SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TRAKAI CASTLE BRIDGE

For the Europa issues, Litauen issued two stamps in 2018 of 0.75 Euro, by the stamp with the Trakai Castle Bridge the Litauen Post gives.

Trakai Castle Bridge - a pedestrian bridge on Lake Galvė leading to one of the larger islands - Castle Island in Trakai. The bridge connecting the city with the castle consists of two parts, among which the Karaim or Cowan Island.

There are some medieval type vessels depict in the foreground of which I think by looking to the rigging that the small vessel on the left of the stamp is a “kurenas” see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8754
On the right of the stamp two ships of the “maasilinn” type are depict see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14743

Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

MAIL TRANSPORT PORTUGAL

For the 25 Anniversary van het Ministry of Transport in 1973 Portugal issued three stamps which shows us mail transports, on the 6$00 stamp which shows us a stylized vessel which looks like a ro-ro vessel. Have not any info on the ship.

Portugal 1973 6e00 sg?, scott?

MERIDIANAS

Litauen issued in 2018 two Europa stamps which shows us bridges of that country both are 0.75 Euro.
The stamp which shows us a stamp with a bridge in Klaipeda, is the Birzos Bridge, in the background is a cruise vessel of which I have not any information, the light tower is the rear leading light tower of the port.
In front of the bridge is a tall ship, which is the MERIDIANAS homeported in Klaipeda and used as a floating restaurant vessel in 2018.

Built as a wooden hulled training ship under yard No 5 by Oy Laivateollisuus Ab shipyard in Turkey, Finland for the Ministry of Fisheries in Moscow.
22 February 1947 laid down.
10 June 1948 launched as the MERIDIAN, two sisters the SEKSTANT and TROPIK.
Tonnage 322 brt, 41 nrt, 55 dwt., dim. 39.40 x 8.90 x 3.40m. (draught)
Powered with an auxiliary 2-stroke diesel engine, speed with engine 6.5 knots.
Barquentine rigged.
30 August 1948 completed.
01 October 1948 delivered to the Soviet Union.

After Finland signed a peace treaty with the Soviet Union on 19 September 1944 Finland agreed war reparations under which building of vessels for the Soviet Union, one of this vessels was the MERIDIAN.
03 May 1949 the Maritime School of Klaipeda receives the training vessel, her name was then MERIDIANAS.
1954 She joins the Baltic training fleet, thereafter she was used for training voyages with trainees from Kaliningrad, Riga and Klaipeda maritime schools.
1968 In the aftermath of an accident MERIDIANAS is deleted from the list of active training ships and moved to Klaipeda.
1970 She is handed over to the Public Trust of Eateries, Restaurants and Cafés of Klaipeda.
1971 A restaurant was opened on board of the MERIDIANAS.
1994 Was she privatised.
2001 For a token of 1 Litas she was sold, and a support fund was founded for the sailing ship MERIDIANAS, a symbol of the maritime city Klaipeda, which took over the management of the ship.
Early October 2012 the then head of the Fund applies to the Government of Litauen for a permit to sink the MERIDIANAS in the territorial waters of Litauen. The reason not any money is available for the repair and restauration of the vessel.
19 October 2012 the ship was handed over to Aloyzas Kuzmarskis and Aidas Kaveckis with intention to overhaul and repair the barquentine, she was moved to the Western Shipyard (AB Klasipédos laivu remontas AB) where she docked on 10 November 2012, and repair work on her hull commenced.
09 November 2013 after repaired and restoration she was moved to her permanent location at the embankment of the Dane River behind the Birzos Bridge.
19 July 2014 her sail were hoisted again for the first time after the restoration, and she is handed back to the city of Klaipeda.
18 December 2014 management is taken over by Friedrich pazazas.
2018 She is still in Klaipeda and a restaurant and bar are operating on board.

Source: http://www.restoranasmeridianas.lt/en/h ... ackground/ and internet.
Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

HAMINA-CLASS fast attack craft

This Finish stamp shows us one of the Hamina-class fast attack craft, the stamp shows not a pennant no, that one of this class of four ships is depict.

