SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SAN SALVADOR 1542

Not any painting or drawing exist of the vessel SAN SALVADOR shown on this stamp, also a painting of drawing of Cabrillo is not found. The ship depict is chosen by the designer of the stamp, as a ship from that timeframe. It looks the designer has used the replica for his design.

The SAN SALVADOR was built as a wooden hulled sailing vessel for the discovery of the Northwest Passage.

SAN SALVADOR was the flagship of explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo (João Rodrigues Cabrilho in Portuguese). She was a 100-foot (30 m) full-rigged galleon with 10-foot (3.0 m) draft and capacity of 200 tons. She carried officers, crew, slaves, and a priest.
Explorations
In 1542 Cabrillo was the first European to explore the coast of present-day California. He had three ships: the 200-ton galleon SAN SALVADOR, the 100-ton La VICTORIA, and lateen-rigged, 26-oared SAN MIGUEL. The two ships were not the square-rigged galleons commonly used for crossing open ocean. Rather, they were built in Acajutla, El Salvador, and the ship SAN SALVADOR, was named after Pedro de Alvarado's newly founded city in western El Salvador, San Salvador, the ship SAN MIGUEL was named after the second newly founded city in eastern San Miguel, El Salvador, and the ship VICTORIA was named after the Victory of Pedro de Alvarado against the long and arduous battle against the Native American resistance in El Salvador. In 1540 the fleet sailed from Acajutla, El Salvador, and reached Navidad, Mexico on Christmas Day. While in Mexico, Pedro de Alvarado went to the assistance of the town of Nochistlán, which was under siege by hostile natives, and was killed when his horse fell on him, crushing his chest. Following Alvarado's death, the viceroy took possession of Alvarado's fleet. Part of the fleet was sent off to the Philippine Islands under Ruy Lopez de Villalobos and two of the ships were sent north under the command of Cabrillo. Navidad is some 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Manzanillo, Colima. A requirement of exploration ships was the ability to sail with ease into small harbors. The ships were rigged with triangular sails (lateen sail) supported by swept booms. This sail arrangement, a forerunner to the sails found in the modern-day fore-and-aft rig of sloops, ketches and yawls, made the craft more agile and gave them the ability to point higher into the wind than square riggers.
Departing from Navidad on 27 June 1542, Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay on 28 September. He went ashore and claimed the land for Spain. Continuing his explorations northward, he landed on Santa Catalina Island on 7 October and described nearby San Clemente Island. (He gave names to his discoveries, but all were renamed later.) He continued north as far as the Russian River, California before turning back to overwinter at Santa Catalina. Cabrillo died there of an infected injury on 3 January 1543. His second-in-command brought the ships and crew back to Navidad, arriving on 14 April 1543.
SAN SALVADOR replica
Starting in spring 2011 and concluding in 2015, the Maritime Museum of San Diego built a full-sized, fully functional, historically accurate replica of SAN SALVADOR. The ship was constructed in full public view at Spanish Landing park on Harbor Drive in San Diego. The keel was laid on 15 April 2011. The construction site, called "SAN SALVADOR Village", opened 24 June 2011 and was open to the public. The project gave people the opportunity to see an example of sixteenth century shipbuilding, which was the first modern industrial activity in the Americas. The replica galleon is 92 feet (28 m) long with a beam of 24 feet (7.3 m). When completed, SAN SALVADOR was launched on San Diego Bay and became part of the Museum's fleet of historic and replica ships. As of April 2015 construction was nearly completed, and a launch ceremony was planned for 19 April 2015. However, on April 8 the ceremony was postponed due to "unanticipated technical complications involving the movement and lifting of the ship". The ship was eventually moved by barge to a boatyard in Chula Vista. She made her public debut on 4 September 2015, leading a parade of tall ships for the start of San Diego's annual Festival of Sail. At that time she was powered by an auxiliary engine since she had not yet been fitted with sails. She will open for public tours starting in September 2016, in conjunction with the Maritime Museum's annual Festival of Sail. Later that month she is expected to start making coastal tours of the California coast.
Model of SAN SALVADOR
Cabrillo's flagship SAN SALVADOR has been described as having four masts: a square-rigged foremast, lateen-rigged main and mizzen-masts and an even smaller mizzen-type mast with a boom that swung well outboard, in the style of the modern-day yawl. La VICTORIA is described as having two masts, both lateen rigged. A model of SAN SALVADOR was built by Señor Manuel Monmeneu in association with the Naval Museum in Madrid, Spain. The model project was sponsored by the Portuguese-American Social and Civic Club of San Diego. This model depicts SAN SALVADOR more like La VICTORIA, with two major masts.

