SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

BRIDAL BOAT IN HARDANGER FJORD

On this stamp issued by Norway in 1974 you see a bridal boat carrying the bride and groom and her guests dressed in traditional garb on her wedding day to or from the church some-where in the Hardanger fjord, Norway.
The painting was made in 1848 by the Norwegian landscape painter Hans Gude in collaboration with Adolph Tidemand, the painting has the title “The Bridal Procession in Hardanger” and it is a famous well know painting in Norway. When you click on this link you can see a very large image of the painting, when you enlarge the painting, the bride is sitting in the stern.
http://samling.nasjonalmuseet.no/en/object/NG.M.00467

Of the boat used I have not much information, most probably the “kirkebåt” was used, which was owned by the farmers of the district, and it was important that the boat carrying the bride should be the fastest, and stout oarsmen had to be selected among the young men of the community.

Norway 1974 1k sg 716, scott 633
Source: Internet

DAO

The three stamps issued by the Comoro Islands in 1970 shows us on the foreground three ships under sail, which Stanley Gibbons give that it are “feluccas” actual it are “dau’s” also known as “boutre” but she are a larger type.

You can find this type of vessels in the Comoro Islands and western Indian Ocean. The “dau” is a roughly constructed wooden vessel that carried cargo to the west coast of India, taken advantage of the monsoon winds. Slightly raking stem, square stern. Decked or open.
Set a large lateen to forward-raking mast; yard supported by a jibboom.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 15.2m, beamy; tonnage 50 to 60 ton.
The mosque is the Mosquée de Vendredi (old Friday mosque), which is the oldest mosque in the Medina. It was originally built in 1427, and a minaret was added in 1921.

Comoro Islands 1970 5/40f sg 91/93, scott
Source: From Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft. Internet.

AMERICA CUP yacht 1970

The stamp issued by Mali in March 1971 shows us an unnamed America cup yacht, most probably for the 1970 America Cup races in Newport, Rhode Island which was won by the America yacht INTREPID, at that time the yachts used in the race were of the 12m class. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-metre_class

The 1970 America's Cup was held in September 1970 at Newport, Rhode Island. The US defender, INTREPID, skippered by Bill (Ficker is Quicker) Ficker, defeated the Australian challenger, GRETEL II, skippered by James Hardy, four races to one
INTREPID had beaten HERITAGE and VALIANT to become the defender. (1962 winner WEATHERLY also participated in the trials, providing a fourth boat so racing could proceed more uniformly.) GRETEL II had beaten FRANCE to become the challenger

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_America%27s_Cup
Mali 1971 200f sg 271, scott?

Navicula gives that the FRANCE is depict, but I can’t find any confirmation for that.
http://www.12mrclass.com/yachts/detail/ ... 07113.html

VAKA HEKE FA outrigger Niue

The dugout outrigger canoes used in Niue were built with the same structure of the Tonga Islands and are single outrigger canoes and used for fishing, the modern canoes are small fishing craft holding from one to four men.
The outrigger is always on the left side of the hull of the canoe which are connected with two or more booms lashed to the topstrakes of the canoe, and the booms are lashed to the outrigger float.
Mostly decked fore and aft.

From Aak to Zumbra named this outrigger a “vaka heke fa” and gives the following information:
Used in the Niue Islands and central Pacific; a four men fishing canoe. Dugout hull, washstrakes and end decking sewn on; slender; elongated ends taper on all sides, rounded bottom. Hull spread with curved pieces lashed to three booms, which also serve as thwarts; stringers cross atop the booms above the washstrakes. Sharp ended, cylindrical float attached by two pairs of oblique stanchions and a single vertical one.
She are paddled by using lanceolate-bladed paddles.
The canoe has to be light in weight due to the waters around the island are deep and the canoe has to be carried out of the water on shore after use.
Length 7.6m, beam 0.4m depth 0.46 – 0.6m.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.
Niue 1950 2d sg 115, scott96, 1970 3c sg 155, scott?, 1999 20c sg?, scott 741a.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.
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S-44

