SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Tristan da Cunha.The first landing.

Though far west of the Cape of Good Hope, the islands were on the preferred route from Europe to the Indian Ocean in the 17th century; ships first crossed the Atlantic to Brazil on the Northeasterly Trades, followed the Brazil Current south to pass the Doldrums, and then picked up the Westerlies to cross the Atlantic again, where they could encounter Tristan da Cunha. The Dutch East India Company required their ships to follow this route, and on 17 February 1643 the crew of the Heemstede, captained by Claes Gerritszoon Bierenbroodspot, made the first confirmed landing. The Heemstede replenished their supplies with fresh water, fish, seals and penguins and left a wooden tablet with the inscription "Today, 17 February 1643, from the Dutch fluyt Heemstede, Claes Gerritsz Bierenbroodspot from Hoorn and Jan Coertsen van den Broec landed here".(See the stamp). There after, the Dutch East India Company returned to the area four more times to explore whether the islands could function as a supply base for their ships. The first stop was in 5 September 1646 on a voyage to Batavia, Dutch East Indies, and the second was an expedition by the galliot Nachtglas (Nightglass), which left from Cape Town on 22 November 1655. The crew of the Nachtglas noticed the tablet left by the Heemstede on 10 January 1656 near a watering place. They left a wooden tablet themselves as well, like they also did on Nachtglas Eijland (now Inaccessible Island). The Nachtglas, commanded by Jan Jacobszoon van Amsterdam, examined Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island and made rough charts for the Dutch East India Company. Dutch sailors also stayed on the island for four weeks in 1658, and made their last stop in April 1669, when their idea of utilizing the islands as a supply base was abandoned, probably due to the absence of a safe harbour.
In the 17th century ships were also sent from Saint Helena by the English East India Company to Tristan to report on a proposed settlement there, but that project also came to nothing.
Tristan da Cunha 1983;4p;SG351.
Source: wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha.

Tristan da Cunha.The first survey.

The uninhabited islands of Tristan da Cunha were first sighted in May 1506 during a voyage to India by the Portuguese admiral Tristão da Cunha, although rough seas prevented a landing. He named the main island after himself, Ilha de Tristão da Cunha, which was later anglicised to Tristan da Cunha Island.[2] His discovery appeared on nautical maps from 1509 and on Mercator's world map of 1541. Some sources state that the Portuguese made the first landing on Tristan in 1520, when the Lás Rafael captained by Ruy Vaz Pereira called for water. The first survey of the archipelago was made by the French corvette “HEURE du BERGER” in 1767. Soundings were taken and a rough survey of the coastline was made. The presence of water at the large waterfall of Big Watron and in a lake on the north coast were noted, and the results of the survey were published by a Royal Navy hydrographer in 1781. The first scientific exploration was conducted by French naturalist Louis-Marie Aubert du Petit-Thouars, who stayed on the island for three days in January 1793, during a French mercantile expedition from Brest, France to Mauritius. Aubert made botanical collections and reported traces of human habitation, including fireplacesand overgrown gardens, probably left by Dutch explorers in the 17th century.
Tristan da Cunha 2006;30p;SG?
Source:wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha

PUSHER TUG WITH BARGES

The 6-cent Arkansas River Navigation commemorative stamp was issued October 1, 1968, at Little Rock, Arkansas.
This stamp was in recognition of the economic potential of the $1.2 billion project, which was nearing completion. It eventually provided Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma with a barge route to the Mississippi River and became one of the nation's major inland waterways.
The maritime theme on the stamp is a steering wheel with in the background a pusher tug https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pusher_(boat) with barges on the Arkansa River.
The pusher tug is not identified and the term barge has applied to numerous types of vessel around the world, but mostly the barges used on American Rivers are square flat bottomed barges. The following web-site has more on the American barges: http://www.caria.org/barge-and-towboat-facts/

Why is a towboat called a towboat when it pushes the barges?
The word “tow” comes from the canal age when a draft animal walking along the bank of the canal pulled a barge. As rivermen gained experience with moving barges, they found that, by lashing barges together and pushing them, they could control the barges better and move more of them. The control was especially helpful when navigating the smaller rivers and tight bends in a river.