USA 1992 29c sg2751, scott2704.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Salva ... o%27s_ship)

GREAT LAKE VESSEL

The stamps issued by Canada in 1967 shows in the background and in a lock a unknown Great Laker. The Canadian Encyclopedia has the following entry on this ships:

Lake Carriers, or "lakers," are ships whose design is unique to the Great Lakes of N America. The lake carrier's long and flat shape reveals its basic purpose - to move bulk cargoes through the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY and Great Lakes, a total distance of almost 4000 km. The JOHN B AIRD, a typical modern Canadian lake carrier, was launched in 1983 by Collingwood Shipyards on Georgian Bay, is 219 m long and has a deadweight tonnage of 30 700 tonnes. Similar to an increasing number of lake carriers of its size which are fitted with cranes or conveyor belts, the JOHN B AIRD is a self-unloading lake carrier.
Ships of this size can carry one million bushels of wheat on a single voyage (27 000 tonnes#. Wheat and other feed grains account for about 40% of all cargoes carried by Canadian lake carriers, followed by coal, iron ore and limestone. The annual 9-month shipping season of the lake carriers does not include the winter months of late December to early March, when the seaway is closed and ice covers much of the Great Lakes.
Nearly all of the 162 Canadian and US lake carriers in service in 1994, down from 247 in 1984, belonged to member shipping companies of either the Canadian Shipowners' Assn #CSA) of Ottawa, with 106 ships and whose corporate na#e was changed in 1988 from the historic Dominion Marine Assn (DMA) founded in 1903; or the Lake Carriers' Assn formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1892, which owned the remainder.
The drop in the total gross registered tonnage (grt) of CSA member ships in service from 1 957 000 grt in 1984 to 1 637 000 grt in 1993 was a result of both severe reductions in the demand for raw materials such as iron ore by the recession-hit Canadian primary steel mills along the Great Lks, and an increase in the volume of grain transported by rail. As a result of the latter, annual grain cargoes carried by CSA member ships declined from 18.6 million t in 1984 to 9.6 million t in 1993.
During 1994 in response to the reduced use of their ships, CSA member firms created 2 joint holding companies to administer their ships' activities when in service. These 2 firms are Seaway Self Unloaders of St Catharines, made up of 17 self-unloading bulk carriers owned by Algoma Central Corp and Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd, and Seaway Bulk Carriers, with 11 bulk carriers from Canada Steamship Lines Inc plus 19 more from the smaller bulk carrier shipping companies in the CSA.
The modern Canadian lake carrier is the result of more than 100 years of continually changing Great Lakes ship design and modification Earlier types of cargo carriers on the Great Lakes, all of them built for the bulk transit of goods, included the exotically na#ed hermaphrodite barquentines of the age of sail and the whalebacks and canalers of the age of mechanical propulsion.
As becomes the na#e "hermaphrodite," which means having 2 opposite qualities, this class of sailing ship had 2 masts, with square-rigged sails on the foremast for manoeuvring in and out of dock and in narrow passages, and fore-and-aft rigged sails on the mainmast for speed. Except for their tall funnels and awkward deck structures, the whalebacks of the age of coal-fired steam engines, squat and broad-beamed, looked like the modern nuclear submarine.
The whalebacks were also called "pig boats" because their bows ended in a steel snout built above the water line. The later canalers were designed to fit snugly into the narrow locks of the old Welland Canal, linking Lakes Erie and Ontario and passing near St Catharines, and the canal system between Lk Ontario and Montreal which terminated at the Lachine Canal. The canaler was one-third the length of the JOHN B AIRD. In 1959 canalers were replaced in the wider and longer locks of the St Lawrence Seaway system by upper lakers, which had previously been restricted to the upper lakes above Niagara because of their size. These locks can take ships up to 222.5 m in length and 23.2 m in breadth.
Some of these larger carriers, though designed primarily for the inland lakes, have been built for both the coastal trade and deep-sea service and are called ocean lakers. This is not entirely a new trend since some earlier lakers were requisitioned to serve on the N Atlantic during WWII, and a few of them were sunk by German U-Boats.
The Great Lakes have been a graveyard for hundreds of ships, most of them lost during the age of sail between 1750 and 1870 in storms, fires and collisions. Despite their size, even modern lake carriers can be victims of severe ice conditions and storms. The tragic sinking on 10 Nov 1975 of the EDMUND FITZGERALD, a 222 m long US iron-ore carrier, was commemorated in song by Gordon LIGHTFOOT. After battling 7.5 m waves and record 125 km/h winds on Lk Superior, the ship suddenly plunged to the bottom with the loss of the entire crew of 29, including her experienced captain. See: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12821&p=13970&hilit=edmund#p13970

Canada 1967 4, 6 and 7c sg582, 601, 607 and 609, scott?. 1993 43c sg1566, scott1488.
Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia.

