SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

FERRY SEA COASTER CONCEPT

When you look carefully to this stamp you can see that the name ROCKET II is painted mid-ships on the hull, the stamp gives that a “ferry sea coaster concept” is shown. The stamp shows I believe a ship drawing of the design, but actually the ship is the ISLAND ROCKET II.

She was built in 1997 for the Island Express Boat Lines, Sandosky, OH by the Air Ride Craft Inc. Miami.
Delivered as the ISLAND ROCKET II.
Tonnage 32 grt, 25 nrt, dim. 64.70 x 19.20 x 6.5ft.
Powered by?

On the "home-grown" design front, the new Surface Effect Ship (SES) catamaran ferry ISLAND ROCKET II will begin service this summer on Lake Erie for owner Island Express Boat Lines, Ltd., Sandusky, Ohio.
"We were looking for something with a little more speed and a little more passenger comfort," Island Express general manager Brad Castle told Marine Log, "and this certainly fit the bill."
At full load, Castle says the 149-passenger ISLAND ROCKET II should reach cruising speeds in the "mid-40 knot range" and still be comfortable for passengers. It will combine with Island Express Boat Lines' other ferry, the ISLAND ROCKET I, to offer regular service from Sandusky to Kelleys Island to Put-in-Bay.
Based on the Seacoaster design from inventor Don Burg, president of Air Ride Craft, Inc., Miami, the 72 ft ISLAND ROCKET II integrates the best features of an SES and a catamaran. Like other SESs, the Seacoaster rides on a pressurized air cushion created under the vessel, which carries some 75 to 90% of its weight, greatly reducing the wetted area hull friction. This means that an SES normally needs much less propulsive power--about half--of that required for similar size monohulls or catamarans at speeds of 25 knots and up. For operators, this translates into fuel and power savings, a smooth ride in rough seas, and better wake characteristics at high speeds.
While SES craft are nothing new, the Seacoaster design has attracted some interest among other operators. One of those is Dan Yates, owner of the PORTLAND SPIRIT, as well as two other dinner boats in Portland, Ore. Yates has been exploring the possibility of creating a network of water taxis and fast ferries that would connect downtown Portland with Vancouver, Wash., via the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. The concept would involve possibly five ferries in the 100 passenger range.
"The designs are out there," says Yates, "but I don't want to be an innovator in technology. Rather, I want to use technology in an innovative way." But because of political and operational hurdles, he believes the effort could take two more years to come to fruition. "There's a strong light rail contingent," says Yates, "and there's also a lot of debris in the river. My dinner boats get their props banged every so often by 125 ft trees floating down the river," says Yates. ML

http://m.marinelog.com/DOCS/hisp.html

2005 The last I can find on the net that she was in a service in Florida and for sale. At that time still owned by the same owner, under USA Flag and registry IMO Number D1058181.

https://cgmix.uscg.mil/PSIX/PSIXSearch.aspx
Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

