SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.

BAOBAO canoe

The “BAOBAO” or “boopaa” used in the Tonga Islands, central Pacific, it is a roughly hewn single outrigger paddling canoe used for fishing inshore or just outside the reefs. Detail vary somewhat from island to island. Dugout hull, slight tumble home to sides; bottom rounded transversely with rocker fore-and-aft, with stern ending above the waterline. Solid vertical ends; break in the sheer line near ends. Two or three straight booms lashed atop the gunwales, cross to the pointed float. Booms and float attached by pairs of over-crossed stanchions, or by double U-shaped flexible withes.
Carries 1-4 people, length 3 – 5m, and depth 0.31 – 0.38m.

Gilbert & Ellice Islands 1939 1½d sg 45, scott 42 and 2d sg 46, scott? 5d sg sg 49, scott 46.1956 2d sg 66, scott? and 5d sg 69, scott? and 10sh sg 75, scott? 1971 35c sg 184, scott? and 35c sg192, scott? 1975 35c sg 259, scott?
Gilbert Islands 1976 2c sg 5, scott?, and 35c sg 20, scott? and 35c sg
Source: Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

NIGHT FISHING IN GILBERT & ELLICE ISLANDS

Night fishing in low lying coral atolls of the Gilbert Islands appears to provide an ideal environment for flying-fish, which are abundant in the deeper water outside the reefs during the day or night.
The flying-fish is used for eating but also for bait to catch, shark, swordfish, tuna, etc.
The stamp shows the night fishing with flares. The best time is during new moon and full moon and the ensuing three days.
When the people on the island decide to go fishing during the night, the canoes are made ready and the young children and women are told to make the flares from fallen dry coconut fronds, rolled together, the flare has a length of about 9 feet, and each canoe needs around 12 flares.
The scoop net is about three feet long and two feet wide and bound on a pole with a length of eight to 12 feet.
The canoe on the stamp is one of the “baobao” type and has a crew of four. After launching the canoe in the water she is heading late afternoon out of the lagoon passing the surf and waiting till the moon is raising and the flares are lighted, the flying-fish is heading for the light and the net is brought down over or before the fish and only the experienced men can handle the scoop net, during the fishing during full moon the canoe moved forward.
The canoe has flares aboard for fishing around four hours, and the average catch for a canoe is around the 60 fish.

Much more info is given on: http://www.jps.auckland.ac.nz/document? ... lt&target=
More info on the baobao is given: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15857

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 35c sg184, scott?

WOMEN OF THE BOUNTY

Mauatua, Faahotu, Mareva, Puarei, Tetuahitea,Teehuteatuaonoa, Teio, Teraura, Tevarua, Tinafanaea, Toofaiti, Vahineatua, Sully ...
These are the names of the twelve women and the little girl who were on board of the BOUNTY when the ship arrived in January 1790 off the island “Hitiaurevareva” now known as Pitcairn. It is to these women whose names have been forgotten, eclipsed by the history of their mutinous companions, whom this stamp pays homage. Removed from their families and friends, forced companions of sometimes violent men, they nevertheless patiently built the life of the community of this lost island off the Gambier archipelago, making the choices they considered best for the well-being of their children. On the spot, they recognized edible plants, those which can be braided for the roofs, those which heal, and those which are beaten to make “tapa”, a precious stuff in their islands. In 1790,the death of two of these “vahine” triggered a series of violent events which only stopped three years later, but, these strong women defended their independence in times of crisis, even by trying to leave the island where their companions had killed each other. Thanks to one of them, Teehuteatuaonoa, we know more about the circumstances in which the community of Pitcairn was born. She delivered her version of the story, their attempt to settle on Tupua'i (or Tubuai island), and on their precipitous departure from Tahiti until their arrival and their settlement in their new home land away from the British bloodhounds. Their retreat was finally discovered in 1808 by Mayhew Folger, captain of the TOPAZ,who met John Adams, the last surviving mutineer, 19 years after the famous mutiny. Teehuteatuaonoa finally managed to leave the island of Pitcairn in 1817 on board of the whaler SULTAN leaving for Chile. She, the Pitcairn rebel without descendants, finally found Tahiti where she is buried ... In 1838, these women ahead of their time are the first in the world to vote, 70 years before the now famous suffragettes.
It is for these Polynesian women forgotten by history that this stamp about the Vahine of the BOUNTY is dedicated... Josiane Teamotuaitau, PhD in Polynesian Civilization This joint issue with Pitcairn islands illustrates the party
evening where the twelve vahine and little Sully went on the BOUNTY which was anchored in the bay of Matavai. Pitcairn islands on the same theme "Women of the BOUNTY" issues
a series of three stamps illustrating the day after partying away from Tahiti, the firing of the BOUNTY condemning the vahines to stay on the island, and life resuming its course
on this lost rock in the Pacific.

http://www.tahitiphilatelie.com/details ... 017&id=317
French Polynesia 2017 1.40F sg?, scott?

