SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DELTUVA

The Colombian Post issued in 2018 a miniature sheet with images from Barranquilla, of which one stamp shows us the Barranquilla port with a cargo vessel.

The cargo vessel is the DELTUVA the name is visible on the bow when you enlarge the stamp.
Built as a cargo vessel under yard No b570-1/1 by Stocznia Szczecinska Nowa Z O.O. New Szczecin Shipyard in Szczecin, Poland for Clipper Eagle Shipping Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas,
09 July 1994 launched as the CLIPPER EAGLE.
Tonnage 11,542 grt, 5,366 net, 16,906 dwt, dim. 149,44 x 23.00 x 12.10m., length bpp. 138.0m, draught 6.10m.
Powered by a one 4S50MC 4-cyl. diesel engine, manufactured bu H. Cegielski, 5,720 kW. One fixed pitch propeller. Speed 14 knots.
Four holds. Two cranes each 20.0 ton lifting capacity.
Capacity, grain 21,307m², bale 21,043m².
04 October 1994 completed. IMO No 8908832.

2007 Sold to Lithuanian Shipping Co. Klaipeda, Lithuania, renamed in DELTUVA.
2016 After the Lithuanian Shipping Co, got bankrupt during a public auction the DELTUVA was bought by Pirita Shipholding Co., Geneva, Switserland, renamed PIRITA under Antigua& Barbuda flag and registry.
15 June 2017 PIRITA arrived Chittagong, Bangladesh for scrapping.

Colombia 2018 $5.000 sg?, scott? and miniature sheet al $5.000 stamps.
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.nz and internet.

FAKHR EL BIHAR Royal yacht

For a meeting between King Farouk of Egypt and King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia in 1945 at Radhwa the Saudi Arabian Post issued four stamps. The stamps are not so clear, but the vessel on the left top is the Egyptian Royal yacht FAKHR EL BIHAR on which the meeting took place.

Built as a steel hulled yacht under yard No 268 by Ramage & Ferguson, Leith, Scotland for H.H. Prince Youssouf Kamal, Alexandria, Egypt.
09 September 1930 launched as the NAZ-PERWER.
Tonnage 708 grt, 251nrt, 1.051 tm, dim. 75.98 x 9.75 x 4.98m.
Powered by two 4S.C.SA 8-cyl. oil engines, manufactured by Friedrich Krupp A.G., Kiel, 384 nhp.
Schooner rigged.
December 1930 completed.

1940 Sold to King Farouk of Egypt and renamed in FAKHR EL BIHAR.
24 January 1945 King Farouk visited King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia. The meeting between the two kings took place in Radhwa on board of the FAKHR EL BIHAR.
1949 Sold to the Egyptian Government and renamed El QUOSSEIR. Used by the Egyptian Naval Academy as training ship.
2018 In service same name and managed by the Egyptian Navy.

Source Log Book 3/70 and internet.
Saudi Arabia 1945 ½ to 10g scott 173/76

TE ARAWA waka

Hawaiki – a real island? Or a mythical place? Hawaiki is the traditional Māori place of origin. The first Māori are said to have sailed to New Zealand from Hawaiki

