SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Sailing ships in the painting of Christoph Blossom

In 2010 Somalia issued a small sheet dedicated to the marine paintings of the artist Christopher Blossom.
Christopher Blossom
When a child has a father and grandfather who are both well known illustrators, it is likely the offspring will also become an artist. And when a boy starts to sail at the age of six, it is also likely that the artist might choose the sea and sailing ships as his subject. Such was the case for Christopher Blossom, who, by the time he left the Parsons School of Design and Robert Bourke’s Design Studio, could visualize a finished boat from only its plans—and draw the craft from any angle. Before Blossom was twenty, he had sailed under square rig aboard the brigantine Young America. Known for his complex, detailed compositions of ships at sea, Blossom combines his appreciation for the beauty and the menace of the sea with his love of maritime history and ship construction. Before Blossom paints a vessel, he is likely to study the ship’s blueprint to learn about it hull design, length, tonnage and deck layout. Blossom’s historically accurate ships and harbors are combined with color, light and composition to capture the mood of a voyage and convey the essence of the seafaring experience. At the age of twenty, he won a Gold Medal at the Society of Illustrators Scholarship Exhibition. His dual vocation of experiencing the sea and then painting both nautical history and some of the greatest modern places to sail, was truly launched. Blossom became both a charter member and an artist of the American Society of Marine Artists, serving as its president from 1983 to 1986. His awards include a Gold Medal from the National Academy of Western Art for his painting of ships in Monterey. Saluted as an undisputed master, Blossom has exhibited his art at the Gilcrease Museum, the Colorado Museum of History, the prestigious Prix de West Invitational and the Artists of America show. Blossom continues to achieve artistic honors including the Robert Lougheed Memorial Award at the 2001 Prix de West. Almost the only time he isn’t painting is when he is sailing, visiting ports of call in Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, the Bahamas, California and Washington state. Blossom, who recently spent a year sailing around the Caribbean with his wife and two sons says of his love, "It’s not a hobby, it’s a way of life. When I look at the ocean, I get the same feeling pilots must get when they look to the sky." On the sheetlet shows the pictures:
1."Morning Star", Hudon´s Bay, 1864- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12594.
2. Among the rolling brakers.
3. "Allerton" on the East river- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16277.
4. "Benjamin Sewall" arriving in San Francisco Bay- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12580.
5. Boston Navy Yard- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16276.
6. "Arthur James" heading out-viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16282.
7. Before the gale.
8. "Cutting in" in the Arctic.
Somalia 2010;(2500x8)Ms
http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist

GOREY HARBOUR on Jersey

The stamp shows us Gorey Harbour on Jersey with in the background Mont Orgueil Castle, in the foreground a wooden hulled fishing boat under sail and two rowing boats around 1795.
They is one of a set of stamps issued by Jersey, all are designed after paintings made by Sarah Louisa Kolpac http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/ ... sa_Kilpack

Jersey 1989 13p sg 512, scott ?

SANTIAGO carrack or nao (1570)

In 1971 Portugal issued three stamps for the IV Centenary of the Martyr Missionaries of Brasil all three stamps have the same design, with in the top the SANTIAGO a carrack (also given as a nao) from around 1570, who transported the missionaries to Brasil. The group of missionaries was headed by Inacio de Azevedo, and Wikipedia has the following on this missionary, and the voyage to Brasil.

Blessed Inácio de Azevedo (1527–1570) was a Portuguese Jesuit missionary.