The full index of our ship stamp archive

S-44

Postby john sefton » Mon Apr 17, 2017 2:21 pm

S-44.jpg
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USS S-44 (SS-155) was a third-group (S-42) S-class submarine of the United States Navy.
Her keel was laid down on 19 February 1921 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 27 October 1923 sponsored by Mrs. H. E. Grieshaber, and was commissioned on 16 February 1925 with Lieutenant A. H. Bateman in command.
1924-1941
S-44 operated off the New England coast into the summer of 1925. In late August, she departed New London, Connecticut, for Panama and on 5 September arrived at Coco Solo to join Submarine Division (SubDiv) 19. With the division, she conducted training exercises, participated in fleet exercises and joint Army-Navy maneuvers, and made good will visits to various Caribbean and Pacific, Latin American ports until the spring of 1927. From that time to December 1930, she operated out of San Diego with her division, interrupting exercises off southern California twice for fleet problems in Hawaiian waters.
In December 1930, the S-boat was transferred to Hawaii where her division, now SubDiv 11, was home ported for four years. The boats then returned to San Diego, California and in 1937 were shifted back to Coco Solo.
World War II
In the spring of 1941, as American involvement in World War II increased, the Panama S-boats were ordered back to the east coast for overhaul. With sister ships S-42 and S-46, S-44 proceeded to New London, Connecticut, and in November went to Philadelphia, where the work was completed.
Trials took S-44 into the new year, 1942 and on 7 January, she got underway to return to Panama. Arriving on 16 January, she departed Balboa on 24 January with S-21, S-26, and S-28, to conduct a security patrol in the western approaches to the canal. Within a few hours, however, she was engaged in rescue operations for S-26, which had been rammed and sunk by submarine chaser PC-460.
First patrol, March 1942
From Panama, the division (now SubDiv 53) was ordered to the southwest Pacific. Starting across the Pacific in early March, the boats reached Brisbane in mid-April, and within ten days, S-44 was on her first war patrol. She cleared Moreton Bay on 24 April. Three days later, her port engine went out of commission, but 36 hours of hard work and ingenuity put it back in operation. On 29 April, she began running submerged during the day and surfacing at night to recharge batteries and allow fresh air into the non-air-conditioned boat. By 2 May, she was in her patrol area, New Britain-New Ireland waters. Six days later, she sighted a ship through a haze of rain and launched two torpedoes which missed. She attempted to close the range. However the surface ship easily outdistanced her. The next afternoon, she attempted to close on a Japanese destroyer, east of Adler Bay, but again was easily outrun. On 10 May, off Cape St. George, she closed on another target but was sighted and attacked.
In late afternoon of 12 May, 15 miles (24 km) from the cape, she encountered a merchantman and a trawler escort. For the first time, the weather, her position, and the target's course were all in her favor. She launched four torpedoes while surfaced and hit with two. She then submerged. The Shoei Maru, a salvage vessel of over 5000 tons was sunk. The Japanese escort attacked S-44 and dropped sixteen or more depth charges, none of which was close. On 14 May, S-44 headed home, arriving at Brisbane on 23 May.
2nd patrol, June 1942
Another overhaul followed, and on 7 June she left of Moreton Bay on a course for the Solomon Islands. Within the week, she was on patrol off Guadalcanal, operating from there to Savo and Florida Island. A few days later, she shifted south of Guadalcanal and on 21 June sank the converted gunboat Keijo Maru. At 14:15, S-44 fired her torpedoes. Just 3 minutes later the enemy aircraft dropped a bomb which exploded close to the submarine, bending the holding latch to the conning tower and allowing in 30 gallons of sea water. This damaged the depth gauges, the gyrocompass, and the ice machine, besides causing leaks. The number-one periscope was thought to be damaged; but when the submarine surfaced a Japanese seaman's coat was found wrapped around its head.
Three days later, S-44 was in Lunga Roads. On 26 June, poor weather set in and blanketed the area until she turned for home. She departed her patrol area on 29 June and arrived at Moreton Bay on 5 July.
3rd patrol, July 1942
