SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

HMS Shannon captures USS Chesapeake,1813

On 9 April 1813 the U.S. Frigate Chesapeake returned to Boston after a cruise against British commercial shipping. Over the next several weeks she was refitted and received a new Commanding Officer, the recently promoted Captain James Lawrence. Many of her officers were replaced and a large percentage of her crew was newly enlisted. Though the ship was a good one, with a well-seasoned Captain, time would be necessary to work her men into a capable and disciplined combat team. However, the time was not available. Blockading off Boston was HMS Shannon, commanded for the past seven years by Captain Philip Broke, whose attention to gunnery practice and other elements of combat readiness was extraordinary. Shannon and Chesapeake were of virtually identical strength, though the American ship's crew was rather larger, and a duel between the two was attractive to both captains. Broke even issued a formal challenge, though it did not reach Lawrence, whose previous experience with British warships had convinced him that they were not likely to be formidable opponents. Chesapeake left Boston Harbor in the early afternoon of 1 June 1813. The two ships sailed several miles offshore, where Shannon slowed to await her opponent, who approached flying a special flag proclaiming "Free Trade and Sailors' Rights" in recognition of America's prewar grievances against British policies. Though Lawrence had a brief opportunity to rake, he did not do so, but closed to place his port broadside against Shannon's starboard battery. Somewhat before 6 PM the ships opened fire, both hitting, but the British guns did more damage and produced crippling casualties on Chesapeake's quarterdeck. Captain Lawrence was mortally wounded by small arms fire and had to be taken below, giving his final order "Don't give up the ship!" The American ship was soon out of control. The two frigates came together. Captain Broke led his boarding party onto Chesapeake's quarterdeck, where they met fierce but disorganized resistance. Assisted by cannon and small arms fire from on board Shannon, they soon gained control above decks, though Captain Broke was badly wounded in the process. Some fifteen minutes after the battle began, Chesapeake was in British hands. Casulaties were heavy: more than sixty killed on Chesapeake; about half that many on Shannon. The latter's cannon had made more than twice as many hits, and her boarding party demonstrated decisive superiority in hand-to-hand fighting. The action, which greatly boosted British morale, provided another of the War of 1812's many convincing examples of the vital importance of superior training and discipline in combat on sea and land.
Mali 2017;840f;SG?
Source:www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/events/war1812/atsea/ches-sn.htm

PK 10/130 UMS 1000 fire fighting boat

Ukraine issued in 2017 four stamps with firefighting craft of which one shows us a fire fighting and rescue boat in use in the Ukrainian waters.

The craft depict is the PK 10/130 (UMS 1000) which is sold by the Kompaniyatital 000 at Kiev. If they are the builder of the boat I am not sure, but I believe she are the agent for the builder.
Displacement 7000 kg. Full weight 3,500 kg. dim. 10.6 x 3.2 x 3.5m.
Powered by two Volvo Penta diesel engines each 330 hp, speed 45 knots.
For oil fighting she has a foam bag of 200 kg. and one fire pump.
Crew 8

Source: various internet sites.
Ukraine 2017 5k00 sg?, scott?

TRAUNSEE and paddlesteamer GISELA

By the issues is given:

About 35 Years UNPA at the Traunsee (1982 – 2017) - (Sheetlet Mint)
On 24 August 2017, UNPA will issue a personalized special event sheet celebrating “35 years UNPA at the Traunsee”. The sheet is composed of ten different € 0.68 denominated stamps. The stamps and the background image feature views of the Lake Traunsee, the City of Gmunden, the Castle “Schloss Ort” as well as the Villa Toscana. United Nations cancellations from the year 1982 are depicted on the tabs.
https://www.wopa-plus.com/en/stamps/product/&pid=38870#

The sheetlet has three maritime theme stamps, Two stamps shows us a paddlesteamer on the lake and a sail-yacht of the latter I do not have any information. The paddlesteamer must be the GISELA, the only old paddlesteamer on the lake, comparing the stamps with photos of the GISELA she is the vessel.
Her details and history are given on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12854&p=15702&hilit=gisela#p15702

United Nations 2017 0.68Euro sgMS?, scott?

