SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.

BAOBAO canoe

The “BAOBAO” or “boopaa” used in the Tonga Islands, central Pacific, it is a roughly hewn single outrigger paddling canoe used for fishing inshore or just outside the reefs. Detail vary somewhat from island to island. Dugout hull, slight tumble home to sides; bottom rounded transversely with rocker fore-and-aft, with stern ending above the waterline. Solid vertical ends; break in the sheer line near ends. Two or three straight booms lashed atop the gunwales, cross to the pointed float. Booms and float attached by pairs of over-crossed stanchions, or by double U-shaped flexible withes.
Carries 1-4 people, length 3 – 5m, and depth 0.31 – 0.38m.

Gilbert & Ellice Islands 1939 1½d sg 45, scott 42 and 2d sg 46, scott? 5d sg sg 49, scott 46.1956 2d sg 66, scott? and 5d sg 69, scott? and 10sh sg 75, scott? 1971 35c sg 184, scott? and 35c sg192, scott? 1975 35c sg 259, scott?
Gilbert Islands 1976 2c sg 5, scott?, and 35c sg 20, scott? and 35c sg
Source: Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

NIGHT FISHING IN GILBERT & ELLICE ISLANDS

Night fishing in low lying coral atolls of the Gilbert Islands appears to provide an ideal environment for flying-fish, which are abundant in the deeper water outside the reefs during the day or night.
The flying-fish is used for eating but also for bait to catch, shark, swordfish, tuna, etc.
The stamp shows the night fishing with flares. The best time is during new moon and full moon and the ensuing three days.
When the people on the island decide to go fishing during the night, the canoes are made ready and the young children and women are told to make the flares from fallen dry coconut fronds, rolled together, the flare has a length of about 9 feet, and each canoe needs around 12 flares.
The scoop net is about three feet long and two feet wide and bound on a pole with a length of eight to 12 feet.
The canoe on the stamp is one of the “baobao” type and has a crew of four. After launching the canoe in the water she is heading late afternoon out of the lagoon passing the surf and waiting till the moon is raising and the flares are lighted, the flying-fish is heading for the light and the net is brought down over or before the fish and only the experienced men can handle the scoop net, during the fishing during full moon the canoe moved forward.
The canoe has flares aboard for fishing around four hours, and the average catch for a canoe is around the 60 fish.

Much more info is given on: http://www.jps.auckland.ac.nz/document? ... lt&target=
More info on the baobao is given: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15857

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 35c sg184, scott?

WOMEN OF THE BOUNTY

Mauatua, Faahotu, Mareva, Puarei, Tetuahitea,Teehuteatuaonoa, Teio, Teraura, Tevarua, Tinafanaea, Toofaiti, Vahineatua, Sully ...
These are the names of the twelve women and the little girl who were on board of the BOUNTY when the ship arrived in January 1790 off the island “Hitiaurevareva” now known as Pitcairn. It is to these women whose names have been forgotten, eclipsed by the history of their mutinous companions, whom this stamp pays homage. Removed from their families and friends, forced companions of sometimes violent men, they nevertheless patiently built the life of the community of this lost island off the Gambier archipelago, making the choices they considered best for the well-being of their children. On the spot, they recognized edible plants, those which can be braided for the roofs, those which heal, and those which are beaten to make “tapa”, a precious stuff in their islands. In 1790,the death of two of these “vahine” triggered a series of violent events which only stopped three years later, but, these strong women defended their independence in times of crisis, even by trying to leave the island where their companions had killed each other. Thanks to one of them, Teehuteatuaonoa, we know more about the circumstances in which the community of Pitcairn was born. She delivered her version of the story, their attempt to settle on Tupua'i (or Tubuai island), and on their precipitous departure from Tahiti until their arrival and their settlement in their new home land away from the British bloodhounds. Their retreat was finally discovered in 1808 by Mayhew Folger, captain of the TOPAZ,who met John Adams, the last surviving mutineer, 19 years after the famous mutiny. Teehuteatuaonoa finally managed to leave the island of Pitcairn in 1817 on board of the whaler SULTAN leaving for Chile. She, the Pitcairn rebel without descendants, finally found Tahiti where she is buried ... In 1838, these women ahead of their time are the first in the world to vote, 70 years before the now famous suffragettes.
It is for these Polynesian women forgotten by history that this stamp about the Vahine of the BOUNTY is dedicated... Josiane Teamotuaitau, PhD in Polynesian Civilization This joint issue with Pitcairn islands illustrates the party
evening where the twelve vahine and little Sully went on the BOUNTY which was anchored in the bay of Matavai. Pitcairn islands on the same theme "Women of the BOUNTY" issues
a series of three stamps illustrating the day after partying away from Tahiti, the firing of the BOUNTY condemning the vahines to stay on the island, and life resuming its course
on this lost rock in the Pacific.