In Māori mythology, ARAWA was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled Aotearoa (New Zealand).
The Te ARAWA confederation of Māori iwi and hapu (tribes and sub-tribes) based in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty areas of New Zealand trace their ancestry from this waka
Construction of the canoe
Eventually, a large tree was felled and from this the waka which eventually came to be known as Te ARAWA was formed. The men who turned this log into a beautifully decorated canoe were Rata, Wahieroa, Ngaahue and Parata. "Hauhau-te-rangi" and "Tuutauru" (made from New Zealand greenstone brought back by Ngaahue) were the adzes they used for this time-consuming and intensive work. Upon completion, the waka was given the name Ngaa raakau kotahi puu a Atua Matua (also known as Ngaa raakau maatahi puu a Atua Matua).
The waka was eventually completed and berthed in Whenuakura Bay while Tama-te-kapua, in his capacity as rangatira (chief) of the canoe, set about trying to find a tohunga (priest) for the journey. Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife Kearoa were tricked by Tama-te-kapua to board the canoe to perform the necessary appeasement incantations to the gods prior to the canoe's departure. However, while they were on board, Tama-te-kapua signalled his men to quickly set sail, and before Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife could respond they were far out to sea
Voyage to Aotearoa
One of the more dramatic stories pertaining to the voyage to Aotearoa occurred because Tama-te-kapua became desirous of Kearoa. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed the glint in Tama-te-kapua's eye and took precautions to protect his wife during the night while he was on deck navigating by the stars. This was done by tying one end of a cord to her hair and holding the other end in his hand. However, Tama-te-kapua untied the cord from Kearoa's hair and attached it to the bed instead. He then made love to her, following this pattern over a number of nights. One night however, he was nearly discovered in the act by Ngātoro-i-rangi, but just managed to escape. In his haste he forgot the cord. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed this and therefore knew that Tama-te-kapua had been with Kearoa. He was furious and, in his desire to gain revenge, raised a huge whirlpool in the sea named Te korokoro-o-te-Parata ("The throat of Te Parata"). The waka was about to be lost with all on board but Ngātoro-i-rangi eventually took pity and caused the seas to become calm (Steedman, pp 99-100).
One incident that occurred during this drama was that all the kūmara (sweet potato) carried on the waka were lost overboard, save for a few that were in a small kete being clutched by Whakaotirang Immediately after the calming of the seas, a shark (known as an ARAWA) was seen in the water. Ngātoro-i-rangi immediately renamed the waka Te ARAWA, after this shark, which then accompanied the waka to Aotearoa, acting in the capacity of a kai-tiaki (guardian).
The ARAWA waka then continued on to Aotearoa without incident, finally sighting land at Whangaparaoa where feather headdresses were foolishly cast away due to greed and due to the beauty of the pohutukawa bloom. Upon landfall, an argument took place with members of the Tainui canoe over a beached whale and the ownership thereof. Tama-te-kapua again resorted to trickery and took possession of it despite rightful claim of the Tainui. . The canoe then travelled north up the coast to the Coromandel Peninsula, where Tama-te-kapua first sighted the mountain Moehau, a place he was later to make home. Heading south again, it finally came to rest at Maketu, where it was beached and stood until being burnt by Raumati of Taranaki some years later.
Some items of note that were brought to Aotearoa on the ARAWA, other than the precious kūmara saved by Whakaotirangi, was a tapu kōhatu (stone) left by Ngātoro-i-rangi on the island Te Poito o te Kupenga a Taramainuku just off the coast of Cape Colville. This stone held the mauri to protect the Te ARAWA peoples and their descendants from evil times (Stafford, 1967, p17). In addition, the waka brought over two gods, one called Itupaoa, which was represented by a roll of tapa, and another stone carving now possibly buried at Mokoia Island, Lake Rotorua.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARAWA_(canoe)
New Zealand 1906 ½d sg 370, scott ?

INAUGURATION OF THE PORT OF LOME

For the inauguration of the port of Lome and the 8th anniversary of Independence the Togo Post issued a set of stamps.

The 20f stamp shows us the inauguration of the port with in the background a tug and cargo vessels, which are not identified.
Lomé is the main port for the trade of goods. It was established by the Germans in the early 1900s. From the wooden wharf to the current modern facilities, this port has been the centre of major changes. Today (2018) , it is one of the deepest–water ports in the whole West African region, handling over 80% of the international trade of Togo. Lomé is also an important transit point for landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.
The Port of Lomé lies in the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic coast), in the extreme southwestern corner of the country. Its modernization started in the 1960s. The deepwater harbor was completed/inaugurated in 1968. It was initially planned for a 400,000-ton annual traffic, but currently handles a traffic estimated over 6 millions tons.
The increased capacity of the Port of Lomé has facilitated the shipping of phosphates and other major export products, such as cocoa, coffee, copra, cotton, and palm products. It has also positioned Lomé as one of the main port for the international trade of neighboring landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.

Source: http://dlca.logcluster.org/display/publ ... CB9087590E
Togo 1968 30f sg 590 scott?

LANDING OF THE MAORI IN NEW ZEALAND AROUND 1350.

Landing of Maori in New Zealand around 1350, in the background of the stamp you see a double hulled waka prow.

Maori history was transmitted orally from generation to generation in pre-European times. A continuing examination of the traditions, archaeological, linguistic and cultural evidence, has discredited the 'great fleet theory' of the Maori arrival in New Zealand. The consensus among scholars now is that the Polynesians originally moved into the Pacific from the west, spread eastwards, and that the Maori came most recently from the eastern Pacific (that is from Tahiti or the Marquesas). They began to arrive here in small groups, starting more than 1000 years ago, probably via islands to the north-east. The scene depicted on the stamp is an original conception by the artist of the arrival of one of the canoes The Maoris have been pictured as arriving in a state of physical exhaustion, the inevitable consequence, despite their magnificent seafaring skills, of weeks spent in open canoes.

