SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TUG and LOG RAFT

For the prevention of tuberculosis, Finland issued in 1971 three stamps which shows us images of the timber industries, what this stamps has to do with tuberculosis is for me a puzzle. One stamp has a maritime theme, it shows us a steam tug towing a log raft.

Mr. Meliberg has contacted the stamp designer who said that the design of the 30 + 6p stamp was based on photographs he himself had taken of a steam tugboat in the Lake District in southwestern Finland. The designer could not remember the tugboat name.

Source: Watercraft Philately 1990 page 11.
Finland 1971 30 + 6p sg 780, scott B 192.

VILLA DE MADRID fregate 1863

Built as a wooden screw frigate by Arsenal de la Carraca (Cadiz) for the Spanish Navy.
30 September 1860 ordered
03 November 1860 keel laid down, as the NUESTRA SENORA DE ATOCHA
07 October 1862 launched one of the Unica Class.
Displacement 4,478 ton. Dim. 87.05 x 15.42 x 7.84m., draught 7.40m.
Powered by two steam engines manufactured by Penn & Son. 3,200 hp, one shaft, speed 15 knots.
Bunker capacity 720 ton coal.
Armament 30 – 200mm, 14 – 160mm guns. 2 howitzers and 2 – 80mm guns.
Crew 617.
12 November 1863 completed as VILLA DE MADRID.

The wooden hulled steam screw frigate VILLA DE MADRID was built for the Spanish Navy .It received its name in honour of the uprising of the people of Madrid against the French invaders on 02 May 1808, her name she was ordered under was, NUESTRA SEÑORA DE ATOCHA following the custom of the ships of the Spanish Navy of the time, those ships with a non-religious name, they had to carry another one that was religious.

The ship
Its construction was ordered by Royal Order of 30 September 1860 and began in the Arsenal de la Carraca (Cádiz) on 03 November of the same year. It was launched in the presence of Queen Isabel II with the name of NUESTRA SENORA DE ATOCHA on 07 October 1862, after a failed first attempt two days before.
Between 17 March 1863 and 15 July 1863 the machinery was installed and her hull copper sheated.
06 November 1863 underwent sea trials
Her figurehead, was the municipal coat of arms of Madrid, with the bear and the strawberry tree.
Building cost was 5,636,975 pesetas.
History
On 12 November 1863, she entered service, and her first mission was to take a battalion of Marine Infantry to Havana, after which she returned to Cádiz.
On 06 September 1864, she sailed from Cádiz to Montevideo, Uruguay, where she joined the screw frigates BLANCA and BERENGUELA, with which she passed the Strait of Magellan and joined in December of the same year Admiral José Manuel's Squadron at the Chincha Islands, Chile.
Under the command of Captain Claudio Alvargonzález Sánchez, she participated with the squadron of Admiral Casto Méndez Núñez in the Battle of Abtao, the bombardment of Valparaíso and in the Battle of Callao, where she had 27 casualties.
She returned to Cádiz on 04 November 1866, with a jubilant welcome from the authorities and the town people.
It remained anchored in Civitavecchia during the assault on Rome by Garibaldi, in case the Pope was forced to flee he could board her, when not more needed she returned to Cartagena at the end of 1867.
He transported the Infanta Doña Isabel, her husband the count of Girgenti and his brothers, refugees in Spain since 1861, back to Italy, in the spring of 1868.
In July of 1868 she took the Duke of Montpensier and his family to exile to Lisbon, where she arrived on 03 August 1868.
She then went to San Sebastian, and anchored in Cadiz at the end of August 1868 where she was rearmed with 20 smoothbore guns of 200 mm in batteries, and 10 guns of 160 mm.
She participated in the Revolution in Spain of September of 1868, being a unit of the insurrectionary ships in Cádiz. On 25 September 1868, she sailed from Cádiz to visit Algeciras, Ceuta, Málaga, Cartagena, Valencia and Barcelona.
She later joined the Mediterranean Squadron under the command of the Commodore of the Antequera Navy. At this time, it remained anchored in Santa Pola.
In 1870, forming a squadron with NUMANCIA and VITORIA under the command of Rear Admiral Rafael Rodríguez de Arias , she went to Italy to pick up the new monarch Amadeo I. On the outward journey she raised the royal standard without a king on board. It was the first and only time in the history of Spain that this has happened.
On 30 July 1873 she joined the Canton of Cartagena and was abandoned by most of her crew to enjoy the permits granted by the cantonalists. His machine was broken down, so he did not participate in the Arsenal defense against Admiral Lobo's centralist squadron.
From 1879 to 1884 the date on which she appeared as disarmed, she served in the Training Squadron, being discharged in 1884 and scrapped the same year.
Curiosities
One of her anchors remained as a monument in the Buen Retiro Park in Madrid.