Transfer of the Portuguese Court to Brazil.1808

In 1807, at the outset of the Peninsular War, Napoleonic forces invaded Portugal due to the Portuguese alliance with the United Kingdom. The prince regent of Portugal at the time, John VI, had formally governed the country on behalf of Maria I of Portugal since 1799. Anticipating the invasion of Napoleon's army, John VI ordered the transfer of the Portuguese royal court to Brazil before he could be deposed. Setting sail for Brazil on November 29, the royal party navigated under the protection of the British Royal Navy, and eight ships of the line, five frigates, and four smaller vessels of the Portuguese Navy, under the command of Admiral Sir Sidney Smith. On December 5, almost halfway between Lisbon and Madeira, Sidney Smith, along with Britain's envoy to Lisbon, Lord Strangford, returned to Europe with part of the British flotilla. Graham Moore, a British sailor and career officer in the Royal Navy, continued escorting the Portuguese royal family to Brazil with the ships Marlborough, London, Bedford, and Monarch. On January 22, 1808, John and his court arrived in Salvador, Brazil. There, Prince John signed a law opening commerce between Brazil and "friendly nations" such as the United Kingdom. This new law, however, broke the colonial pact that had permitted Brazil to maintain direct commercial relations with Portugal only. Secret negotiations at London in 1807 by Portuguese ambassador Domingos António de Sousa Coutinho guaranteed British military protection in exchange for British access to Brazil's ports and to Madeira as a naval base. Coutinho's secret negotiations paved the way for Prince John's law to come to fruition in 1808. On March 7, 1808, the court arrived in Rio de Janeiro. On December 16, 1815, John created the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves (Reino Unido de Portugal, Brasil e Algarves), elevating Brazil to the same rank as Portugal and increasing the administrative independence of Brazil. Brazilian representatives were elected to the Portuguese Constitutional Courts (Cortes Constitucionais Portuguesas). In 1815, in the aftermath of Napoleon's defeat and the meeting of the Congress of Vienna convened to restore European political arrangements, the Portuguese monarch declared Brazil a co-equal to Portugal to increase Portugal's bargaining power. In 1816, with the death of Queen Maria, Prince John became king of the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves. After several delays, the ceremony of his acclamation took place in Rio de Janeiro in 1818. Owing to the absence of the king and the economic independence of Brazil, Portugal entered a severe political crisis that obliged John VI and the royal family to return to Portugal in 1821, otherwise he risked loss of his Portuguese throne. The heir of John VI, Pedro I, remained in Brazil. The Portuguese Cortes demanded that Brazil return to its former status as a colony and the return of the heir to Portugal. Prince Pedro, influenced by the Rio de Janeiro Municipal Senate (Senado da Câmara), refused to return to Portugal during the Dia do Fico (January 9, 1822). Brazil declared its independence on September 7, 1822, forming the Empire of Brazil, ending 322 years of colonial dominance of Portugal over Brazil. Pedro was crowned the first emperor in Rio de Janeiro on October 12, 1822, taking the name Dom Pedro I.
Mali 2017;600f;SG?
Source:wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfer of the Portuguese Court to Brazil

FREMM FRIGATE (AQUITAINE)

About 150 Years of Military Transmissions
The stamp issued in 2017 by the French Post commemorates the 150th anniversary of military transmissions. The founding act of military transmissions was the Niel Act of 1867 establishing the first military units responsible for military telegraphy.
The visual illustrates the evolution of military transmissions from the telegraphic sappers (beginning of the optical telegraph) to the transmitters of today;
Symbolization of transmissions in the service of the 3 armies (Rafale aircraft, Leclerc tank, FRégate Européenne MultiMmission Fremm), transmissions = "the weapon that unites all weapons";
The color of the uniforms worn by the units of the "Blue" (made up of the militarized personnel from the Telegraph Administration) is the emblem of the transmissions, the sky blue.