The first Maori arrived in the canoe ARAWA or TAINUI.

New Zealand 1940 ½d sg613, scott?
Source: New Zealand Post.

CANOE PROW MAKING BY MAORI

Canoe Prow.
This 1d stamp shows us the making of a canoe prow by the Maori in New Zealand before 1800 by which the New Zealand Post gives:
When it is considered that the Māori did not process metal tools and relied upon stone and bone, the intricacy and beauty of the wood carving that was produced is incredible.

New Zealand 1906 1d sg 371, scott ?.
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HEALY USCG icebreaker

The full index of our ship stamp archive

HEALY USCG icebreaker

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:59 pm

Healy_(WAGB-20)_north_of_Alaska.jpg
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2016 icebreakers ms.jpg
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Built as an icebreaker under yard No 2372 by the Litton Avondale Shipyard at Avondale, USA for the American Coast Guard’
16 September 1996 laid down.
15 November 1997 launched as the USCG HEALY (WAGB-20).
Displacement 16,257 ton full load. Tonnage 15,150 grt, 7,500 ton dwt. Dim. 128 x 25 x 8.92m. (draught), length bpp. 121.2m.
Powered diesel electric by four Sulzer 12ZAV40S diesel engines, 34,560 kW. Two AC Synchronous Drive motors, 11,2 MW, twin fixed pitch propellers, speed maximum 17 knots.
Three knots in 4.5 ft thick ice.
Accommodation for 19 officers, 12 CPO, 54 enlisted, 35 scientists, 17 others.
29 October 1999 completed.
10 November 1999 commissioned.