Source: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_de_Madrid_(buque)
Chile 2017 label.

RED CROSS HOSPITAL SHIP Finland 1964

On the Finland Red Cross Issues of 1964 is given by Mr. Albert Meliberg of Finland in Watercraft Philately.
Mr Meliberg gives that the stamp designer’s intention was only to illustrate the Red Cross Convention, and so drew a very ordinary passenger ship (looks more like a cargo vessel) with Red Cross emblems. Mr Meliberg has discussed the ship design with a colleague of the stamp designer and with the author of Effos – Finland Steamship Line’s book “The Ship of Our First Centenary 1883-1983”, and both agree that the ship design is not intended to represent a named ship.

Source: Watercraft Philately 1990 page 11
Finland 1964 25 + 4p sg 694, scottB170.

RESOLUCION frigate 1862

Built as a wooden hulled frigate by the Arsenal Ferrol, Spain for the Spanish Navy.
29 September 1859 laid down.
19 September 1861 launched as the RESOLUCION, one of the Loyalty class.
Displacement 3,200 ton, dim. 72.5m (bpp.), 14.55 x 6.16m. (draught).
Powered by 1 steam engine, 1,449 hp., speed 11 knots.
Armament: 4 – 220mm, 2 – 200mm guns.
Crew 450.
28 April 1862 completed.

The MÉNDEZ NUNEZ was an armoured frigate in the service of the Spanish Navy, which was originally a frigate of the Loyalty Class RESOLUCION (Ex- NUESTRA SENORA DEL PATROCINIO).
The ship
After her rebuilt to an armoured frigate which only consisted in the installation of a iron belt and a 120 mm armoured redoubt on the centre of the hull side, which protected the machine and the batteries, where the 6 heavy-caliber guns were housed, while the rest of the wooden hull was without any protection.
History
Under the name of RESOLUCION and before its transformation she participated in the campaign of the Pacific in 1866 forming part of the squadron commanded by Casto Méndez Núñez and under the command of the captain Manuel de la Pezuela, where she took part in the bombardment of Valparaiso of March 31, 1866 and in the Battle of El Callao , being the ship that suffered less casualties and damages and whose guns were more effective. Upon his return to Spain, she was renamed as NUESTRA. SENORA. DEL PATROCINIO, and after finding out the excellent sea conditions after she had passed around Cape Horn , it was decided to rebuilt her into an armoured frigate in 1869 .
The following year she received his new name, MÉNDEZ NÚÑEZ, in memory and honor of a deceased sailor which died on board on 21 August 1869. After the transformation, she was assigned to the Mediterranean squadron and, at the end of 1872 in the reserve squadron, in which she was surprised by the uprising of the Canton of Cartagena, in the year 1873. The Spanish Government declared all the insurgent ships pirate ships.
She participated in the Naval Combat of Portman , on 11 October 1873, between the cantonal squadron and the government.
She was decommissioned in 1888 and scrapped the following year at Mahón.
Miramar has, stricken 1886 and broken up 1896.

Chile 2017 label
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9nd ... B1ez_(1869)

BOMBARDMENT OF VALPARAISO in 1866

The Bombardment of Valparaíso on 31 March 1866 happened after the Chincha Islands War, when a Spanish fleet shelled, burned and destroyed the undefended port of Valparaíso.

