SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Tristan da Cunha.The first landing.

Though far west of the Cape of Good Hope, the islands were on the preferred route from Europe to the Indian Ocean in the 17th century; ships first crossed the Atlantic to Brazil on the Northeasterly Trades, followed the Brazil Current south to pass the Doldrums, and then picked up the Westerlies to cross the Atlantic again, where they could encounter Tristan da Cunha. The Dutch East India Company required their ships to follow this route, and on 17 February 1643 the crew of the Heemstede, captained by Claes Gerritszoon Bierenbroodspot, made the first confirmed landing. The Heemstede replenished their supplies with fresh water, fish, seals and penguins and left a wooden tablet with the inscription "Today, 17 February 1643, from the Dutch fluyt Heemstede, Claes Gerritsz Bierenbroodspot from Hoorn and Jan Coertsen van den Broec landed here".(See the stamp). There after, the Dutch East India Company returned to the area four more times to explore whether the islands could function as a supply base for their ships. The first stop was in 5 September 1646 on a voyage to Batavia, Dutch East Indies, and the second was an expedition by the galliot Nachtglas (Nightglass), which left from Cape Town on 22 November 1655. The crew of the Nachtglas noticed the tablet left by the Heemstede on 10 January 1656 near a watering place. They left a wooden tablet themselves as well, like they also did on Nachtglas Eijland (now Inaccessible Island). The Nachtglas, commanded by Jan Jacobszoon van Amsterdam, examined Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island and made rough charts for the Dutch East India Company. Dutch sailors also stayed on the island for four weeks in 1658, and made their last stop in April 1669, when their idea of utilizing the islands as a supply base was abandoned, probably due to the absence of a safe harbour.
In the 17th century ships were also sent from Saint Helena by the English East India Company to Tristan to report on a proposed settlement there, but that project also came to nothing.
Tristan da Cunha 1983;4p;SG351.
Source: wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha.

Tristan da Cunha.The first survey.

The uninhabited islands of Tristan da Cunha were first sighted in May 1506 during a voyage to India by the Portuguese admiral Tristão da Cunha, although rough seas prevented a landing. He named the main island after himself, Ilha de Tristão da Cunha, which was later anglicised to Tristan da Cunha Island.[2] His discovery appeared on nautical maps from 1509 and on Mercator's world map of 1541. Some sources state that the Portuguese made the first landing on Tristan in 1520, when the Lás Rafael captained by Ruy Vaz Pereira called for water. The first survey of the archipelago was made by the French corvette “HEURE du BERGER” in 1767. Soundings were taken and a rough survey of the coastline was made. The presence of water at the large waterfall of Big Watron and in a lake on the north coast were noted, and the results of the survey were published by a Royal Navy hydrographer in 1781. The first scientific exploration was conducted by French naturalist Louis-Marie Aubert du Petit-Thouars, who stayed on the island for three days in January 1793, during a French mercantile expedition from Brest, France to Mauritius. Aubert made botanical collections and reported traces of human habitation, including fireplacesand overgrown gardens, probably left by Dutch explorers in the 17th century.
Tristan da Cunha 2006;30p;SG?
Source:wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tristan_da_Cunha

PUSHER TUG WITH BARGES

The 6-cent Arkansas River Navigation commemorative stamp was issued October 1, 1968, at Little Rock, Arkansas.
This stamp was in recognition of the economic potential of the $1.2 billion project, which was nearing completion. It eventually provided Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma with a barge route to the Mississippi River and became one of the nation's major inland waterways.
The maritime theme on the stamp is a steering wheel with in the background a pusher tug https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pusher_(boat) with barges on the Arkansa River.
The pusher tug is not identified and the term barge has applied to numerous types of vessel around the world, but mostly the barges used on American Rivers are square flat bottomed barges. The following web-site has more on the American barges: http://www.caria.org/barge-and-towboat-facts/

Why is a towboat called a towboat when it pushes the barges?
The word “tow” comes from the canal age when a draft animal walking along the bank of the canal pulled a barge. As rivermen gained experience with moving barges, they found that, by lashing barges together and pushing them, they could control the barges better and move more of them. The control was especially helpful when navigating the smaller rivers and tight bends in a river.

What is the size of a barge?
The standard barge is 195 feet long, 35 feet wide, and can be used to a 9-foot draft. Its capacity is 1500 tons. Some of the newer barges today are 290 feet by 50 feet, double the capacity of earlier barges.

What is the size of a towboat?
Towboats range in physical size from about 117 feet long by 30 feet wide to more than 200 feet long and 45 feet wide. They draft anywhere from 6.5 feet to 9.0 feet. The boat’s diesel engine can produce power from a few hundred horsepower to 10,000 horsepower. A few are in excess of that, but not many. The larger boats operated on the Lower Mississippi where the water is freeflowing and wide.
How many barges and towboats are there?
There are approximately 26,000 dry cargo barges, 3,000 tanker barges, and 1,200 towboats operating today.