USCGC HEALY (WAGB-20) is the United States' largest and most technologically advanced icebreaker. She is classified as a medium icebreaker by the U.S. Coast Guard. She is homeported in Seattle, Washington and was commissioned in 1999. On September 5, 2015, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. The current Commanding Officer is Captain Jason Hamilton. Captain Hamilton assumed command of HEALY in May, 2015.
Construction
HEALY was built by Avondale Industries in New Orleans, Louisiana. The construction included a technology transfer agreement between Avondale Industries and the Finnish Kværner Masa-Yards Arctic Technology Centre, where the latter provided expertise for hull form development and propulsion line engineering based on the Finnish diesel-electric icebreaker OTSO.
HEALY is named in honor of United States Revenue Cutter Service Captain Michael A. HEALY. Her keel was laid on 16 September 1996. HEALY joined the icebreakers USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB-10) and USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB-11) in their homeport of Seattle, Washington on 10 November 1999. The ship departed New Orleans on January 26, 2000, performing sea trials off of San Juan, Puerto Rico and in Baffin Bay between Canada and Greenland. She arrived in Seattle on 9 August 2000 after transiting the famed Northwest Passage and was placed "In Commission, Active" on August 21, 2000.
USCGC HEALY is an optimally manned vessel, meaning it has the minimum number of personnel staffed in order to safely navigate. Due to the vast array of missions conducted by HEALY, it is vital that crewmembers are fully qualified on a number of duties. HEALY operates two A-Frames, one on the aft working deck and one on the starboard side. There are two articulated cranes on the aft working deck, with the starboard side rated to 15 short tons (14 t) and the port side rated to 5 short tons (4.5 t). The aft working deck provides ample space to conduct science and research operations. HEALY has a forecastle crane with a load capacity of 3 short tons (2.7 t), and two 04 level cranes with load capacities of 15 tons each HEALY has a Dynamic Positioning System (DPS) that uses its Bow Thruster system, which aids in navigation and station keeping during science operations. Its flight deck is capable of landing both of the Coast Guard's helicopter airframes, and attached is a hangar that can house 2 HH-65 helicopters. HEALY can accommodate 8 ISO vans on the ship, which are used as science labs and workstations. HEALY has three small boats on board. One is the 38 ft (12 m) foot Arctic Survey Boat (ASB), which is on the starboard side. HEALY has two 26 ft (7.9 m) Cutter Boat Large (CBL) Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIB), one on each side.
HEALY and the Geotraces science team have their portrait taken at the North Pole Sept. 7, 2015. HEALY reached the pole on Sept. 5, becoming the first U.S. surface vessel to do so unaccompanied.
Designed to conduct a wide range of research activities, HEALY provides more than 4,200 square feet (390 m2) of scientific laboratory space, numerous electronic sensor systems, oceanographic winches, and accommodations for up to 50 scientists. HEALY is also designed to break 4.5 ft (1.4 m) of ice continuously at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) or ice 10 ft (3.0 m) thick when backing and ramming, and can operate in temperatures as low as −50 °F (−46 °C).
As a Coast Guard cutter, HEALY is also a platform for supporting other potential missions in the polar regions, including: search and rescue, ship escort, environmental protection, and enforcement of laws and treaties.
Notable Operations
October 29, 2015: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 24 June to 29 October 2015 during their Arctic West Summer 2015 deployment. HEALY traveled over 16,000 miles, took over 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations, and became the first unaccompanied U.S. surface vessel to reach the North Pole. She also engaged with the crew of the German icebreaker POLARSTERN while at the North Pole in support of the international scientific mission Geotraces. Finally, HEALY became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from ice-bound Arctic waters, streaming video of a search and rescue exercise to shore-based coordinators.
April 10, 2012: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from 3 January to 5 February 2012 after she escorted a tanker carrying a critical load of fuel through tremendously difficult winter ice conditions to Nome, AK. In November 2011, a strong winter storm struck western Alaska, which prevented a vital fuel delivery to Nome. HEALY delayed her return home from a six-month Arctic deployment in order to escort the Russian-flagged tanker MT RENDA to Nome, AK. HEALY escorted the MT RENDA through over 300 miles of extremely difficult ice conditions and broke out the beset ship time after time. After many days of great exertion, MT RENDA transferred the fuel to Nome over the course of three days. On 20 January, HEALY began the break out for herself and the MT RENDA. They emerged from the ice on 29 January 2012 after successful completion of the mission. This was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska.
January 20, 2010: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 6 August to 16 September 2009 while conducting the Joint U.S. Canada United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Expedition. In collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT, HEALY pushed 150 nautical miles further north than planned and avoided $2.4 million in future expedition mapping costs. HEALY also acquired over 1,000 pounds of valuable geological samples by conducting dredging operations at depths of up to 3 miles. The rare samples were essential in establishing the origin of the targeted extended continental shelf.
July 16, 2008: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from April 2007 to July 2008 while conducting science operations in support of national scientific, economic, and political interests. HEALY conducted a multi-year project in order to evaluate the entire ecosystem of the Bering Sea. Data collected during these missions helped improve the understanding of food webs and biological communities in the Arctic. Through superior mission execution in adverse weather, HEALY exceeded expectations significantly.
May 7, 2003: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation award for exceptionally meritorious service from January 2003 to April 2003 while conducting Operation Deep Freeze in support of the U.S. Antarctic Program. With less than three weeks' notice, HEALY was deployed to Antarctica in support of the critical annual re-supply of McMurdo Station. HEALY played an instrumental role in coordination with USCGC POLAR SEA in resupplying the ice station. HEALY successfully escorted the freighter AMERICAN TERN and the tanker RICHARD G. MATTHIESON. HEALY successfully escorted both ships in and out of the ice, and facilitated the delivery of resources to McMurdo Station
