SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SEAWOLF CLASS submarine

The class was built as a nuclear attack submarine by General Dynamics Electro Boat Co., Groton for the USA Navy. Of this class three were built commissioned between 1997 and 2005. The last JIMMY CARTER had another tonnage and dim.
Displacement 7,460 tons standard, 9,137 tons full load, dim. 1007.6 x 12.9 x 11m. (draught).
Powered by one S6W PWR nuclear reactor, 52,000 shp, one shaft, pumpjet propulsor, speed + 35 knots.
Range, unlimited, endurance, till food supplies run out.
Diving depth + 800 feet.
Armament: 8 – 26 inch torpedo tubes, 40 torpedoes, 50 missiles or 100 mines.
Crew 140.
More on this class of three ships is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf-class_submarine
2018 Al three are in active service.

I believe the USS CONNECTICUT is depict on this stamp. See photo and stamp. When I am correct the tugboat is the harbour tug USS NATCHITOCHES (799).

Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott?

«Allerton»- iron full-rigged ship

An iron full-rigged ship built in 1884 by Oswald, Mordaunt & Co., Southampton, as Yard No. 224. Dimensions 83,17×12,23×7,50 meters and 1936 tons under deck.
In 1885 the Captain J. Gyllencreutz was appointed.
In 1910 sold to owners in Valparaiso, Chile, for £ 2600 and converted into a hulk.
The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “The year is 1897 and the iron hull rigger "Allerton" makes her way up the East River, viewed from the piers of South Street. The last of the late afternoon sun just catches her toward her berth. The crew of the "Allerton" stands by on the fo-c'sle while some bystanders watch with perhaps some professional curiosity.” "Allerton" was typical of many latter day sailing ships being squeezed out of business by the competition with steam.
Somalia 2010;2500. Source:http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships/Merchant/Sail/A/Allerton(1884). http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist.

Boston Navy Yard

The earliest naval shipbuilding activities in Charlestown, Massachusettsacross the Charles River and Boston harbor to the north from the city of Boston , began during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The land for the Charlestown Navy Yard was purchased by the United States government in 1800 and the yard itself established shortly thereafter. The yard built the first US ship of the line , "USS Independence" , but was primarily a repair and storage facility until the 1890s, when it started to build steel ships for the "New Navy". By then, it was called the Boston Navy Yard. Forty-six ships have been constructed in the Boston Navy Yard, the first vessel launched being the sloop of war Frolic in 1813, and the latest the Whitney, a destroyer tender, launched in 1923. Additional vessels have been constructed for other governmental departments. No. 1 drydock, built of granite, completed in 1833 was the first drydock built in this country, and the first vessel to enter it was the famous frigate Constitution. The U. S. S. Constitution, or "Old Ironsides" as it is commonly referred to, was built by the act of Congress which authorized the building of six frigates in the year 1793. Work has commenced on the frigate at "Moulton's Point," former name of the navy yard, in 1794 and she was launched in 1797. This famous old ship participated in forty battles and never suffered defeat. In 1927 work of rebuilding her was undertaken at this yard. The necessary funds for the rebuilding were raised by popular subscription, in addition to an appropriation of three hundred thousand dollars authorized by Congress in 1930 to complete the work. In the late 1880s and 1890s, the Navy began expanding again bringing into service new modern steel hulled steam-powered warships and that brought new life to the Yard. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom.
Somalia 2010;2500.
Sources:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Navy_Yard. https://www.mca-marines.org/leatherneck ... e-barracks

DOLPHIN INS submarine

This stamp shows us a Dolphin class submarine of the Israeli Navy, the stamp is designed after a few design alternations were made in the design after a photo on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin-class_submarine and shows us the DOLPHIN the lead ship of her class.