PLANESAIL yacht

John Walker, an aircraft designer working on Concorde, designed and built PLANESAIL, at Devonport Dockyard, Plymouth, UK.
She was a no expense spared build using modern aircraft construction techniques, using the latest high tech materials like epoxy laminates, Nomex, Airex foam, carbon and glass, and cost several million.
1990 PLANESAIL was delivered.
Length 57 ft., weight 16 tons.
Two auxiliary diesel engines each 36 hp
PLANESAIL was later also called BLUE NOVA and INVENTURE.
1991
PLANESAIL made history as the first Wingsail yacht to cross the Atlantic. Though heavily landen for her transatlantic voyage, she achieved speeds of 18 knots.
She also encountered hurricanes Claudette & Andrew.
John Walker reported:
The wind had gone “off the clock” at 50 knots by midnight and stayed there for several hours as the noise of the wind continued to increase. We can only estimate that it reached perhaps 60-70 knots. Plenty, anyway. From later analysis of information from our GPS, log and the Hurricane Centre in Coral Gables, Florida, it seemed that we had passed around 60 miles from the core of Madame Claudette, and if we hadn't been able to gybe Blue Nova round we should have gone straight on into her centre.
and
Sailing Blue Nova up towards Manhattan Island past the Statue of Liberty was a great moment for us all, and TV film shot from a circling helicopter made it straight on to the evening news. A charming Customs man didn't even bother to look at our passports, let alone search the ship. He cheerfully made out our Cruising Permit and wished us a happy stay in the US.
1995 - Cowes Week
The Duke of Edinburgh spent 4 hours on board with only his personal bodyguard, the designer John Walker, and a photographer.
1997
28 February: The Next Challenge Ltd, set up by Trevor Jones in 1995, purchases PLANESAIL from Walker Wingsail plc.
PLANESAIL was customized by Simon Rogers for a circumnavigation by wheelchair bound quadriplegic, Trevor Jones.
Trevor intended to be the first quadriplegic to sail around the world.
Trevor was the Navy pilot who plucked Virgin tycoon Sir Richard Branson to safety after his transatlantic balloon crashed into the Irish Sea in 1987.14 October: Trevor throws the orange gauntlet at Richard Branson's feet at 10 yr rescue reunion on HMS Endurance, challenging him, wagering that Trevor would be the first to make it around the world in a customized yacht, before Branson made it around the world in a balloon.
1998
11 December: Trevor sails PLANESAIL, renamed INVENTURE, to London, were she was unveiled with the help of the Duke of York.
2001 - New Daggerboard
Nigel Irens locates a suitable new daggerboard to replace the centerboard of Planessail, for improved windward performance. It is from the French racing trimaran Primagaz.
The daggerboard is purchased for £8,000 and Simon Rogers designs the new slot for it using carbon fibre.
2001 - Around Britain
As a preparation for his circumnavigation, Trevor does the Around Britain Challenge starting the challenge on 8 August, and completing it on 19 November.
His circumnavigation attempt had to be cancelled because of poor health.

2002
Inventure Trust charity launched in London, with corporate sponsors on board. PLANESAIL as INVENTURE was certified by Mecal to operate as a sailing vessel for disabled passengers.
2004
PLANESAIL lost her Wingsail rig. The Inventure Trust continued to operate her as a Mecal certified charter motor vessel for disabled passengers.
2006
PLANESAIL purchased by current owner, who conducted an extensive refit to prepare her for long distance cruising.
2011
PLANESAIL cruised from Plymouth to the Algarve, via the Americas Cup at Cascais. The trip went smoothly, without incident.

2017 Can’t find anything on her on the net.

Downloaded from: http://PLANESAIL.com/history/index.html
Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

CANADIAN NAVY UNIFORMS

The Royal Canadian Navy was formed in 1910, at the time of the Anglo-German naval arms race. The Canadian parliament looked to the new navy to help preserve "the security of commerce, the safety of the empire, and the peace of the world." In the face of German naval expansion, the Royal Navy began to concentrate its strength in European waters between 1880 and 1906. Gradually, naval duties in Canadian waters had to be taken over by vessels of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. In 1902 Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier stated his intention of creating a Canadian navy, but not until the Dreadnought crisis of 1906-08 did circumstances favour development of the idea. The British-designed dreadnought battleships had unmatched firepower, but the German navy quickly developed ships of comparable capabilities. It was clear that German would soon equal Britain in this category, and when German dreadnought construction began to outstrip that of Britain, pressure mounted in the Dominions to lend the mother country a hand. The debate in the Canadian Parliament revealed deep divisions of opinion. Some urged a cash donation to allow the British to build more dreadnoughts. Others advocated what their opponents scornfully called a "tin-pot-navy" of small ships like those in the fisheries protection fleet. Another group feared that a Canadian navy would cause Canada to become embroiled, as in the Boer War, with Britain's imperial conflicts. Although these differences would help to defeat the Liberals in the election of 1911, Sir Wilfrid Laurier's government successfully brought in the Naval Service Act. It received royal assent on 4 May 1910, and the Royal Canadian Navy's first warship, the old British cruiser Niobe, entered Halifax Harbour on 21 October 1910.
The Navy stamp was designed by Toronto illustrator William Southern and graphic designer Ralph Tibbles. The design features naval personnel from three time periods: a gunner's mate from HMCS NIOBE; a World War II officer in duffel coat; and an female enlisted person in the new summer-white dress uniform.