Battle of Buceo

The Battle of Buceo was a decisive naval battle which took place on 14–17 May 1814, during the Argentine War of Independence between an Argentine fleet under William Brown and a Spanish fleet under Admiral Sienna off the coast of Montevideo, in today's Uruguay.
Five Spanish ships were burned and two were captured on 17 May. The other surrendered later and 500 prisoners were taken. Argentine forces lost four men killed in action and one ship. William Brown was given the rank of Admiral because of this victory.
Ships involved
Argentina (William Brown)
Hercules 32 (flag) viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8790&p=8834&hilit=hercules#p8834
Zephyr 18 (King)
Nancy 10 (Leech)
Julietta 7 (McDougald)
Belfast 18 (Oliver Russell)
Agreeable 16 (Lemare)
Trinidad 12 (Wack)
Spain (Sienna)[edit]
Hyena 18 (flag)
Mercurio 32
Neptuno 28 - Captured by Belfast 16 May
Mercedes 20
Palomo 18 - Captured 16 May
San Jose 16 - Captured 16 May
Cisne 12
6 schooners

M Class submarine

M CLASS.
They were ordered in place of the last four of the first group of steam-propelled K-class fleet submarines, K17-K21, the original orders being cancelled.
They were initially intended as coastal bombardment vessels, submarine monitors, but their role had been changed before detailed design begun. The intention was that merchant ships could be engaged at periscope depth or on the surface using the gun, rather than torpedoes. At that time torpedoes were considered ineffective against moving warships at more than 1,000 yards (900 m). A 12-inch gun fired at relatively short range would have a flat trajectory simplifying aiming, and few ships would be expected to survive a single hit.

The guns were 12-inch (305 mm) 40 calibre Mark IX guns from spares for the Formidable-class battleships. The mounting allowed them to elevate by 20 degrees, depress 5 degrees and train 15 degrees in either direction from the centre line. The weapon was normally fired from periscope depth using a simple bead sight on the end of the gun aligned with the target through the periscope at a range of around 1200 metres. The exposure time of the gun above the surface was around 75 seconds. The submarine had to surface to reload the gun, which would take about 3 minutes. In practice the concept was not very successful and only three of the four M-class boats ordered were completed, all between 1917 and 1918. M-class submarines are sometimes called submarine monitors.
M1 and M2 also had four 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes whilst M3 and M4 had 21-inch (533 mm) diameter tubes and were 3 metres longer to accommodate them.

M1 was the only one to enter service before the end of World War I but did not see action. She was captained during her sea trials by experienced submariner Commander Max Horton after his return from the Baltic, and was later lost with all hands while on exercise in the English Channel near Start Point in Devon after a collision with a Swedish collier, SS Vidar, on 12 November 1925. The wreck of M1 was discovered by a diving team led by Innes McCartney in 1999 at a depth of 73 metres. Later that year the wreck was visited again by Richard Larn and a BBC TV documentary crew, and the resulting film was aired in March 2000.
HMS M2
M2 was converted to a seaplane carrier in 1925, a hangar replacing the gun turret. She was lost off Chesil Beach on 26 January 1932. It is thought that the hangar door was opened prematurely. M2 lies in much shallower water, 32 metres deep with the top of the conning tower only 20 metres below the surface at low tide. She is a popular attraction for local scuba divers with as many as six boats anchored above her on busy days.
M3 was converted to a minelayer in 1927 with stowage for 100 mines, primarily to test the mine-handling equipment of the Grampus class. The mines were carried on a conveyor belt which ran along her upper deck and covered over by an enlarged casing. The mines were laid through a door at the stern. She was scrapped in 1932 after the trials had been completed.
M4 was broken up before completion.
In 1924 all three completed members of the class were used to test hull camouflage to reduce the visibility of submarines from aircraft—M1 was painted grey-green, M2 dark grey and M3 was painted dark blue.

