SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

CARMEN sloop 1811

On 5 December 2016 Argentina issued a new stamp in honour of the Greek sailors who fought for the Argentine independence, Pedro Samuel Spiro and Nicolas Jorge Colmaniatis, they fought under orders of Admiral Guillermo Brown.
The vessel on the stamp is designed after a watercolour of the sloop CARMEN painted by the Argentine maritime painter Emilio Biggeri (1907-1977).

Information on the sloop CARMEN you can find: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9586&p=9871&hilit=carmen#p9871

Argentine 2016 $11 sg?, scott?
Source: Argentine Post.

The island, Sint Eustatius. "First Salute"

The name of the island, “Sint Eustatius”, is the Dutch name for Saint Eustace, a legendary Christian martyr.The island was seen by Christopher Columbus in 1493 and claimed by many different nations. From the first settlement, in the 17th century until the early 19th century, St. Eustatius changed hands twenty-two times. In 1636, the chamber of Zeeland of the Dutch West India Company took possession of the island that was then reported to be uninhabited. As of 1678, the islands of St. Eustatius, Sint Maarten and Saba fell under direct command of the Dutch West India Company, with a commander stationed on St. Eustatius to govern all three. At the time, the island was of some importance for cultivation of tobacco and sugar. The island sold arms and ammunition to anyone willing to pay. It was one of the few places from which the young United States could obtain military stores. The good relationship between St. Eustatius and the United States resulted in the noted "First Salute". On November 16, 1776, Captain Isaiah Robinson[9] of the 14-gun American brig Andrew Doria,[10] sailed into the anchorage below St. Eustatius' Fort Oranje. Robinson announced his arrival by firing a thirteen gun salute, one gun for each of the thirteen American colonies in rebellion against Britain. Governor Johannes de Graaff replied with an eleven gun salute from the cannons of Fort Oranje. International protocol required a two gun less acknowledgement of a sovereign flag. The Andrew Doria flew the Continental Colors of the fledgling United States. It was the first international acknowledgment of American independence.[Note 1] The Andrew Doria had arrived to purchase munitions for the American Revolutionary forces. She was also carrying a copy of the Declaration of Independence which was presented to Governor De Graaff. An earlier copy had been captured on the way to Holland by the British. U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt came to St. Eustatius in 1939 to recognize the importance of the 1776 "First Salute". He presented a large brass plaque to St. Eustatius which is displayed today under a flagpole atop the walls of Fort Oranje. The plaque reads:"In commemoration to the salute to the flag of the United States, Fired in this fort November 16. 1776, By order of Johannes de Graaff, Governor of Saint Eustatius, In reply to a National Gun-Salute, Fired by the United States Brig of War Andrew Doria, Under Captain Isaiah Robinson of the Continental Navy, Here the sovereignty of the United States of America was first formally acknowledged to a national vessel by a foreign official. Presented by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President of the United States of America"
Caribish Nederland 2016;88,0c. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sint_Eustatius

RIVER ADADA (Nigeria)

Built in 1978-'79 by Brodogradiliste i Tvornica Dizel Motora, Split, #290, for the Nigerian National Shipping Line, Lagos.
General cargo, Gt:13,165/9016, Nt:6699/4322, Dw:16,487/12,000, Loa:174.96m. Lbpp:166.17m. B:22.84m. Depth:13.01m. Draft:-/9.17m. 6 cyl. Sulzer/R.O. Tvornica Dizel Motora '3 Maj', Rijeka diesel:14,400 bhp. (10,592 kW.) 18.25 kn. 2 thrusters controllable pitch propellers forewards, 5 holds, 1 derrick SWL:80 tons, 7 derricks SWL:22 tons. TEU:428, pass:6, IMO.7716672, call sign:5NEC, strengthened for heavy cargoes, ice class 3.
In 1996 sold to Power Shipping S.A., St. Vincent, renamed RIVER, same year to Mediterranean Victory Marine Ltd., Cyprus, renamed AXION I.
08-2004 to Aseanise Ventures Ltd., St. Vincent, renamed LEONIS, 2008 to View Finance Business Corp., Panama, renamed LEONIS I.
27-07-2008 sold for US$8.2 million for scrapping in Chittagong.

Sisterships #291 RIVER OJI, #292 RIVER OLI, #293 RIVER MAJIDUN, # 294 RIVER GURARA, #295 RIVER OSHUN, #296 RIVER OGBESE, #297 RIVER MAJE.

