SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

FAKHR EL BIHAR Royal yacht

For a meeting between King Farouk of Egypt and King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia in 1945 at Radhwa the Saudi Arabian Post issued four stamps. The stamps are not so clear, but the vessel on the left top is the Egyptian Royal yacht FAKHR EL BIHAR on which the meeting took place.

Built as a steel hulled yacht under yard No 268 by Ramage & Ferguson, Leith, Scotland for H.H. Prince Youssouf Kamal, Alexandria, Egypt.
09 September 1930 launched as the NAZ-PERWER.
Tonnage 708 grt, 251nrt, 1.051 tm, dim. 75.98 x 9.75 x 4.98m.
Powered by two 4S.C.SA 8-cyl. oil engines, manufactured by Friedrich Krupp A.G., Kiel, 384 nhp.
Schooner rigged.
December 1930 completed.

1940 Sold to King Farouk of Egypt and renamed in FAKHR EL BIHAR.
24 January 1945 King Farouk visited King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia. The meeting between the two kings took place in Radhwa on board of the FAKHR EL BIHAR.
1949 Sold to the Egyptian Government and renamed El QUOSSEIR. Used by the Egyptian Naval Academy as training ship.
2018 In service same name and managed by the Egyptian Navy.

Source Log Book 3/70 and internet.
Saudi Arabia 1945 ½ to 10g scott 173/76

TE ARAWA waka

Hawaiki – a real island? Or a mythical place? Hawaiki is the traditional Māori place of origin. The first Māori are said to have sailed to New Zealand from Hawaiki

In Māori mythology, ARAWA was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled Aotearoa (New Zealand).
The Te ARAWA confederation of Māori iwi and hapu (tribes and sub-tribes) based in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty areas of New Zealand trace their ancestry from this waka
Construction of the canoe
Eventually, a large tree was felled and from this the waka which eventually came to be known as Te ARAWA was formed. The men who turned this log into a beautifully decorated canoe were Rata, Wahieroa, Ngaahue and Parata. "Hauhau-te-rangi" and "Tuutauru" (made from New Zealand greenstone brought back by Ngaahue) were the adzes they used for this time-consuming and intensive work. Upon completion, the waka was given the name Ngaa raakau kotahi puu a Atua Matua (also known as Ngaa raakau maatahi puu a Atua Matua).
The waka was eventually completed and berthed in Whenuakura Bay while Tama-te-kapua, in his capacity as rangatira (chief) of the canoe, set about trying to find a tohunga (priest) for the journey. Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife Kearoa were tricked by Tama-te-kapua to board the canoe to perform the necessary appeasement incantations to the gods prior to the canoe's departure. However, while they were on board, Tama-te-kapua signalled his men to quickly set sail, and before Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife could respond they were far out to sea
Voyage to Aotearoa
One of the more dramatic stories pertaining to the voyage to Aotearoa occurred because Tama-te-kapua became desirous of Kearoa. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed the glint in Tama-te-kapua's eye and took precautions to protect his wife during the night while he was on deck navigating by the stars. This was done by tying one end of a cord to her hair and holding the other end in his hand. However, Tama-te-kapua untied the cord from Kearoa's hair and attached it to the bed instead. He then made love to her, following this pattern over a number of nights. One night however, he was nearly discovered in the act by Ngātoro-i-rangi, but just managed to escape. In his haste he forgot the cord. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed this and therefore knew that Tama-te-kapua had been with Kearoa. He was furious and, in his desire to gain revenge, raised a huge whirlpool in the sea named Te korokoro-o-te-Parata ("The throat of Te Parata"). The waka was about to be lost with all on board but Ngātoro-i-rangi eventually took pity and caused the seas to become calm (Steedman, pp 99-100).
One incident that occurred during this drama was that all the kūmara (sweet potato) carried on the waka were lost overboard, save for a few that were in a small kete being clutched by Whakaotirang Immediately after the calming of the seas, a shark (known as an ARAWA) was seen in the water. Ngātoro-i-rangi immediately renamed the waka Te ARAWA, after this shark, which then accompanied the waka to Aotearoa, acting in the capacity of a kai-tiaki (guardian).
The ARAWA waka then continued on to Aotearoa without incident, finally sighting land at Whangaparaoa where feather headdresses were foolishly cast away due to greed and due to the beauty of the pohutukawa bloom. Upon landfall, an argument took place with members of the Tainui canoe over a beached whale and the ownership thereof. Tama-te-kapua again resorted to trickery and took possession of it despite rightful claim of the Tainui. . The canoe then travelled north up the coast to the Coromandel Peninsula, where Tama-te-kapua first sighted the mountain Moehau, a place he was later to make home. Heading south again, it finally came to rest at Maketu, where it was beached and stood until being burnt by Raumati of Taranaki some years later.
Some items of note that were brought to Aotearoa on the ARAWA, other than the precious kūmara saved by Whakaotirangi, was a tapu kōhatu (stone) left by Ngātoro-i-rangi on the island Te Poito o te Kupenga a Taramainuku just off the coast of Cape Colville. This stone held the mauri to protect the Te ARAWA peoples and their descendants from evil times (Stafford, 1967, p17). In addition, the waka brought over two gods, one called Itupaoa, which was represented by a roll of tapa, and another stone carving now possibly buried at Mokoia Island, Lake Rotorua.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARAWA_(canoe)
New Zealand 1906 ½d sg 370, scott ?