The vessel depict on the stamp is one of the Fremm class of which many till so far have been built for the French and other navies. It is not given which frigate is depict.
The first unit was launched as the AQUITAINE.

Built as a frigate at the DCNS shipyard in Lorient for the French Navy.
2007 Laid down.
29 April 2010 launched as the AQUITAINE (D650).
Displacement standard?, full load 6,000 tons, dim. 142.2 x 20 x 5m. (draught)
Powered CODLOG with two electric motors 5MW combined and a single gas turbine 42,900 shp. Speed 28 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 11,000 km.
Armament: 1 – 76mm dual purpose gun, 3 – 20mm cannons. 16 – Aster 15 SAM missiles, 16 – Scalp naval land attack cruise missiles. 8 – MM 40 Exocet anti ship missiles. 2 – twin 324mm torpedo tubes for MU90 lightweight torpedoes.
One NI-190 NFH helicopter.
Crew 145.
23 November 2012 commissioned.

The FREMM ("European multi-purpose frigate"; French: Frégate européenne multi-mission; Italian: Fregata europea multi-missione) is a class of multi-purpose frigates designed by DCNS/Armaris and Fincantieri for the navies of France and Italy. The lead ship of the class, AQUITAINE, was commissioned in November 2012 by the French Navy. In France the class is known as the Aquitaine class, while in Italy they are known as the Bergamini class. Italy has ordered six general purpose variants and four anti-submarine variants; the last two Italian general purpose FREMMs will have anti-aircraft warfare, anti-ballistic missile and surface attack capabilities. France has ordered six anti-submarine variants, and two air-defence variants.
Background
Three original variants of the FREMM were proposed; an anti-submarine variant (ASW) and a general-purpose variant (GP) and a land-attack variant (AVT) to replace the existing classes of frigates within the French and Italian navies. A total of 27 FREMM were to be constructed - 17 for France and 10 for Italy - with additional aims to seek exports, however budget cuts and changing requirements has seen this number drop significantly for France, while the order for Italy remained invaried. The land-attack variant (AVT) was subsequently cancelled.
A third anti-air warfare variant of FREMM was proposed by DCNS in response to French requirements for a new air-defence frigate, the new variant became known as FREDA ("FREgates de Défense Aériennes", "Air defence frigate"). This new French requirement was due to the third and fourth Horizon-class frigates being cancelled after the first two cost €1,350m each, but this decision left French Navy still in-need of replacements for its ageing Cassard-class air-defence frigates.
As of 2009, the FREDA design features a more powerful version of the Herakles (radar) passive electronically scanned array radar and 32 cells of SYLVER A50 in place of the 16 cells of A43 and 16 cells of A70. The SYLVER A50 would allow it to fire the 120 kilometres (75 mi)-range Aster 30 missile; the towed array sonar would not be fitted.
At Euronaval 2012 DCNS showed a new concept called FREMM-ER for the FREDA requirement, again based on the FREMM, but specifically mentioning the ballistic missile defence mission as well as anti-air. FREMM-ER has a modified superstructure replacing Héraklès with the new Thales Sea Fire 500 radar, whose four fixed plates resemble those of the US Navy's AN/SPY-1. However unlike the Héraklès and the SPY-1 (both using passive electronically scanned array technology), the Sea Fire 500 has active electronically scanned array antennas.
France
Original plans were for 17 FREMM to replace the nine D'Estienne d'Orves-class avisos and nine anti-submarine frigates of the Tourville and Georges Leygues classes. In November 2005 France announced a contract of €3.5 billion for development and the first eight hulls, with options for nine more costing €2.95 billion split over two tranches (totaling 17).
Following the cancellation of the third and fourth of the Horizon-class frigates in 2005 on budget grounds, requirements for an air-defence derivative of the FREMM called FREDA were placed – with DCNS coming up with several proposals. Expectations were that the last two ships of the 17 FREMM planned would be built to FREDA specifications; however, by 2008 the plan was revised down to just 11 FREMM (9 ASW variants and 2 FREDA variants) at a cost of €8.75 billion (FY13, ~US$12 billion). The 11 ships would cost €670 million (~US$760m) each in FY2014, or €860m (~US$980m) including development costs.
The 2013 White Paper on Defence and National Security committed France to 15 front-line frigates, which was initially wrongly interpreted as 2 Horizons, 5 La Fayettes and a reduction in the FREMM fleet down to 8 ships. The 2014/2019 defence plan restated a target of 11 FREMMs; the current plan is to deliver six ASW variants to replace the Georges Leygues-class frigates by 2019, followed by two anti-air variants to replace the ageing Cassard-class frigates and a decision will be taken in 2016 on what version the remaining three will be. In 2014, the French Navy's Chief of Staff, Adm. Bernard Rogel, confirmed that 11 FREMM frigates had been ordered but in 2015 the order was cut to 8 in order to allow the purchase of five FTI Mid-Size frigates from 2023. The FTI will replace the La Fayette-class class, which will be fitted with a sonar as an interim measure.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FREMM_mul ... se_frigate and French Post and Internet.
French 2017 1.46 Euro sg?, scott?