In September 1789 after the mutiny and while staying briefly on Tahiti, Fletcher Christian became concerned that some of his men were ready to rebel against him. Spurred also by fear of discovery and arrest from Britain, he made a hurried departure. He and 8 members of the BOUNTY crew sailed from Tahiti with 6 Polynesian men, 12 Polynesian women and a baby girl.

Searching for a new home took four months until uncharted Pitcairn was sighted on 15 January 1790. A decision was made on 23 January to burn the BOUNTY and the fate of all to remain on the island was sealed. The women consorts soon adopted a survival mode by growing crops, fishing, making tapa for warmth and clothing and ensuring Tahitian culture remained an integral part of Pitcairn�s identity through music and dance.

Pauline Reynolds in her "Textile History" article* writes how the production of tapa and gifting "reveals information regarding their social, ritual and innovative activities, and their contribution to the BOUNTY/Pitcairn story". This activity was exclusively a female role but one that gave them a degree of power, status and prestige (depending on the fineness of the cloth). It also provided an outlet for their creative talents and helped bind social relationships.

In addition to clothing the community, the tapa made by the BOUNTY Women also made fine tapa for traditional gifting to seafaring visitors. This gave the women an important role in Pitcairn daily life. Also adds Reynolds, "The making and felting of cloth by the women of the Pitcairn community was symbolic of the binding and weaving of relationships, particularly amongst the women and their children". Their innovative designs and experimentation led to unique Pitcairn tapa cloths which are different to those from Tahiti (French Polynesia) and very recognisable today.

The production of tapa enabled the women to meet regularly and, while speaking in their native tongue, share gossip and stories, as well as frustrations. The work was hard and time consuming but helped develop their strength and athleticism which helped their survival.

Reynolds concludes that the BOUNTY women were "active agents in their community, playing a dynamic role in shaping the social landscape".

*Tapa Cloths and Beaters: Tradition, Innovation and the Agency of the BOUNTY Women in Shaping a New Culture on Pitcairn Island from 1790 to 1850. � Pauline Reynolds, 2016.

http://www.stamps.gov.pn/
Pitcairn Island 2017 $1.80/2.80 sgMS?, scott?.

NET FISHING at GILBERT & ELLICE ISLAND

The stamp shows us net fishing in the lagoon from a canoe, the most common types of fishing in the Gilbert & Ellice Islands in the lagoon is net-, line- or shell fishing.
The nylon net is about 20 to 30 feet long, 2 – 3 feet high and used by 3 or 4 fishermen, two for setting the net, while the other is disturbing the water to chase the fish in the net.
The canoe is a “Wa” canoe without sail and rigging: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8600

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 1971 2c sg 174, scott?
Tuvalu 1976 2c sg20, scott?
Source: Management of Marine Resources in Kiribati By Roniti Teiwaki
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CROWN PRINCESS Cruise vessel (2006)

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CROWN PRINCESS Cruise vessel (2006)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:14 pm

Crown_Princess.jpg
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Built as a passenger-cruise vessel under yard No 6100 by Sestri Fincantieri Italiana, Monfalcone, Italy for Princess Cruiseline Ltd., Valencia, CA, USA.
03 May 2004 laid down.
The forepart of the vessel was built under yard no 1100 by Sestri, Genoa-Sestri and after completed towed to Monfalcone.
09 September 2005 floated out under the name CROWN PRINCESS.
Tonnage 113,365 grt, 85,676 nrt, 13,294 dwt, dim. 288.6 x 36.1 x 11.4m., draught 8,00m, length bpp. 242.4m.
Powered diesel electric by six Wärtsilä_Sulzer 16ZAV40s diesel engines, 67,200 kW, two fixed pitch propellers with Siemens Electric propulsion each 19 MW.
Accommodation for maximum 3592 passengers, crew 1201.
26 May 2006 completed. Homeport Hamilton, Bermuda. IMO No 9293399.

