SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

BUNGO or BONGO dugout

The ‘bungo” or “bongo” is in Panama a large 18th century dugout canoe, that carried passengers and cargo on the Rio Changres across the isthmus from Panama City to Porto Bello.

During the gold rush to California it carried the forty-niners the nickname for the first passengers to the gold fields in 1844 from the Rio Charges at Gorgona to Las Cruises a distance of forty-mile which took three to four days. From there the passengers were taken overland to Panama City, to board a passenger vessel for San Francisco.
The bongo was partly covered with a palm-thatched shelter as seen on the stamp, to protect the passengers against the sun and rain.
The bongo was paddled by a crew of 18 – 20 . Length ca 37 m. Could carry only a few passengers with their luggage. The stamp shows only three crew poling the bongo.
More on this set of stamps is given on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7055#!lightbox[gallery]/1/

Source: Various internet sites and Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
Canal Zone 1949 6c sg 196, scott 143.

Gabon ships on stamps 1965.

This stamps issued by Gabon were designed by the French marine painter Roger Chapelet (1903 – 1995) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Chapelet

25Fr. Vaisseau an French term for ship. The stamp issued by Gabon in 1965 shows a ship of the 16th Century.
It looks that a model of a galleon is depict. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11966

50F. Vaisseau, merchant ship of the XVII century. The merchantman at that time was used for trading and commerce but she was also armed to protect her for pirate attacks.

85 Fr. In the 18th century, the term frigate referred to ships that were usually as long as a ship of the line and were square-rigged on all three masts (full rigged), but were faster and with lighter armament, used for patrolling and escort. In the definition adopted by the British Admiralty, they were rated ships of at least 28 guns, carrying their principal armaments upon a single continuous deck — the upper deck — while ships of the line possessed two or more continuous decks bearing batteries of guns.
Source: Wikipedia.

100Fr.
The stamp shows a two-masted brig. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11973

Gabon 1965 85f sg230/233, scott ?

PRAM DINGHY

As given by Watercraft Philately the small dinghy is a “pram dinghy” with a length of 6ft.
A small rowboat used as a tender and also used as a small racing yacht. Normally rowed, when used for racing fitted out with a sail and an outboard rudder.
In the past often used as a tender by the yachts anchored in the harbour, but have now been mostly replaced by a small inflatable.

Cayman Islands 1962 1sh 9p sg176, scott 164.
Source: Internet.

THE FERRY, QUEBEC painting

Canada issued in 1967 a set of stamps with paintings, the 20c stamp shows us a painting made by James Wilson Morrice http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/e ... n-morrice/
The painting combines three views: the train station at Lévis at the St Lawrence River, and a view of Cape Diamond taken from the ferry on the St Lawrence River in the centre of the painting, sailing between Lévis and Quebec. The painting is now in the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.
The painting was made in 1906 and at that time the ferry service was owned by the Quebec & Levis Ferry Co., Quebec, and in 1906 the company owned four ferries, which ferry is shown is not known.

The ferries owned by the company were steam ferries.

SOUTH, built as a wooden ferry by A. Russell at Levis in 1885, tonnage 349 ton.
1924 Sold to T. Hardy, Quebec, not renamed.
First quarter of 1934 broken up.
POLARIS, built as a wooden ferry by R. Sample, Levis in 1883, tonnage 533 ton.
1924 Sold to H. Lizotte, Quebec, not renamed.
Second quarter of 1928 broken up.
PILOT, built as a wooden ferry by R. Sample, Levis in 1884, tonnage 427 ton.
18 November 1917 she was wrecked at Red Island, St Lawrence.
QUEEN, a wooden ferry built by E. Samson, Levis in 1886, tonnage 367 ton.
1924 Sold to La Traverse de Levis Ltee, Quebec, not renamed.
1927 Broken up.

It looks that in 1924 the Quebec & Levis Ferry Co., was going out of business.

Canada 1967 20c sg 587, scott464.
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.nz and internet

FRANÇOIS PREMIER LOCK at Le Havre

The stamp issued in 1973 by France shows us the largest lock in France, also three cargo ships, one is leaving the lock, the ships look like bulkers, and have not been identified.

The lock is the François Premier lock in Le Havre in north France, and the lock provide access to a huge basin and shipping terminals located upstream of the industrial port area of Le Havre.
The lock was completed in 1971, with a length of 400 metre and wide of 67 metres.

Source: Internet
France 1973 0.90Fr. sg 1998, scott 1364.