Empress of China (1783)

Empress of China, also known as Chinese Queen, was a three-masted, square-rigged sailing ship of 360 tons, initially built in 1783 for service as a privateer. After the Treaty of Paris brought a formal end to the American Revolutionary War, the vessel was refitted for commercial purposes. She became the first American ship to sail from the newly independent United States to China, opening what is known today as the Old China Trade and transporting the first official representative of the American government to Canton. America began trade with China in 1784, with the Philadelphia ship the Empress of China. Popular trade goods were tea, porcelain and fabric. The Chinese were skeptical of foreign powers, and trading was restricted to certain ports, one of which was Canton. The Chinese government saw Canton as a major trading hub and felt that it needed to be controlled tightly to limit the influence of the foreigners. The actual port for Canton was called Whampoa Reach and it was about 12 miles down river from Canton. Western vessels had to anchor at Whompoa Reach and transfer their cargo to junks which transported the goods to the city for trading. The first American merchant vessel to enter Chinese waters left New York harbor on Washington's birthday, February 22, 1784. The Empress returned to New York on May 11, 1785 after a round voyage of 14 months and 24 days. The success of the voyage encouraged others to invest in further trading with China. President Washington bought a set of Chinese porcelain tableware from the ship. The ship's captain John Green (1736–1796) was a former U.S. naval officer, its two business agents (supercargos), Samuel Shaw (1754–1794) and Thomas Randall (1723–1797), were former officers in the U.S. Continental Army, and its syndicate of owners, including Robert Morris (1734–1806) were some of the richest men in the new nation. In 1986, China minted a silver 5-yuan to commemorate the voyage of the Empress. The design stamp is made after painting of Raymond-Massey: « Arrival «Empress of China» in Whampoa».
Mali 2017;420f;SG? Source:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empress_of_China_(1783); http://americanhistory.si.edu/collectio ... ah_1301925.
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HEALY USCG icebreaker

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HEALY USCG icebreaker

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:59 pm

Healy_(WAGB-20)_north_of_Alaska.jpg
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Built as an icebreaker under yard No 2372 by the Litton Avondale Shipyard at Avondale, USA for the American Coast Guard’
16 September 1996 laid down.
15 November 1997 launched as the USCG HEALY (WAGB-20).
Displacement 16,257 ton full load. Tonnage 15,150 grt, 7,500 ton dwt. Dim. 128 x 25 x 8.92m. (draught), length bpp. 121.2m.
Powered diesel electric by four Sulzer 12ZAV40S diesel engines, 34,560 kW. Two AC Synchronous Drive motors, 11,2 MW, twin fixed pitch propellers, speed maximum 17 knots.
Three knots in 4.5 ft thick ice.
Accommodation for 19 officers, 12 CPO, 54 enlisted, 35 scientists, 17 others.
29 October 1999 completed.
10 November 1999 commissioned.