Background
After the humiliating defeat at the Battle of Papudo and the indecisive Battle of Abtao, Rear Admiral Casto Méndez Núñez was ordered to take punitive action against South American ports. When the Chilean government ordered that vessels supplying or communicating with the Spanish fleet should not be allowed to enter Chilean ports, Méndez Núñez's first target became the most important and undefended Chilean city of Valparaíso.
Attempts at mediation
Efforts to mediate were initially steered by European diplomats whose countrymen were most affected by the initial blockade of Chilean ports and by the threat of bombardment. High-level contacts took place intensively in late 1865 and early 1866 between London, Paris and Madrid. A formula to resolve the conflict appeared, at one stage, to have been secured.In the final two weeks, the United States was especially active. The American minister to Chile, General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick and the US Naval Commander John Rodgers who was at port commanding a US naval squadron composed of the ironclad monitor USS MONADNOCK and the steamers POWHATAN, TUSCARORA and VANDERBILT attempted a last-minute settlement with the Spanish Admiral. To that effect they enlisted the cooperation of the commander of the British Pacific Station, Rear Admiral Joseph Denman, who had under his command two warships: HMS SUTLEY and HMS LEANDER. The British commander, despite coming under great pressure from British merchants in the city, later changed his mind and decided to enforce a strict neutrality, refusing the cooperation of his ships.
Ultimately, all the attempts at mediation failed, as the chief condition of Admiral Méndez Núñez was the proper salute to the Spanish flag, the return by the Chileans of the captured Schooner COVADONGA and the immediate payment of a crippling indemnity. The talks broke over the matter of the flag salute. When General Kilpatrick threatened to defend the port with the US squadron and attack the Spanish fleet, Admiral Méndez Núñez famously responded with, "I will be forced to sink [the US ships], because even if I have one ship left I will proceed with the bombardment. Spain, the Queen and I prefer honor without ships than ships without honor." Consequently the Spanish Admiral, notwithstanding the protest of the diplomatic corps, gave notice on March 27 to all neutrals to evacuate the city.

Bombardment
At 7 am on March 31, the Spanish fleet took positions in front of their targets. It consisted of the NUMANCIA, RESOLUCION, VILLA DE MADRID, BLANCA, VENCEDORA and the PAQUETE DEL MAULE. The frigate BERENGUELA remained behind to guard against the possible escape of the merchant fleet. At 8.10 AM, the NUMANCIA discharged two shots as final notice and to give opportunity for the people still in town to take cover. The bombardment itself started at 9 am and lasted for three hours without fire being returned, as Valparaíso was totally defenseless.
The Spanish bombarded the town unhindered. The loss in public and private property was estimated at $1,000,000, and in merchandise at $9,000,000, huge sums at the time. One recent account suggests that in today's money the losses amounted to the equivalent of around $224,000,000.
The action created an international scandal. While the Spanish were heavily criticized for attacking an unarmed city, so too was the British government for not employing its own naval force to protect the lives and property of its own nationals. Most of the losses were actually endured by British merchants, and a large argument developed in the British Parliament when news arrived in May

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombardme ... 3%ADso1866
Chile 2017 label on $6 stamps of Especialidao Abastecimiento set.
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ISE battleship

The stamp of 80Y is one out of a Japanese miniature sheet for the 1914-1920 Millennium set, the design of this stamp was adopted from a part of “Shonen Gunkan Sugoruku” (Japanese battleship board game for boys by Kawabata Ryushi 1885-1966), and represent the First World War and shows in the foreground the Japanese battleship ISE at that time the newest and most powerful ship in the Japanese Navy.

Built as a battleship on the Japanese shipyard Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe for the Japanese Imperial Navy.
10 May 1915 laid down.
12 November 1916 launched as the ISE, named after the Province Ise, one sister the HYUGA.
Displacement 31,760 ton standard, 37,100 ton full load, dim. 208.2 x 28.7 x 8.93m. (draught), length bpp.195.7m.
Powered by two sets Brown-Curtis steam turbines, 45,000 shp, four shafts, speed 23 knots.
Range by a speed of 14 knots, 9,680 mile.
Armament: 6 – 356mm, 16 – 140mm, 12 – 76mm, 4 – 76mm AA guns and 6 – submerged 533mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 1,198.
15 December 1917 completed.

ISE (senkan)), was the lead ship of the two-vessel ISE-class battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy, which saw combat service during the Pacific War. ISE was named after Ise Province, one of the traditional provinces of Japan, now part of Mie Prefecture.