Reference
Canada Post Corporation. [Postage Stamp Press Release], 1985.
Canada 1985 34p sg 1189, scott 1075

SCOUT BOAT

For the 125th Anniversary of the death of General Major Sir John Doyle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_John_ ... st_Baronet , Guernsey used four stamps in 1984. Only one stamp has a maritime theme.

The 34p stamp depicts a “scout” or “look-out-boat”, the ship is nearing the Casquets light-house, on deck you can see the helmsman and some armed guards. The boat was loaned to the British Post Office to carry the mail between the Channel Islands and the U,K. during the French wars.

Owing to the infrequent sailings of the Post Office packets, various cutters, or scouts as they were called, were loaned to carry the mail. Each governor of the Islands had a scout for his dispatches during the war, as did the Commander in Chief of the British Naval Squadron at Jersey. The names of some of these vessels were the MARY (armed scout). BRITANNIA— Captain Naylor, BRILLIANT — Captain Court, SIR SYDNEY (armed scout), SIR WILLIAM CURTIS— Captain Batton, and RAPID— Captain White.

https://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php ... efore_1815 Guernsey Post Office release.
Guernsey 1984 34p sg 331, scott306.

BLOCKADE RUNNER (Bahamas)

During the American Civil War, blockade running became a major enterprise for the Confederacy due to the Union's Anaconda Plan, which sought to cut off all the Confederacy's overseas trade. Twelve major ports and approximately 3,500 miles of coastline along the Confederate States were patrolled by some 500 ships that were commissioned by the Union government. Great Britain played a major role on the blockade running business, as they had huge investments in the south and were the recipients of many commodities exported goods, especially cotton. Great Britain also had control over many of the neutral ports in the Caribbean, as well as Atlantic ports off the East Coast of the United States, such as the Bahamas and Bermuda. To protect their interests British investors had engineered steamships that were longer, narrower and considerably faster than most of the conventional steamers guarding the American coastline, thus enabling them to outmaneuver and outrun Union ships on blockade patrol. Among the more notable of these premier vessels was the CSS ADVANCE that completed more than 20 successful runs through the Union blockade before being captured. These vessels also served to import badly needed supplies, especially firearms, and also served to bring mail to and from the Confederacy. The blockade played a major role in the Union's victory over the Confederate states. By the end of the Civil War the Union Navy had captured more than 1,100 blockade runners and had destroyed or run aground another 355 vessels.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade_ ... _Civil_War
More info is given on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade_ ... _Civil_War

On the site given below I found the image after which the Bahamas stamp was designed, but the site did not give a name, and I could not find a name either, she was an early blockade runner with one mast and all the photos on the internet or books I have shown blockade runners with two masts.
Can somebody place a shipsname by the blockade runner?
http://www.minecreek.info/blockade-runn ... nners.html
Bahamas 1980 18c sg 564, scott? and 1983 80c on 18c sg 648, scott?

SEA DIVER (diving support ship)

Built as a diving support vessel under yard No 943 by Quincy Adams Yacht Yard, Quincy, MA for the Sea Diver Corp., New York.
Launched as the SEA DIVER.
Tonnage 158 grt, 108 net, dim. 25.69 (bpp) x 6.88 x 2.96m. (draught)
Powered by two 6-cyl. Caterpillar diesels each 403 kW, twin shafts, speed ?
Accommodation for 12 passengers.
01 January 1959 delivered to owners.

1959, Edwin and Marion Link led an expedition sponsored by National Geographic, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Institute of Jamaica. This was the first mission with their new vessel SEA DIVER, the first in the world specifically designed for marine archaeology. Fitted out with specialized equipment includes bow nozzles for waterjet steering, air compressor for divers air supply and 10” suction hoses, a heavy duty crane, built in glass windows in the bow, in the stern is a diving compartment opening in the sea.

Carried an 18 ft. water-jet-propelled launch for exploration in shallow water.