What is the size of a barge?
The standard barge is 195 feet long, 35 feet wide, and can be used to a 9-foot draft. Its capacity is 1500 tons. Some of the newer barges today are 290 feet by 50 feet, double the capacity of earlier barges.

What is the size of a towboat?
Towboats range in physical size from about 117 feet long by 30 feet wide to more than 200 feet long and 45 feet wide. They draft anywhere from 6.5 feet to 9.0 feet. The boat’s diesel engine can produce power from a few hundred horsepower to 10,000 horsepower. A few are in excess of that, but not many. The larger boats operated on the Lower Mississippi where the water is freeflowing and wide.
How many barges and towboats are there?
There are approximately 26,000 dry cargo barges, 3,000 tanker barges, and 1,200 towboats operating today.

How many barges are there in a tow?
The average tow has 15 barges, but flotillas can go up to 40 barges, depending on the type of cargo, the river segments being navigated, and the size of the towboat. Smaller tributaries, such as the Alabama River, can support only a four-barge tow because of the meandering nature of the river and varying width of the river itself. In addition, the Alabama’s locks are only 84 feet wide and 600 feet long.

U.S.A. 1968 6c sg 1343, scott 1325.

S-Class, INS TANIN (S-71) or INS RAHAV (S-73)

S-Class (Fourth Group)
Israel's first submarines were ex-Royal Navy S-Class submarines which entered service in 1958. The Israeli navy operated two boats, S-71 INS TANIN (ex-HMS SPRINGER) and S-73 INS RAHAV (ex-HMS SANGUINE) until the late 1960s. Built in the final days of WW2, they had undergone a modest modernization after the war involving the fitting of a folding snort mast to allow charging of the batteries whilst the boat was submerged, and better sonar. All the same these boats were essentially WW2 era types largely obsolete even before they entered Israeli service.

HMS SPRINGER (P 264)
Built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:8 May 1944, launched:14 May 1945, commissioned:2 August 1945. Displacement: 814-872 tons surfaced, 990 tons submerged. Length:217’ (66.14 m.)
Beam:23’ 6” (7.16 m.) Draught:11’ (3.35m.) diesel/electric 1900/1300 hp. 14.75 kn. surfaced, 8 knots submerged
Complement:48 officers and men.
Armament:6 × forward 21” (533 mm.) torpedo tubes, one aft, 13 torpedoes, 1-3”(76mm.) gun, 1-20 mm. canon., 3-.303 calibre machine guns.
Sold to Israeli Navy on 9 October 1958, renamed TANIN, fate: scrapped in 1972.

HMS SANGUINE (P 266)
Same details as HMS SPRINGER, built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:10 January 1944, launched:15 February 1945, commissioned:13 May 1945, sold to Israeli Navy in March 1958, renamed RAHAV, fate: cannibalised for spares for TANIN in 1968, broken up at Haifa in 1969.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
Internet.

ALBERT CALMETTE

This stamp issued by St Pierre et Miquelon, shows a portrait of the French physician and bacteriologist Albert Calmette.
In the background is a two masted topsail schooner, which is not identified. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12482&p=18296&hilit=topsail+schooner#p18296 within the foreground are many doris viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11927&p=12785&hilit=dories#p12785
Albert Calmette (1863 – 1933) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Calmette
1888-1890 Calmette was assigned to Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon where he conducted research on the red cod.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1963 30f. sg426, scott 366.

COXLESS SCULL Biglin brothers

This stamp is designed after a painting made by Thomas Eakins https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Eakins and shows the Biglin Brothers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biglin_Br ... ver_-_1872
The painting was made in 1872 and is now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington and shows the Biglin Brothers in a coxless scull of which Wikipedia gives:

A coxless pair is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for two rowers, who propel the boat with sweep oars.
The crew consists of a pair of rowers, each having one oar, one on the stroke side (rower's right hand side) and one on the bow side (rower's lefthand side). As the name suggests, there is no coxswain on such a boat, and the two rowers must co-ordinate steering and the proper timing of oar strokes between themselves or by means of a steering installation which is operated by foot from one of the rowers. The equivalent boat when it is steered by a cox is referred to as a "coxed pair".
Racing boats (often called "shells") are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material (usually carbon-fibre reinforced plastic) for strength and weight advantages. Pairs have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat.
A coxless pair is often considered the most difficult boat to row, as each rower must balance his/her side in cooperation with the other, apply equal power, place their catch and extract the blade simultaneously in order to move the boat efficiently. It requires excellent technique, communication and experience.
"Coxless pair" is one of the classes recognized by the International Rowing Federation and is competed in the Olympic Games

