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PHARAOH NECHO ships 600 B.C.

Somewhere between the years 610 and 594 B.C. some Phœnician ships, acting under instructions from Pharaoh Necho, who reigned from 612-596 BC, are said to have circumnavigated Africa, having proceeded from the Indian to the Southern Ocean, and thence round by the Atlantic and through the Pillars of Hercules home. The voyage occupied more than two years, a circumstance which was due to the fact that they always landed in the autumn and sowed a tract of country with corn, and waited on shore till it was fit to cut. In the time of Solomon the joint fleets of the Israelites and Phœnicians made voyages from the head of the Red Sea down the coasts of Arabia and Eastern Africa, and even to Persia and Beluchistan, and probably also to India. The Phœnicians were not only great traders themselves, but they manned the fleets of other nations, and built ships for other peoples, notably for the Egyptians and Persians. It is unfortunate that we have so few representations of the Phœnician ships, but we are justified in concluding that they were of the same general type as those which were used by the Greeks, the Carthaginians, and eventually by the Romans. The representations of their vessels known to be in existence were found by the late Sir Austin Layard in the palace built by King Sennacherib at Kouyunjik, near Nineveh, about 700 B.C. Though they were obviously rather symbols of ships than faithful representations, we can, nevertheless, gather from them that the warship was a galley provided with a ram, and fitted with a mast carrying a single square sail; there were also two banks of oars on each side. The steering was accomplished by two large oars at the stern, and the fighting troops were carried on a deck or platform raised on pillars above the heads of the rowers.

The vessel depict on the stamp is an Egyptian vessel from around 1600 BC and not one from around 600 BC see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14305&p=16144&hilit=ancient+Egyptian+ship#p16144
Source: ... tm#Page_27
Uganda 1989 150s sg 765, scott722

Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule.

HMS HERMES was a 20-gun class sixth-rate post ship built in Milford Dockyard in 1811. On 11 February 1812 Hermes captured the American brig Flora. Then on 26 April Hermes captured the American brig Tigress. Four days later, HERMES and BELLE POULE captured the American privateer schooner GIPSY (or Gipsey). She was on her way from New York City to Bordeaux with a cargo worth ₤50,000 when the British vessels captured her in the mid-Atlantic after a three-day chase. Gipsey surrendered twice to Hermes and twice got away again before Belle Poule caught her. Gipsey was of 300 tons (bm) and was armed with twelve 18-pounder carronades and an 18-pounder gun on a pivot mount.In September 1814, master Percy led her in an unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer. The Louisiana State Museum has a map of the battle. The attack took place on 15 September at about 4:30pm. Two of the four British vessels could not get close enough to fire. The fort was more strongly armed than expected, the British fire was ineffective, and a parallel ground attack failed. Furthermore, as she tried to withdraw, Hermes grounded under the guns of the fort. Percy evacuated her crew on boats from Sophie and then set fire to Hermes, which blew up after the fire reached her magazine at around 10pm. In all, Hermes had lost 17 killed in action, 5 mortally wounded and 19 wounded. (The medical journal of the Hermes has survived. ) She was destroyed in 1814 to prevent her falling into American hands after grounding during her unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer on Mobile Pointoutside Mobile, Alabama. On 18 January 1815, Percy faced a court martial on board Cydnus, off Cat Island (Mississippi). The court acquitted him of all blame, finding that the circumstances justified the attack and that all involved had behaved with great gallantry. HMS BELLE POULE was a Royal Navy fifth rate frigate, formerly Belle Poule, a Virginie-class frigate of the French Navy, which was built by the Crucy family's shipyard at Basse-Indre to a design by Jacques-Noël Sané. She was launched on 17 April 1802, and saw active service in the East, but in 1806 a British squadron under Sir John Borlase Warren captured her off La Palma in the Canary Islands. The Admiralty commissioned her into the Royal Navy as HMS Belle Poule. At the time of her capture Belle Poule was armed with forty 18-pounder guns, had a crew of 320 men, and was under the command of Captain Brouillac. Marengo and Belle Poule had lost 65 men killed and 80 wounded. The British on London and Amazon had 13 officers and men killed and 26 officers and men wounded. Belle Poule returned to Portsmouth on 17 May 1815. A week later she sailed for Cork. She was converted to a prison hulk in 1815. She was sold on 11 June 1816 for ₤2,700. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale: “Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule”.
Somali 2017;


The sixth issue from Maritime Malta series consists of 3 stamps featuring vessels dating back to the Order of Saint John.