THE SMELL OF THE SEA BUTARITARI ISLAND

The 10c stamp issued by the Gilbert & Ellice Islands issued in 1971 tells us the myth or legend how Butaritari Island received his name.
The stamp shows an angler sitting in a dug-out canoe pulling up the island. The following storey is downloaded from the internet.

Posted by Amota Eromanga on August 8, 2013 at 5:50 PM

Many years ago, at Buariki village on Tarawa lived Kaboia and his wife. He was nothing but lazy bones. He didn’t cut toddy or went fishing and his bwabwai pits were the only ones in the village that lay uncultivated. All he loved doing was staying home - sleeping on his buia; while young men in his village would go fishing, cut toddy or work inside their bwaibwai pits located out in the bush. His wife often encouraged him to stop being lazy and be active like the others but he just couldn’t listen.
An important feast to honor the gods was planned and agreed to be held soon in the village. It was compulsory whereby every family must bring three dried salted fish, two bwaibwai (taro) and two coconut shells full of kamwaimwai (syrup) to the mwaneaba. At the day of the feast, all the families in the village brought the required items except Kaboia and his wife who had nothing to bring.
The village people weren’t complaining but only reminded the couple to prepare the items before the next feast. The next and similar feast came and still the family of Kaboia didn’t bring anything at all. This time, people began complaining about the lazy couple. The old men of the village called Kaiboia to a disciplinary meeting and informed him that he must bring his contribution of fish, bwabwai and kamwaimwai to the next feast. He was given no other choices. At the third feast, Kaiboia brought nothing. Now, everyone in the village was really angry because the couple had never brought any foods to the gods. They decided to punish them.
Kaiboia was afraid of the punishment so he began working hard. He started cutting toddy and working in his bwabwai pits. One day, he prepared his fishing gear then set off on his small outrigger canoe. He paddled northwards where he met other fishermen on the way. They mockingly laughed at him knowing that it was his first time to fish. They were also certain that he knew none of the fishing grounds at all. Kaiboia did not care at all; he just paddled further away from them. As he reached the spot - in line with Abaiang island - he paddled a little further so the island was just behind. He floated and began fishing.
Not long, his fishing line was tugged so he quickly held back tightly. The pull increased hence Kaiboia kept holding back. “A very big fish!” he thought for the pull was incredible. He kept pulling his line hoping to see a huge fish. Alas, what he had caught appeared on the water surface. He couldn’t believe what he saw. It wasn’t a big fish but an island! He called the island Butaritari (smell of the sea).

Categories: Legends & Myths http://www.storiesfromkiribati.com/apps ... butaritari
Gilbert and Ellice islands 1971 10c sg 244, scott?
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ISE battleship

The full index of our ship stamp archive

ISE battleship

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:38 pm

ise battleship.jpg
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1999 ise.jpg
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The stamp of 80Y is one out of a Japanese miniature sheet for the 1914-1920 Millennium set, the design of this stamp was adopted from a part of “Shonen Gunkan Sugoruku” (Japanese battleship board game for boys by Kawabata Ryushi 1885-1966), and represent the First World War and shows in the foreground the Japanese battleship ISE at that time the newest and most powerful ship in the Japanese Navy.

Built as a battleship on the Japanese shipyard Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe for the Japanese Imperial Navy.
10 May 1915 laid down.
12 November 1916 launched as the ISE, named after the Province Ise, one sister the HYUGA.
Displacement 31,760 ton standard, 37,100 ton full load, dim. 208.2 x 28.7 x 8.93m. (draught), length bpp.195.7m.
Powered by two sets Brown-Curtis steam turbines, 45,000 shp, four shafts, speed 23 knots.
Range by a speed of 14 knots, 9,680 mile.
Armament: 6 – 356mm, 16 – 140mm, 12 – 76mm, 4 – 76mm AA guns and 6 – submerged 533mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 1,198.
15 December 1917 completed.

ISE (senkan)), was the lead ship of the two-vessel ISE-class battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy, which saw combat service during the Pacific War. ISE was named after Ise Province, one of the traditional provinces of Japan, now part of Mie Prefecture.