All four were built by Aker Finnyard in Rauma, Finland for the Finnish Navy.
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 51 x 8.5 x 1.7m. (draught).
Powered by two MTU 16V 538 TB93 diesel engines 5,520 kW, two Rolls Royce Kamewa 90SII waterjets. Speed over 30 knots., range 500 mile.
Armament: 1 – Bofors 57mm/70 SAK Mk3, 2 – 12.7mm M.G. 8 Umkhonto-IR SAM (Denel), 4 – RRS-15 Mk2 SSM (Saab), 1 rail for depth charges or mines (sea mine 2000)
Crew 26.

The Hamina-class missile boat is a class of fast attack craft of the Finnish Navy. They are classified as "missile fast attack craft" or ohjusvene, literally "missile boat" in Finnish.
History
The vessels were built in the late 1990s, early 2000s, and are the fourth generation of Finnish missile craft. The first vessel was ordered in December 1996 and the fourth was handed over on 19 June 2006. Since the launch of the Helsinki-class missile boats, all fast attack craft have been named after Finnish coastal cities. The class was previously known also as Rauma 2000 following its predecessor the Rauma class.
The four vessels form what the Finnish Navy calls Squadron 2000 (Finnish: Laivue 2000). Initially the Finnish Navy considered several different compositions for the new squadron, and at one point only two Hamina-class vessels and four Tuuli-class ACV were to have been built. After a strategic shift of the Finnish Navy's role, the composition of the Squadron 2000 followed suit. The Tuuli-class prototype was never fully equipped, nor fitted for operational use and its three sisters were cancelled, instead two more Hamina-class boats have been built; with some of the equipment intended for the Tuulis being used in the Haminas. The fourth and final Hamina-class vessel was delivered in summer 2006.
The squadron reached its full operational capability in 2008 and have greatly improved the surface- and air surveillance as well as air defense capability of the Finnish Navy. Their electronic surveillance suite also increases the quality of information available to military leaders.
All ships were built at Aker Finnyards in Rauma, Finland. The vessels have their home base at Upinniemi.
In March 2014 it was announced that the Hamina-class missile boats will be upgraded in the near future.
MLU (Mid-Life Update
In January 2018, it was announced that the vessels will be equipped initially With Torped 45 and later with Torped 47 torpedoes. It was also announced that new Bofors 40mm Mk.4 guns had been selected as part of the MLU upgrade.
In February it was announced that Finland intended to buy RGM-84Q-4 Harpoon Block II missiles for the Haminas.
Design
The vessel's hull is constructed of aluminum and the superstructures are constructed of re-enforced carbon fiber composite. The vessels have a very low displacement and are very maneuverable. They are equipped with water jets instead of propellers, which allow them to operate in very shallow waters and accelerate, slow down and turn in unconventional ways.
The Hamina class are very potent vessels, boasting surveillance and firepower capacities which are usually found in ships twice the size.
Stealth technology
The Hamina class has been designed and constructed as stealth ships with minimal magnetic, heat and radar signatures.
The shape of the vessel has been designed to reduce radar signature. Metal parts have been covered with radar absorbent material, and the composite parts have radar absorbent material embedded in the structure. Radar transparent materials have been used where applicable.
Unlike glass fiber, carbon fiber blocks radio waves. This protects ship's electronics against electromagnetic pulse. In addition, it stops any radio frequency signals generated by ships electronic devices escaping outside. Except for the bridge, the vessel has no windows that would allow the signals to escape.
The vessel contains hardly any steel parts, thus generating very low magnetic field. The remaining magnetic field is actively canceled with electromagnets.
Exhaust gases can be directed underwater to minimize thermal signature, or up in the air to minimize sound in submarines direction. 50 nozzles around the decks and upper structures can be used to spray seawater on the vessel to cool it. In addition, the nozzles can be used to clean the ship after chemical attack or radioactive fall-out.
Weapons
The Hamina class have the latest in surveillance and weapons technology all integrated into an intelligent command system. A Hamina class vessel can monitor about 200 kilometres (120 mi) of air space and its Umkhonto surface-to-air missile system can simultaneously engage a maximum of eight aircraft, up to 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) away, while the vessel's anti-ship missiles have a range in excess of over 250 kilometres (160 mi).
The Hamina class' primary weaponry is four RBS-15 Mk.3 anti-ship missiles. The vessels are further equipped with a Bofors 57 mm gun against surface and aerial targets as well as the Umkhonto-IR surface-to-air missiles, MASS decoy system and two 12.7 mm heavy machine guns. It is also possible to use the ships for mine-laying.
The software of the centralized combat control system is COTS oriented, built on top of Linux running on redundant x86 rack servers, which makes maintenance and future updates and optimizations simpler.
In early 2018, Finland announced the mid-life upgrade program, which will equip all four boats in the class with new Swedish lightweight anti-submarine warfare torpedoes in the years 2023-2025 and extend the life of the boats to 2035