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxless_pair
USA 1967 5c sg ?, scott1335.
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HÉROS

The full index of our ship stamp archive

HÉROS

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:02 pm

Heros_img_3178.jpg
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suffren arrival mauritius 1783.jpg
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Mauritius issued in 1970 two stamps which shows us Port Louis in 1970 and 1783, the R2.50 stamps gives that it shows the port at the arrival of the French Admiral Suffren on board the HÉROS in 1783 in Port Louis, Ile de France (now Mauritius), comparing stamp with the stern drawing of the ship she is the ship in the front, with the other ship behind the HÉROS must be the VENGEUR of 1765 which arrived with the HÉROS in Port Louis. The stamp is designed after a drawing viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15957&p=18633#!lightbox[gallery]/1/ http://earthwisecentre.org/general/why- ... mauritius/

The HÉROS was built as a third-rate wooden hulled ship-of-the-line by the Toulon Arsenal in Toulon for the French Navy. Designed by Joseph-Marie-Blaise-Coulomb
1778 Keel laid down.
30 December 1778 launched as the HÉROS
Tonnage 1,500 ton burthen, dim. 54.57m length of gundeck, beam 14,02m, depth in hold 6.82m.
Armament: lower gun deck 29 – 36pdr., upper gun deck 30 – 18pdr., quarterdeck and forecastle 16 – 8 pdr. guns.
Crew ?
Commissioned ?.