INAUGURATION OF THE PORT OF LOME

For the inauguration of the port of Lome and the 8th anniversary of Independence the Togo Post issued a set of stamps.

The 20f stamp shows us the inauguration of the port with in the background a tug and cargo vessels, which are not identified.
Lomé is the main port for the trade of goods. It was established by the Germans in the early 1900s. From the wooden wharf to the current modern facilities, this port has been the centre of major changes. Today (2018) , it is one of the deepest–water ports in the whole West African region, handling over 80% of the international trade of Togo. Lomé is also an important transit point for landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.
The Port of Lomé lies in the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic coast), in the extreme southwestern corner of the country. Its modernization started in the 1960s. The deepwater harbor was completed/inaugurated in 1968. It was initially planned for a 400,000-ton annual traffic, but currently handles a traffic estimated over 6 millions tons.
The increased capacity of the Port of Lomé has facilitated the shipping of phosphates and other major export products, such as cocoa, coffee, copra, cotton, and palm products. It has also positioned Lomé as one of the main port for the international trade of neighboring landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.

Source: http://dlca.logcluster.org/display/publ ... CB9087590E
Togo 1968 30f sg 590 scott?

LANDING OF THE MAORI IN NEW ZEALAND AROUND 1350.

Landing of Maori in New Zealand around 1350, in the background of the stamp you see a double hulled waka prow.

Maori history was transmitted orally from generation to generation in pre-European times. A continuing examination of the traditions, archaeological, linguistic and cultural evidence, has discredited the 'great fleet theory' of the Maori arrival in New Zealand. The consensus among scholars now is that the Polynesians originally moved into the Pacific from the west, spread eastwards, and that the Maori came most recently from the eastern Pacific (that is from Tahiti or the Marquesas). They began to arrive here in small groups, starting more than 1000 years ago, probably via islands to the north-east. The scene depicted on the stamp is an original conception by the artist of the arrival of one of the canoes The Maoris have been pictured as arriving in a state of physical exhaustion, the inevitable consequence, despite their magnificent seafaring skills, of weeks spent in open canoes.

The first Maori arrived in the canoe ARAWA or TAINUI.

New Zealand 1940 ½d sg613, scott?
Source: New Zealand Post.

CANOE PROW MAKING BY MAORI

Canoe Prow.
This 1d stamp shows us the making of a canoe prow by the Maori in New Zealand before 1800 by which the New Zealand Post gives:
When it is considered that the Māori did not process metal tools and relied upon stone and bone, the intricacy and beauty of the wood carving that was produced is incredible.

New Zealand 1906 1d sg 371, scott ?.

ISLAND BAY N.Z. and fishing boats.