For many years, warships, such as the galley, were used by the Mediterranean naval powers. In fact this type of ship served for many years as the backbone of the Navy of the Order of Saint John. The Galley was characterised by its long, slender and shallow hull. These vessels were usually painted red with a white waterline and while most vessels at the time had sails, however the primary method of propulsion was the human strength of prisoners.

The 26c stamp depicts a model of the common galley, also known as Sensile. This was armed with five bronze cannon on the bow and propelled by 26 oars on each side. Three to five people were needed for each oar and this vessel was also rigged with two lateen sails. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

The 42c Stamp depicts a model known as the Demi Galley or the Half Galley. This was introduced in 1742 and was a smaller version of the common galley. The development of this galley came at the time when availability of prisoners as oarsmen was scarce hence the smaller number of rowers needed. This galley was equipped with one large calibre bronze cannon on the bow. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum and it is considered as the only surviving Demi Galley model known.

The 1 stamp shows a model of a brigantine. This was the ceremonial barge of the Portuguese Grand Master Antonio Manoel de Vilhena and was painted green with a white waterline. It was fitted with nine oars on each side and was not designed for long voyages, with storage space kept at a minimum. It is documented that Grand Master de Vilhena travelled to Gozo in this vessel. This model underwent extensive restoration in 1964 and it is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

Source: Joseph Abela (Heritage Malta) ... sues%2fphi
Malta 2018 0.26/1.00 Euro sg?, scott? (The 1.00 Euro has the year 2019 printed on it)


Antigua & Barbuda issued in 1988 a set of stamps and a miniature sheet for the “Sailing week yacht regatta 1988”. All stamps and sheet shows sailing yachts of which I have not any information. Of the regatta Wikipedia has the following:

Antigua and Barbuda Sailing Week is a yacht regatta held at Nelson's Dockyard, St. Johns, Antigua. It is one of Antigua's most notable events. Founded in 1967, it is cited as one of the top regattas in the world and attracts an average 150-200 yachts, 1500 participants and 5000 spectators on average annually. In 2012 the regatta was held between 29 April and 4 May. In 2005, 24 countries were represented at the regatta. There are five main races held, including the English Harbour race, and at the end of the week the event finishes with the Lord Nelson's Ball.
Antigua & Barbuda 1988 30c/$5 sg 1190/93 and sgMS 1194, Scott 1112/16


Norfolk Island has not a deep water harbour, ships are required to anchor about a kilometre or so off shore. The cargo is then transferred from the hold of the ship to lighters. The 30 feet lighters, which are a local adaption of wooden whaling boats, are then towed by launch to the jetty.
Of the whalers used on Norfolk Island after which the lighters were built see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13176&p=14506&hilit=blessing+of+the+whalers#p14506

Loading jetties are located at Kingston and Cascade, but ships cannot get close to either of them. When a supply ship arrives, it is emptied by whaleboats towed by launches, five tonnes at a time. Which jetty is used depends on the prevailing weather on the day. The jetty on the leeward side of the island is often used. If the wind changes significantly during unloading/loading, the ship will move around to the other side. Visitors often gather to watch the activity when a supply ship arrives.

Much more is given on the following URL: ... nic-fleet/ ... olk_Island
Norfolk Island 1988 39 and 55c sg452/53, scott?. 1990 5c and10c sg483/84, scott?. 1993 45c sg 541, scott? 1996 $3.70 sg627, scott?, and 45c sg 629, scott? 2000 sgMS 731, scott? 2001 45c/$1.50 sg?, scott?


The Isle of Man issued two stamps in 1974 for the 1000th centenary of King Magnus Haraldson.

Under which name he was known has in the years many times spelled differently in the documents, but most probably it was King Magnus Haraldson, when born is also not known.
He was King of the Isle of Man and on the 8p stamp his fleet is seen. Twice in the year he sailed with this fleet of between 3600-4800 sails around the British Islands as admiral of the fleet to clear the waters around the islands from pirates especially the Danes and Normans. Also his coat of arms is depict on the stamp. Why are she rowing she are under sail, and why carry the shields outboard, so far I know the shields were only used during battle in this way, and clearly not a battle took place on this stamp.
The 4p stamp shows Magnus Haraldson in a stately barge with King Edgar of England on the River Dee in Wales. The skyline of the town in the background is of the town of Chester, a mistake has been made. The skyline of the town is from a drawing of the 14th century. Of the barge I have not any info, looks she is rowed by kings, all wearing a crown, King Edgar standing in the stern.
King Magnus Haraldson died in 977, but also other years have been given.

Source: Various internet sites.
Isle of Man 1974 4½p and 8p sg51/52, scott?