HÉROS was a 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy, known mostly for being the flagship of Pierre André de Suffren de Saint Tropez during the Anglo-French War.
Construction
She was built in 1778 at Toulon on a design by Joseph-Marie-Blaise Coulomb.
Six battles in 27 months
In 1781 she became part of Suffren's force, consisting of the 16-gun frigate FORTUNE, five ships of the line, eight troopships and a thousand soldiers, all entrusted with carrying the French war effort into the Indian Ocean. The other warships were one other 74 gun ship (the ANNIBAL) and three 64-gun ships (the VENGEUR, the SPHINX and the ARTÉSIEN). Suffren had been allowed to choose his officers and non-commissioned officers and so these were mainly from Provence, despite the fact that the force set off from Brest. There were around ten men per gun, making a total crew of 712.
On 22 March 1781 the force sailed for the south Atlantic and on 16 April it met a force under commodore George Johnstone waiting off Cape Verde to attack the Cape. Suffren sailed the HÉROS into the centre of the enemy formation to try to destroy it while it was still at anchor, in what became the battle of Porto Praya. The ship almost fought the battle alone, since the other French ships were not so well commanded or manoeuvred and so engaged the enemy little or not at all. For more than an hour the HÉROS was under continual fire from the British ships - she fired "as fast as it was possible to load and reload" noted a British report of the battle. The ANNIBAL was completely dismasted and her captain was killed, leaving the HÉROS to take her in tow after the battle.
HÉROS was stationed off the Cape from 21 June to 29 August to defend the Dutch colony from a British attack and to repair the damage done to her at Porto Praya. On 25 October she arrived at Mauritius Island to join the French ships already stationed there - these were the ships of the line ORIENT (74 guns), SÉVÉRE (64), BIZARRE (64), AJAX (64), BRILLANT (64) and FLAMAND (56), the frigates POURVOYEUSE (38), FINE (36) and BELLONE (32), the corvettes SUBTILE (24), SYLPHIDE (12) and DILIGENT (10) and the fireship PULVÉRISATEUR (6 or 4 guns). With HÉROS as Suffren's flagship, the eleven ships left the island on 7 December 1781 to attack the British force in the Indian Ocean
On 17 February 1782 the HÉROS fought at the battle of Sadras off the coast of Coromandel, attachking the centre of the British formation and seriously damaging below the waterline Edward Hughes' flagship, the 74 gun HMS SUPERB. HÉROS and the rest of the squadron then called at Pondichéry and Porto-Novo to disembark general Duchemin's troops (21 February to 23 March 1782).
On 12 April, still Suffren's flagship, she fought in the bitter battle of Providien off Sri Lanka. She attacked HMS SUPERB again at pistol-shot range, causing a fire to break out aboard the British ship. She then dismasted HMS MONMOUTH, forcing her to leave the British line. However, the HÉROS was also heavily damaged, losing the top of her foremast. This meant she was no longer maneouvrable and so forced to leave the battle, with Suffren switching his flag to the 64 gun AJAX mid-battle.[ The HÉROS then called at Batticaloa on Sri Lanka with the rest of the squadron for repairs and to rest her crew.
On 6 July HÉROS fought in the battle of Negapatam. The wind suddenly changed direction mid-battle and the broke up the two lines of battle, turning the engagement into a general mêlée. HÉROS saved the 64 gun BRILLANT which had lost her mainmast, then try to engage HMS SUPERB, but the British ship refused to engage and the two squadrons disengaged for the third time after an indecisive battle. HÉROS called at Cuddalore on 8 July and she and the squadron were based there until 1 August. There Suffren met nabab Haidar Ali, who had come with his army to ally with Suffren against the British. The force then sailed again for Sri Lanka.
She and the squadron called at Batticaloa again from 9 to 23 August 1782 to be reinforced by the 74 gun ILLUSTRE and the 60 gun SAINT-MICHEL and seventeen transports with troops and supplies. HÉROS was also placed on her side at Batticaloa to repair her hull, caulking and upperwork. Meanwhile, Suffren prepared an attempt to recapture Trincomalee, the main port on Sri Lanka. On 25 August, en route to Trincomalee, HÉROS had her stern and aftcastle lightly damaged in a collision with the ARTÉSIEN. She was still able to take part in the French landings on 26 August which ended in the surrender of the British garrison on 31 August and the port's recapture.
On 3 September 1782, in the battle of Trincomalee, HÉROS was again engaged against Hughes' squadron, which had come to the aid of Trincomalee. HÉROS, ILLUSTRE and AJAX attacked the British centre but the wind dropped on part of the French line and the rest of the squadron was unable to follow - several captains only bombarded the British ships from a distance contrary to Suffren's orders. A sketch by one of Suffren's officers shows HÉROS spending several hours at the height of the action in the crossfire of HMS SUPERB, HMS MONMOUTH (64 guns), HMS BURFORD (74 guns) and HMS EAGLE (64 guns). She lost her mainmast then her mizzenmast - the latter dragged the French flag into the water with it and for a moment the British thought that Suffren had struck his colours. Unengaged French ships of the line finally managed to tack into the battle and get the HÉROS to safety. Suffren moved to ORIENT and HÉROS was taken in tow by SPHINX, staying at Trincomalee for repairs until 1 October - she was repaired with matured timber and supplies taken from other ships of the line and transport ships.
She and the squadron sailed to Cuddalore in October to support the French garrison there, then under threat of siege. It wintered, resupplied and rested at Sumatra in November and December. On 12 November HÉROS became a floating embassy when Suffren received Alauddin Muhammad Syah, Sultan of Aceh on board her. This was the first French squadron of such size to visit the region and - fearing it was an invasion - Syah wished to find out whether or not its intent was hostile towards him. On 8 January 1783, HÉROS returned to the Indian coast and took part in a deception which captured a British frigate. She then arrived in Cuddalore on 6 February.