(Gambia 1983, 50b. StG.503)
LR88/89 + Internet

BENMORE 1870

On this postal card is also depict the figurehead of the iron hulled sailing vessel BENMORE, the figurehead is now in the Mariners Museum in Newport, Virginia, the figurehead was repainted in 1920 with USA flag drapery.

Built as an iron hulled three masted sailing vessel under yard No 4 by John Reid & Co., Port Glasgow Glen yard for Benjamin C. Nicholson and McGill, Liverpool.
17 April 1870 launched as the BENMORE.
Tonnage 1,530 grt, 1,460 nrt, dim. 73.8 x 12.0m.
Square rigged, and one of the first ship to be fitted with double topgallant yards.
26 May 1870 registered at Liverpool.

She was mostly used in the general trade by the owners.
In 1872 she went out from Liverpool to Sydney, Australia in 81 days.
A few other voyages:
11 March 1893 left Penarth and arrived Rangoon on 14 June after a passage of 95 days.
18 July 1893 sailed from Rangoon and arrived Liverpool 03 November after a passage of 108 days.
23 December 1893 sailed Liverpool and arrived Vancouver 17 April 1894 after a passage of 107 days.
Her total mileage was 37,240 miles in 10 months 12 days (excluding time sent in port)
Her last voyage for her British owners was, when she sailed New York on 01 January 1898 bound for Sydney and after a passage of 80 days she arrived in Sydney. Then she sailed home and after arrival in October in Liverpool she was sold.
1898 Sold to Chr. Winsnaes, Norway.
1914 Sold to Brown Jenkinson & Co., London.
1914 Sold to the Fenchurch Trading Syndicate Ltd., London.1915 Sold to Minister of Railways & Canals, Canada, Ottawa. Her tonnage then given as 1,497 grt, 1,427 nrt.
1918 Sold to J. A. Farquar, Halifax N.S. and converted in a coal hulk.
Circa 1920 moved to St Thomas, West Indies still used as a coal hulk. Owned by Pendleton Bros. of New York.
1924 Refitted at Norfolk, Virginia and rerigged as a barque; sailed from Norfolk with a cargo of coal bound for Genoa, four days later she put into New York with a leak in her forepeak.
The coal was discharged and the BENMORE foundered in New York on 10 July 1924.

USA Postal card 1974 UX67. (the figurehead on the imprinted stamp is the EDINBURGH.)
Source: http://www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?of ... el=BENMORE. The last of the Windjammers Volume 1 by Basil Lubbock.

Alonso de Ojeda

Alonso de Ojeda was born between 1466 and 1470 in Cuenca, Spain.He enters the service of the Duke of Medinaceli and receives the protection of the bishop Juan Rodriguez de Fonseca, thanks to which he manages to embark with Christopher Columbus, in his second trip, at the end of the year 1493. On the island of Guadalupe, Christopher Columbus orders him to find Diego Marquez and his men who had ventured on the island and had not returned from their expedition. On the island of Hispaniola (Hispaniola) Christopher Columbus sends Alonso de Ojeda to confront one of the Caribbean chiefs, Caonabo, who reigned over the central area of the island and the mines of Cibao.Ojeda manages to gain the trust of Caonabo and takes him prisoner. It also takes part in the battle of the Vega Real, in front of an impressive army of Indians that Fra Bartolomé de Las Casas has calculated with exaggeration in a hundred thousand. Back in Spain, he attended a policy of change and a whole series of discoveries that began in 1499. In conclusion of this policy, a series of capitulations are signed (past contracts between the discoverers, the conquerors and the king, In which the name Columbus is mentioned).Ojeda is the first to inaugurate what are called "minor trips" or "Andalusian journeys". The first expedition of Alonso de Ojeda, in association with Juan de la Cosa and Américo Vespucio, leaves of the Port of Santa Maria 18 of May of 1499.They follow the route of the third voyage of Columbus: Trinidad, Margarita (Pearl Coast), Curaçao and the peninsula of Coquibacoa or Goajira.The expedition will be back in Cadiz a year later, judged unprofitable. In order to carry out a second expedition in the same zone, Ojeda signs a new capitulation with the king the 8 of June of 1501. He is named Governor of Coquibacoa. In the company of Juan de Vergara and Garcia de Campos they drive four caravels. The expedition goes from Cape Verde to Margarita Island, bordering the coast of Curiana to reach Paraguana.During the voyage, he commits some abuses against the Portuguese and the Indians, to such an extent that he is made to arrest. In 1504 he regained his freedom thanks to the help of Fonseca. In 1508 he was appointed Governor of Uraba. Part of Hispaniola the following year but the expedition is a failure: Juan de la Cosa died in a confrontation with the Indians. After this failure, Alonso de Ojeda returns to Santo Domingo, where he would die in 1515.
Nederlands Antilles(Curacao) 1949;6c;12,5c;15с;SG306;307;308. Caribish Nederland 2016;88,0c.
Source:www.americas-fr.com/es/historia/ojeda.html

