SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Tristan da Cunha.The first survey.

The uninhabited islands of Tristan da Cunha were first sighted in May 1506 during a voyage to India by the Portuguese admiral Tristão da Cunha, although rough seas prevented a landing. He named the main island after himself, Ilha de Tristão da Cunha, which was later anglicised to Tristan da Cunha Island.[2] His discovery appeared on nautical maps from 1509 and on Mercator's world map of 1541. Some sources state that the Portuguese made the first landing on Tristan in 1520, when the Lás Rafael captained by Ruy Vaz Pereira called for water. The first survey of the archipelago was made by the French corvette “HEURE du BERGER” in 1767. Soundings were taken and a rough survey of the coastline was made. The presence of water at the large waterfall of Big Watron and in a lake on the north coast were noted, and the results of the survey were published by a Royal Navy hydrographer in 1781. The first scientific exploration was conducted by French naturalist Louis-Marie Aubert du Petit-Thouars, who stayed on the island for three days in January 1793, during a French mercantile expedition from Brest, France to Mauritius. Aubert made botanical collections and reported traces of human habitation, including fireplacesand overgrown gardens, probably left by Dutch explorers in the 17th century.
Tristan da Cunha 2006;30p;SG?
Source:wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha

PUSHER TUG WITH BARGES

The 6-cent Arkansas River Navigation commemorative stamp was issued October 1, 1968, at Little Rock, Arkansas.
This stamp was in recognition of the economic potential of the $1.2 billion project, which was nearing completion. It eventually provided Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma with a barge route to the Mississippi River and became one of the nation's major inland waterways.
The maritime theme on the stamp is a steering wheel with in the background a pusher tug https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pusher_(boat) with barges on the Arkansa River.
The pusher tug is not identified and the term barge has applied to numerous types of vessel around the world, but mostly the barges used on American Rivers are square flat bottomed barges. The following web-site has more on the American barges: http://www.caria.org/barge-and-towboat-facts/

Why is a towboat called a towboat when it pushes the barges?
The word “tow” comes from the canal age when a draft animal walking along the bank of the canal pulled a barge. As rivermen gained experience with moving barges, they found that, by lashing barges together and pushing them, they could control the barges better and move more of them. The control was especially helpful when navigating the smaller rivers and tight bends in a river.

What is the size of a barge?
The standard barge is 195 feet long, 35 feet wide, and can be used to a 9-foot draft. Its capacity is 1500 tons. Some of the newer barges today are 290 feet by 50 feet, double the capacity of earlier barges.

What is the size of a towboat?
Towboats range in physical size from about 117 feet long by 30 feet wide to more than 200 feet long and 45 feet wide. They draft anywhere from 6.5 feet to 9.0 feet. The boat’s diesel engine can produce power from a few hundred horsepower to 10,000 horsepower. A few are in excess of that, but not many. The larger boats operated on the Lower Mississippi where the water is freeflowing and wide.
How many barges and towboats are there?
There are approximately 26,000 dry cargo barges, 3,000 tanker barges, and 1,200 towboats operating today.

How many barges are there in a tow?
The average tow has 15 barges, but flotillas can go up to 40 barges, depending on the type of cargo, the river segments being navigated, and the size of the towboat. Smaller tributaries, such as the Alabama River, can support only a four-barge tow because of the meandering nature of the river and varying width of the river itself. In addition, the Alabama’s locks are only 84 feet wide and 600 feet long.

U.S.A. 1968 6c sg 1343, scott 1325.

S-Class, INS TANIN (S-71) or INS RAHAV (S-73)

S-Class (Fourth Group)
Israel's first submarines were ex-Royal Navy S-Class submarines which entered service in 1958. The Israeli navy operated two boats, S-71 INS TANIN (ex-HMS SPRINGER) and S-73 INS RAHAV (ex-HMS SANGUINE) until the late 1960s. Built in the final days of WW2, they had undergone a modest modernization after the war involving the fitting of a folding snort mast to allow charging of the batteries whilst the boat was submerged, and better sonar. All the same these boats were essentially WW2 era types largely obsolete even before they entered Israeli service.

HMS SPRINGER (P 264)
Built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:8 May 1944, launched:14 May 1945, commissioned:2 August 1945. Displacement: 814-872 tons surfaced, 990 tons submerged. Length:217’ (66.14 m.)
Beam:23’ 6” (7.16 m.) Draught:11’ (3.35m.) diesel/electric 1900/1300 hp. 14.75 kn. surfaced, 8 knots submerged
Complement:48 officers and men.
Armament:6 × forward 21” (533 mm.) torpedo tubes, one aft, 13 torpedoes, 1-3”(76mm.) gun, 1-20 mm. canon., 3-.303 calibre machine guns.
Sold to Israeli Navy on 9 October 1958, renamed TANIN, fate: scrapped in 1972.

HMS SANGUINE (P 266)
Same details as HMS SPRINGER, built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:10 January 1944, launched:15 February 1945, commissioned:13 May 1945, sold to Israeli Navy in March 1958, renamed RAHAV, fate: cannibalised for spares for TANIN in 1968, broken up at Haifa in 1969.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
Internet.