http://www.tahitiphilatelie.com/details ... 017&id=317
French Polynesia 2017 1.40F sg?, scott?

In September 1789 after the mutiny and while staying briefly on Tahiti, Fletcher Christian became concerned that some of his men were ready to rebel against him. Spurred also by fear of discovery and arrest from Britain, he made a hurried departure. He and 8 members of the BOUNTY crew sailed from Tahiti with 6 Polynesian men, 12 Polynesian women and a baby girl.

Searching for a new home took four months until uncharted Pitcairn was sighted on 15 January 1790. A decision was made on 23 January to burn the BOUNTY and the fate of all to remain on the island was sealed. The women consorts soon adopted a survival mode by growing crops, fishing, making tapa for warmth and clothing and ensuring Tahitian culture remained an integral part of Pitcairn�s identity through music and dance.

Pauline Reynolds in her "Textile History" article* writes how the production of tapa and gifting "reveals information regarding their social, ritual and innovative activities, and their contribution to the BOUNTY/Pitcairn story". This activity was exclusively a female role but one that gave them a degree of power, status and prestige (depending on the fineness of the cloth). It also provided an outlet for their creative talents and helped bind social relationships.

In addition to clothing the community, the tapa made by the BOUNTY Women also made fine tapa for traditional gifting to seafaring visitors. This gave the women an important role in Pitcairn daily life. Also adds Reynolds, "The making and felting of cloth by the women of the Pitcairn community was symbolic of the binding and weaving of relationships, particularly amongst the women and their children". Their innovative designs and experimentation led to unique Pitcairn tapa cloths which are different to those from Tahiti (French Polynesia) and very recognisable today.

The production of tapa enabled the women to meet regularly and, while speaking in their native tongue, share gossip and stories, as well as frustrations. The work was hard and time consuming but helped develop their strength and athleticism which helped their survival.

Reynolds concludes that the BOUNTY women were "active agents in their community, playing a dynamic role in shaping the social landscape".

*Tapa Cloths and Beaters: Tradition, Innovation and the Agency of the BOUNTY Women in Shaping a New Culture on Pitcairn Island from 1790 to 1850. � Pauline Reynolds, 2016.

http://www.stamps.gov.pn/
Pitcairn Island 2017 $1.80/2.80 sgMS?, scott?.

NET FISHING at GILBERT & ELLICE ISLAND

The stamp shows us net fishing in the lagoon from a canoe, the most common types of fishing in the Gilbert & Ellice Islands in the lagoon is net-, line- or shell fishing.
The nylon net is about 20 to 30 feet long, 2 – 3 feet high and used by 3 or 4 fishermen, two for setting the net, while the other is disturbing the water to chase the fish in the net.
The canoe is a “Wa” canoe without sail and rigging: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8600

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 2c sg 174, scott?
Tuvalu 1976 2c sg20, scott?
Source: Management of Marine Resources in Kiribati By Roniti Teiwaki
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HEALY USCG icebreaker