Built as a submarine by Thyssen Nordsee Werke in Emden, Germany for the Israeli Navy.
07 October 1994 keel laid down.
12 April 1996 launched as the INS DOLPHIN.
Displacement 1,640 ton surface, 1,900 ton submerged, dim. 57.3 x 6.8 x 6.2m (draught).
Powered: Diesel electric by 3 diesels, 4,243 shp, 3,164 kW., one shaft, speed 20 knots.
Test depth more as 350m.
Armament: 6 – 533mm torpedo tubes and 4 – 650mm torpedo tubes. She has the capacity to carry anti-ship missiles, mines, decoys and stn Atlas wire-guided DM2A3 torpedoes. The surface-to—surface missile is the submarine launched Harpoon which delivers a 227 kg warhead to a range of 130 km at high subsonic speed.
Crew 35 and 10 additional.
She was fitted out at the HDW yard in Kiel, Germany, and completed on 31 July 1999.


2018 Still a unit of the Israeli Navy and in service.

Source: Wikipedia and internet.
Solomon Island 2016 $12 sg?, scott?

SEVERODVINSK (K-560) submarine

On this stamp issued by the Solomon Islands in 2016 four submarines are depict, of which one shows us one of the Russian Severodvinsk class, there is not a Severodvinsk class submarine in the Russian Navy, the SEVERODVINSK is a ship of the Yasen-class.

She was built as a nuclear attack submarine by SevMash at Arkhangelskaya oblast, Severodvinsk for the Russian Navy.
1993 Laid down.
15 June 2010 launched as the SEVERODVINSK (K-560) one of the Yasen-class.
Displacement 5,800-7,700-9,500 ton surface, 8,200-13,800 submerged. Dim. 120 x 15 x 8.4m. (draught)
Powered by 1 KPM type pressurized water reactor ?kW, speed 20 knots surfaced, 28 knots (silent) submerged and maximum speed submerged 35 knots.
Armament: 8 – VL.S equipped silos for either 32 (8 x 4) Oniks or 40 (8 x 4) Kalibr-PI anti-ship, anti-submarine and land attack submarines launched weapon. Kh-10 cruise missiles. 10 torpedo tubes (8 x 650mm and 2 x 533mm).
Crew 90.
30 December 2013 commissioned. A unit of the Northern Russian Fleet.

K-560 SEVERODVINSK is a Yasen-class submarine nuclear attack submarine of the Russian Navy. The construction of the submarine started in 1993 and was first planned to be launched in 1998. However budgetary problems delayed the construction for years, and it was only launched on 15 June 2010. SEVERODVINSK began sea trials on 12 September 2011. The submarine returned from her first voyage by 6 October 2011.
SEVERODVINSK's torpedo-launching systems have been fitted behind the compartment of the central station.[
Trials and Operational History
On 7 November 2012, the boat (while submerged) successfully launched a Kalibr cruise missile (anti-ship version) at a sea target in the White Sea. Later that same month the submarine successfully test fired two additional (land attack) cruise missiles. The first land attack SLCM was launched on 26 November 2012 from a surfaced position and a second two days later from a submerged position.
SEVERODVINSK was handed over to the Navy in late December 2013. The flag-raising ceremony was held on 17 June 2014 marking its introduction into the Russian Navy.[
In November 2014 the submarine successfully tested its rescue capsule which surfaced from a depth of 40 metres (130 ft) with five crew members inside.
SEVERODVINSK became combat-ready in early 2016. At the end of April 2016 and in August 2017, K-560 conducted drills using 3M14 missiles.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_s ... verodvinsk
Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott 2080a.

NIKOLAI VASILICVICH GOGUL

Guinea Bissau issued a set of stamps with inland steamships. Guinea Bissau is a country which supplies us with an avalanche of stamps each year.