New Zealand issued in 1983 four stamps which shows us paintings made by Rita Angus, one of this stamps has a maritime theme, it shows us the Island Bay near Wellington, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_Bay,_New_Zealand with in the bay fishing boats, which are locally known as the Italian wooden fishing boats. Since the late 19th century Italian emigrants settled in Island Bay (little Italy) many commenced fishing from the bay in the Cook Strait After the 1960s the Italian fleet declined and 2018 there are not more Italian boats in the bay.
Of this issues the New Zealand post gives. This issue of stamps featured the works of Rita Angus whose meticulous compositions in oil and water-colours earned her the reputation as a leader of the modern school of New Zealand painting.
Rita Angus, born in Hastings, and received her early arts skills training at Palmerston North before moving to Christchurch where she attended Diploma classes at the Canterbury School of Arts from 1927-1931. She lived in Christchurch until 1954 when she moved northwards to settle in Wellington, leaving it for one year in 1958 to study and work in Europe. Throughout her career she made frequent painting trips throughout New Zealand, especially to Central Otago and Hawke's Bay.
In the early part of her career she often depicted aspects of Wanaka, a region of particularly serene beauty in New Zealand's South Island. It has been suggested that she turned to watercolour during the war years because paintings in that medium were more saleable when people had less money and also because of a shortage of imported artists materials, but the fact is that the artist was equally at home with both watercolours and oils using them alternatively until the end of her career.
Rita Angus died in 1970 at the age of 62 years following a lifetime devoted to art. In a newspaper obituary Mr Melvin Day, the Director of the National Art Gallery, stated "Her influence on painting in this country was wholly beneficial, not only because of her achievement in art, but above all for her artistic integrity and independence". But perhaps the last word should be left to the artist. In the Year Book of the Arts, 1947, Rita said her aim was "to show to the present a peaceful way, and through devotion to visual art to sow some seed for possible maturity in later generations."
This stamp issue featured four stamps with her artwork and the issue coincided with the first major touring exhibition of works by the artist, which was organised by the National Art Gallery in Wellington. The four paintings chosen to feature on the stamps came from different stages of the artist's career, spanning forty years, in the medium of watercolours and oils. A presentation pack was also issued on 27 April and featured the four stamps. The pack was done in a vertical format, which comformed to the stamp issue. A self-portrait of Rita Angus featured on the front cover.

https://stamps.nzpost.co.nz/new-zealand ... -paintings
New Zealand 1983 24c sg1312, scott?
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HMS Shannon captures USS Chesapeake,1813

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HMS Shannon captures USS Chesapeake,1813

Postby Anatol » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:57 pm

img16013.jpg
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On 9 April 1813 the U.S. Frigate Chesapeake returned to Boston after a cruise against British commercial shipping. Over the next several weeks she was refitted and received a new Commanding Officer, the recently promoted Captain James Lawrence. Many of her officers were replaced and a large percentage of her crew was newly enlisted. Though the ship was a good one, with a well-seasoned Captain, time would be necessary to work her men into a capable and disciplined combat team. However, the time was not available. Blockading off Boston was HMS Shannon, commanded for the past seven years by Captain Philip Broke, whose attention to gunnery practice and other elements of combat readiness was extraordinary. Shannon and Chesapeake were of virtually identical strength, though the American ship's crew was rather larger, and a duel between the two was attractive to both captains. Broke even issued a formal challenge, though it did not reach Lawrence, whose previous experience with British warships had convinced him that they were not likely to be formidable opponents. Chesapeake left Boston Harbor in the early afternoon of 1 June 1813. The two ships sailed several miles offshore, where Shannon slowed to await her opponent, who approached flying a special flag proclaiming "Free Trade and Sailors' Rights" in recognition of America's prewar grievances against British policies. Though Lawrence had a brief opportunity to rake, he did not do so, but closed to place his port broadside against Shannon's starboard battery. Somewhat before 6 PM the ships opened fire, both hitting, but the British guns did more damage and produced crippling casualties on Chesapeake's quarterdeck. Captain Lawrence was mortally wounded by small arms fire and had to be taken below, giving his final order "Don't give up the ship!" The American ship was soon out of control. The two frigates came together. Captain Broke led his boarding party onto Chesapeake's quarterdeck, where they met fierce but disorganized resistance. Assisted by cannon and small arms fire from on board Shannon, they soon gained control above decks, though Captain Broke was badly wounded in the process. Some fifteen minutes after the battle began, Chesapeake was in British hands. Casulaties were heavy: more than sixty killed on Chesapeake; about half that many on Shannon. The latter's cannon had made more than twice as many hits, and her boarding party demonstrated decisive superiority in hand-to-hand fighting. The action, which greatly boosted British morale, provided another of the War of 1812's many convincing examples of the vital importance of superior training and discipline in combat on sea and land.
Mali 2017;840f;SG?
Source:www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/events/war1812/atsea/ches-sn.htm
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