Vessels
FNS HAMINA
Pennant number: 80
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: December 1996
Commissioned: 24 August 1998
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service.
FNS TORNIO
Pennant number: 81
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2001
Commissioned: 12 May 2003
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS HANKO
Pennant number: 82
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 3 December 2003
Commissioned: 22 June 2005
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS PORI
Pennant number: 83
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2005
Commissioned: 19 June 2006
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamina-class_missile_boat

Finland 2018 sg?, scott

VÄINÄMÕINEN or ILMARINEN

The Finish navy did have two coastal defence ships before World War II and one of this is depict on this stamp. The submarine in the foreground is the VESIKKO see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16336

Both were built on the Ab Crichton-Vulcan Oy in Turkey for the Finish Navy.
The VÄINÄMÕINEN was ordered in 1927 the ILMARINEN in1929.
29 April 1932 launched as the VÄINÄMÕINEN.
Displacement 3,900 ton, dim. 93.0 x 16.8 x 5.0m. (draught)
Powered diesel electric by four Krupp engines each 1,173 hp each,two shafts,speed 14.5 knots.

Range 700 mile by 14.5 knots.

Armament: 2 – 254 mm Bofors, 4 – 105mm Bofors, 4 – 40mm Vickers and 2 – 20mm Madsens when built, four 20mm Madsens added in 1944.
Crew 410.
28 December 1932 commissioned.

VÄINÄMÕINEN was a Finnish coastal defence ship, the sister ship of the Finnish Navy's flagship ILMARINEN and also the first ship of her class. She was built at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku and was launched in 1932. Following the end of the Continuation War, VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over to the Soviet Union as war reparations and renamed Vyborg.[i] The ship remained in Soviet hands until her scrapping in 1966.
Design
VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN were planned to be mobile coastal fortresses for the defence of the Finnish demilitarized islands at Åland in particular. The two ships were not well suited for the open seas due to a design with emphasis on operations in the shallow waters of the archipelago: it has been said that they were volatile and rolled too much. The minimal depth keel, together with the high conning tower, made the ships' movements slow and wide. It was said that the ships were uncomfortable, but harmless to their crews.
The ship's heavy armament of 254-millimetre (10 in) Bofors guns could fire shells of 255 kilograms (562 lb) up to 31 kilometres (19 mi).
Fire control
In fire control, the two coastal ships were identical. The fire control centre and the gun towers were connected electrically so that ranging and orders could be given without spoken contact. With the aid of mechanical calculators, the values were transferred directly to the gun towers.
Operational history
Winter War
During the Winter War, the two coastal defence ships were transferred to the Åland islands to protect against invasion. When the ice cover started to become too thick in December, the ships were transferred to Turku, where their anti-aircraft artillery aided in the defence of the city.
Continuation War
The only time VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN fired their heavy artillery against an enemy was at the beginning of the Continuation War, during the Soviet Red Army evacuation of their base at the Hanko Peninsula. VÄINÄMÕINEN also participated in the distraction manoeuvre Operation Nordwind on 13 September 1941, during the course of which her sister ship ILMARINEN was lost to mines.
In 1943 "Detachment VÄINÄMÕINEN", which consisted of VÄINÄMÕINEN, six VMV patrol boats and six motor minesweepers, was moved east to take positions along the coast between Helsinki and Kotka. She did not actively participate in many operations, since the heavier Soviet naval units never left Leningrad, where they were used as floating batteries during the siege. As a result, VÄINÄMÕINEN's primary operational duties were to patrol the Gulf of Finland between the minefields "Seeigel" and "Nashorn", as well as protection of the German-Finnish anti-submarine net across the gulf.
During the Soviet assault in the summer of 1944, the Soviets put much effort into trying to find and sink VÄINÄMÕINEN. Reconnaissance efforts revealed a large warship anchored in Kotka harbour and the Soviets launched an air attack of 132 bombers and fighters. However the target was not VÄINÄMÕINEN — instead it was the German anti-aircraft cruiser NIOBE .
Postwar
After the end of the Continuation War VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over as war reparations to the Soviet Union. The ship was handed over on 29 May 1947 to the Soviet Baltic Fleet, where she was renamed VYBORG. The ship served over 6 years in the Red Fleet at the Soviet base in Porkkala, Finland. The ship was called Vanya (a Russian short form of the name Ivan) by the sailors of the Baltic Fleet.
VYBORG was modernized during the 1950s and served for a while as an accommodation ship in Tallinn. Preparations to scrap the ship were begun in 1958. During this time, there were talks to return the ship to Finland. The ship was, however, scrapped in 1966 at a Leningrad scrapyard. According to Soviet calculations, 2,700 tons of metal were recovered.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4in ... fence_ship