His life
His full name was Inácio de Azevedo de Ataíde e Abreu Malafaia and he was born in Porto from a wealthy family, being the eldest son of Dom Manuel de Azevedo and Dona Francisca de Abreu. One of his brothers, Dom Jerónimo de Azevedo, was Viceroy of Portuguese India from 1612 to 1617.
He was educated at the Portuguese court of King John III and at the age of 18 he became administrator of his family's estate. However, after attending the sermons and speeches of Jesuit priest Francisco Estrada he decided to renounce all his possessions, including the feudal honra of Barbosa, in the northern Portuguese province of Entre Douro e Minho
In 1548 he made an irrevocable choice of a religious life and entered the Society of Jesus where he was finally ordained in 1553. In 1565 Saint Francis Borgia charged him with full powers for the inspection of the Jesuit missions in the Portuguese colony of Brazil, a task that took him nearly 3 years to accomplish. He arrived in Bahia in August, 1566 and he proceeded to visit all the Jesuit missions in Brazil. He nominated Father Manuel da Nóbrega Provincial for Brazil and with Nóbrega and Blessed José de Anchieta he visited the missions in the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro whose foundations were then being laid. He thus spent two years of his life in Brazil.
In October 1568 he was back in Lisbon and in May 1569 he proceeded to Rome to report to Pope Pius V and Saint Francis Borgia. In his final report, Inácio de Azevedo asked for more people to be sent to the missions and Saint Francis Borgia thus ordered him to recruit new elements for the Jesuits in Brazil. Then, after several months of intense preparations that included meetings with King Sebastian of Portugal, Azevedo and his companions finally left Portugal for Brazil on the merchant vessel SANTIAGO on 5 June 1570, while another group of more than 20 companions boarded the military fleet of the newly appointed Governor General of Brazil.
During the trip to Brazil, on July 15, 1570 while sailing near the Canary Islands, the Santiago was attacked and captured by a fleet led by French Huguenot corsair Jacques de Sores off Fuencaliente Lighthouse. Following the capture, Azevedo and his 39 companions were massacred.

The Forty Martyrs of Brazil were blessed by Pope Pius IX on 11 May 1854. In 1999 40 concrete crosses at the place of martyrdom, about 200 ft off the Fuencaliente lighthouse were placed on the seabed by the government of the island La Palma. This place is situated in a depth of about 20 meters and is today a popular diving destination. Adjacent to the old tower, another monument for the Forty Martyrs of Brazil has been erected in the October 2014. This monument is a stone cross, with a plate on which the names of the martyrs are engraved.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In%C3%A1cio_de_Azevedo
Portugal 1971 1e, 3.30e and 4.80e sg?, scott 1116/18.

FRENCH WARSHIP 1720

Dominica issued in 1989 four stamps and a miniature sheet for the Exposition Philatélique Mondale in Paris from 7 to 17 July,
The $1.00 stamp also in the ms shows us a French two decker warship from 1720 of which I have not any details or her career.

Dominica 1989 $1,00 and MS, sg 1228 and sgMS?, scott?

«Arthur James»-fishing schooner

Fishing schooner «Arthur James» had been built in 1905. She had seen sixteen seasons and four collisions, the most recent in 1916 off Castle Island, where she sank in fifty feet of water after being run down by steamer. Every spring around March, the seiners of the mackerel fleet would fit out and prepare to head south to meet the schools of mackerel off the Carolina capes. Then, through the summer, the fleet would pursue the schools north along the coast, finding them by autumn off Nova Scotia. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “This is a view of the schooner "Arthur James" leaving Gloucester just after the turn of the century. She is heading out of the harbor at sunrise with a blustery northwest wind. Behind her is the fort section of town. Around her, at anchor and throughout the harbor, the fleet prepares to get under way. With a full load of salt and one seine boat on deck and another towing astern, the "Arthur James" is bound south.”
Somalia 2010;2500. Source: http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/details/default. asp?p=87&a=10&t. https://books. google. ru/ books?id=s2mBTh6mC.