The full index of our ship stamp archive

HEALY USCG icebreaker

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:59 pm

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Built as an icebreaker under yard No 2372 by the Litton Avondale Shipyard at Avondale, USA for the American Coast Guard’
16 September 1996 laid down.
15 November 1997 launched as the USCG HEALY (WAGB-20).
Displacement 16,257 ton full load. Tonnage 15,150 grt, 7,500 ton dwt. Dim. 128 x 25 x 8.92m. (draught), length bpp. 121.2m.
Powered diesel electric by four Sulzer 12ZAV40S diesel engines, 34,560 kW. Two AC Synchronous Drive motors, 11,2 MW, twin fixed pitch propellers, speed maximum 17 knots.
Three knots in 4.5 ft thick ice.
Accommodation for 19 officers, 12 CPO, 54 enlisted, 35 scientists, 17 others.
29 October 1999 completed.
10 November 1999 commissioned.

USCGC HEALY (WAGB-20) is the United States' largest and most technologically advanced icebreaker. She is classified as a medium icebreaker by the U.S. Coast Guard. She is homeported in Seattle, Washington and was commissioned in 1999. On September 5, 2015, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. The current Commanding Officer is Captain Jason Hamilton. Captain Hamilton assumed command of HEALY in May, 2015.
Construction
HEALY was built by Avondale Industries in New Orleans, Louisiana. The construction included a technology transfer agreement between Avondale Industries and the Finnish Kværner Masa-Yards Arctic Technology Centre, where the latter provided expertise for hull form development and propulsion line engineering based on the Finnish diesel-electric icebreaker OTSO.
HEALY is named in honor of United States Revenue Cutter Service Captain Michael A. HEALY. Her keel was laid on 16 September 1996. HEALY joined the icebreakers USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB-10) and USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB-11) in their homeport of Seattle, Washington on 10 November 1999. The ship departed New Orleans on January 26, 2000, performing sea trials off of San Juan, Puerto Rico and in Baffin Bay between Canada and Greenland. She arrived in Seattle on 9 August 2000 after transiting the famed Northwest Passage and was placed "In Commission, Active" on August 21, 2000.
USCGC HEALY is an optimally manned vessel, meaning it has the minimum number of personnel staffed in order to safely navigate. Due to the vast array of missions conducted by HEALY, it is vital that crewmembers are fully qualified on a number of duties. HEALY operates two A-Frames, one on the aft working deck and one on the starboard side. There are two articulated cranes on the aft working deck, with the starboard side rated to 15 short tons (14 t) and the port side rated to 5 short tons (4.5 t). The aft working deck provides ample space to conduct science and research operations. HEALY has a forecastle crane with a load capacity of 3 short tons (2.7 t), and two 04 level cranes with load capacities of 15 tons each HEALY has a Dynamic Positioning System (DPS) that uses its Bow Thruster system, which aids in navigation and station keeping during science operations. Its flight deck is capable of landing both of the Coast Guard's helicopter airframes, and attached is a hangar that can house 2 HH-65 helicopters. HEALY can accommodate 8 ISO vans on the ship, which are used as science labs and workstations. HEALY has three small boats on board. One is the 38 ft (12 m) foot Arctic Survey Boat (ASB), which is on the starboard side. HEALY has two 26 ft (7.9 m) Cutter Boat Large (CBL) Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIB), one on each side.
HEALY and the Geotraces science team have their portrait taken at the North Pole Sept. 7, 2015. HEALY reached the pole on Sept. 5, becoming the first U.S. surface vessel to do so unaccompanied.
Designed to conduct a wide range of research activities, HEALY provides more than 4,200 square feet (390 m2) of scientific laboratory space, numerous electronic sensor systems, oceanographic winches, and accommodations for up to 50 scientists. HEALY is also designed to break 4.5 ft (1.4 m) of ice continuously at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) or ice 10 ft (3.0 m) thick when backing and ramming, and can operate in temperatures as low as −50 °F (−46 °C).
As a Coast Guard cutter, HEALY is also a platform for supporting other potential missions in the polar regions, including: search and rescue, ship escort, environmental protection, and enforcement of laws and treaties.
Notable Operations
October 29, 2015: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 24 June to 29 October 2015 during their Arctic West Summer 2015 deployment. HEALY traveled over 16,000 miles, took over 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations, and became the first unaccompanied U.S. surface vessel to reach the North Pole. She also engaged with the crew of the German icebreaker POLARSTERN while at the North Pole in support of the international scientific mission Geotraces. Finally, HEALY became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from ice-bound Arctic waters, streaming video of a search and rescue exercise to shore-based coordinators.