The ILMARINEN was also ordered in September 1929.
09 July 1932 laid down.
09 September 1933 launched as ILMARINEN.
She has the same details as her sister.
17 April 1934 completed.

ILMARINEN was a Finnish Navy Panssarilaiva ("Armored ship"; a coastal defence ship by British classification). The unit was constructed at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku, Finland, and named after the mythological hero ILMARINEN from the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala. ILMARINEN was the flagship of the Navy from 1 May 1933 until her demise on 13 September 1941.
During the early inter-war period the Finnish Navy consisted of some 30 ex-Russian vessels, most of them taken as war-trophies following the civil war. Never ideal types for the navy's needs, they were generally old and in poor condition. In 1925, a tragic incident highlighted the sorry state of the navy. An old torpedo boat was lost in a fierce storm, taking with her the entire crew of 53. A heated debate started, and intensive lobbying led to the adoption of a new Finnish Navy Act in 1927.
Prior to World War II, the fleet renewal program led to the acquisition or construction of five submarines, four torpedo boats, and two coastal defense ships. Among the last of their kind, VÄINNÄNÖINEN and ILMARINEN were two of the most concentrated naval artillery units ever built. They were designed by the Dutch company NV Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a front for German interests circumventing the Treaty of Versailles), and were optimized for operations in the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea. Their open sea performance was de-emphasized in order to give the vessels their shallow draft and super-compact design.
Coastal defence ships were particularly popular in the Nordic countries, and began serving in the navies of Denmark, Sweden and Norway early in the 20th century. These vessels typically had heavy armament and good armor protection, but were relatively slow. Their sizes were around 4,000 tons, main armament consisted of guns between 210 and 240 mm (8 and 9 in), the armor corresponded to that of armoured cruisers, and speeds were between 15 and 18 knots (28 and 33 km/h; 17 and 21 mph). A coastal defence ship was somewhere between a cruiser and a monitor: slower than a cruiser but better armed, faster than a monitor, but with smaller guns. The coastal defence ships also varied among themselves; some of them were closer to cruisers, and others, such as the Finnish ones, were closer to monitors.
Being the second of her class, ILMARINEN was launched at the Turku shipyard on 9 September 1933. The ship went through its finishing trials and was handed over to the Finnish Navy on 17 April 1934. Her sister ship Väinämöinen had preceded her by two years.
The vessels had a compact design, with a high mast and large turrets for main and secondary artillery. Foreign comments on their design ranged from puns to praise. Not truly designed for open sea operations, the ships had a tendency to roll slowly and widely even in moderate seas. Travel on them was unpleasant, but deemed safe. Additional keels were later fitted, which improved the situation...

HSU FU bamboo raft

Ancient Chinese texts tell the story of Hsu Fu, a navigator and explorer sent by the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, in 218 BC into the "Eastern Ocean" in search of life-prolonging drugs. Hsu Fu completed the voyage on a bamboo raft, which some believe took him to America and back.

Tim Severin set out to prove that such a voyage really could have been made. On the beach at Sam Son, Vietnam, he oversaw the construction of a 60-foot (18.3 m) long, 15-foot (4.6 m) wide raft built of 220 bamboos and rattan cording, and driven by an 800 square foot (74 square metre), junk-rigged sail. After leaving Asia in May 1993, Severin and his crew faced monsoons, pirates, and typhoons before the rattan began rotting and the raft began falling apart in the mid-Pacific. After travelling 5,500 miles (8,850 km) in 105 days, they were forced to abandon the raft about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) short of their destination.

