SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Tristan da Cunha.The first survey.

The uninhabited islands of Tristan da Cunha were first sighted in May 1506 during a voyage to India by the Portuguese admiral Tristão da Cunha, although rough seas prevented a landing. He named the main island after himself, Ilha de Tristão da Cunha, which was later anglicised to Tristan da Cunha Island.[2] His discovery appeared on nautical maps from 1509 and on Mercator's world map of 1541. Some sources state that the Portuguese made the first landing on Tristan in 1520, when the Lás Rafael captained by Ruy Vaz Pereira called for water. The first survey of the archipelago was made by the French corvette “HEURE du BERGER” in 1767. Soundings were taken and a rough survey of the coastline was made. The presence of water at the large waterfall of Big Watron and in a lake on the north coast were noted, and the results of the survey were published by a Royal Navy hydrographer in 1781. The first scientific exploration was conducted by French naturalist Louis-Marie Aubert du Petit-Thouars, who stayed on the island for three days in January 1793, during a French mercantile expedition from Brest, France to Mauritius. Aubert made botanical collections and reported traces of human habitation, including fireplacesand overgrown gardens, probably left by Dutch explorers in the 17th century.
Tristan da Cunha 2006;30p;SG?
Source:wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha

PUSHER TUG WITH BARGES

The 6-cent Arkansas River Navigation commemorative stamp was issued October 1, 1968, at Little Rock, Arkansas.
This stamp was in recognition of the economic potential of the $1.2 billion project, which was nearing completion. It eventually provided Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma with a barge route to the Mississippi River and became one of the nation's major inland waterways.
The maritime theme on the stamp is a steering wheel with in the background a pusher tug https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pusher_(boat) with barges on the Arkansa River.
The pusher tug is not identified and the term barge has applied to numerous types of vessel around the world, but mostly the barges used on American Rivers are square flat bottomed barges. The following web-site has more on the American barges: http://www.caria.org/barge-and-towboat-facts/

Why is a towboat called a towboat when it pushes the barges?
The word “tow” comes from the canal age when a draft animal walking along the bank of the canal pulled a barge. As rivermen gained experience with moving barges, they found that, by lashing barges together and pushing them, they could control the barges better and move more of them. The control was especially helpful when navigating the smaller rivers and tight bends in a river.

What is the size of a barge?
The standard barge is 195 feet long, 35 feet wide, and can be used to a 9-foot draft. Its capacity is 1500 tons. Some of the newer barges today are 290 feet by 50 feet, double the capacity of earlier barges.

What is the size of a towboat?
Towboats range in physical size from about 117 feet long by 30 feet wide to more than 200 feet long and 45 feet wide. They draft anywhere from 6.5 feet to 9.0 feet. The boat’s diesel engine can produce power from a few hundred horsepower to 10,000 horsepower. A few are in excess of that, but not many. The larger boats operated on the Lower Mississippi where the water is freeflowing and wide.
How many barges and towboats are there?
There are approximately 26,000 dry cargo barges, 3,000 tanker barges, and 1,200 towboats operating today.

How many barges are there in a tow?
The average tow has 15 barges, but flotillas can go up to 40 barges, depending on the type of cargo, the river segments being navigated, and the size of the towboat. Smaller tributaries, such as the Alabama River, can support only a four-barge tow because of the meandering nature of the river and varying width of the river itself. In addition, the Alabama’s locks are only 84 feet wide and 600 feet long.

U.S.A. 1968 6c sg 1343, scott 1325.

S-Class, INS TANIN (S-71) or INS RAHAV (S-73)

S-Class (Fourth Group)
Israel's first submarines were ex-Royal Navy S-Class submarines which entered service in 1958. The Israeli navy operated two boats, S-71 INS TANIN (ex-HMS SPRINGER) and S-73 INS RAHAV (ex-HMS SANGUINE) until the late 1960s. Built in the final days of WW2, they had undergone a modest modernization after the war involving the fitting of a folding snort mast to allow charging of the batteries whilst the boat was submerged, and better sonar. All the same these boats were essentially WW2 era types largely obsolete even before they entered Israeli service.