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:37 pm

zuytdorp painting.jpg
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2017 zuytdorp_jpg_.jpg
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Shipwrecks: Capturing our maritime past

While shipwrecks are a relative rare occurrence these days, since the 1600s more than 8,000 shipwrecks have been recorded as occurring in Australian waters. Of these, however, only around 2,000 have been located.
The Shipwrecks stamp issue, which will be released on 29 August 2017, presents three historically and archaeologically significant shipwrecks. The stamps feature paintings by maritime artists of each wreck event, together with a recovered relic, to show the context of each voyage.
Australia protects shipwrecks under the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 (Cth), including automatic protection for all shipwrecks more than 75 years old. More than 6,500 wrecks in Commonwealth waters are protected under the Act, and there is complementary legislation in each state and the Northern Territory. The Act also currently protects half a million historic shipwreck relics and artefacts in various public and private collections.
For this three-part article series, we spoke with some of the curators who assisted researcher Jane Levin with the stamp issue, to learn more about each wreck and the incredible work they do in caring for and preserving them. We also spoke to one of the artists whose detailed research helped to beautifully capture a moment in history.
In June 1712, with an estimated 200 or more passengers and crew on board, the VOC ship ZUYTDORP was wrecked on the Western Australian coast. Captained by Marinus Wijsvliet, and heading from the Netherlands to Batavia (now Jakarta, Indonesia), it crashed onto rocks at the bottom of cliffs just south of Shark Bay, now known as Zuytdorp Cliffs. Even today, the currents and cliffs of this area are notoriously treacherous.
As well as conveying various trade goods, the three-masted 700-ton ship was carrying a highly valuable load of silver coins, valued at around 250,000 Dutch guilders. Wreck artefacts were discovered near the site in 1927, including silver coins dated 1711. These coins helped archaeologists in the 1950s and ‘60s to identify the wreck as that of ZUYTDORP. There is an area of the wreckage site called the “carpet of silver”, because of the number of coins that still remain embedded there. One of these coins is featured on the stamp, and a medallion based on the coin design is featured in a limited-edition medallion cover.
When Dutch-born artist Adriaan De Jong conceived of painting the wrecking of the ZUYTDORP, which appears on the stamp, he had much to consider, especially as no survivors of the wreck came forward to report the event or give their version of it. He also had to think about the weather and other circumstances that may have led to the wrecking event, let alone what the ship itself may have looked like, including the detailed sterns typical to VOC ships of the era.
“If one paints a seascape the weather condition plays an important role in picturing the scene,” says Adriaan.
“This shipwrecking most probably took place in the beginning of June, 1712,” says Adriaan. “To the antipodes of the northern hemisphere this is the beginning of the winter season. The weather is more changeable and it is not uncommon that changes announce themselves with fronts of rain and thunder that drift from the sea towards the land. In the southern latitude of 27º 11΄, where the ZUYTDORP perished, it is possible that a fast upcoming front with thunderstorms caught out the sailors on board the ZUYTDORP while sailing on a northern course not far from the coast,” he adds.
“Knowing that the ship moved in northerly direction towards Batavia, it is noteworthy that the wreck came to rest sideways against a coast stretching south-southeast to north-northwest, but with the stern pointing northward! A track gouged out under water where the keel rammed the ground at first indicates the ship was driven headlong onto the underwater rock shelf. Stuck by the bow, a south westerly wind with accompanying wave condition would then have pivoted the ship around until the stern pointed to the north and driven it further on shore where it also sank,” says Adriaan.

