With a dedicated band of murderous young men, Cornelisz began to systematically kill anyone he believed would be a problem to his reign of terror, or a burden on their limited resources. The mutineers became intoxicated with killing, and no one could stop them. They needed only the smallest of excuses to drown, bash, strangle or stab to death any of their victims, including women and children.

Cornelisz never committed any of the murders himself, although he tried and failed to poison a baby (who was eventually strangled). Instead, he used his powers of persuasion to coerce others into doing it for him, firstly under the pretence that the victim had committed a crime such as theft. Eventually, the mutineers began to kill for pleasure, or simply because they were bored. He planned to reduce the island's population to around 45 so that their supplies would last as long as possible. In total, his followers murdered at least 110 men, women, and children.

Although Cornelisz had left the soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to die, they had in fact found good sources of water and food on their islands. Initially, they were unaware of the barbarity taking place on the other islands and sent pre-arranged smoke signals announcing their finds. However, they soon learned of the massacres from survivors fleeing Cornelisz' island. In response, the soldiers devised makeshift weapons from materials washed up from the wreck. They also set a watch so that they were ready for the mutineers, and built a small fort out of limestone and coral blocks.

Cornelisz seized on the news of water on the other island, as his own supply was dwindling and the continued survival of the soldiers threatened his own success. He went with his men to try to defeat the soldiers marooned on West Wallabi Island. However, the trained soldiers were by now much better fed than the mutineers and easily defeated them in several battles, eventually taking Cornelisz hostage. The mutineers who escaped regrouped under a man named Wouter Loos and tried again, this time employing muskets to besiege Hayes' fort and almost defeated the soldiers.

But Wiebbe Hayes' men prevailed again, just as Pelsaert arrived. A race to the rescue ship ensued between Cornelisz's men and the soldiers. Wiebbe Hayes reached the ship first and was able to present his side of the story to Pelsaert. After a short battle, the combined force captured all of the mutineers.

Pelsaert decided to conduct a trial on the islands, because the Saardam on the return voyage to Batavia would have been overcrowded with survivors and prisoners. After a brief trial, the worst offenders were taken to Seal Island and executed. Cornelisz and several of the major mutineers had both hands chopped off before being hanged. Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were maroonedon mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland. However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.

The remaining mutineers were taken to Batavia for trial. Five were hanged, while several others were flogged. Cornelisz's second in command, Jacop Pietersz, wasbroken on the wheel, the most severe punishment available at the time.

Captain Jacobsz, despite being tortured, did not confess to his part in planning the mutiny and escaped execution due to lack of evidence. What finally became of him is unknown. It is suspected that he died in prison in Batavia.

A board of inquiry decided that Pelsaert had exercised a lack of authority and was therefore partly responsible for what had happened. His financial assets were seized, and he died a broken man within a year.

On the other hand, the common soldier Wiebbe Hayes was hailed as a hero. The Dutch East India Company promoted him to sergeant, and later to lieutenant, which increased his salary fivefold.

Of the original 341 people on board the Batavia, only 68 made it to the port of Batavia.

During Admiralty surveys of the Abrolhos Islands on the north-west coast in April 1840, Captain Stokes of HMS Beagle reported that:
On the south west point of an island the beams of a large vessel were discovered, and as the crew of the Zeewyk, lost in 1728, reported having seen a wreck of a ship on this part, there is little doubt that the remains were those of the Batavia, Commodore Pelsart, lost in 1629. We in consequence named our temporary anchorage Batavia Road, and the whole group Pelsart Group.

However, Stokes appears to have confused the wreck of the Zeewyk for that of the Batavia. In the 1950s, historian Henrietta Drake-Brockman, who had learnt of the story due to her association with the children of the Abrolhos Islands guano merchant F. C. Broadhurst, son of Charles Edward Broadhurst, argued from extensive archival research and translations by E. D. Drok, that the wreck must lie in the Wallabi Group of islands. Surveyor Bruce Melrose and diving journalist Hugh Edwards agreed with the theory. In association with Drake-Brockman, Edwards organised a number of search expeditions near Beacon Island in the early 1960s and narrowly missed locating the site. After Edwards provided his research to them, and after being led to the place by Abrolhos rock lobster-fisherman Dave Johnson (who had seen an anchor from his boat while setting lobster pots), on 4 June 1963 Max and Graham Cramer with Greg Allen became the first to dive on the site. Its location, together with those of the VOC ship Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon) and the English East India CompanyTriall (Tryal), in the early 1960s, led to the formation of the Departments of Maritime Archaeology and Materials Conservation and Restoration at the Western Australian Museum.

In 1972, the Netherlands transferred all rights to Dutch shipwrecks on the Australian coasts to Australia. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle, Australia. Others are held by the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton. These two museums presently share the remains: a replica stone arch is held in The Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries, which was intended to serve as a stone welcome arch for the city of Batavia and the actual stone arch is held in the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; the original timbers from the ship's hull are held at the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries. While a great deal of materials have been recovered from the wreck-site, the majority of the cannons and anchors have been left in-situ. As a result, the wreck remains one of the premier dive sites on the West Australian coast and is part of the museum's wreck trail, or underwater "museum-without-walls" concept.

A replica of the Batavia was built at the Bataviawerf (Batavia Wharf) in Lelystad in the Netherlands. The project lasted from 1985 to 7 April 1995, and was conducted as an employment project for young people under master-shipbuilder Willem Vos. The shipyard is currently reconstructing another 17th century ship. In contrast to the merchant ship Batavia, Michiel de Ruyters' flagship, the Zeven Provinciën, See topic: De Zeven Provincien ( ship of the line).

The Batavia replica was built with traditional materials, such as oak and hemp, and using the tools and methods of the time of the original ship's construction. For the design, good use was made of the remains of the original ship in Fremantle (and of the Vasa in Stockholm), as well as historical sources, such as 17th century building descriptions (actual building plans weren't made at the time), and prints and paintings by artists (who,at the time, generally painted fairly true to nature),of similar ships.

On 25 September 1999, the new Batavia was transported to Australia by barge, and moored at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. In 2000, Batavia was the flagship for the Dutch Olympic Team during the 2000 Olympic Games. During its stay in Australia, the ship was towed to the ocean once, where it sailed on its own. On 12 June 2001, the ship returned to the Batavia werf in Lelystad, where it remains on display to visitors. On the evening of 13 October 2008, a fire ripped through the wharf. The museum's workshops, rigging loft, block shop, offices, part of a restaurant and the entire hand-sewn suit of sails of the ship were lost to the blaze, however the replica of "De Zeven Provinciën" nearby was undamaged. The moored Batavia was never in danger.

Burkina Faso, 1999, S.G.?, Scott: 1134.
Source: Wikipedia
Arturo
 
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:02 pm

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Batavia
Niger2014;750f;SG? Djibouti2013;400f;SG? Malawi2013;SG?
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Dec 30, 2015 7:57 pm

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Germany Postmark 2015. Most probably depict the replica of the BATAVIA.
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:00 pm

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(New Earth ???)
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 pm

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Batavia 1628. Djibouti 2015;1000f.
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