April 10, 2012: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 3 January to 5 February 2012 after she escorted a tanker carrying a critical load of fuel through tremendously difficult winter ice conditions to Nome, AK. In November 2011, a strong winter storm struck western Alaska, which prevented a vital fuel delivery to Nome. HEALY delayed her return home from a six-month Arctic deployment in order to escort the Russian-flagged tanker MT RENDA to Nome, AK. HEALY escorted the MT RENDA through over 300 miles of extremely difficult ice conditions and broke out the beset ship time after time. After many days of great exertion, MT RENDA transferred the fuel to Nome over the course of three days. On 20 January, HEALY began the break out for herself and the MT RENDA. They emerged from the ice on 29 January 2012 after successful completion of the mission. This was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska.
January 20, 2010: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 6 August to 16 September 2009 while conducting the Joint U.S. Canada United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Expedition. In collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT, HEALY pushed 150 nautical miles further north than planned and avoided $2.4 million in future expedition mapping costs. HEALY also acquired over 1,000 pounds of valuable geological samples by conducting dredging operations at depths of up to 3 miles. The rare samples were essential in establishing the origin of the targeted extended continental shelf.
July 16, 2008: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from April 2007 to July 2008 while conducting science operations in support of national scientific, economic, and political interests. HEALY conducted a multi-year project in order to evaluate the entire ecosystem of the Bering Sea. Data collected during these missions helped improve the understanding of food webs and biological communities in the Arctic. Through superior mission execution in adverse weather, HEALY exceeded expectations significantly.
May 7, 2003: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from January 2003 to April 2003 while conducting Operation Deep Freeze in support of the U.S. Antarctic Program. With less than three weeks' notice, HEALY was deployed to Antarctica in support of the critical annual re-supply of McMurdo Station. HEALY played an instrumental role in coordination with USCGC POLAR SEA in resupplying the ice station. HEALY successfully escorted the freighter AMERICAN TERN and the tanker RICHARD G. MATTHIESON. HEALY successfully escorted both ships in and out of the ice, and facilitated the delivery of resources to McMurdo Station
January 23, 2002: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 12 June 2001 to 21 December 2001 during the Arctic East 2001 Science Mission. HEALY mapped 1,100 miles of the Gakkel Ridge, previously the only unmapped undersea ridge in the world. Twelve previously unknown volcanoes and numerous undersea hydrothermal vents were discovered. Eight tons of rock samples were taken from over 100 deep sea dredges.
Recent Operations
.
2016: On October 15, 2016, USCGC HEALY returned to its home port in Seattle, Washington after a 127-day summer deployment in the Arctic Ocean. The crew of the USCGC HEALY and its accompanying scientists participated in three scientific studies. Highlights of this deployment include the discovery of new species of jellyfish in the Chukchi Sea, observations of the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea, and data collection on climate change.
2015: On September 5, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. HEALY travelled over 16,000 nautical miles during Arctic West Summer 2015 (AWS15). During this expedition, more than 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations were collected through Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) casts and on-ice science stations. USCGC HEALY worked with both the United States Coast Guard Research & Development Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to test and develop Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), and became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from Arctic waters. HEALY also conducted a professional international engagement with the German Icebreaker POLARSTERN at the North Pole. It was a historic Arctic deployment that displayed the Coast Guard’s unique polar capabilities to the public and the world. Between May and October 2015, HEALY also tested the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) high frequency satellite communication system throughout its Arctic Summer West 2015 mission. Successful tests were completed throughout the expedition during the transit to the North Pole.