RANKIN HMAS

Built as a guided missile submarine by Australian Submarine Corp., Port Adelaide for the Australian Navy.
12 May 1995 laid down.
07 November 2001 launched as the HMAS RANKIN (S-78), christened by Ms Patricia Rankin. She is one of the Collins class.
Displacement 3,100 ton surfaced, 3,407 ton surfaced, dim. 77.8 x 7.8 x 7m, (draught surfaced)
Powered diesel electric by 3 Hedemora/Garden Island Type V18B/14 diesels for surface speed and 3 Jeumont Schneider generators for submerged speed who deliver power to a single shaft. Hp?
1 Mac Taggart Scott DM 43,006 hydraulic motor for emergency propulsion.
Armament: Missiles, McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, torpedoes McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, or 44 mines in lieu of torpedoes.
Crew 48 plus trainees.
29 March 2009 commissioned.

HMAS RANKIN is the sixth and final submarine of the Collins class, which are operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, the boat was laid down in 1995, and commissioned into the RAN in March 2003, following major delays.
Early in her career, RANKIN was the subject of a documentary series and a coffee table book. She was the first submarine since 1987 to be awarded the Gloucester Cup.

Construction
RANKIN was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation on 12 May 1995. The boat was launched on 7 November 2001. She was delivered to the RAN on 18 March 2003 and commissioned on 29 March 2003, 41 months behind schedule, after major delays in the completion and fitting out of the boat due to the diversion of resources to the "fast track" submarines DECHAINEUX and SHEEEAN and repeated cannibalisation for parts to repair the other five Collins-class boats.
RANKIN was named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William RANKIN, who died when the ship he commanded, HMAS YARRA, engaged a force of five Japanese warships on 4 March 1942, to allow an Allied convoy to escape. The boat is nicknamed "The Black Knight".
Characteristics
The Collins class is an enlarged version of the Västergötland-class submarine designed by Kockums. At 77.42 metres (254.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.8 metres (26 ft) and a waterline depth of 7 metres (23 ft), displacing 3,051 tonnes when surfaced, and 3,353 tonnes when submerged, they are the largest conventionally powered submarines in the world. The hull is constructed from high-tensile micro-alloy steel, and are covered in a skin of anechoic tiles to minimise detection by sonar. The depth that they can dive to is classified: most sources claim that it is over 180 metres (590 ft),
The submarine is armed with six 21-inch (530 mm) torpedo tubes, and carry a standard payload of 22 torpedoes: originally a mix of Gould Mark 48 Mod 4 torpedoes and UGM-84C Sub-Harpoon, with the Mark 48s later upgraded to the Mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) version.
The submarine is equipped with three Garden Island-Hedemora HV V18b/15Ub (VB210) 18-cylinder diesel engines, which are each connected to a 1,400 kW, 440-volt DC Jeumont-Schneider generator. The electricity generated is stored in batteries, then supplied to a single Jeumont-Schneider DC motor, which provides 7,200 shaft horsepower to a single, seven-bladed, 4.22-metre (13.8 ft) diameter skewback propeller. The Collins class has a speed of 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph) when surfaced and at snorkel depth, and can reach 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph) underwater. The submarines have a range of 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km; 13,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) when surfaced, 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) at snorkel depth. When submerged completely, a Collins class submarine can travel 32.6 nautical miles (60.4 km; 37.5 mi) at maximum speed, or 480 nautical miles (890 km; 550 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph). Each boat has an endurance of 70 days.
Operational history
During a multinational exercise in September 2003, which was attended by RANKIN and sister boat WALLER, RANKIN successfully "sank" a Singaporean anti-submarine warfare vessel.
In 2004, a film crew was embarked aboard RANKIN for the creation of Submariners, a six-part documentary aired by SBS in 2005 and depicting life aboard a submarine. The film crew was on board from February to April 2004, during which the boat completed pre-deployment trials, participated in the submarine rescue exercise Pacific Reach, and made a diplomatic visit to Kure, Japan. They later rejoined RANKIN during the submarine's deployment to Hawaii for RIMPAC 04 in June and July. Later that year, RANKIN was also the subject of the book Beneath Southern Seas. The coffee table book, which encompasses the history of the Royal Australian Navy Submarine Service, was primarily based on photographs and interviews of RANKIN and those aboard taken by the authors during a twelve-day voyage from Sydney to Fremantle, concluding the six-month deployment started during the filming of Submariners. The 20,000 nautical miles (37,000 km; 23,000 mi) voyage—the longest undertaken by a Collins-class submarine to that date—began with workups in February, and saw the submarine visit Korea, Japan, and Hawaii, and participate in various multinational exercises before returning to Fremantle via Sydney. RANKIN was at sea for 126 days, 80% of which was spent underwater.
On 10 June 2005, RANKIN was presented with the Gloucester Cup. Presented to the RAN vessel with the greatest overall efficiency over the previous twelve months, RANKIN was the first Collins-class submarine to earn the Cup, and the first submarine to receive it since ORION in 1987. The award was again presented to RANKIN in 2008.
RANKIN was docked for a long maintenance period in 2008, but workforce shortages and malfunctions on other submarines requiring urgent attention have drawn this out: in 2010 RAN and ASC officials predicted that she would not be back in service until 2013. At the end of the works on RANKIN, personnel were transferred from HMAS FARNCOMB (which was commencing a similar period of maintenance and upgrades), and RANKIN arrived at Fleet Base West on 1 October 2014.
2018 In active service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_RANKIN_(SSG_78) and internet
Solomon Islands 2016 $35 sgMS?, scott?
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Bundaberg HMAS (ACPB 91)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Bundaberg HMAS (ACPB 91)