Operational history
Early histor
Originally planned to be the third Fusō-class battleship, experience gained in the construction of the Fusō class revealed a number of design issues, including weak armament and protection, which forced a redesign and new classification.
ISE was laid down at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries shipyard in Kobe on 5 May 1915, launched on 12 November 1916, and completed on 15 December 1917 and assigned to the Kure Naval District.
Completed too late for service in World War I, in the early 1920s, ISE participated in numerous patrols off the Siberia coast and in northern waters in support of Japan's Siberian Intervention against the Bolshevik Red Army.
On 12 April 1922, while at Yokohama, ISE hosted a delegation which included the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII), who was accompanied by his second cousin, the future Lord Mountbatten of Burma. From the mid-1920s through the late 1930s, ISE patrolled mostly off the China coast.
In 1928-1929, ISE was rebuilt at the Kure Naval Arsenal, with its foremast increased in height in the distinctive "pagoda" style similar to HARUNA. The fore funnel was fitted with a curved smoke cap, and a flying off platform for Yokosuka E1Y2 Type 14 floatplanes was fitted atop No. 5 main turret. Later, from 1930–1931, additional searchlights and a derrick was installed at the stern for handling floatplanes.
However, a more complete upgrade occurred from 20 November 1931 – 10 February 1932 at Kure Naval Arsenal, which involved shortening the mainmast top section, replacing all the 76 mm (3.0 in)/40 cal AA guns with eight Type 89 127 mm (5.0 in)/40 cal AA guns (4x2), and adding four Vickers Type 40 mm (1.6 in) AA guns (2x2). The shielded 140 mm (5.5 in)/40 cal guns from the forecastle deck were removed and a catapult and aircraft handling crane were fitted to the fantail. On 14 May 1933, a second catapult and three Type 90 seaplanes were added.
From 1 August 1935, ISE was drydocked at Kure Naval Arsenal and underwent an extensive reconstruction and modernization. The 24 mixed-fired (coal and oil) boilers were replaced by eight new Kampon oil-fired boilers and new Kampon geared turbines were fitted. Maximum speed increased to 25.4 kn (47.0 km/h; 29.2 mph) (25.21 kn (46.69 km/h; 29.01 mph) was reached during trials). The fore funnel was removed and stern lengthened by 7.62 m (25 ft). Anti-torpedo bulges were added and her six submerged torpedo tubes were removed. The maximum elevation of ISE's main battery (with the exception of the aftermost turret No. 6) was increased to 43°. Two forward 140 mm (5.5 in) casemate guns were removed, as was done with most other Japanese warships during this period, due to their exposed nature in heavy seas. The elevation of secondary guns was increased from 20° to 30° and range increased from 15,800 m (51,800 ft) to 19,100 m (62,700 ft). Four 40 mm (1.6 in) Vickers AA guns were replaced by 10 Type 96 twin 25 mm (0.98 in)/60 cal AA guns. The original catapult was replaced by a Kure Type No. 2 Mod. 5 catapult and the aircraft handling deck was extended. Reconstruction was completed by 27 March 1937.

Start of the Pacific War
Despite these efforts at modernization and upgrading, ISE was still considered obsolete by the start of the Pacific War due to her relatively slow speed, large crew, and short range, and never saw combat as a battleship. ISE participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor (albeit on a sortie from Hashirajima as far as the Bonin Islands) and pursued but did not catch the American carrier force that had launched the Doolittle Raid on 18 April 1942.
In May, ISE had an accident which flooded her No. 2 engine room. During repair work, ISE was fitted with one of the first experimental model Type 21 radar sets in the Japanese navy.