EDINBURGH barque 1883 figurehead

This postal card issued by the USA Mail shows us an imprinted stamp of 12c of a ships figurehead from the barque EDINBURG. The figurehead is carved by the Canadian wood carver John Rogerson (1837-1925) and it is believed to have been modelled on the Duchess of Edinburgh, The Russian born daughter of Czar Alexander II and daughter in law of Queen Victoria. The figurehead was sold by Christie’s New York in 2007 for $262,400 to a private European buyer, much more as the worth of the ship when built.

Built as a wooden barque in 1883 by W.Charland at Levis, Quebec for his own account.
Launched as the EDINBURGH.
Tonnage 1,318 ton, dim. 203.3 x 28.6 x 23.9ft.
She was built of oak, hackmatack and elm.

1883 Maiden voyage under command of Captain Thos. Filkins, and registered in Quebec, Canada.
1884 Is given as owner John Herron of Liverpool, and registered in Liverpool.
The ships of J. Herron & Co., Liverpool were mostly used between the U.K. and Australia, so most probably also the EDINBURGH.
1905 Was she sold to Biagio Mortola, Genoa, Italy not renamed.
1905 She foundered off Bermuda and was washed up on the beach of Bermuda. The figurehead was bought by the American consul of Bermuda, and for many years it was standing in the garden of the Consulate until bought by the Addison Gallery.

Source: Log Book 4/51.
USA 1974 postal card UX67.
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Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Arturo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:07 pm

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Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC: Vereinigde Oost-Indische Comapagnie). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 (The date on the stamp 1626 is wrong).
She was a vessel of 600 tons (180' x 40') and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons and a number of bronze guns. She was one of a fleet of eight V.O.C. ships which set sail from Texel on 27 October 1628. In addition to the usual complement of sailors and soldiers, she carried a few passengers and a large consingment of silver. Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. A twentieth-century replica of the ship is also called the Batavia and can be visited in Lelystad, Netherlands.
On 27 October 1628, the newly built Batavia, commissioned by the Dutch East India Company, sailed from Texel for the Dutch East Indies, to obtain spices. It sailed under commandeur and opperkoopman (upper- or senior merchant) Francisco Pelsaert, with Ariaen Jacobsz serving as skipper. These two had previously encountered each other in Surat, India. Although some animosity had developed between them there, it is not known whether Pelsaert even remembered Jacobsz when he boarded Batavia. Also on board was the onderkoopman (under-or junior merchant) Jeronimus Cornelisz, a bankrupt pharmacist from Haarlem who was fleeing the Netherlands, in fear of arrest because of his heretical beliefs associated with the painter Johannes van der Beeck, also known as Torrentius.
During the voyage, Jacobsz and Cornelisz conceived a plan to take the ship, which would allow them to start a new life somewhere, using the huge supply of trade gold and silver then on board. After leaving Cape Town, where they had stopped for supplies, Jacobsz deliberately steered the ship off course, away from the rest of the fleet. Jacobsz and Cornelisz had already gathered a small group of men around them and arranged an incident from which the mutiny was to ensue. This involved molesting a high-ranking young female passenger, Lucretia Jans, in order to provoke Pelsaert into disciplining the crew. They hoped to paint his discipline as unfair and recruit more members out of sympathy. However, the woman was able to identify her attackers. The mutineers were then forced to wait until Pelsaert made arrests, but he never acted, as he was suffering from an unknown illness.

On 4 June 1629 the ship struck Morning Reef near Beacon Island, part of the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast. Of the 322 aboard, most of the passengers and crew managed to get ashore, although 40 people drowned. The survivors, including all the women and children, were then transferred to nearby islands in the ship's longboat and yawl. An initial survey of the islands found no fresh water and only limited food (sea lions and birds). Pelsaert realised the dire situation and decided to search for water on the mainland.