In Adriaan De Jong’s evocative painting, he shows how the ZUYTDORP has already turned sideways in front of the rocks with her stern pointing to the north, which Adriaan describes as “speculative but plausible”.
“A maritime expert explained to me that the vessel must have been driven hard up against that cliff and that possibly the crew managed to bring out ropes from the masts to the cliff and careen the ship with its masts against the cliff, thus enabling a large number of people to abandon ship. During excavations half of the broken ship’s bell has been found wedged in the side of the cliff, indicating how close the vessel must have been to this cliff. In recent times there has been much speculation about what may have happened to the ZUYTDORP survivors and the main conjecture is that they may have integrated in the local Aboriginal communities. That was also my reason to place the Aboriginal figures on top of the cliff,” says Adriaan.
Adriaan also carried out extensive research into the potential distance between the ZUYTDORP and the ship immediately behind it, the KOCKENGE, to determine the likelihood of the ZUYTDORP experiencing different weather conditions to the reportedly ‘fine’ weather conditions experienced by the KOCKENGE around the same time. Adriaan examined VOC charters from the time and then used physics to calculate the likely speed each ship was capable of. Adriaan concluded that the KOCKENGE would have reached the same location a good seven to 10 days later, which could explain differing weather conditions experienced by each.
Meticulous research was also undertaken to determine the size and appearance of the ship itself.
“The VOC charters of the time are very detailed,” says Adriaan. “For instance, a ship is imagined to be divided in nine cross-sections and for each section six points, port and starboard, are given what the width and height of each point is. It is thus possible to reconstruct the lines of these ships. The charters are for ships of 160, 145 and 130 feet and there can be no doubt that the ZUYTDORP was built in accordance with the charter for 160 foot ships. Having the lines plan of the ZUYTDORP it is then possible to rotate this into a position which would suit my idea of how to paint the vessel,” he adds.
“What is more problematic is determining the detail. We do know that the name of a VOC ship was almost always depicted in an emblem on the ornate stern. For details of the ornamentation I have relied to a large extent on art works by the marine artist Ludolph Backhuysen, who painted around the time of the ZUYTDORP. One of his engravings, for example, includes a ship which has a carving of a woman holding a mirror in her hand (representing Prudence – a careful lady who can look ahead but, thanks to the mirror, can also see what’s happening behind). In addition, the emblem representing the name of the ship must have had a direct connection with the village called ZUYTDORP in the province of Zeeland in the Netherlands. It so happens that this village has a coat of arms which is a yellow field on which three blue flowers grow. This coat of arms is left from the middle of the stern. I have also included a second coat of arms which is that of the province of Zeeland,” explains Adriaan.

To learn more about the ZUYTDORP, visit the Western Australian Museum website.
In our next instalment, we look at the incredible tale of the HMS PANDORA, which sank on the Great Barrier Reef, after returning home from her mission to capture the notorious Bounty mutineers.
Wikipedia has an interesting article on the ship: ... time-past/

The ZUIDDORP (ZUYTDORP) actual the village is named Zuiddorpe after which the ship is named, the VOC database gives the name ZUIDDORP to the ship and the following comes from this database. All the web-sites (and there are many on the ship) name the vessel ZUYTDORP.
The vessel was built in the province of Zeeland most probably at Flushing for the Chamber of the VOC of Zeeland in 1701 as a retour-ship.
Tonnage 1,152 ton.
Her maiden voyage was when she sailed from the Wielingen on 15 January 1702 bound for Batavia in the Dutch East Indies under command of skipper Kornelis Jorissen.
On board where 221 crew, 89 soldiers and 6 passengers.
From 26 January till 05 March 1702 she stayed at the Torbay, south coast of England, 7 sailors and 1 soldier ran away there.
12 June 1702 she arrived at the Cape in South Africa, during the voyage 6 crew died. 13 crew and 10 soldiers left the ship in the Cape and 1 passenger, 12 crew and 2 soldiers joined the vessel.
07 July 1702 she sailed from the Cape and arrived in Batavia on 06 October 1702, during the whole voyage from the Netherlands to the East Indies 8 crew and 6 soldiers died.
01 December 1705 she sailed from Batavia bound for the Netherlands under command of Skipper Arie Taats with a crew of 105, 30 soldiers, 8 impotenten (invalids), 7 craftsmen and 13 passengers.
03 February 1706 arrived at the Cape and sailed from there on 04 April 1706.
26 July 1706 arrived at Rammekens by Flushing.
Her second voyage to the East Indies was on 05 June 1707 when she sailed from the Wielingen under command of Skipper Jan Akkerman with on board 150 crew and 107 soldiers. During the passage to the Cape 32 people died.
07 November 1707 arrived at the Cape, where 13 crew and 14 soldiers left the ship.
09 December 1707 sailed again from the Cape, 3 crew members joined the ship.
29 February 1708 she arrived in Batavia with on board 124 crew and 70 soldiers.
13 November 1709 she sailed again from Batavia with on board 105 crew, 30 soldiers, 7 impotenten and 15 passengers under command of Skipper Jan Akkerman.
31 January 1710 arrived at the Cape, during the voyage 3 crew died.
02 April 1710 sailed from the Cape, at the Cape 22 crew left the vessel.
16 July 1710 arrived at Rammekens.
Her last voyage was under command of Skipper Marinus Wijsvliet with 286 crew.
Made a call at Annobón, Equatorial Guinea and stayed at San Tomé & Principe from 13 December 1711 till 04 January 1712.
23 March 1712 arrived at the Cape, during the voyage 112 crew died and at the Cape 22 crew joined the vessel.
22 April 1712 sailed from the Cape and that is the last information, her wreck was discovered in 1927 in a position 40 miles north of the Murchison River at the west coast of Australia.
Australia 2017 $1 sg?, scott?
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