On the stamp she is shown exploring the sunken city of Port Royal, Jamaica in 1959. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1692_Jamaica_earthquake

1959 She spent 10 weeks in Jamaica exploring the sunken city of Port Royal.
01 July 2001 she was renamed EDWIN LINK.
1994 She was rebuilt and repowered. Tonnage given as 160 grt, 48 nrt, dim. 34,44 x 6,86 x 3.81m, length bpp. 30.48m. (I am not sure if the Caterpillar diesel engines were place at that time?)
12 October 2003 sold to Lone Star Offshore Marine Inc., Galveston, Texas and renamed ODYSSEY.
2017 Same name and owner, laid up, Imo No 7622637, homeport Galveston, Texas.

Source Log Book. ABS Records and internet.
Jamaica 1964 5d sg230, scott?
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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Arturo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:07 pm

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Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC: Vereinigde Oost-Indische Comapagnie). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 (The date on the stamp 1626 is wrong).
She was a vessel of 600 tons (180' x 40') and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons and a number of bronze guns. She was one of a fleet of eight V.O.C. ships which set sail from Texel on 27 October 1628. In addition to the usual complement of sailors and soldiers, she carried a few passengers and a large consingment of silver. Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. A twentieth-century replica of the ship is also called the Batavia and can be visited in Lelystad, Netherlands.
On 27 October 1628, the newly built Batavia, commissioned by the Dutch East India Company, sailed from Texel for the Dutch East Indies, to obtain spices. It sailed under commandeur and opperkoopman (upper- or senior merchant) Francisco Pelsaert, with Ariaen Jacobsz serving as skipper. These two had previously encountered each other in Surat, India. Although some animosity had developed between them there, it is not known whether Pelsaert even remembered Jacobsz when he boarded Batavia. Also on board was the onderkoopman (under-or junior merchant) Jeronimus Cornelisz, a bankrupt pharmacist from Haarlem who was fleeing the Netherlands, in fear of arrest because of his heretical beliefs associated with the painter Johannes van der Beeck, also known as Torrentius.
During the voyage, Jacobsz and Cornelisz conceived a plan to take the ship, which would allow them to start a new life somewhere, using the huge supply of trade gold and silver then on board. After leaving Cape Town, where they had stopped for supplies, Jacobsz deliberately steered the ship off course, away from the rest of the fleet. Jacobsz and Cornelisz had already gathered a small group of men around them and arranged an incident from which the mutiny was to ensue. This involved molesting a high-ranking young female passenger, Lucretia Jans, in order to provoke Pelsaert into disciplining the crew. They hoped to paint his discipline as unfair and recruit more members out of sympathy. However, the woman was able to identify her attackers. The mutineers were then forced to wait until Pelsaert made arrests, but he never acted, as he was suffering from an unknown illness.

On 4 June 1629 the ship struck Morning Reef near Beacon Island, part of the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast. Of the 322 aboard, most of the passengers and crew managed to get ashore, although 40 people drowned. The survivors, including all the women and children, were then transferred to nearby islands in the ship's longboat and yawl. An initial survey of the islands found no fresh water and only limited food (sea lions and birds). Pelsaert realised the dire situation and decided to search for water on the mainland.

A group comprising Captain Jacobsz, Francisco Pelsaert, senior officers, a few crewmembers, and some passengers left the wreck site in a 30-foot (9.1 m) longboat (a replica of which has also been made), in search of drinking water. After an unsuccessful search for water on the mainland, they headed north in a danger-fraught voyage to the city of Batavia, now known as Jakarta. This journey, which ranks as one of the greatest feats of navigation in open boats, took 33 days and, extraordinarily, all aboard survived.
After their arrival in Batavia, the boatswain, a man named Jan Evertsz, was arrested and executed for negligence and "outrageous behaviour" before the loss of the ship (he was suspected to have been involved). Jacobsz was also arrested for negligence, although his position in the potential mutiny was not guessed by Pelsaert.