2014: A main area of focus during Arctic West Summer 2014 (AWS14) was the study of phytoplankton blooms along the Chukchi Sea. HEALY also worked in conjunction with the United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center to test Aerostat balloons, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), and oil tracking buoys.
2013: Arctic West Summer 2013 (AWS13) consisted of four different missions for HEALY, over which more than 19,000 miles were covered. The first mission utilized HEALY's unique over-the-side science capabilities in order to collect organisms and create an ecological picture of the Hanna Shoal region. The second mission yielded sediment samples from the Mackenzie River Basin through the use of coring devices. For the third mission the Coast Guard Research Development Center, in coordination with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, deployed numerous equipment for testing and development. The fourth and final mission deployed subsurface moorings and conducted numerous Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) tests to study the Alaskan Boundary Current.[19] A group of researchers from the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory tested their Submarine Team Behaviors Tool with the HEALY crew in September 2013. They were part of the 50 person science team from the USCG Research and Development Center that evaluated technology for the recovery of "simulated oil trapped in or under ice at the polar ice edge".
2012: In January 2012, HEALY escorted the Russian-flagged freighter RENDA through pack ice to deliver an emergency supply of fuel to Nome, Alaska. Such a winter delivery had never been attempted before because the ice floes are 1 to 5 feet (0.30 to 1.52 m) thick during the winter seasonThe resupply was vital to the city, and was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska. Over the course of Arctic West Summer 2012 (AWS12), HEALY travelled over 18,000 nautical miles and conducted 687 science casts. HEALY also added 25% more data to the bathymetric mapping project of the extended continental shelf through multibeam sonar bottom-mapping. This data was collected in support of the delineation of the American and Canadian continental shelves.
2011: During Arctic West Summer 2011 (AWS11), HEALY collaborated with researchers from NASA to study the refractive properties of sunlight in the Arctic. USCGC HEALY spent the summer mapping the Extended Continental Shelf in collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT. A third mission of this patrol studied organic carbon and its levels in the Arctic water column. This data was used to explain bacteria distribution in the water column as well as carbon dioxide and biomass cycles.
Dive Mishap
On August 17, 2006, Lieutenant Jessica Hill and PO2 Stephen Duque died of unspecified causes during diving operations in the Arctic Ocean. The Coast Guard conducted simultaneous safety and administrative investigations the results of which were made public in January 2007 along with a Final Decision Letter dated August 23, 2007. Initial press reports indicated that the divers were conducting an inspection of the rudder - a routine operation - at the time of the accident, but later reports stated that the two were doing a cold-water training dive near the bow of the ship. The dive was reported to have been planned for a maximum depth of 20 feet (6 m). Lieutenant Hill's father, citing autopsy reports, has indicated that his daughter actually reached a depth of near 200 feet (61 m) in what he described as an out of control descent. The divers were tended by unqualified and poorly-instructed personnel on the surface, none of whom were familiar with cold water diving or scuba diving in general. It is not clear why they extended so much line to the divers. By the time the two could be pulled to the surface, gas reserves were empty and neither diver could be revived.
On August 30, Commanding Officer Captain Douglas G. Russell was temporarily relieved of command by Vice Admiral Charles Wuster citing a "loss of confidence" in Russell's ability to command. The relief was later made permanent by Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen. Russell was initially replaced by Captain Daniel K. Oliver, the previous HEALY Commanding officer who Russell had relieved only two months earlier. Oliver returned to his regular staff job a short time later, when Captain Ted Lindstrom was named the new commanding officer. Lindstom has commanded four previous Coast Guard cutters, and was Chief of Response for the Coast Guard's 13th District in Seattle, Washington prior to returning to sea.
Awards and honors
US Coast Guard E Ribbon for the period of 4 February 2012 to 19 November 2014, at Afloat Training Organization (ATO) Everett, Washington.
2017 In service same name. IMO No 9083380.

Sierra Leone 2016 Le24,000 sgMS?, scott? (The two icebreakers in the margin are the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT and USCGC POLAR STAR.)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_HEALY_(WAGB-20)
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