Postby john sefton » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:44 am

Bundaberg HMAS.jpg
Click image to view full size
HMAS Bundaberg (ACPB 91), named after the city of Bundaberg, Queensland, was an Armidale class patrol boat of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The ship was built in Henderson, Western Australia, and was commissioned into the RAN in March 2007. Based at HMAS Cairns, Bundaberg spent much of her career deployed as part of border protection and fisheries protection patrols as part of Operation Resolute. In addition, the patrol boat was involved in several national and multinational training exercises, visited Vanuatu in 2011 (the vessel's only overseas deployment), tracked a suspected drug-smuggling vessel that led to a multimillion-dollar seizure, and participated in the International Fleet Review 2013. In August 2014, a large fire broke out on the ship while she was undergoing refit. Extensive damage from the fire led to the ship's decommissioning in December 2014.
The Armidale class patrol boats are 56.8 metres (186 ft) long, with a beam of 9.7 metres (32 ft), a draught of 2.7 metres (8 ft 10 in), and a standard displacement of 270 tons. The semi-displacement vee hull is fabricated from aluminium alloy, and each vessel is built to a combination of Det Norske Veritas standards for high-speed light craft and RAN requirements. The Armidales can travel at a maximum speed of 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph), and are driven by two propeller shafts, each connected to an MTU 16V M70 diesel. The ships have a range of 3,000 nautical miles (5,600 km; 3,500 mi) at 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph), allowing them to patrol the waters around the distant territories of Australia, and are designed for standard patrols of 21 days, with a maximum endurance of 42 days.
The main armament of the Armidale class is a Rafael Typhoon stabilised 25-millimetre (0.98 in) gun mount fitted with an M242 Bushmaster cannon. Two 12.7-millimetre (0.50 in) machine guns are also carried. Boarding operations are performed by two 7.2-metre (24 ft), waterjet propelled rigid-hulled inflatable boats (RHIBs). Each RHIB is stored in a dedicated cradle and davit, and is capable of operating independently from the patrol boat as it carries its own communications, navigation, and safety equipment.
Each patrol boat has a standard ship's company of 21 personnel, with a maximum of 29. The Armidales do not have a permanently assigned ship's company; instead, they are assigned to divisions at a ratio of two vessels to three companies, which rotate through the vessels and allow the Armidales to spend more time at sea, without compromising sailors' rest time or training requirements. A 20-berth auxiliary accommodation compartment was included in the design for the transportation of soldiers, illegal fishermen, or unauthorised arrivals; in the latter two cases, the compartment could be secured from the outside. However, a malfunction in the sewerage treatment facilities aboard HMAS Maitland in August 2006 pumped hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide into the compartment, non-fatally poisoning four sailors working inside, after which use of the compartment for accommodation was banned across the class.
Bundaberg was constructed by Austal at their shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia. She was commissioned into the RAN in her namesake city on 3 March 2007.
Operational history