How many barges are there in a tow?
The average tow has 15 barges, but flotillas can go up to 40 barges, depending on the type of cargo, the river segments being navigated, and the size of the towboat. Smaller tributaries, such as the Alabama River, can support only a four-barge tow because of the meandering nature of the river and varying width of the river itself. In addition, the Alabama’s locks are only 84 feet wide and 600 feet long.

U.S.A. 1968 6c sg 1343, scott 1325.

S-Class, INS TANIN (S-71) or INS RAHAV (S-73)

S-Class (Fourth Group)
Israel's first submarines were ex-Royal Navy S-Class submarines which entered service in 1958. The Israeli navy operated two boats, S-71 INS TANIN (ex-HMS SPRINGER) and S-73 INS RAHAV (ex-HMS SANGUINE) until the late 1960s. Built in the final days of WW2, they had undergone a modest modernization after the war involving the fitting of a folding snort mast to allow charging of the batteries whilst the boat was submerged, and better sonar. All the same these boats were essentially WW2 era types largely obsolete even before they entered Israeli service.

HMS SPRINGER (P 264)
Built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:8 May 1944, launched:14 May 1945, commissioned:2 August 1945. Displacement: 814-872 tons surfaced, 990 tons submerged. Length:217’ (66.14 m.)
Beam:23’ 6” (7.16 m.) Draught:11’ (3.35m.) diesel/electric 1900/1300 hp. 14.75 kn. surfaced, 8 knots submerged
Complement:48 officers and men.
Armament:6 × forward 21” (533 mm.) torpedo tubes, one aft, 13 torpedoes, 1-3”(76mm.) gun, 1-20 mm. canon., 3-.303 calibre machine guns.
Sold to Israeli Navy on 9 October 1958, renamed TANIN, fate: scrapped in 1972.

HMS SANGUINE (P 266)
Same details as HMS SPRINGER, built by Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd. Birkenhead, laid down:10 January 1944, launched:15 February 1945, commissioned:13 May 1945, sold to Israeli Navy in March 1958, renamed RAHAV, fate: cannibalised for spares for TANIN in 1968, broken up at Haifa in 1969.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
Internet.

ALBERT CALMETTE

This stamp issued by St Pierre et Miquelon, shows a portrait of the French physician and bacteriologist Albert Calmette.
In the background is a two masted topsail schooner, which is not identified. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12482&p=18296&hilit=topsail+schooner#p18296 within the foreground are many doris viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11927&p=12785&hilit=dories#p12785
Albert Calmette (1863 – 1933) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Calmette
1888-1890 Calmette was assigned to Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon where he conducted research on the red cod.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1963 30f. sg426, scott 366.

COXLESS SCULL Biglin brothers

This stamp is designed after a painting made by Thomas Eakins https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Eakins and shows the Biglin Brothers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biglin_Br ... ver_-_1872
The painting was made in 1872 and is now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington and shows the Biglin Brothers in a coxless scull of which Wikipedia gives:

A coxless pair is a rowing boat used in the sport of competitive rowing. It is designed for two rowers, who propel the boat with sweep oars.
The crew consists of a pair of rowers, each having one oar, one on the stroke side (rower's right hand side) and one on the bow side (rower's lefthand side). As the name suggests, there is no coxswain on such a boat, and the two rowers must co-ordinate steering and the proper timing of oar strokes between themselves or by means of a steering installation which is operated by foot from one of the rowers. The equivalent boat when it is steered by a cox is referred to as a "coxed pair".
Racing boats (often called "shells") are long, narrow, and broadly semi-circular in cross-section in order to reduce drag to a minimum. Originally made from wood, shells are now almost always made from a composite material (usually carbon-fibre reinforced plastic) for strength and weight advantages. Pairs have a fin towards the rear, to help prevent roll and yaw. The riggers are staggered alternately along the boat so that the forces apply asymmetrically to each side of the boat.
A coxless pair is often considered the most difficult boat to row, as each rower must balance his/her side in cooperation with the other, apply equal power, place their catch and extract the blade simultaneously in order to move the boat efficiently. It requires excellent technique, communication and experience.
"Coxless pair" is one of the classes recognized by the International Rowing Federation and is competed in the Olympic Games

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxless_pair
USA 1967 5c sg ?, scott1335.
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FLAT-BOTTOM type ship