USCGC HEALY (WAGB-20) is the United States' largest and most technologically advanced icebreaker. She is classified as a medium icebreaker by the U.S. Coast Guard. She is homeported in Seattle, Washington and was commissioned in 1999. On September 5, 2015, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. The current Commanding Officer is Captain Jason Hamilton. Captain Hamilton assumed command of HEALY in May, 2015.
Construction
HEALY was built by Avondale Industries in New Orleans, Louisiana. The construction included a technology transfer agreement between Avondale Industries and the Finnish Kværner Masa-Yards Arctic Technology Centre, where the latter provided expertise for hull form development and propulsion line engineering based on the Finnish diesel-electric icebreaker OTSO.
HEALY is named in honor of United States Revenue Cutter Service Captain Michael A. HEALY. Her keel was laid on 16 September 1996. HEALY joined the icebreakers USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB-10) and USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB-11) in their homeport of Seattle, Washington on 10 November 1999. The ship departed New Orleans on January 26, 2000, performing sea trials off of San Juan, Puerto Rico and in Baffin Bay between Canada and Greenland. She arrived in Seattle on 9 August 2000 after transiting the famed Northwest Passage and was placed "In Commission, Active" on August 21, 2000.
USCGC HEALY is an optimally manned vessel, meaning it has the minimum number of personnel staffed in order to safely navigate. Due to the vast array of missions conducted by HEALY, it is vital that crewmembers are fully qualified on a number of duties. HEALY operates two A-Frames, one on the aft working deck and one on the starboard side. There are two articulated cranes on the aft working deck, with the starboard side rated to 15 short tons (14 t) and the port side rated to 5 short tons (4.5 t). The aft working deck provides ample space to conduct science and research operations. HEALY has a forecastle crane with a load capacity of 3 short tons (2.7 t), and two 04 level cranes with load capacities of 15 tons each HEALY has a Dynamic Positioning System (DPS) that uses its Bow Thruster system, which aids in navigation and station keeping during science operations. Its flight deck is capable of landing both of the Coast Guard's helicopter airframes, and attached is a hangar that can house 2 HH-65 helicopters. HEALY can accommodate 8 ISO vans on the ship, which are used as science labs and workstations. HEALY has three small boats on board. One is the 38 ft (12 m) foot Arctic Survey Boat (ASB), which is on the starboard side. HEALY has two 26 ft (7.9 m) Cutter Boat Large (CBL) Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIB), one on each side.
HEALY and the Geotraces science team have their portrait taken at the North Pole Sept. 7, 2015. HEALY reached the pole on Sept. 5, becoming the first U.S. surface vessel to do so unaccompanied.
Designed to conduct a wide range of research activities, HEALY provides more than 4,200 square feet (390 m2) of scientific laboratory space, numerous electronic sensor systems, oceanographic winches, and accommodations for up to 50 scientists. HEALY is also designed to break 4.5 ft (1.4 m) of ice continuously at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) or ice 10 ft (3.0 m) thick when backing and ramming, and can operate in temperatures as low as −50 °F (−46 °C).
As a Coast Guard cutter, HEALY is also a platform for supporting other potential missions in the polar regions, including: search and rescue, ship escort, environmental protection, and enforcement of laws and treaties.
Notable Operations
October 29, 2015: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 24 June to 29 October 2015 during their Arctic West Summer 2015 deployment. HEALY traveled over 16,000 miles, took over 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations, and became the first unaccompanied U.S. surface vessel to reach the North Pole. She also engaged with the crew of the German icebreaker POLARSTERN while at the North Pole in support of the international scientific mission Geotraces. Finally, HEALY became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from ice-bound Arctic waters, streaming video of a search and rescue exercise to shore-based coordinators.