Although the Hsu Fu, as the craft was named, did not complete the trip, Severin believed the voyage had accomplished its purpose. In The China Voyage, published in 1994, he wrote that the expedition had proved that a bamboo raft of the second century BC could, indeed, have made a voyage across the Pacific, just as Hsu Fu's account recorded.

More on the voyage you can find on: http://www.personal.psu.edu/pjc12/From% ... dition.htm

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Sever ... oyage_(May–November_1993)
Surinam 2018 SRD 19.00 sg?, scott?
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HEALY USCG icebreaker

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HEALY USCG icebreaker

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:59 pm

Healy_(WAGB-20)_north_of_Alaska.jpg
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2016 icebreakers ms.jpg
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Built as an icebreaker under yard No 2372 by the Litton Avondale Shipyard at Avondale, USA for the American Coast Guard’
16 September 1996 laid down.
15 November 1997 launched as the USCG HEALY (WAGB-20).
Displacement 16,257 ton full load. Tonnage 15,150 grt, 7,500 ton dwt. Dim. 128 x 25 x 8.92m. (draught), length bpp. 121.2m.
Powered diesel electric by four Sulzer 12ZAV40S diesel engines, 34,560 kW. Two AC Synchronous Drive motors, 11,2 MW, twin fixed pitch propellers, speed maximum 17 knots.
Three knots in 4.5 ft thick ice.
Accommodation for 19 officers, 12 CPO, 54 enlisted, 35 scientists, 17 others.
29 October 1999 completed.
10 November 1999 commissioned.