ALBERT CALMETTE

This stamp issued by St Pierre et Miquelon, shows a portrait of the French physician and bacteriologist Albert Calmette.
In the background is a two masted topsail schooner, which is not identified. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12482&p=18296&hilit=topsail+schooner#p18296 within the foreground are many doris viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11927&p=12785&hilit=dories#p12785
Albert Calmette (1863 – 1933) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Calmette
1888-1890 Calmette was assigned to Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon where he conducted research on the red cod.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1963 30f. sg426, scott 366.

COXLESS SCULL Biglin brothers

This stamp is designed after a painting made by Thomas Eakins https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Eakins and shows the Biglin Brothers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biglin_Br ... ver_-_1872
The painting was made in 1872 and is now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington and shows the Biglin Brothers in a coxless scull of which Wikipedia gives:

A coxless pair is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for two rowers, who propel the boat with sweep oars.
The crew consists of a pair of rowers, each having one oar, one on the stroke side (rower's right hand side) and one on the bow side (rower's lefthand side). As the name suggests, there is no coxswain on such a boat, and the two rowers must co-ordinate steering and the proper timing of oar strokes between themselves or by means of a steering installation which is operated by foot from one of the rowers. The equivalent boat when it is steered by a cox is referred to as a "coxed pair".
Racing boats (often called "shells") are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material (usually carbon-fibre reinforced plastic) for strength and weight advantages. Pairs have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat.
A coxless pair is often considered the most difficult boat to row, as each rower must balance his/her side in cooperation with the other, apply equal power, place their catch and extract the blade simultaneously in order to move the boat efficiently. It requires excellent technique, communication and experience.
"Coxless pair" is one of the classes recognized by the International Rowing Federation and is competed in the Olympic Games

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxless_pair
USA 1967 5c sg ?, scott1335.

BUNGO or BONGO dugout

The ‘bungo” or “bongo” is in Panama a large 18th century dugout canoe, that carried passengers and cargo on the Rio Changres across the isthmus from Panama City to Porto Bello.

During the gold rush to California it carried the forty-niners the nickname for the first passengers to the gold fields in 1844 from the Rio Charges at Gorgona to Las Cruises a distance of forty-mile which took three to four days. From there the passengers were taken overland to Panama City, to board a passenger vessel for San Francisco.
The bongo was partly covered with a palm-thatched shelter as seen on the stamp, to protect the passengers against the sun and rain.
The bongo was paddled by a crew of 18 – 20 . Length ca 37 m. Could carry only a few passengers with their luggage. The stamp shows only three crew poling the bongo.
More on this set of stamps is given on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7055#!lightbox[gallery]/1/

Source: Various internet sites and Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
Canal Zone 1949 6c sg 196, scott 143.
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DENIS SULLIVAN tall ship

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DENIS SULLIVAN tall ship

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Feb 14, 2017 7:28 pm

denis sullivan.jpg
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Built as a wooden hulled schooner on the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association yard at Wisconsin for the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association.
1995 Keel laid down.
22 June 2000 launched as the DENIS SULLIVAN.
Displacement 150 tons, tonnage 97 ton gross, dim.42 x 7.3 x 2.67m. length on deck 30.0m.
Two auxiliary diesel engines each 180 hp.
Rigged as a three-master topsail schooner, 10 sails, sail area 550 square meters.
Accommodation for 31 persons on long voyages and 60 on day trips. Crew 10.
2000 Completed, homeport Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The S/V DENIS SULLIVAN is a replica three-masted, wooden, gaff rigged schooner from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is a flagship of both the state of Wisconsin and of the United Nations Environment Programme.
History
The construction of the DENIS SULLIVAN was first proposed in 1991 by a group of Milwaukee residents and volunteers from other states. Their plan was to build a tall ship which would serve as a platform for educating people about the Great Lakes. Community involvement was welcome in the project, and almost a thousand people donated almost a million volunteer hours toward the DENIS SULLIVAN's construction. Through the efforts of both professional shipwrights and volunteers, the DENIS SULLIVAN was partially completed and launched in June 2000. She departed Milwaukee for her first sail to the Caribbean in November 2000.
Design
The DENIS SULLIVAN is not a replica of a specific vessel. Rather, her design is inspired by that of the Great Lakes cargo schooners of the 19th century. Like many of those schooners, she carries a raffee, a square-rigged fore topsail which is triangular in shape.
In designing the DENIS SULLIVAN, architects Timothy Graul Marine Services looked to several nineteenth century Great Lakes schooners for inspiration, including the ROUSE SIMMONS, CLIPPER CITY and ALVIN CLARK Above the waterline, the SULLIVAN closely resembles these earlier vessels. Her shape is that of an efficient cargo carrier, and her rigging and deck arrangement are likewise authentic. She differs from her predecessors, however, below the waterline. Traditionally, Great Lakes cargo schooners were built with a fairly flat bottom to minimize draft and permit sailing in shallow waters. They carried a centerboard to compensate for this when sailing to windward. The DENIS SULLIVAN strayed from this tradition to meet both modern Coast Guard safety requirements and the practical considerations of a passenger vessel. She has a relatively deep hull and weighted keel, which provide greater stability to the vessel and allow for 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) of head clearance in the below decks accommodations. An additional concession to safety regulations was the division of the traditional cargo hold into watertight bulkheads.
2017 In service owned by Discovery World at Pier Wisconsin. Imo No 1100209.

Mozambique 2016 100.00MT sg?, scott?
Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denis_Sullivan_(schooner)
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