From February to June 1783 HÉROS cruised between the Coromandel and Trincomalee coasts, with Suffren making Trincomalee his main base. She was present on 10 March when the squadron was reinforced by a large force under Bussy (consisting of the 74 gun FENDANT and ARGONAUTE, the 66 gun HARDI and transports carrying 2,500 men). Suffren ordered this force to attack the British forces heading for Madras. HÉROS escorted the force before returning to Trincomalee and on 20 June she and the squadron fought the battle of Cuddalore. This was the final engagement between Hughes' and Suffren's squadrons - Suffren decided to give battle despite being outnumbered 18 to 15 in an attempt to lift the encirclement of Bussy's forces at Cuddalore. HÉROS took part in the battle, but orders received from the French king forced Suffren to lead the squadron from a frigate instead to avoid being wounded or captured - this directive had come into force after de Grasse's capture from the VILLE DE PARIS at the battle of the Saintes on 12 April the previous year. Hughes' squadron was forced to flee, saving Bussy's force as Suffren had hoped. However, Suffren was unable to capitalize upon the victory since nine days later he received a dispatch reporting the signing of a preliminary peace agreemenent in Europe five months earlier (what would become the Treaty of Paris).
HÉROS sailed back to France in triumph - she and VENGEUR sailed on 6 October and arrived at Mauritius on 12 November, where its governor M. de Souillac came on board to salute Suffren. On 29 November, now accompanied by the frigate CLÉOPATRE she sailed from the Cape, which she reached on 22 December. Nine British ships of the line were calling at the Cape at the same time - most of them had fought against Suffren but his renown was such that all the British officers came on board the HÉROS "to salute in person a master of their profession,[24] in a unique scene in French naval history. On 3 January 1784 the ship resumed her journey, reaching Toulon on 26 March to a rapturous reception and festivities at the city's hôtel de l’Intendance. On 6 April a local newspaper, the Courrier d'Avignon, reported a surprise dessert served to Suffren:
"It is written of this town [Toulon] that she presented to one diner a symbol, whose allegory was expressed with equal ingenuity and delicacy. As a dessert, it served a small sugar ship of the line modeled on the HÉROS, sailing the commander's flag; it was placed in a glass bowl below which was placed a laurel crown; at the poop of the ship was written the ship's name in large letters, Le HÉROS, and lower one read "At this table where everything flatters taste / With a shining circle around it, / This one must admire above all / It's Le HÉROS who virtue crowns".
Impressed by the quality of Hindustani textile manufacture and hoping to set up a textile industry on Malta, Suffren had embarked fifty Indian cotton manufacturers on the HÉROS for the voyage home. They were immediately sent from Toulon to Malta to use its local cotton.
Evolution during the Indian Campaign
The ship was on station for 27 months and then took 9 months to get back to France, meaning she was away from home waters for almost three years. This made her one of the most heavily engaged French warships of the time, though she was much-changed when she returned to Toulon - she had been dismasted twice (at Providien and Trincomalee) and repaired with modified rigging and masts from other ships and her launch had been so badly damaged by gunfire that Suffren suspended it from the stern at the level of the gallery.
The good health and discipline of the ship's crew (or at least those who remained on the flagship) is also instructive as to the kind of men being recruited in Brest in March 1781. However, it is difficult to trace changes in personnel over the course of the campaign - for example, the ship's muster does not take into account the presence of slaves, Lascars and sepoys, who at times formed a considerable proportion of the crew. This was especially true during the final months in the Indian Ocean, when large numbers of the original crew had been killed in action or lost to sickness, wounds or desertion The Indian sailors' pay was different and records of their service are incomplete.
Of the 19 officers and gardes de la marine who left Brest with the ship in March 1781, only 8 returned to Toulon aboard her - 8 had left the ship during the campaign, 2 had been killed in combat and 1 had died of his wounds.[29] 88 of the seamen were killed in battle, 99 died of sickness or wounds at sea and 399 were hospitalized at least once - of that 399, it is recorded that 41 died in hospital, though that is definitely an under-estimate. 49 men deserted. Total losses were 365 out of a complement of 712 men on departure from Brest. Suffren made up these losses by taking men from frigates and transport ships, recruiting locally and redistributing among the squadron the crews of ORIENT and BIZARRE, which both ran aground in 1782. Research is complicated by these crew movements and by the fact that Suffren gave preference to sailors from Provence for the voyage home, so that they could return home more easily to their family, since he chose Toulon not Brest as his destination. It is estimated that around 40% of the original crew did not return to Toulon.
Later career
Suffren died in December 1788 and HÉROS remained stationed at Toulon with the Levant squadron. Early in 1793 war broke out again between France and Britain and HÉROS was seized by the British as she was moored at Toulon when a Royalist cabale surrendered the city to them on 29 August. As the Siege of Toulon ended in the liberation of the city, Captain Sidney Smith had her scuttled by fire on 18–19 December along with THÉMISTOCLE and six other ships of the line which he was unable to take with him as prize ships.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_sh ... 9ros_(1778) https://threedecks.org/index.php?displa ... ip&id=2082
Mauritius 1970 2R50 sg423, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
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