USCGC HEALY (WAGB-20) is the United States' largest and most technologically advanced icebreaker. She is classified as a medium icebreaker by the U.S. Coast Guard. She is homeported in Seattle, Washington and was commissioned in 1999. On September 5, 2015, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. The current Commanding Officer is Captain Jason Hamilton. Captain Hamilton assumed command of HEALY in May, 2015.
Construction
HEALY was built by Avondale Industries in New Orleans, Louisiana. The construction included a technology transfer agreement between Avondale Industries and the Finnish Kværner Masa-Yards Arctic Technology Centre, where the latter provided expertise for hull form development and propulsion line engineering based on the Finnish diesel-electric icebreaker OTSO.
HEALY is named in honor of United States Revenue Cutter Service Captain Michael A. HEALY. Her keel was laid on 16 September 1996. HEALY joined the icebreakers USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB-10) and USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB-11) in their homeport of Seattle, Washington on 10 November 1999. The ship departed New Orleans on January 26, 2000, performing sea trials off of San Juan, Puerto Rico and in Baffin Bay between Canada and Greenland. She arrived in Seattle on 9 August 2000 after transiting the famed Northwest Passage and was placed "In Commission, Active" on August 21, 2000.
USCGC HEALY is an optimally manned vessel, meaning it has the minimum number of personnel staffed in order to safely navigate. Due to the vast array of missions conducted by HEALY, it is vital that crewmembers are fully qualified on a number of duties. HEALY operates two A-Frames, one on the aft working deck and one on the starboard side. There are two articulated cranes on the aft working deck, with the starboard side rated to 15 short tons (14 t) and the port side rated to 5 short tons (4.5 t). The aft working deck provides ample space to conduct science and research operations. HEALY has a forecastle crane with a load capacity of 3 short tons (2.7 t), and two 04 level cranes with load capacities of 15 tons each HEALY has a Dynamic Positioning System (DPS) that uses its Bow Thruster system, which aids in navigation and station keeping during science operations. Its flight deck is capable of landing both of the Coast Guard's helicopter airframes, and attached is a hangar that can house 2 HH-65 helicopters. HEALY can accommodate 8 ISO vans on the ship, which are used as science labs and workstations. HEALY has three small boats on board. One is the 38 ft (12 m) foot Arctic Survey Boat (ASB), which is on the starboard side. HEALY has two 26 ft (7.9 m) Cutter Boat Large (CBL) Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIB), one on each side.
HEALY and the Geotraces science team have their portrait taken at the North Pole Sept. 7, 2015. HEALY reached the pole on Sept. 5, becoming the first U.S. surface vessel to do so unaccompanied.
Designed to conduct a wide range of research activities, HEALY provides more than 4,200 square feet (390 m2) of scientific laboratory space, numerous electronic sensor systems, oceanographic winches, and accommodations for up to 50 scientists. HEALY is also designed to break 4.5 ft (1.4 m) of ice continuously at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) or ice 10 ft (3.0 m) thick when backing and ramming, and can operate in temperatures as low as −50 °F (−46 °C).
As a Coast Guard cutter, HEALY is also a platform for supporting other potential missions in the polar regions, including: search and rescue, ship escort, environmental protection, and enforcement of laws and treaties.
Notable Operations
October 29, 2015: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 24 June to 29 October 2015 during their Arctic West Summer 2015 deployment. HEALY traveled over 16,000 miles, took over 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations, and became the first unaccompanied U.S. surface vessel to reach the North Pole. She also engaged with the crew of the German icebreaker POLARSTERN while at the North Pole in support of the international scientific mission Geotraces. Finally, HEALY became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from ice-bound Arctic waters, streaming video of a search and rescue exercise to shore-based coordinators.
April 10, 2012: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 3 January to 5 February 2012 after she escorted a tanker carrying a critical load of fuel through tremendously difficult winter ice conditions to Nome, AK. In November 2011, a strong winter storm struck western Alaska, which prevented a vital fuel delivery to Nome. HEALY delayed her return home from a six-month Arctic deployment in order to escort the Russian-flagged tanker MT RENDA to Nome, AK. HEALY escorted the MT RENDA through over 300 miles of extremely difficult ice conditions and broke out the beset ship time after time. After many days of great exertion, MT RENDA transferred the fuel to Nome over the course of three days. On 20 January, HEALY began the break out for herself and the MT RENDA. They emerged from the ice on 29 January 2012 after successful completion of the mission. This was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska.
January 20, 2010: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 6 August to 16 September 2009 while conducting the Joint U.S. Canada United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Expedition. In collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT, HEALY pushed 150 nautical miles further north than planned and avoided $2.4 million in future expedition mapping costs. HEALY also acquired over 1,000 pounds of valuable geological samples by conducting dredging operations at depths of up to 3 miles. The rare samples were essential in establishing the origin of the targeted extended continental shelf.
July 16, 2008: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from April 2007 to July 2008 while conducting science operations in support of national scientific, economic, and political interests. HEALY conducted a multi-year project in order to evaluate the entire ecosystem of the Bering Sea. Data collected during these missions helped improve the understanding of food webs and biological communities in the Arctic. Through superior mission execution in adverse weather, HEALY exceeded expectations significantly.
May 7, 2003: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from January 2003 to April 2003 while conducting Operation Deep Freeze in support of the U.S. Antarctic Program. With less than three weeks' notice, HEALY was deployed to Antarctica in support of the critical annual re-supply of McMurdo Station. HEALY played an instrumental role in coordination with USCGC POLAR SEA in resupplying the ice station. HEALY successfully escorted the freighter AMERICAN TERN and the tanker RICHARD G. MATTHIESON. HEALY successfully escorted both ships in and out of the ice, and facilitated the delivery of resources to McMurdo Station