HMS SPRINGER (P 264)
Built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:8 May 1944, launched:14 May 1945, commissioned:2 August 1945. Displacement: 814-872 tons surfaced, 990 tons submerged. Length:217’ (66.14 m.)
Beam:23’ 6” (7.16 m.) Draught:11’ (3.35m.) diesel/electric 1900/1300 hp. 14.75 kn. surfaced, 8 knots submerged
Complement:48 officers and men.
Armament:6 × forward 21” (533 mm.) torpedo tubes, one aft, 13 torpedoes, 1-3”(76mm.) gun, 1-20 mm. canon., 3-.303 calibre machine guns.
Sold to Israeli Navy on 9 October 1958, renamed TANIN, fate: scrapped in 1972.

HMS SANGUINE (P 266)
Same details as HMS SPRINGER, built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:10 January 1944, launched:15 February 1945, commissioned:13 May 1945, sold to Israeli Navy in March 1958, renamed RAHAV, fate: cannibalised for spares for TANIN in 1968, broken up at Haifa in 1969.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
Internet.

ALBERT CALMETTE

This stamp issued by St Pierre et Miquelon, shows a portrait of the French physician and bacteriologist Albert Calmette.
In the background is a two masted topsail schooner, which is not identified. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12482&p=18296&hilit=topsail+schooner#p18296 within the foreground are many doris viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11927&p=12785&hilit=dories#p12785
Albert Calmette (1863 – 1933) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Calmette
1888-1890 Calmette was assigned to Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon where he conducted research on the red cod.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1963 30f. sg426, scott 366.

COXLESS SCULL Biglin brothers

This stamp is designed after a painting made by Thomas Eakins https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Eakins and shows the Biglin Brothers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biglin_Br ... ver_-_1872
The painting was made in 1872 and is now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington and shows the Biglin Brothers in a coxless scull of which Wikipedia gives:

A coxless pair is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for two rowers, who propel the boat with sweep oars.
The crew consists of a pair of rowers, each having one oar, one on the stroke side (rower's right hand side) and one on the bow side (rower's lefthand side). As the name suggests, there is no coxswain on such a boat, and the two rowers must co-ordinate steering and the proper timing of oar strokes between themselves or by means of a steering installation which is operated by foot from one of the rowers. The equivalent boat when it is steered by a cox is referred to as a "coxed pair".
Racing boats (often called "shells") are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material (usually carbon-fibre reinforced plastic) for strength and weight advantages. Pairs have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat.
A coxless pair is often considered the most difficult boat to row, as each rower must balance his/her side in cooperation with the other, apply equal power, place their catch and extract the blade simultaneously in order to move the boat efficiently. It requires excellent technique, communication and experience.
"Coxless pair" is one of the classes recognized by the International Rowing Federation and is competed in the Olympic Games

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxless_pair
USA 1967 5c sg ?, scott1335.

BUNGO or BONGO dugout

The ‘bungo” or “bongo” is in Panama a large 18th century dugout canoe, that carried passengers and cargo on the Rio Changres across the isthmus from Panama City to Porto Bello.

During the gold rush to California it carried the forty-niners the nickname for the first passengers to the gold fields in 1844 from the Rio Charges at Gorgona to Las Cruises a distance of forty-mile which took three to four days. From there the passengers were taken overland to Panama City, to board a passenger vessel for San Francisco.
The bongo was partly covered with a palm-thatched shelter as seen on the stamp, to protect the passengers against the sun and rain.
The bongo was paddled by a crew of 18 – 20 . Length ca 37 m. Could carry only a few passengers with their luggage. The stamp shows only three crew poling the bongo.
More on this set of stamps is given on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7055#!lightbox[gallery]/1/

Source: Various internet sites and Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
Canal Zone 1949 6c sg 196, scott 143.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