Batavia's Governor General, Jan Coen, immediately gave Pelsaert command of the Sardam to rescue the other survivors, as well as to attempt to salvage riches from the Batavia's wreck. He arrived at the islands two months after leaving Batavia, only to discover that a bloody mutiny had taken place amongst the survivors, reducing their numbers by at least a hundred.

Jeronimus Cornelisz, who had been left in charge of the survivors, was well aware that if that party ever reached the port of Batavia, Pelsaert would report the impending mutiny, and his position in the planned mutiny might become apparent. Therefore, he made plans to hijack any rescue ship that might return and use the vessel to seek another safe haven. Cornelisz even made far-fetched plans to start a new kingdom, using the gold and silver from the wrecked Batavia. However, to carry out this plan, he first needed to eliminate possible opponents.

Cornelisz's first deliberate act was to have all weapons and food supplies commandeered and placed under his control. He then moved a group of soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to nearby West Wallabi Island, under the false pretence of searching for water. They were told to light signal fires when they found water and they would then be rescued. Convinced that they would be unsuccessful, he then left them there to die.

Cornelisz then had complete control. The remaining survivors would face two months of unrelenting butchery and savagery.

With a dedicated band of murderous young men, Cornelisz began to systematically kill anyone he believed would be a problem to his reign of terror, or a burden on their limited resources. The mutineers became intoxicated with killing, and no one could stop them. They needed only the smallest of excuses to drown, bash, strangle or stab to death any of their victims, including women and children.

Cornelisz never committed any of the murders himself, although he tried and failed to poison a baby (who was eventually strangled). Instead, he used his powers of persuasion to coerce others into doing it for him, firstly under the pretence that the victim had committed a crime such as theft. Eventually, the mutineers began to kill for pleasure, or simply because they were bored. He planned to reduce the island's population to around 45 so that their supplies would last as long as possible. In total, his followers murdered at least 110 men, women, and children.

Although Cornelisz had left the soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to die, they had in fact found good sources of water and food on their islands. Initially, they were unaware of the barbarity taking place on the other islands and sent pre-arranged smoke signals announcing their finds. However, they soon learned of the massacres from survivors fleeing Cornelisz' island. In response, the soldiers devised makeshift weapons from materials washed up from the wreck. They also set a watch so that they were ready for the mutineers, and built a small fort out of limestone and coral blocks.

Cornelisz seized on the news of water on the other island, as his own supply was dwindling and the continued survival of the soldiers threatened his own success. He went with his men to try to defeat the soldiers marooned on West Wallabi Island. However, the trained soldiers were by now much better fed than the mutineers and easily defeated them in several battles, eventually taking Cornelisz hostage. The mutineers who escaped regrouped under a man named Wouter Loos and tried again, this time employing muskets to besiege Hayes' fort and almost defeated the soldiers.

But Wiebbe Hayes' men prevailed again, just as Pelsaert arrived. A race to the rescue ship ensued between Cornelisz's men and the soldiers. Wiebbe Hayes reached the ship first and was able to present his side of the story to Pelsaert. After a short battle, the combined force captured all of the mutineers.

Pelsaert decided to conduct a trial on the islands, because the Saardam on the return voyage to Batavia would have been overcrowded with survivors and prisoners. After a brief trial, the worst offenders were taken to Seal Island and executed. Cornelisz and several of the major mutineers had both hands chopped off before being hanged. Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were maroonedon mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland. However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.

The remaining mutineers were taken to Batavia for trial. Five were hanged, while several others were flogged. Cornelisz's second in command, Jacop Pietersz, wasbroken on the wheel, the most severe punishment available at the time.

Captain Jacobsz, despite being tortured, did not confess to his part in planning the mutiny and escaped execution due to lack of evidence. What finally became of him is unknown. It is suspected that he died in prison in Batavia.

A board of inquiry decided that Pelsaert had exercised a lack of authority and was therefore partly responsible for what had happened. His financial assets were seized, and he died a broken man within a year.

On the other hand, the common soldier Wiebbe Hayes was hailed as a hero. The Dutch East India Company promoted him to sergeant, and later to lieutenant, which increased his salary fivefold.

Of the original 341 people on board the Batavia, only 68 made it to the port of Batavia.