The full index of our ship stamp archive

FLAT-BOTTOM type ship

Postby aukepalmhof » Sat Sep 23, 2017 3:22 am

Image (46).jpg
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Image (45).jpg
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For Sail Amsterdam 1985 the Dutch Post issued one stamp of 70c which shows us the rigging of a flat-bodem ship. By looking at the design a botter rigging has been used, see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10692&p=11282&hilit=botter#p11282
The envelope was used during Operation Sail 1986 from 3 – 6 July 1986 in New York in which 35 flat-bottem vessel from the Netherlands took part. The USA stamp was issued for the 100th Anniversary of the Statue of Liberty.
A flat bottom is - strictly - a ship with a flat bottom but usually this means an historical sailing vessels from the low countries that do not have, or almost have no keel. A flat bottom is also referred to as a flat-bottemed vessel - especially in earlier years.
Features
The features are a flat or substantially flat bottom and a keel that does not or barely stick beneath the bottom. A flat bottom has leeboards instead of a keel .
Platbodems have little draught and they can sit on the bottom without any problems. In tidal waters , they can wait during low tide on a sandbank till the water raise again.
In the Wadden Sea and the Zeeland waters this was often done by, for example, the shell, kelp and oysters fishermen. Their ships were equipped with a heavily constructed bottoms. In Zeeland: the hoogaars and the hengst, in the Wadden Sea: the Wieringeraak and various bolschepen . The smaller flat-bottoms were used for fishing and transport on the relatively shallow inland waters. In the province of Friesland, flat-bottom (mostly tjalks and barges ) were used to transport their cargo (peat, manure and mound earth) through shallow waters from Friesland to the Westland and the Randstad.
Original flat-bottom yachts are usually registered in the registry of round and flat-bottom yachts . The ships of the type of round-bottom, such as the Lemsteraak , Staverse jol and the boyer, belong to the family of flat bottom ships.
Distribution area
Flat-bodems are very suitable for the wadden areas and shallow estuarines of rivers. In Western Europe, they therefore occur in an area that extends from the Baltic Sea through the Frisian language area (including North Germany ), the Low Countries (including Belgium) and South-East England to the Thames River.
Current use
Chartering
Many Dutch flatbottoms, especially former sailing iron cargo ships, have been retained due to the rise of the tourist charter market , in the commenly named the Brown Fleet . They are then adapted for the reception of passengers, as a sailing holiday home (sometimes partyschip) with which cruises are held. This usually leads, but not always, to concessions related to the authenticity of the original ship. Fortunately, there are various, nicely refurbished larger ships. A number of things have also been developed on these ships, whether or not using modern materials. So some things can also be placed in modern times. These ships must fully comply with modern regulations and their owners want to earn their bread as before. This requires adjustments sometimes seen as non authentic.
Meanwhile, a number of ships have been built which have nothing to do with traditional or authentic. These drive the emotions of customers who want extreme comfort or a pirate ship.
They are sometimes acclaimed with brand names, while the words "authentic" and "original" are sometimes used in a very dubious way.
Monumental Company Ship
Another group of skipper/owners has returned its ships in old state as a sailing company vessel, with minimal necessary adjustments related to safety. These ships are often registered in the Netherlands as a Sailing monument in the National Register of Sailing Monuments . The owners are often members of the National Association for Conservation of the Historic Business Ship, the LVBHB. These flat-bottoms sometimes make trips, even fishing is possible. The proceeds of this form of rental are used to preserve the ship as a cultural heritage .
Pleasure craft
Some are also used as a pleasure craft. The owners of these last two groups often spend a lot of time, effort and money to keep their ships in good original condition.
Several municipalities with a port along the former Zuiderzee have recently shown that providing a berth to such ships is a good thing for the hospatality industry and shops, and that the ships greatly improves the view of the port and the city.
Houseboat;
A large number of former flat-bottoms are used as houseboats. They are moored with people as residents. It is possible that these ships fall under one of the above categories. There is also a new build accommodation on an existing hull. Whether it is falling under improving the view, always remains in dispute. Practically, however, it is generally for the intended purpose.
Species by geographic area
There are various types of flat-bottom with each their own features.
In the wadden area they were round of construction and were named as aak .
In the Frisian lake area , they were also built round but much lighter of execution and of exceptional beauty.
In the Zeeland waters they were sharp in construction with more depth fore than behind.
There was a lot of variation in the Zuiderzee (now IJselmeer) area
Ships of the eastern shore as the schokkers, bons and zeepunter are sharp and angular of construction.
West-shore and south-shore vessels are full-round and high at the bow with a deck, and low and open at the stern (clean), like the various botters and bolschepen, this was necessary for the various types of fishing.
Types of cargo
By cargo transport on the inland waterways , they are long and narrow in shape with a wide variety in performance and size. Among them are the types of aak , river clipper and the large family of tjalks and prams . These ships are often built with a particular purpose in mind. Thus, there are many different sizes and hull shapes. When used as a fisshing vessel, often made for a particular fishing area. Or for example, a format built special for a particular lock.
Especially the tjalks were the water-transport vehicle in the Low Countries and were used for everything, from the transport of peat, mound-earth and drek with the friesian tjalk and passenger transport across the Zuiderzee (now IJselmeer).

source: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platbodem

Netherland 1985 70c sg?, scott
aukepalmhof
 
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