January 23, 2002: USCGC HEALY received the Coast Guard Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation award for meritorious service from 12 June 2001 to 21 December 2001 during the Arctic East 2001 Science Mission. HEALY mapped 1,100 miles of the Gakkel Ridge, previously the only unmapped undersea ridge in the world. Twelve previously unknown volcanoes and numerous undersea hydrothermal vents were discovered. Eight tons of rock samples were taken from over 100 deep sea dredges.
Recent Operations
.
2016: On October 15, 2016, USCGC HEALY returned to its home port in Seattle, Washington after a 127-day summer deployment in the Arctic Ocean. The crew of the USCGC HEALY and its accompanying scientists participated in three scientific studies. Highlights of this deployment include the discovery of new species of jellyfish in the Chukchi Sea, observations of the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea, and data collection on climate change.
2015: On September 5, USCGC HEALY became the first unaccompanied United States surface vessel to reach the North Pole. HEALY travelled over 16,000 nautical miles during Arctic West Summer 2015 (AWS15). During this expedition, more than 25,000 water and ice samples from 72 science stations were collected through Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) casts and on-ice science stations. USCGC HEALY worked with both the United States Coast Guard Research & Development Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to test and develop Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), and became the first vessel to broadcast a live feed from Arctic waters. HEALY also conducted a professional international engagement with the German Icebreaker POLARSTERN at the North Pole. It was a historic Arctic deployment that displayed the Coast Guard’s unique polar capabilities to the public and the world. Between May and October 2015, HEALY also tested the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) high frequency satellite communication system throughout its Arctic Summer West 2015 mission. Successful tests were completed throughout the expedition during the transit to the North Pole.
2014: A main area of focus during Arctic West Summer 2014 (AWS14) was the study of phytoplankton blooms along the Chukchi Sea. HEALY also worked in conjunction with the United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center to test Aerostat balloons, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), and oil tracking buoys.
2013: Arctic West Summer 2013 (AWS13) consisted of four different missions for HEALY, over which more than 19,000 miles were covered. The first mission utilized HEALY's unique over-the-side science capabilities in order to collect organisms and create an ecological picture of the Hanna Shoal region. The second mission yielded sediment samples from the Mackenzie River Basin through the use of coring devices. For the third mission the Coast Guard Research Development Center, in coordination with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, deployed numerous equipment for testing and development. The fourth and final mission deployed subsurface moorings and conducted numerous Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) tests to study the Alaskan Boundary Current.[19] A group of researchers from the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory tested their Submarine Team Behaviors Tool with the HEALY crew in September 2013. They were part of the 50 person science team from the USCG Research and Development Center that evaluated technology for the recovery of "simulated oil trapped in or under ice at the polar ice edge".
2012: In January 2012, HEALY escorted the Russian-flagged freighter RENDA through pack ice to deliver an emergency supply of fuel to Nome, Alaska. Such a winter delivery had never been attempted before because the ice floes are 1 to 5 feet (0.30 to 1.52 m) thick during the winter seasonThe resupply was vital to the city, and was the first-ever winter fuel delivery from the water in Western Alaska. Over the course of Arctic West Summer 2012 (AWS12), HEALY travelled over 18,000 nautical miles and conducted 687 science casts. HEALY also added 25% more data to the bathymetric mapping project of the extended continental shelf through multibeam sonar bottom-mapping. This data was collected in support of the delineation of the American and Canadian continental shelves.
2011: During Arctic West Summer 2011 (AWS11), HEALY collaborated with researchers from NASA to study the refractive properties of sunlight in the Arctic. USCGC HEALY spent the summer mapping the Extended Continental Shelf in collaboration with the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT. A third mission of this patrol studied organic carbon and its levels in the Arctic water column. This data was used to explain bacteria distribution in the water column as well as carbon dioxide and biomass cycles.
Dive Mishap
On August 17, 2006, Lieutenant Jessica Hill and PO2 Stephen Duque died of unspecified causes during diving operations in the Arctic Ocean. The Coast Guard conducted simultaneous safety and administrative investigations the results of which were made public in January 2007 along with a Final Decision Letter dated August 23, 2007. Initial press reports indicated that the divers were conducting an inspection of the rudder - a routine operation - at the time of the accident, but later reports stated that the two were doing a cold-water training dive near the bow of the ship. The dive was reported to have been planned for a maximum depth of 20 feet (6 m). Lieutenant Hill's father, citing autopsy reports, has indicated that his daughter actually reached a depth of near 200 feet (61 m) in what he described as an out of control descent. The divers were tended by unqualified and poorly-instructed personnel on the surface, none of whom were familiar with cold water diving or scuba diving in general. It is not clear why they extended so much line to the divers. By the time the two could be pulled to the surface, gas reserves were empty and neither diver could be revived.
On August 30, Commanding Officer Captain Douglas G. Russell was temporarily relieved of command by Vice Admiral Charles Wuster citing a "loss of confidence" in Russell's ability to command. The relief was later made permanent by Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen. Russell was initially replaced by Captain Daniel K. Oliver, the previous HEALY Commanding officer who Russell had relieved only two months earlier. Oliver returned to his regular staff job a short time later, when Captain Ted Lindstrom was named the new commanding officer. Lindstom has commanded four previous Coast Guard cutters, and was Chief of Response for the Coast Guard's 13th District in Seattle, Washington prior to returning to sea.
Awards and honors
US Coast Guard E Ribbon for the period of 4 February 2012 to 19 November 2014, at Afloat Training Organization (ATO) Everett, Washington.
2017 In service same name. IMO No 9083380.

Sierra Leone 2016 Le24,000 sgMS?, scott? (The two icebreakers in the margin are the CCGS LOUIS S. ST-LAURENT and USCGC POLAR STAR.)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_HEALY_(WAGB-20)
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