Operational history
Early histor
Originally planned to be the third Fusō-class battleship, experience gained in the construction of the Fusō class revealed a number of design issues, including weak armament and protection, which forced a redesign and new classification.
ISE was laid down at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries shipyard in Kobe on 5 May 1915, launched on 12 November 1916, and completed on 15 December 1917 and assigned to the Kure Naval District.
Completed too late for service in World War I, in the early 1920s, ISE participated in numerous patrols off the Siberia coast and in northern waters in support of Japan's Siberian Intervention against the Bolshevik Red Army.
On 12 April 1922, while at Yokohama, ISE hosted a delegation which included the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII), who was accompanied by his second cousin, the future Lord Mountbatten of Burma. From the mid-1920s through the late 1930s, ISE patrolled mostly off the China coast.
In 1928-1929, ISE was rebuilt at the Kure Naval Arsenal, with its foremast increased in height in the distinctive "pagoda" style similar to HARUNA. The fore funnel was fitted with a curved smoke cap, and a flying off platform for Yokosuka E1Y2 Type 14 floatplanes was fitted atop No. 5 main turret. Later, from 1930–1931, additional searchlights and a derrick was installed at the stern for handling floatplanes.
However, a more complete upgrade occurred from 20 November 1931 – 10 February 1932 at Kure Naval Arsenal, which involved shortening the mainmast top section, replacing all the 76 mm (3.0 in)/40 cal AA guns with eight Type 89 127 mm (5.0 in)/40 cal AA guns (4x2), and adding four Vickers Type 40 mm (1.6 in) AA guns (2x2). The shielded 140 mm (5.5 in)/40 cal guns from the forecastle deck were removed and a catapult and aircraft handling crane were fitted to the fantail. On 14 May 1933, a second catapult and three Type 90 seaplanes were added.
From 1 August 1935, ISE was drydocked at Kure Naval Arsenal and underwent an extensive reconstruction and modernization. The 24 mixed-fired (coal and oil) boilers were replaced by eight new Kampon oil-fired boilers and new Kampon geared turbines were fitted. Maximum speed increased to 25.4 kn (47.0 km/h; 29.2 mph) (25.21 kn (46.69 km/h; 29.01 mph) was reached during trials). The fore funnel was removed and stern lengthened by 7.62 m (25 ft). Anti-torpedo bulges were added and her six submerged torpedo tubes were removed. The maximum elevation of ISE's main battery (with the exception of the aftermost turret No. 6) was increased to 43°. Two forward 140 mm (5.5 in) casemate guns were removed, as was done with most other Japanese warships during this period, due to their exposed nature in heavy seas. The elevation of secondary guns was increased from 20° to 30° and range increased from 15,800 m (51,800 ft) to 19,100 m (62,700 ft). Four 40 mm (1.6 in) Vickers AA guns were replaced by 10 Type 96 twin 25 mm (0.98 in)/60 cal AA guns. The original catapult was replaced by a Kure Type No. 2 Mod. 5 catapult and the aircraft handling deck was extended. Reconstruction was completed by 27 March 1937.

Start of the Pacific War
Despite these efforts at modernization and upgrading, ISE was still considered obsolete by the start of the Pacific War due to her relatively slow speed, large crew, and short range, and never saw combat as a battleship. ISE participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor (albeit on a sortie from Hashirajima as far as the Bonin Islands) and pursued but did not catch the American carrier force that had launched the Doolittle Raid on 18 April 1942.
In May, ISE had an accident which flooded her No. 2 engine room. During repair work, ISE was fitted with one of the first experimental model Type 21 radar sets in the Japanese navy.