Built in 1911 in Nizhny-Novgorod for service on the Northern Dvina River.
Length : 110 m, breadth 14 m, draught 1.4 m
Engines : Triple expansion with cylinders of 38, 61 and 110 cm and stroke of 110 cm and generating 380 hp and a normal top speed of 18 km/hour.
Rarely in use but is available for charter and in recent years has been chartered for cruises generally of 2-3 nights by a local travel agency. In 2010/11 she was under internal renovation costing 40 million roubles and returned to service in 2012 offering a 7-night river tour in June and a three-night trip in July from Archangelsk for the Pomor Tours company.
2018 In service. She is better known as N.V. GOGUL.

http://www.paddlesteamers.info/PaddleSteamerList.htm
Guinea Bissau 2009 600 FCFA sg?, scott?
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Halifax Explosion

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Halifax Explosion

Postby john sefton » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:01 pm

Canada-Post-Unveils-Halifax-Explosion-Stamp-678x381.jpg
Click image to view full size
Halifax was devastated on 6 December 1917 when two ships collided in the city's harbour, one of them a munitions ship loaded with explosives bound for the battlefields of the First World War. The result was the largest human-made explosion prior to the detonation of the first atomic bombs in 1945. The north end of Halifax was wiped out by the blast and subsequent tsunami. Nearly 2,000 people died, another 9,000 were maimed or blinded, and more than 25,000 were left without adequate shelter.

Wartime Harbour
Halifax was a busy, wartime port city in 1917, its harbour crowded with merchant vessels and warships from Canada and Britain. The city’s population of nearly 50,000 was swollen by the constant coming and going of naval officials, sailors, and troops bound for service in Europe. With one of the finest ice-free harbours in North America, Halifax was an important staging area for trans-Atlantic convoys, which collected in the protected inner expanse of Bedford Basin before ferrying supplies and soldiers to the war effort.
Two of those merchant ships were the Norwegian vessel Imo, en route to New York to pick up relief supplies for the beleaguered population of war-torn Belgium, and the French munitions ship Mont-Blanc — filled with tons of benzol, picric acid, TNT and gun cotton — arriving to join a convoy across the Atlantic.

Collision
The Imo was departing the harbour on the morning of 6 December 1917. It was travelling south through the Narrows, the harbour's tightest navigation section, moving faster than it should and passing to the left (port side) of oncoming ships, rather than to the right (starboard), which was customary. The Mont-Blanc was entering the harbour bound for Bedford Basin when it encountered the Imo in the Narrows sailing toward it. Not only did incoming ships (in this case Mont-Blanc) have right-of-way over outgoing vessels, but the Imo was also sailing too far to the left, in what should have been Mont-Blanc's path.
After a series of whistles and miscommunications between the officers and pilots on the two ships, the Imo struck the starboard bow of the Mont-Blanc, generating sparks that ignited benzol stored on Mont-Blanc's deck; the burning liquid then seeped into the holds.
For nearly 20 minutes the Mont-Blanc burned, sending a huge plume of black smoke into the sky, attracting the attention of people on shore, including children on their way to school. The spectacle drew many residents to their windows and others towards the ship itself, including teams of firefighters and sailors from other ships wanting to put out the fire on the Mont-Blanc.
Few understood the danger, except for a handful of harbour and naval officials, and the French-speaking crew and the local harbour pilot of the Mont-Blanc, who fled the ship after the fire broke out, rowing desperately in lifeboats for the Dartmouth side of the harbour. As they did so, the crippled and burning Mont-Blanc drifted towards Pier 6 on the Halifax shore, a busy area containing residential homes, businesses, moored ships and a large sugar refinery.