April 10, 2012: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 3 January to 5 February 2012 after she escorted a tanker carrying a critical load of fuel through tremendously difficult winter ice conditions to Nome, AK. In November 2011, a strong winter storm struck western Alaska, which prevented a vital fuel delivery to Nome. HEALY delayed her return home from a six-month Arctic deployment in order to escort the Russian-flagged tanker MT RENDA to Nome, AK. HEALY escorted the MT RENDA through over 300 miles of extremely difficult ice conditions and broke out the beset ship time after time. After many days of great exertion, MT RENDA transferred the fuel to Nome over the course of three days. On 20 January, HEALY began the break out for herself and the MT RENDA. They emerged from the ice on 29 January 2012 after successful completion of the mission. This was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska.
January 20, 2010: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 6 August to 16 September 2009 while conducting the Joint U.S. Canada United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Expedition. In collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT, HEALY pushed 150 nautical miles further north than planned and avoided $2.4 million in future expedition mapping costs. HEALY also acquired over 1,000 pounds of valuable geological samples by conducting dredging operations at depths of up to 3 miles. The rare samples were essential in establishing the origin of the targeted extended continental shelf.
July 16, 2008: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from April 2007 to July 2008 while conducting science operations in support of national scientific, economic, and political interests. HEALY conducted a multi-year project in order to evaluate the entire ecosystem of the Bering Sea. Data collected during these missions helped improve the understanding of food webs and biological communities in the Arctic. Through superior mission execution in adverse weather, HEALY exceeded expectations significantly.
May 7, 2003: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from January 2003 to April 2003 while conducting Operation Deep Freeze in support of the U.S. Antarctic Program. With less than three weeks' notice, HEALY was deployed to Antarctica in support of the critical annual re-supply of McMurdo Station. HEALY played an instrumental role in coordination with USCGC POLAR SEA in resupplying the ice station. HEALY successfully escorted the freighter AMERICAN TERN and the tanker RICHARD G. MATTHIESON. HEALY successfully escorted both ships in and out of the ice, and facilitated the delivery of resources to McMurdo Station
January 23, 2002: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 12 June 2001 to 21 December 2001 during the Arctic East 2001 Science Mission. HEALY mapped 1,100 miles of the Gakkel Ridge, previously the only unmapped undersea ridge in the world. Twelve previously unknown volcanoes and numerous undersea hydrothermal vents were discovered. Eight tons of rock samples were taken from over 100 deep sea dredges.
Recent Operations
.
2016: On October 15, 2016, USCGC HEALY returned to its home port in Seattle, Washington after a 127-day summer deployment in the Arctic Ocean. The crew of the USCGC HEALY and its accompanying scientists participated in three scientific studies. Highlights of this deployment include the discovery of new species of jellyfish in the Chukchi Sea, observations of the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea, and data collection on climate change.
2015: On September 5, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. HEALY travelled over 16,000 nautical miles during Arctic West Summer 2015 (AWS15). During this expedition, more than 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations were collected through Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) casts and on-ice science stations. USCGC HEALY worked with both the United States Coast Guard Research & Development Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to test and develop Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), and became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from Arctic waters. HEALY also conducted a professional international engagement with the German Icebreaker POLARSTERN at the North Pole. It was a historic Arctic deployment that displayed the Coast Guard’s unique polar capabilities to the public and the world. Between May and October 2015, HEALY also tested the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) high frequency satellite communication system throughout its Arctic Summer West 2015 mission. Successful tests were completed throughout the expedition during the transit to the North Pole.
2014: A main area of focus during Arctic West Summer 2014 (AWS14) was the study of phytoplankton blooms along the Chukchi Sea. HEALY also worked in conjunction with the United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center to test Aerostat balloons, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), and oil tracking buoys.