S-44

The full index of our ship stamp archive

S-44

Postby john sefton » Mon Apr 17, 2017 2:21 pm

S-44.jpg
Click image to view full size
USS S-44 (SS-155) was a third-group (S-42) S-class submarine of the United States Navy.
Her keel was laid down on 19 February 1921 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 27 October 1923 sponsored by Mrs. H. E. Grieshaber, and was commissioned on 16 February 1925 with Lieutenant A. H. Bateman in command.
1924-1941
S-44 operated off the New England coast into the summer of 1925. In late August, she departed New London, Connecticut, for Panama and on 5 September arrived at Coco Solo to join Submarine Division (SubDiv) 19. With the division, she conducted training exercises, participated in fleet exercises and joint Army-Navy maneuvers, and made good will visits to various Caribbean and Pacific, Latin American ports until the spring of 1927. From that time to December 1930, she operated out of San Diego with her division, interrupting exercises off southern California twice for fleet problems in Hawaiian waters.
In December 1930, the S-boat was transferred to Hawaii where her division, now SubDiv 11, was home ported for four years. The boats then returned to San Diego, California and in 1937 were shifted back to Coco Solo.
World War II
In the spring of 1941, as American involvement in World War II increased, the Panama S-boats were ordered back to the east coast for overhaul. With sister ships S-42 and S-46, S-44 proceeded to New London, Connecticut, and in November went to Philadelphia, where the work was completed.
Trials took S-44 into the new year, 1942 and on 7 January, she got underway to return to Panama. Arriving on 16 January, she departed Balboa on 24 January with S-21, S-26, and S-28, to conduct a security patrol in the western approaches to the canal. Within a few hours, however, she was engaged in rescue operations for S-26, which had been rammed and sunk by submarine chaser PC-460.
First patrol, March 1942
From Panama, the division (now SubDiv 53) was ordered to the southwest Pacific. Starting across the Pacific in early March, the boats reached Brisbane in mid-April, and within ten days, S-44 was on her first war patrol. She cleared Moreton Bay on 24 April. Three days later, her port engine went out of commission, but 36 hours of hard work and ingenuity put it back in operation. On 29 April, she began running submerged during the day and surfacing at night to recharge batteries and allow fresh air into the non-air-conditioned boat. By 2 May, she was in her patrol area, New Britain-New Ireland waters. Six days later, she sighted a ship through a haze of rain and launched two torpedoes which missed. She attempted to close the range. However the surface ship easily outdistanced her. The next afternoon, she attempted to close on a Japanese destroyer, east of Adler Bay, but again was easily outrun. On 10 May, off Cape St. George, she closed on another target but was sighted and attacked.
In late afternoon of 12 May, 15 miles (24 km) from the cape, she encountered a merchantman and a trawler escort. For the first time, the weather, her position, and the target's course were all in her favor. She launched four torpedoes while surfaced and hit with two. She then submerged. The Shoei Maru, a salvage vessel of over 5000 tons was sunk. The Japanese escort attacked S-44 and dropped sixteen or more depth charges, none of which was close. On 14 May, S-44 headed home, arriving at Brisbane on 23 May.
2nd patrol, June 1942
Another overhaul followed, and on 7 June she left of Moreton Bay on a course for the Solomon Islands. Within the week, she was on patrol off Guadalcanal, operating from there to Savo and Florida Island. A few days later, she shifted south of Guadalcanal and on 21 June sank the converted gunboat Keijo Maru. At 14:15, S-44 fired her torpedoes. Just 3 minutes later the enemy aircraft dropped a bomb which exploded close to the submarine, bending the holding latch to the conning tower and allowing in 30 gallons of sea water. This damaged the depth gauges, the gyrocompass, and the ice machine, besides causing leaks. The number-one periscope was thought to be damaged; but when the submarine surfaced a Japanese seaman's coat was found wrapped around its head.
Three days later, S-44 was in Lunga Roads. On 26 June, poor weather set in and blanketed the area until she turned for home. She departed her patrol area on 29 June and arrived at Moreton Bay on 5 July.
3rd patrol, July 1942