Reconstruction
To partially compensate for the loss of carrier strength at the Battle of Midway, Navy Aircraft Department began plans to convert the ISE-class battleships to full-sized aircraft carriers each carrying 54 planes. This concept was abandoned due to lack of time and resources and a hybrid battleship/carrier concept was adopted. ISE was dry-docked, and her aft No. 5 and No. 6 main turrets were removed and replaced by a hangar surmounted by a 70 m (230 ft) long flight deck and a "T"-shaped aircraft elevator. This was long enough to permit the launch of aircraft, but not their recovery. Two 25 m (82 ft) Model 11 catapults were installed on tall supports on the port and starboard sides forward of the flight deck. A collapsible derrick crane was fitted port abaft (two cranes were originally planned but installation was not carried out). It was realized that a single faulty aircraft engine could ruin the whole concept, so, to prevent jams, the deck was fitted with two rails to each catapult, 12 turntables, trolleys and tie-downs. Plans called for the new hangar to carry nine planes inside, with 11 on deck and one on each catapult. The new deck was covered with 200 mm (7.9 in) of concrete to compensate for the unbalanced condition created after removal of the aft armament. A 1 m (3 ft) thick layer of concrete was also poured around the main and reserve steering rooms and a 150 mm (5.9 in) horizontal armor cover was added.
Additional anti-aircraft weapons were installed to better fight off aerial attack. The eight single 127 mm (5.0 in) DP guns were replaced with eight twin-mounts, and the Type 96 25 mm (0.98 in) AA guns were increased from 20 to 57 (including 19 triple-mounts). Type 21 air-search radar and two Type 22 surface-search radars were also installed. As modified, ISE could carry 22 aircraft. The operational concept envisioned ISE accompanying the Kido Butai (Carrier Strike Force), and launching its 11 Yokosuka D4Y2 SuISEi ("Judy") dive bombers and 11 Aichi E16A Zuiun ("Paul") seaplanes that are capable of diving attacks to add another 44 bombers to the Strike Force. The SuISEi had to land either on a conventional carrier or on land bases, whereas the E16A could be hoisted back aboard using a crane, after landing near the ship. ISE's final aircraft allowance called for 14 E16As and eight D4Y2s.
The rebuild was officially completed on 8 October 1943; however, as training with the new pilots was not completed by autumn 1944, ISE was never used in its new configuration in an operational mission. Its aircraft were offloaded to land bases, and ISE continued to be used as a pure battleship in the cover force.
ISE made a sortie to Truk in October 1943, conveying a detachment of the...
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Bundaberg HMAS (ACPB 91)

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Bundaberg HMAS (ACPB 91)