2013: Arctic West Summer 2013 (AWS13) consisted of four different missions for HEALY, over which more than 19,000 miles were covered. The first mission utilized HEALY's unique over-the-side science capabilities in order to collect organisms and create an ecological picture of the Hanna Shoal region. The second mission yielded sediment samples from the Mackenzie River Basin through the use of coring devices. For the third mission the Coast Guard Research Development Center, in coordination with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, deployed numerous equipment for testing and development. The fourth and final mission deployed subsurface moorings and conducted numerous Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) tests to study the Alaskan Boundary Current.[19] A group of researchers from the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory tested their Submarine Team Behaviors Tool with the HEALY crew in September 2013. They were part of the 50 person science team from the USCG Research and Development Center that evaluated technology for the recovery of "simulated oil trapped in or under ice at the polar ice edge".
2012: In January 2012, HEALY escorted the Russian-flagged freighter RENDA through pack ice to deliver an emergency supply of fuel to Nome, Alaska. Such a winter delivery had never been attempted before because the ice floes are 1 to 5 feet (0.30 to 1.52 m) thick during the winter seasonThe resupply was vital to the city, and was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska. Over the course of Arctic West Summer 2012 (AWS12), HEALY travelled over 18,000 nautical miles and conducted 687 science casts. HEALY also added 25% more data to the bathymetric mapping project of the extended continental shelf through multibeam sonar bottom-mapping. This data was collected in support of the delineation of the American and Canadian continental shelves.
2011: During Arctic West Summer 2011 (AWS11), HEALY collaborated with researchers from NASA to study the refractive properties of sunlight in the Arctic. USCGC HEALY spent the summer mapping the Extended Continental Shelf in collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT. A third mission of this patrol studied organic carbon and its levels in the Arctic water column. This data was used to explain bacteria distribution in the water column as well as carbon dioxide and biomass cycles.
Dive Mishap
On August 17, 2006, Lieutenant Jessica Hill and PO2 Stephen Duque died of unspecified causes during diving operations in the Arctic Ocean. The Coast Guard conducted simultaneous safety and administrative investigations the results of which were made public in January 2007 along with a Final Decision Letter dated August 23, 2007. Initial press reports indicated that the divers were conducting an inspection of the rudder - a routine operation - at the time of the accident, but later reports stated that the two were doing a cold-water training dive near the bow of the ship. The dive was reported to have been planned for a maximum depth of 20 feet (6 m). Lieutenant Hill's father, citing autopsy reports, has indicated that his daughter actually reached a depth of near 200 feet (61 m) in what he described as an out of control descent. The divers were tended by unqualified and poorly-instructed personnel on the surface, none of whom were familiar with cold water diving or scuba diving in general. It is not clear why they extended so much line to the divers. By the time the two could be pulled to the surface, gas reserves were empty and neither diver could be revived.
On August 30, Commanding Officer Captain Douglas G. Russell was temporarily relieved of command by Vice Admiral Charles Wuster citing a "loss of confidence" in Russell's ability to command. The relief was later made permanent by Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen. Russell was initially replaced by Captain Daniel K. Oliver, the previous HEALY Commanding officer who Russell had relieved only two months earlier. Oliver returned to his regular staff job a short time later, when Captain Ted Lindstrom was named the new commanding officer. Lindstom has commanded four previous Coast Guard cutters, and was Chief of Response for the Coast Guard's 13th District in Seattle, Washington prior to returning to sea.
Awards and honors
US Coast Guard E Ribbon for the period of 4 February 2012 to 19 November 2014, at Afloat Training Organization (ATO) Everett, Washington.
2017 In service same name. IMO No 9083380.

Sierra Leone 2016 Le24,000 sgMS?, scott? (The two icebreakers in the margin are the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT and USCGC POLAR STAR.)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_HEALY_(WAGB-20)
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