A group comprising Captain Jacobsz, Francisco Pelsaert, senior officers, a few crewmembers, and some passengers left the wreck site in a 30-foot (9.1 m) longboat (a replica of which has also been made), in search of drinking water. After an unsuccessful search for water on the mainland, they headed north in a danger-fraught voyage to the city of Batavia, now known as Jakarta. This journey, which ranks as one of the greatest feats of navigation in open boats, took 33 days and, extraordinarily, all aboard survived.
After their arrival in Batavia, the boatswain, a man named Jan Evertsz, was arrested and executed for negligence and "outrageous behaviour" before the loss of the ship (he was suspected to have been involved). Jacobsz was also arrested for negligence, although his position in the potential mutiny was not guessed by Pelsaert.

Batavia's Governor General, Jan Coen, immediately gave Pelsaert command of the Sardam to rescue the other survivors, as well as to attempt to salvage riches from the Batavia's wreck. He arrived at the islands two months after leaving Batavia, only to discover that a bloody mutiny had taken place amongst the survivors, reducing their numbers by at least a hundred.

Jeronimus Cornelisz, who had been left in charge of the survivors, was well aware that if that party ever reached the port of Batavia, Pelsaert would report the impending mutiny, and his position in the planned mutiny might become apparent. Therefore, he made plans to hijack any rescue ship that might return and use the vessel to seek another safe haven. Cornelisz even made far-fetched plans to start a new kingdom, using the gold and silver from the wrecked Batavia. However, to carry out this plan, he first needed to eliminate possible opponents.

Cornelisz's first deliberate act was to have all weapons and food supplies commandeered and placed under his control. He then moved a group of soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to nearby West Wallabi Island, under the false pretence of searching for water. They were told to light signal fires when they found water and they would then be rescued. Convinced that they would be unsuccessful, he then left them there to die.

Cornelisz then had complete control. The remaining survivors would face two months of unrelenting butchery and savagery.

With a dedicated band of murderous young men, Cornelisz began to systematically kill anyone he believed would be a problem to his reign of terror, or a burden on their limited resources. The mutineers became intoxicated with killing, and no one could stop them. They needed only the smallest of excuses to drown, bash, strangle or stab to death any of their victims, including women and children.

Cornelisz never committed any of the murders himself, although he tried and failed to poison a baby (who was eventually strangled). Instead, he used his powers of persuasion to coerce others into doing it for him, firstly under the pretence that the victim had committed a crime such as theft. Eventually, the mutineers began to kill for pleasure, or simply because they were bored. He planned to reduce the island's population to around 45 so that their supplies would last as long as possible. In total, his followers murdered at least 110 men, women, and children.

Although Cornelisz had left the soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes, to die, they had in fact found good sources of water and food on their islands. Initially, they were unaware of the barbarity taking place on the other islands and sent pre-arranged smoke signals announcing their finds. However, they soon learned of the massacres from survivors fleeing Cornelisz' island. In response, the soldiers devised makeshift weapons from materials washed up from the wreck. They also set a watch so that they were ready for the mutineers, and built a small fort out of limestone and coral blocks.

Cornelisz seized on the news of water on the other island, as his own supply was dwindling and the continued survival of the soldiers threatened his own success. He went with his men to try to defeat the soldiers marooned on West Wallabi Island. However, the trained soldiers were by now much better fed than the mutineers and easily defeated them in several battles, eventually taking Cornelisz hostage. The mutineers who escaped regrouped under a man named Wouter Loos and tried again, this time employing muskets to besiege Hayes' fort and almost defeated the soldiers.

But Wiebbe Hayes' men prevailed again, just as Pelsaert arrived. A race to the rescue ship ensued between Cornelisz's men and the soldiers. Wiebbe Hayes reached the ship first and was able to present his side of the story to Pelsaert. After a short battle, the combined force captured all of the mutineers.

Pelsaert decided to conduct a trial on the islands, because the Saardam on the return voyage to Batavia would have been overcrowded with survivors and prisoners. After a brief trial, the worst offenders were taken to Seal Island and executed. Cornelisz and several of the major mutineers had both hands chopped off before being hanged. Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were maroonedon mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland. However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.

The remaining mutineers were taken to Batavia for trial. Five were hanged, while several others were flogged. Cornelisz's second in command, Jacop Pietersz, wasbroken on the wheel, the most severe punishment available at the time.

Captain Jacobsz, despite being tortured, did not confess to his part in planning the mutiny and escaped execution due to lack of evidence. What finally became of him is unknown. It is suspected that he died in prison in Batavia.

A board of inquiry decided that Pelsaert had exercised a lack of authority and was therefore partly responsible for what had happened. His financial assets were seized, and he died a broken man within a year.