During Admiralty surveys of the Abrolhos Islands on the north-west coast in April 1840, Captain Stokes of HMS Beagle reported that:
On the south west point of an island the beams of a large vessel were discovered, and as the crew of the Zeewyk, lost in 1728, reported having seen a wreck of a ship on this part, there is little doubt that the remains were those of the Batavia, Commodore Pelsart, lost in 1629. We in consequence named our temporary anchorage Batavia Road, and the whole group Pelsart Group.

However, Stokes appears to have confused the wreck of the Zeewyk for that of the Batavia. In the 1950s, historian Henrietta Drake-Brockman, who had learnt of the story due to her association with the children of the Abrolhos Islands guano merchant F. C. Broadhurst, son of Charles Edward Broadhurst, argued from extensive archival research and translations by E. D. Drok, that the wreck must lie in the Wallabi Group of islands. Surveyor Bruce Melrose and diving journalist Hugh Edwards agreed with the theory. In association with Drake-Brockman, Edwards organised a number of search expeditions near Beacon Island in the early 1960s and narrowly missed locating the site. After Edwards provided his research to them, and after being led to the place by Abrolhos rock lobster-fisherman Dave Johnson (who had seen an anchor from his boat while setting lobster pots), on 4 June 1963 Max and Graham Cramer with Greg Allen became the first to dive on the site. Its location, together with those of the VOC ship Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon) and the English East India CompanyTriall (Tryal), in the early 1960s, led to the formation of the Departments of Maritime Archaeology and Materials Conservation and Restoration at the Western Australian Museum.

In 1972, the Netherlands transferred all rights to Dutch shipwrecks on the Australian coasts to Australia. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle, Australia. Others are held by the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton. These two museums presently share the remains: a replica stone arch is held in The Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries, which was intended to serve as a stone welcome arch for the city of Batavia and the actual stone arch is held in the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; the original timbers from the ship's hull are held at the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries. While a great deal of materials have been recovered from the wreck-site, the majority of the cannons and anchors have been left in-situ. As a result, the wreck remains one of the premier dive sites on the West Australian coast and is part of the museum's wreck trail, or underwater "museum-without-walls" concept.

A replica of the Batavia was built at the Bataviawerf (Batavia Wharf) in Lelystad in the Netherlands. The project lasted from 1985 to 7 April 1995, and was conducted as an employment project for young people under master-shipbuilder Willem Vos. The shipyard is currently reconstructing another 17th century ship. In contrast to the merchant ship Batavia, Michiel de Ruyters' flagship, the Zeven Provinciën, See topic: De Zeven Provincien ( ship of the line).

The Batavia replica was built with traditional materials, such as oak and hemp, and using the tools and methods of the time of the original ship's construction. For the design, good use was made of the remains of the original ship in Fremantle (and of the Vasa in Stockholm), as well as historical sources, such as 17th century building descriptions (actual building plans weren't made at the time), and prints and paintings by artists (who,at the time, generally painted fairly true to nature),of similar ships.

On 25 September 1999, the new Batavia was transported to Australia by barge, and moored at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. In 2000, Batavia was the flagship for the Dutch Olympic Team during the 2000 Olympic Games. During its stay in Australia, the ship was towed to the ocean once, where it sailed on its own. On 12 June 2001, the ship returned to the Batavia werf in Lelystad, where it remains on display to visitors. On the evening of 13 October 2008, a fire ripped through the wharf. The museum's workshops, rigging loft, block shop, offices, part of a restaurant and the entire hand-sewn suit of sails of the ship were lost to the blaze, however the replica of "De Zeven Provinciën" nearby was undamaged. The moored Batavia was never in danger.

Burkina Faso, 1999, S.G.?, Scott: 1134.
Source: Wikipedia
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:02 pm

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Batavia
Niger2014;750f;SG? Djibouti2013;400f;SG? Malawi2013;SG?
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Dec 30, 2015 7:57 pm

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Germany Postmark 2015. Most probably depict the replica of the BATAVIA.
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:00 pm

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(New Earth ???)
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 pm

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Batavia 1628. Djibouti 2015;1000f.
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