S-44 departed Brisbane on 24 July. Cloudy weather with squalls set in. On 31 July, she commenced patrolling the Rabaul-Tulagi shipping lanes. The next day, she sighted a convoy off Cape St. George, but heavy swells hindered depth control and speed, and prevented her from attacking. From Cape St. George, S-44 moved up the east coast of New Ireland to North Cape and Kavieng, where she waited.
On 7 August, the American offensive opened with landing of the 1st Marine Division on the beaches of the Solomon Islands of Guadalcanal and Tulagi. On 9 August, off Savo Island, Cruiser Division 6 of the Imperial Japanese Navy had inflicted one of the worst defeats of the war on American and Australian surface ships.
The next morning, the victorious enemy cruisers neared Kavieng, bound for home. At 07:50, S-44 sighted the formation of four heavy cruisers at less than 900 yards (800 m). At 08:06, she fired four Mark 10 torpedoes at the rear ship, only 700 yards (600 m) away. By 08:08, three torpedoes had exploded and the heavy cruiser Kako was sinking. S-44 had claimed the largest Japanese man-of-war in the Pacific War to date.
Three days later, S-44 was again fighting heavy swells. Her damaged bow planes required three hours to rig out, where they were left. On 23 August, she moored at Brisbane. With one ship sunk on each patrol so far, she set a record no other S-boat would match.
4th patrol, September 1942
On 17 September, now in the hands of Reuben Whitaker, S-44 began her fourth war patrol. The following day, a hydrogen fire blazed in her forward battery compartment, but was extinguished in three minutes. On 22 September, she began surfacing only at night, and, two days later, took patrol station off New Georgia to interdict Japan's Faisi-Guadalcanal supply line. During the patrol, her hunting was hindered by Japanese aerial and surface antisubmarine patrols and her own operational capabilities, which were further limited by material defects and damage inflicted during depth chargings.
On the morning of 4 October, she attacked a destroyer, then survived an intensive depth charge attack with seemingly minor damage. When she submerged the next day, however, the submarine began taking water. She surfaced, made repairs, then submerged to 50 feet (15 m). Leaks were found in her motor room and torpedo room flappers. The latter were jacked shut, but the former continued spraying water onto both motors. Within an hour, four Japanese destroyers had moved into the area. S-44 went to 70 feet (21 m). The leak worsened. The motors were covered in canvas and sheet rubber and the crew waited for the destroyers to pass over her position. As they disappeared, S-44 moved up to 55 feet (17 m) and repairs were made on the flapper. That night, further repairs were made while the ship was surfaced off Santa Isabel Island; and, by midnight, the S-boat was en route back to her patrol area. On 7 October, bad weather set in; and, on 8 October, she departed the area, arriving in Moreton Bay on 14 October.
Overhaul
A month later, S-44 departed Brisbane and headed back to the United States. In early January 1943, she transited the Panama Canal, then moved across the Caribbean Sea and up the Atlantic seaboard to Philadelphia. There, from April to June, she underwent overhaul; and, in July, she retransited the Canal en route to San Diego and the Aleutian Islands.
5th patrol, September 1943
She arrived at Dutch Harbor on 16 September. On 26 September, she departed Attu on her last war patrol. One day out, while en route to her operating area in the northern Kuril Islands, she was spotted and attacked by a Japanese patrol plane. Suffering no damage, she continued west. On the night of 7 October, she made radar contact with what she thought was a "small merchantman" and closed in for a surface attack. Several hundred yards from the target, her deck gun fired and was answered by a salvo. The "small merchantman" in fact was the Shimushu-class escort Ishigaki. An emergency dive was ordered, but the submarine failed to submerge. She then took several hits in the control room, the forward battery room, and elsewhere.
Reluctantly, S-44 was ordered abandoned. A pillow case was raised from the forward battery room hatch as a flag of surrender, but the Japanese shelling continued.
Only two men escaped the sinking ship. Chief Torpedoman's Mate Ernest A. Duva and Radioman Third Class William F. Whitemore were picked up by the enemy destroyer. They were taken first to Paramushiro, then to the Naval Interrogation Camp at Ōfuna. The men spent the last year of World War II working in the Ashio copper mines and survived to be repatriated by the Allies at the end of the war.

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john sefton
 
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