On the other hand, the common soldier Wiebbe Hayes was hailed as a hero. The Dutch East India Company promoted him to sergeant, and later to lieutenant, which increased his salary fivefold.

Of the original 341 people on board the Batavia, only 68 made it to the port of Batavia.

During Admiralty surveys of the Abrolhos Islands on the north-west coast in April 1840, Captain Stokes of HMS Beagle reported that:
On the south west point of an island the beams of a large vessel were discovered, and as the crew of the Zeewyk, lost in 1728, reported having seen a wreck of a ship on this part, there is little doubt that the remains were those of the Batavia, Commodore Pelsart, lost in 1629. We in consequence named our temporary anchorage Batavia Road, and the whole group Pelsart Group.

However, Stokes appears to have confused the wreck of the Zeewyk for that of the Batavia. In the 1950s, historian Henrietta Drake-Brockman, who had learnt of the story due to her association with the children of the Abrolhos Islands guano merchant F. C. Broadhurst, son of Charles Edward Broadhurst, argued from extensive archival research and translations by E. D. Drok, that the wreck must lie in the Wallabi Group of islands. Surveyor Bruce Melrose and diving journalist Hugh Edwards agreed with the theory. In association with Drake-Brockman, Edwards organised a number of search expeditions near Beacon Island in the early 1960s and narrowly missed locating the site. After Edwards provided his research to them, and after being led to the place by Abrolhos rock lobster-fisherman Dave Johnson (who had seen an anchor from his boat while setting lobster pots), on 4 June 1963 Max and Graham Cramer with Greg Allen became the first to dive on the site. Its location, together with those of the VOC ship Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon) and the English East India CompanyTriall (Tryal), in the early 1960s, led to the formation of the Departments of Maritime Archaeology and Materials Conservation and Restoration at the Western Australian Museum.

In 1972, the Netherlands transferred all rights to Dutch shipwrecks on the Australian coasts to Australia. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle, Australia. Others are held by the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton. These two museums presently share the remains: a replica stone arch is held in The Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries, which was intended to serve as a stone welcome arch for the city of Batavia and the actual stone arch is held in the Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; the original timbers from the ship's hull are held at the Western Australian Museum – Shipwreck Galleries. While a great deal of materials have been recovered from the wreck-site, the majority of the cannons and anchors have been left in-situ. As a result, the wreck remains one of the premier dive sites on the West Australian coast and is part of the museum's wreck trail, or underwater "museum-without-walls" concept.

A replica of the Batavia was built at the Bataviawerf (Batavia Wharf) in Lelystad in the Netherlands. The project lasted from 1985 to 7 April 1995, and was conducted as an employment project for young people under master-shipbuilder Willem Vos. The shipyard is currently reconstructing another 17th century ship. In contrast to the merchant ship Batavia, Michiel de Ruyters' flagship, the Zeven Provinciën, See topic: De Zeven Provincien ( ship of the line).

The Batavia replica was built with traditional materials, such as oak and hemp, and using the tools and methods of the time of the original ship's construction. For the design, good use was made of the remains of the original ship in Fremantle (and of the Vasa in Stockholm), as well as historical sources, such as 17th century building descriptions (actual building plans weren't made at the time), and prints and paintings by artists (who,at the time, generally painted fairly true to nature),of similar ships.

On 25 September 1999, the new Batavia was transported to Australia by barge, and moored at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. In 2000, Batavia was the flagship for the Dutch Olympic Team during the 2000 Olympic Games. During its stay in Australia, the ship was towed to the ocean once, where it sailed on its own. On 12 June 2001, the ship returned to the Batavia werf in Lelystad, where it remains on display to visitors. On the evening of 13 October 2008, a fire ripped through the wharf. The museum's workshops, rigging loft, block shop, offices, part of a restaurant and the entire hand-sewn suit of sails of the ship were lost to the blaze, however the replica of "De Zeven Provinciën" nearby was undamaged. The moored Batavia was never in danger.

Burkina Faso, 1999, S.G.?, Scott: 1134.
Source: Wikipedia
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:02 pm

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Batavia
Niger2014;750f;SG? Djibouti2013;400f;SG? Malawi2013;SG?
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Dec 30, 2015 7:57 pm

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Germany Postmark 2015. Most probably depict the replica of the BATAVIA.
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:00 pm

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(New Earth ???)
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Re: Batavia (Dutch Merchant Vessel) 1628

Postby Anatol » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 pm

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Batavia 1628. Djibouti 2015;1000f.
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