Vincent Coleman
One man on shore who did know an explosion was imminent was Vincent Coleman, a railway dispatcher who worked in the nearby rail yards. He was warned by a navy man during the fire about the Mont-Blanc'sdeadly cargo.
Coleman controlled the busy freight and passenger rail traffic coming and going from the Halifax peninsula. As the Mont-Blanc burned and the minutes ticked by, Coleman stayed at his post, tapping out a message on his telegraph key, warning officials at stations up the line to stop any trains — including the 8:55 a.m. train from Saint John, New Brunswick, with hundreds of passengers on board — from entering Halifax. It's not clear whether Coleman was actually responsible for holding up the Saint John train, but his message, in the final minutes of his life, was clear:
"Hold up the train. Ammunition ship afire in harbour making for Pier 6 and will explode. Guess this will be my last message. Goodbye boys."
Explosion and Tsunami
The Mont-Blanc exploded just before 9:05 a.m. More than 2.5 km2 of the north end of Halifax, then known as Richmond, was totally levelled, either by the blast, the subsequent tsunami that washed over the neighbourhood, or the raging fire caused when structures collapsed inward on lanterns, stoves and furnaces. Homes, offices, churches, factories, vessels, the railway station and freight yards — and people in the immediate area — were obliterated. Farther from the epicentre, Citadel Hill deflected shock waves away from south and west Halifax, where shattered windows and doors were the predominant damage. Across the harbour, Dartmouth suffered devastation to a lesser degree, since its north section was sparsely developed. However, the Mi’kmaq settlement at Tuft’s Cove was completely destroyed.
The blast shattered windows in Truro, 100 km away, and was heard in in Prince Edward Island. The crew of the fishing boat Wave, working off the coast of Massachusetts, even claimed to have heard the boom rumbling across the ocean.
Author Laura MacDonald describes the ferocity of the explosion in her book, Curse of the Narrows:
"The air blast blew through the narrow streets, toppling buildings and crashing through windows, doors, walls, and chimneys until it slowed to 756 miles an hour, five miles below the speed of sound. The blast crushed internal organs, exploding lungs and eardrums of those standing closest to the ship, most of whom died instantly. It picked up others, only to thrash them against trees, walls, and lampposts with enough force to kill them. Roofs and ceilings collapsed on top of their owners. Floors dropped into the basement and trapped families under timber, beams and furniture. This was particularly dangerous for those close to the harbour because a fireball, which was invisible in the daylight, shot out over a 1–4 mile area surrounding the Mont-Blanc. Richmond houses caught fire like so much kindling. In houses able to withstand the blast, windows stretched inward until the glass shattered around its weakest point, sending out a shower of arrow-shaped slivers that cut their way through curtains, wallpaper and walls. The glass spared no one. Some people were beheaded where they stood; others were saved by a falling bed or bookshelf. . . . Many others who had watched the fire seconds before awoke to find themselves unable to see."
The blast shot vapourized sections of the ship and cargo upwards in a great fireball. The ship's anchor was sent flying across the city and over the Northwest Arm, nearly 4 km away (where it remains to this day). Meanwhile, burning metal fragments of the ship showered down on Halifax, along with a black rain of carbon particles.
People were also blown through the sky. Charles Mayers, third officer of the vessel Middleham Castle, was picked up and dropped nearly 1 km from his ship, landing atop Fort Needham Hill. "I was wet when I came down," Mayers said. "I had no clothes on when I came to, except my boots. There was a little girl near me and I asked her where we were. She was crying and said she did not know where we were. Some men gave me a pair of trousers and a rubber coat."

Death and Destruction
Across Halifax there were miraculous stories of survival. And equally, stories of tragedy. Many children were killed on their walk to school that morning, or blinded by flying glass. Those that survived the blast stumbled home, only to find their houses shattered, or their parents dead or wounded among the wreckage.
Nearly 2,000 people either died instantly, or succumbed to their injuries in the days that followed. Morgue records from 1918 show 1,611 known dead or missing — about a third of them under the age of 15. By 2004, the number of dead had been revised at 1,952. Nine thousand more were wounded, including 300 blinded or partially blinded by flying glass.
More than 1,500 buildings were destroyed and 12,000 damaged. Six thousand people were made homeless among more than 25,000 overall that lacked proper shelter after the explosion — a problem made worse by the winter blizzard that struck Halifax the next day. Total property damage amounted to an estimated $35 million.

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia
john sefton
 
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Re: Halifax Explosion

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Nov 06, 2017 7:20 pm

The black hulled vessel in the foreground is the IMO and the other vessel is the MOUNT BLANC see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9767#!lightbox[gallery]/0/
aukepalmhof
 
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