CROWN PRINCESS is a Grand-class cruise ship owned and operated by Princess Cruises. Her maiden voyage took place on June 14, 2006, departing Red Hook, Brooklyn (New York) for Grand Turk (Turks & Caicos), Ocho Rios (Jamaica), Grand Cayman (Cayman Islands), and Port Canaveral (Florida). As of 2015, the CROWN PRINCESS sails to Mexico for the Winter season, and Alaska for the Summer season. Like her sister ships EMERALD PRINCESS and RUBY PRINCESS her Skywalkers Night Club is built aft of the funnel rather than suspended over the stern. Her godmother is Martha Stewart.
Galveston
In December 2012, the CROWN PRINCESS made a transatlantic crossing from Venice to Galveston, TX where she stayed to run Caribbean itineraries from December 2012 to April 2013. When the ship arrived in Galveston on December 22, 2012, at least 102 passengers had contracted norovirus. The CROWN PRINCESS had previously been plagued by two separate outbreaks of norovirus in January/February 2012.
Listing incident
On July 18, 2006 at approximately 3:30 pm ET, one hour after departing her last port of call in Port Canaveral, the CROWN PRINCESS reported "listing" or making "heavy turns".The U.S. Coast Guard was contacted shortly after and crews arrived within minutes to assist the troubled vessel. The cruise ship was on its way home to New York City, and the decision was made to return to Port Canaveral due to what was initially thought to be a malfunction in the steering equipment which caused a severe tilting of the ship, and injuries. However, the NTSB found that the second officer, the senior watch officer on the bridge, disengaged the automatic steering mode of the vessel’s integrated navigation system after it put the ship into what the officer felt was an unusually hard turn to port and took manual control of the steering. The second officer turned the wheel first to port and then from port to starboard several times, eventually causing the vessel to list even more, to a maximum angle of about 24° to starboard. The severe listing tumbled passengers, crew members, pool water, and everything else not secured about the decks.[
Fourteen passengers and crew members were seriously injured, one suffering breathing difficulties after being hit in the chest by an airborne chair, and another 284 had minor injuries. Water from the four on-board pools poured into staircases and lift shafts. Most injuries were on the outdoor areas of Decks 15 and 16, where large beach chairs and tables hit and injured passengers. The other area that had many injured passengers was the balcony areas in the grand atrium. Many there were hit by falling objects and heavy marble tables. One woman who had an extended hospital stay was thrown against the glass wall on Deck 15 and covered by pool chairs and water from the pools themselves, being trapped underwater for several seconds. One passenger said "Afterward it was like a war zone with people walking around bleeding." and another added "All the windows were smashed. The top deck looked like a hurricane had hit it." No passengers or crew went overboard.
At 8:30 AM PT on July 19, Princess said that "approximately 240 passengers [were] treated onboard for various injuries such as abrasions, bruises and fractures, of which 94 were transferred to local hospitals ashore for evaluation and treatment"
The matter was referred to the National Transportation Safety Board and United States Coast Guard for investigation. After an internal review by Princess Cruises, its president Alan Buckelew publicly stated that "the incident was due to human error and the appropriate personnel changes have been made."
With approval from the Coast Guard and the Bermuda flag authorities, the vessel returned to service. A full refund was given to all passengers on the ill-fated cruise, and a 50% refund to passengers on the following cruise which was set to depart July 20 but instead departed from Brooklyn on July 22. Since then, CROWN PRINCESS has resumed her normal schedule.
Current/Future Cruises
CROWN PRINCESS until November 2012 was sailing the Mediterranean. In November 2012 the ship sailed to Galveston, Texas for the first time; marking the return of Princess to Galveston, where she sailed 7-Day western Caribbean cruises. In April 2013 she sailed to Southampton, where she sailed to northern Europe/the Mediterranean & the Canary Islands. Following that stint, CROWN PRINCESS will returned to the United States to Fort Lauderdale, Florida sailing alternating 7-Day eastern/southern Caribbean cruises to February 2014. On January 18, 2013 it was announced that CROWN PRINCESS will sail around South America. During that cruise Princess Cruises marked the first ever call in Ilhabela, Brazil. The southern Caribbean cruises from February 15, 2014 through April 26, 2014 were cancelled to allow for the South America cruise. Passengers who booked the cancelled voyages were notified and were assisted with finding alternate cruise options. After the South America cruise, she has been sailing to Mexico, Hawaii, and Pacific coastal cruises from Los Angeles, as well as Northbound and Southbound cruises from Vancouver and Whittier or Roundtrip Alaskan cruises from Seattle replacing the SAPPHIRE PRINCESS.
Starting in the 2016-17 season, she will become the largest Princess cruise ship ever to sail a full season to South America. At the end of this season, she will return to Fort Lauderdale to sail Caribbean cruises. This will mark the first time that the ship will be in the Caribbean since 2014.
2017 in Service same name and owner, Bermuda flag and registry, home port Hamilton.

Uruguay 2016 20p sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_Princess_(ship)
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