S-44 departed Brisbane on 24 July. Cloudy weather with squalls set in. On 31 July, she commenced patrolling the Rabaul-Tulagi shipping lanes. The next day, she sighted a convoy off Cape St. George, but heavy swells hindered depth control and speed, and prevented her from attacking. From Cape St. George, S-44 moved up the east coast of New Ireland to North Cape and Kavieng, where she waited.
On 7 August, the American offensive opened with landing of the 1st Marine Division on the beaches of the Solomon Islands of Guadalcanal and Tulagi. On 9 August, off Savo Island, Cruiser Division 6 of the Imperial Japanese Navy had inflicted one of the worst defeats of the war on American and Australian surface ships.
The next morning, the victorious enemy cruisers neared Kavieng, bound for home. At 07:50, S-44 sighted the formation of four heavy cruisers at less than 900 yards (800 m). At 08:06, she fired four Mark 10 torpedoes at the rear ship, only 700 yards (600 m) away. By 08:08, three torpedoes had exploded and the heavy cruiser Kako was sinking. S-44 had claimed the largest Japanese man-of-war in the Pacific War to date.
Three days later, S-44 was again fighting heavy swells. Her damaged bow planes required three hours to rig out, where they were left. On 23 August, she moored at Brisbane. With one ship sunk on each patrol so far, she set a record no other S-boat would match.
4th patrol, September 1942
On 17 September, now in the hands of Reuben Whitaker, S-44 began her fourth war patrol. The following day, a hydrogen fire blazed in her forward battery compartment, but was extinguished in three minutes. On 22 September, she began surfacing only at night, and, two days later, took patrol station off New Georgia to interdict Japan's Faisi-Guadalcanal supply line. During the patrol, her hunting was hindered by Japanese aerial and surface antisubmarine patrols and her own operational capabilities, which were further limited by material defects and damage inflicted during depth chargings.
On the morning of 4 October, she attacked a destroyer, then survived an intensive depth charge attack with seemingly minor damage. When she submerged the next day, however, the submarine began taking water. She surfaced, made repairs, then submerged to 50 feet (15 m). Leaks were found in her motor room and torpedo room flappers. The latter were jacked shut, but the former continued spraying water onto both motors. Within an hour, four Japanese destroyers had moved into the area. S-44 went to 70 feet (21 m). The leak worsened. The motors were covered in canvas and sheet rubber and the crew waited for the destroyers to pass over her position. As they disappeared, S-44 moved up to 55 feet (17 m) and repairs were made on the flapper. That night, further repairs were made while the ship was surfaced off Santa Isabel Island; and, by midnight, the S-boat was en route back to her patrol area. On 7 October, bad weather set in; and, on 8 October, she departed the area, arriving in Moreton Bay on 14 October.
Overhaul
A month later, S-44 departed Brisbane and headed back to the United States. In early January 1943, she transited the Panama Canal, then moved across the Caribbean Sea and up the Atlantic seaboard to Philadelphia. There, from April to June, she underwent overhaul; and, in July, she retransited the Canal en route to San Diego and the Aleutian Islands.
5th patrol, September 1943
She arrived at Dutch Harbor on 16 September. On 26 September, she departed Attu on her last war patrol. One day out, while en route to her operating area in the northern Kuril Islands, she was spotted and attacked by a Japanese patrol plane. Suffering no damage, she continued west. On the night of 7 October, she made radar contact with what she thought was a "small merchantman" and closed in for a surface attack. Several hundred yards from the target, her deck gun fired and was answered by a salvo. The "small merchantman" in fact was the Shimushu-class escort Ishigaki. An emergency dive was ordered, but the submarine failed to submerge. She then took several hits in the control room, the forward battery room, and elsewhere.
Reluctantly, S-44 was ordered abandoned. A pillow case was raised from the forward battery room hatch as a flag of surrender, but the Japanese shelling continued.
Only two men escaped the sinking ship. Chief Torpedoman's Mate Ernest A. Duva and Radioman Third Class William F. Whitemore were picked up by the enemy destroyer. They were taken first to Paramushiro, then to the Naval Interrogation Camp at Ōfuna. The men spent the last year of World War II working in the Ashio copper mines and survived to be repatriated by the Allies at the end of the war.

Wikipedia
john sefton
 
Posts: 1751
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot] and 103 guests