Wikipedia

ANKARAN HPL-21 (Sri Lanka)

The first two XFAC (Extra Fast Attack Craft) were ordered from Ramta, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) on 02 December 1996. Two more being built at the Goa SY. This is the latest version of an Israeli fast patrol craft, also acquired by the Sri Lankan Navy. An additional 15 are projected, some possibly for the Coast Guard. XFAC is designed for putting to sea in the shortest possible time for day-night coastal surveillance and reconnaissance, co-ordinated sea-air search & rescue (SAR) operations, beach insertion and/or extraction of commando forces and high speed interception of small, manoeuvrable intruder craft over territorial waters. XFAC incorporates the most modern structural, hydro-dynamic and propulsion features and a proven combat record in all aspects. The ASD propulsion system provides the XFAC with the excellent shallow water capability, including beaching, exceptional manoeuvring & survivability, high redundancy, rapid acceleration and de-acceleration, high stability and excellent sea-keeping qualities.

Displacement:60 tons full Load, L:25.40m. B:5.67m. Draft:1.10m. 2 diesel engines:4570 hp. and 2 Arneson ASD articulating surface drives, maximum speed:45 kn. maximum range:700 nm. at 42 kn. complement:10 (incl. 1 officer)

Weapons: 1-Oerlikon 20mm gun and 2-12.7mm MGs.
Weapons Control: Elop MSIS optronic low-light-level surveillance and weapons direction device, which enables the vessel to accurately destroy small high-speed crafts and engage light shore defence. Goa SY Ltd. states that the Super Dvoras are fitted the Mk.20 naval stabilized gun system.
Radar: Surface; Koden, I-band.

Originally the main armament of the Super Dvora Mark II design was the Oerlikon 20 mm cannon which were manually operated. At present all Super Dvora Mark II types have been modified to allow for the installation of Typhoon 25-30 mm stabilized cannon which can be slaved to state-of the art mast-mounted, day/night, long-range electro-optic systems. In addition to its main armament, Super Dvora Mark IIs carry heavy or light machine guns, depending on the operational requirements.
Sri Lankan Navy Super Dvora Mark IIs carry additional weapon systems such as automatic grenade launchers and PKM general purpose machine guns.

(Sri Lanka 2000, 3.50 r. StG.?)
Internet.

SAILING VESSEL OF THE 17 or 18th Century

This Hungary stamp issued in 1981 is designed after a label issued in Austria in 1933 for the Internationale Stamp Fair in Vienna.
It shows us a sailing vessel from around the 17th and 18th century, she carries a spritsail which disappears on sailing ships after the 18th century. She is a two-masted vessel, square rigged on the foremast and (but it is not so clear) lateen rigged on the after-mast. Have not more info on the ship depict.

Hungary 1981 5fo sg?, scott2696d.
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MARIEHAMN 1866

The full index of our ship stamp archive

MARIEHAMN 1866

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Feb 09, 2017 7:37 pm

Mariehamn.jpg
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2017 mariehamn.jpg
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IN THE 1880s, several Ålanders established themselves as shipowners.
They replaced the farmers who, up till then,had built ships and carried goods across the
Baltic and North Seas. One of them was Nikolaj Sittkoff (1828-1887), who became
one of the most important shipping representatives in Åland. The barque MARIEHAMN
was included in his fleet of sailing vessels in 1880. She was built in 1866 in Dundee,
Scotland, and named Lieutenant. The barque became the first Åland owned vessel with a local crew to circumnavigate the world. The long voyage set off in 1881 and, in July 1882, the vessel rounded the
Cape Horn, an event that is featured on the stamp by artist Allan Palmer. The barque
also became the first freight carrying Åland vessel to reach Australia.


MARIEHAMN: She was built in 1866 as a wooden cargo vessel by the yard of Tay Ship Co. in Dundee, Scotland for A.Low also from Dundee.
1866 Launched as the LIEUTENANT.
Tonnage 500 ton gross, dim. 157.7 x 27.9 x 17.6ft.
Barque rigged.

Of her career for Low I could not find much as what is given in Lloyds Register, Low was a jute merchant, most probably the vessel was used in the jute trade between the U,K, and India.
1867/68 L. R. gives her captain as Gorrie.
1872/73 L.R. that she was making a voyage from London to Valparaiso.
So far I could find she was still owned by Low and still carried the name LIEUTENANTwhen she in 1880 was sold to Mariehamn at that time Russian territory..
Aland Post Stamps gives that she was bought by Nikolaj Sittkoff.in 1880 and renamed MARIEHAMN.
Lloyds Register of 1883/84 gives that she was under command of Captain A. Lauren and he was also the owner.
1889 L.R. gives the owner as K.J. Karlson under command of Captain Troberg and homeport Mariehamn.
The last L.R. on line is 1899/1900 and she was still owned by Karlson.
Fate unknown.

Aland Islands 2017 local post sg?. scott?
Source: Aland Post Stamps no4 2016 and Lloyds Registry.
aukepalmhof
 
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