The ship was assigned to Ardent Division, based at HMAS Cairns in Cairns, Queensland, and performed border protection and fisheries protection patrols. After commissioning and a schedule of work-up exercises, she was deployed as part of Operation Resolute for the first time in April 2007. Regular deployments as par of Operation Resolute made up the bulk of the patrol boat's operations during her career.
Bundaberg took part in Exercise Talisman Sabre during June 2007. After the exercise, the first boarding of an illegal foreign fishing vessel was made by Bundaberg's personnel. In July, the ship's company participated in the City of Bundaberg's Bundy In Bloom festival, and were granted the keys to the city. In October, the ship rescued the crew of a capsized yacht off Mindle Beach, Northern Territory. On 4 January 2008, Bundaberg was forced to sail from Darwin to avoid being caught in confined waters by Cyclone Helen.
During May and June 2010, Bundaberg was temporarily removed from Operation Resolute to participate in a Minor War Vessel Concentration Period, before visiting Bundaberg and the Gold Coast. In November, the patrol boat was part of the annual Australia - Papua New Guinea Exercise Paradise. On 4 December, the ship was undergoing routine maintenance in Darwin when a fire started in a storeroom on board. There were no injuries, but damage to Bundaberg kept her out of operation until mid-April 2011. Shortly after returning to service, Bundaberg sailed overseas for the first and only time: a four-day visit to Port Villa, Vanuatu, which saw the patrol boat leave Cairns on 28 April 2011, and return on 8 May. In October, Bundaberg tracked the yacht Friday Freedom as part of an Australian Customs and Australian Federal Police (AFP) anti-smuggling operation. The yacht was detained by the AFP on arrival in Bundaberg, with 300 kilograms (660 lb) of cocaine and A$3 million in cash seized in Australia's fifth-largest drug bust.
In November 2012, Bundaberg was a part of Exercise Paradise/Triton Thunder. On 22 September, Bundaberg sailed from Cairns to Sydney, escorting four Pacific-class patrol boats which were to participate in the International Fleet Review 2013. Bundaberg was also a participant in the review: on 4 October, she was part of the 100th anniversary re-enactment of the RAN's first fleet entry into Sydney Harbour, then on 5 November, sailed into Sydney Harbour again as part of Review Line 2 for the fleet review itself.
Fire
During August 2014, the patrol boat was undergoing refit work at Aluminium Boats Australia (ABA), a civilian shipyard in Hemmant, Queensland. Before midday on 11 August 2014, a large fire broke out aboard, starting in a forward interior section and moving aft. The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) were alerted at 11:52, but it was not until 17:00 that the fire was extinguished, and over the course of the afternoon, 15 fire appliances and over 60 firefighters attended the scene. Two civilian contractors were treated for smoke inhalation, and no other injuries were reported. Financial difficulties following the fire (including the loss of the naval repair contract, the cost of investigating the fire, and industry-wide pressure from imports of foreign-built vessels) cumulated in ABA being placed into voluntary administration on 4 November 2014. As of 5 November 2014, no cause for the fire had been identified, although the QFES speculated at the time of the incident that repair work was responsible.
The ship was extensively damaged in the blaze, and on 18 December 2014, Bundaberg was ceremonially decommissioned at the naval base HMAS Cairns, with the patrol boat's ensign lowered for the final time from the base's flagstaff.

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