Postby john sefton » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:44 am

Bundaberg HMAS.jpg
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HMAS Bundaberg (ACPB 91), named after the city of Bundaberg, Queensland, was an Armidale class patrol boat of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The ship was built in Henderson, Western Australia, and was commissioned into the RAN in March 2007. Based at HMAS Cairns, Bundaberg spent much of her career deployed as part of border protection and fisheries protection patrols as part of Operation Resolute. In addition, the patrol boat was involved in several national and multinational training exercises, visited Vanuatu in 2011 (the vessel's only overseas deployment), tracked a suspected drug-smuggling vessel that led to a multimillion-dollar seizure, and participated in the International Fleet Review 2013. In August 2014, a large fire broke out on the ship while she was undergoing refit. Extensive damage from the fire led to the ship's decommissioning in December 2014.
The Armidale class patrol boats are 56.8 metres (186 ft) long, with a beam of 9.7 metres (32 ft), a draught of 2.7 metres (8 ft 10 in), and a standard displacement of 270 tons. The semi-displacement vee hull is fabricated from aluminium alloy, and each vessel is built to a combination of Det Norske Veritas standards for high-speed light craft and RAN requirements. The Armidales can travel at a maximum speed of 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph), and are driven by two propeller shafts, each connected to an MTU 16V M70 diesel. The ships have a range of 3,000 nautical miles (5,600 km; 3,500 mi) at 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph), allowing them to patrol the waters around the distant territories of Australia, and are designed for standard patrols of 21 days, with a maximum endurance of 42 days.
The main armament of the Armidale class is a Rafael Typhoon stabilised 25-millimetre (0.98 in) gun mount fitted with an M242 Bushmaster cannon. Two 12.7-millimetre (0.50 in) machine guns are also carried. Boarding operations are performed by two 7.2-metre (24 ft), waterjet propelled rigid-hulled inflatable boats (RHIBs). Each RHIB is stored in a dedicated cradle and davit, and is capable of operating independently from the patrol boat as it carries its own communications, navigation, and safety equipment.
Each patrol boat has a standard ship's company of 21 personnel, with a maximum of 29. The Armidales do not have a permanently assigned ship's company; instead, they are assigned to divisions at a ratio of two vessels to three companies, which rotate through the vessels and allow the Armidales to spend more time at sea, without compromising sailors' rest time or training requirements. A 20-berth auxiliary accommodation compartment was included in the design for the transportation of soldiers, illegal fishermen, or unauthorised arrivals; in the latter two cases, the compartment could be secured from the outside. However, a malfunction in the sewerage treatment facilities aboard HMAS Maitland in August 2006 pumped hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide into the compartment, non-fatally poisoning four sailors working inside, after which use of the compartment for accommodation was banned across the class.
Bundaberg was constructed by Austal at their shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia. She was commissioned into the RAN in her namesake city on 3 March 2007.
Operational history
The ship was assigned to Ardent Division, based at HMAS Cairns in Cairns, Queensland, and performed border protection and fisheries protection patrols. After commissioning and a schedule of work-up exercises, she was deployed as part of Operation Resolute for the first time in April 2007. Regular deployments as par of Operation Resolute made up the bulk of the patrol boat's operations during her career.
Bundaberg took part in Exercise Talisman Sabre during June 2007. After the exercise, the first boarding of an illegal foreign fishing vessel was made by Bundaberg's personnel. In July, the ship's company participated in the City of Bundaberg's Bundy In Bloom festival, and were granted the keys to the city. In October, the ship rescued the crew of a capsized yacht off Mindle Beach, Northern Territory. On 4 January 2008, Bundaberg was forced to sail from Darwin to avoid being caught in confined waters by Cyclone Helen.
During May and June 2010, Bundaberg was temporarily removed from Operation Resolute to participate in a Minor War Vessel Concentration Period, before visiting Bundaberg and the Gold Coast. In November, the patrol boat was part of the annual Australia - Papua New Guinea Exercise Paradise. On 4 December, the ship was undergoing routine maintenance in Darwin when a fire started in a storeroom on board. There were no injuries, but damage to Bundaberg kept her out of operation until mid-April 2011. Shortly after returning to service, Bundaberg sailed overseas for the first and only time: a four-day visit to Port Villa, Vanuatu, which saw the patrol boat leave Cairns on 28 April 2011, and return on 8 May. In October, Bundaberg tracked the yacht Friday Freedom as part of an Australian Customs and Australian Federal Police (AFP) anti-smuggling operation. The yacht was detained by the AFP on arrival in Bundaberg, with 300 kilograms (660 lb) of cocaine and A$3 million in cash seized in Australia's fifth-largest drug bust.
In November 2012, Bundaberg was a part of Exercise Paradise/Triton Thunder. On 22 September, Bundaberg sailed from Cairns to Sydney, escorting four Pacific-class patrol boats which were to participate in the International Fleet Review 2013. Bundaberg was also a participant in the review: on 4 October, she was part of the 100th anniversary re-enactment of the RAN's first fleet entry into Sydney Harbour, then on 5 November, sailed into Sydney Harbour again as part of Review Line 2 for the fleet review itself.
Fire
During August 2014, the patrol boat was undergoing refit work at Aluminium Boats Australia (ABA), a civilian shipyard in Hemmant, Queensland. Before midday on 11 August 2014, a large fire broke out aboard, starting in a forward interior section and moving aft. The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) were alerted at 11:52, but it was not until 17:00 that the fire was extinguished, and over the course of the afternoon, 15 fire appliances and over 60 firefighters attended the scene. Two civilian contractors were treated for smoke inhalation, and no other injuries were reported. Financial difficulties following the fire (including the loss of the naval repair contract, the cost of investigating the fire, and industry-wide pressure from imports of foreign-built vessels) cumulated in ABA being placed into voluntary administration on 4 November 2014. As of 5 November 2014, no cause for the fire had been identified, although the QFES speculated at the time of the incident that repair work was responsible.
The ship was extensively damaged in the blaze, and on 18 December 2014, Bundaberg was ceremonially decommissioned at the naval base HMAS Cairns, with the patrol boat's ensign lowered for the final time from the base's flagstaff.

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