January 23, 2002: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 12 June 2001 to 21 December 2001 during the Arctic East 2001 Science Mission. HEALY mapped 1,100 miles of the Gakkel Ridge, previously the only unmapped undersea ridge in the world. Twelve previously unknown volcanoes and numerous undersea hydrothermal vents were discovered. Eight tons of rock samples were taken from over 100 deep sea dredges.
Recent Operations
.
2016: On October 15, 2016, USCGC HEALY returned to its home port in Seattle, Washington after a 127-day summer deployment in the Arctic Ocean. The crew of the USCGC HEALY and its accompanying scientists participated in three scientific studies. Highlights of this deployment include the discovery of new species of jellyfish in the Chukchi Sea, observations of the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea, and data collection on climate change.
2015: On September 5, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. HEALY travelled over 16,000 nautical miles during Arctic West Summer 2015 (AWS15). During this expedition, more than 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations were collected through Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) casts and on-ice science stations. USCGC HEALY worked with both the United States Coast Guard Research & Development Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to test and develop Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), and became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from Arctic waters. HEALY also conducted a professional international engagement with the German Icebreaker POLARSTERN at the North Pole. It was a historic Arctic deployment that displayed the Coast Guard’s unique polar capabilities to the public and the world. Between May and October 2015, HEALY also tested the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) high frequency satellite communication system throughout its Arctic Summer West 2015 mission. Successful tests were completed throughout the expedition during the transit to the North Pole.
2014: A main area of focus during Arctic West Summer 2014 (AWS14) was the study of phytoplankton blooms along the Chukchi Sea. HEALY also worked in conjunction with the United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center to test Aerostat balloons, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), and oil tracking buoys.
2013: Arctic West Summer 2013 (AWS13) consisted of four different missions for HEALY, over which more than 19,000 miles were covered. The first mission utilized HEALY's unique over-the-side science capabilities in order to collect organisms and create an ecological picture of the Hanna Shoal region. The second mission yielded sediment samples from the Mackenzie River Basin through the use of coring devices. For the third mission the Coast Guard Research Development Center, in coordination with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, deployed numerous equipment for testing and development. The fourth and final mission deployed subsurface moorings and conducted numerous Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) tests to study the Alaskan Boundary Current.[19] A group of researchers from the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory tested their Submarine Team Behaviors Tool with the HEALY crew in September 2013. They were part of the 50 person science team from the USCG Research and Development Center that evaluated technology for the recovery of "simulated oil trapped in or under ice at the polar ice edge".
2012: In January 2012, HEALY escorted the Russian-flagged freighter RENDA through pack ice to deliver an emergency supply of fuel to Nome, Alaska. Such a winter delivery had never been attempted before because the ice floes are 1 to 5 feet (0.30 to 1.52 m) thick during the winter seasonThe resupply was vital to the city, and was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska. Over the course of Arctic West Summer 2012 (AWS12), HEALY travelled over 18,000 nautical miles and conducted 687 science casts. HEALY also added 25% more data to the bathymetric mapping project of the extended continental shelf through multibeam sonar bottom-mapping. This data was collected in support of the delineation of the American and Canadian continental shelves.
2011: During Arctic West Summer 2011 (AWS11), HEALY collaborated with researchers from NASA to study the refractive properties of sunlight in the Arctic. USCGC HEALY spent the summer mapping the Extended Continental Shelf in collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT. A third mission of this patrol studied organic carbon and its levels in the Arctic water column. This data was used to explain bacteria distribution in the water column as well as carbon dioxide and biomass cycles.
Dive Mishap
On August 17, 2006, Lieutenant Jessica Hill and PO2 Stephen Duque died of unspecified causes during diving operations in the Arctic Ocean. The Coast Guard conducted simultaneous safety and administrative investigations the results of which were made public in January 2007 along with a Final Decision Letter dated August 23, 2007. Initial press reports indicated that the divers were conducting an inspection of the rudder - a routine operation - at the time of the accident, but later reports stated that the two were doing a cold-water training dive near the bow of the ship. The dive was reported to have been planned for a maximum depth of 20 feet (6 m). Lieutenant Hill's father, citing autopsy reports, has indicated that his daughter actually reached a depth of near 200 feet (61 m) in what he described as an out of control descent. The divers were tended by unqualified and poorly-instructed personnel on the surface, none of whom were familiar with cold water diving or scuba diving in general. It is not clear why they extended so much line to the divers. By the time the two could be pulled to the surface, gas reserves were empty and neither diver could be revived.
On August 30, Commanding Officer Captain Douglas G. Russell was temporarily relieved of command by Vice Admiral Charles Wuster citing a "loss of confidence" in Russell's ability to command. The relief was later made permanent by Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen. Russell was initially replaced by Captain Daniel K. Oliver, the previous HEALY Commanding officer who Russell had relieved only two months earlier. Oliver returned to his regular staff job a short time later, when Captain Ted Lindstrom was named the new commanding officer. Lindstom has commanded four previous Coast Guard cutters, and was Chief of Response for the Coast Guard's 13th District in Seattle, Washington prior to returning to sea.
Awards and honors
US Coast Guard E Ribbon for the period of 4 February 2012 to 19 November 2014, at Afloat Training Organization (ATO) Everett, Washington.
2017 In service same name. IMO No 9083380.

Sierra Leone 2016 Le24,000 sgMS?, scott? (The two icebreakers in the margin are the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT and USCGC POLAR STAR.)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_HEALY_(WAGB-20)
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