Reconstruction
To partially compensate for the loss of carrier strength at the Battle of Midway, Navy Aircraft Department began plans to convert the ISE-class battleships to full-sized aircraft carriers each carrying 54 planes. This concept was abandoned due to lack of time and resources and a hybrid battleship/carrier concept was adopted. ISE was dry-docked, and her aft No. 5 and No. 6 main turrets were removed and replaced by a hangar surmounted by a 70 m (230 ft) long flight deck and a "T"-shaped aircraft elevator. This was long enough to permit the launch of aircraft, but not their recovery. Two 25 m (82 ft) Model 11 catapults were installed on tall supports on the port and starboard sides forward of the flight deck. A collapsible derrick crane was fitted port abaft (two cranes were originally planned but installation was not carried out). It was realized that a single faulty aircraft engine could ruin the whole concept, so, to prevent jams, the deck was fitted with two rails to each catapult, 12 turntables, trolleys and tie-downs. Plans called for the new hangar to carry nine planes inside, with 11 on deck and one on each catapult. The new deck was covered with 200 mm (7.9 in) of concrete to compensate for the unbalanced condition created after removal of the aft armament. A 1 m (3 ft) thick layer of concrete was also poured around the main and reserve steering rooms and a 150 mm (5.9 in) horizontal armor cover was added.
Additional anti-aircraft weapons were installed to better fight off aerial attack. The eight single 127 mm (5.0 in) DP guns were replaced with eight twin-mounts, and the Type 96 25 mm (0.98 in) AA guns were increased from 20 to 57 (including 19 triple-mounts). Type 21 air-search radar and two Type 22 surface-search radars were also installed. As modified, ISE could carry 22 aircraft. The operational concept envisioned ISE accompanying the Kido Butai (Carrier Strike Force), and launching its 11 Yokosuka D4Y2 SuISEi ("Judy") dive bombers and 11 Aichi E16A Zuiun ("Paul") seaplanes that are capable of diving attacks to add another 44 bombers to the Strike Force. The SuISEi had to land either on a conventional carrier or on land bases, whereas the E16A could be hoisted back aboard using a crane, after landing near the ship. ISE's final aircraft allowance called for 14 E16As and eight D4Y2s.
The rebuild was officially completed on 8 October 1943; however, as training with the new pilots was not completed by autumn 1944, ISE was never used in its new configuration in an operational mission. Its aircraft were offloaded to land bases, and ISE continued to be used as a pure battleship in the cover force.
ISE made a sortie to Truk in October 1943, conveying a detachment of the IJA 52nd Division and supplies.
In a refit in Kure in May 1944, 47 additional Type 96 25 mm (0.98 in) AA guns (12 triple, 11 single mount) were added, bringing the total to 104 guns. Two Type 2 IFF units were also installed. In July, two Type 13 air-search radar and an E27 Radar detector were installed. From the end of September 1944, six racks of 30-tube, 127 mm (5.0 in) anti-aircraft rocket launchers were added. The rockets had multiple incendiary shrapnel charges and a timed fuse.

Battle of Leyte Gulf and afterwards
ISE was slightly damaged in October 1944 in the Battle off Cape Engaño, during which ISE's gunners shot down five of the 10 attacking dive bombers, suffering from one small hit on the No. 2 turret. ISE's anti-aircraft cover was ineffective, and by the end of the battle, USN aircraft had sunk the Japanese aircraft carriers ZUIKAKU, ZUIHÖ and CHITOSE, and the destroyer AKIZUKI. Towards the end of the battle, in the fourth attack, ISE was attacked by 85 dive bombers. After 34 near misses, ISE's hull plates near the waterline ruptured and port boiler rooms were damaged; a bomb damaged the port catapult, and five crewmen were killed, with 71 wounded.
After returning to Japan, from 29 October, the aft catapults were removed to improve the firing arcs of the No. 3 and No. 4 turrets.
ISE was dispatched south to Lingga and Singapore in early 1945 for Operation Kita. On the approach to Singapore, ISE was slightly damaged by a naval mine. In Operation Kita, ISE, her sister ship HYUGA and cruiser ÖVODO were loaded with critically needed strategic war supplies (oil, rubber, tin, zinc, and mercury) and evacuate 1,150 oil field personnel back to Japan. ISE arrived back safely in Moji on 19 February 1945, having evaded or escaped pursuit by twenty three Allied submarines along the way,
Final role
From 25 February 1945 until the surrender of Japan, ISE remained docked at Kure, without fuel or aircraft, and repainted in a camouflage olive green with splotches. The camouflage was not effective against USN Task Force 58 carrier-based aircraft on 19 March 1945, when more than 240 aircraft attacked Kure and ISE was hit by two bombs. Re-designated as a fourth-class reserve ship on 20 April, ISE was towed to Ondo Seto (between Kure and Kurahashijima) to serve as a floating anti-aircraft battery. She was attacked again on 24 July by 60 carrier-based aircraft, whose bombs hit the starboard bow, flight deck, main deck, No. 3 turret and bridge, killing Captain Mutaguchi, other bridge officers and around 50 crewmen. On 28 July, in another attack on ISE, she was struck by five 450 kg (1,000 lb) bombs dropped by F4U Corsairs from USS HANCOCK, and eleven more bombs dropped by other aircraft from TF 58. ISE listed starboard and sank in shallow water at
34°15′N 132°31′E34.250°N 132.517°E. She was removed from the Navy list on 20 November 1945.
ISE's underwater hulk section was for some time left where it was and she was scrapped without being raised by the Kure Dockyard of the Harima Zosen Yard from 9 October 1946 – 4 July 1947.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_battleship_ISE
Japan 1999 80y sg ?, scott?
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