SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

USA CAR FERRY around 1900

This stamp issued by the USA and designed by Richard Schlecht of Arlington, Virginia is based on ferry boats sailing on the Hudson River by New York around 1900, he used primarily the NEWARK built in 1902 and her sister the CHICAGO built in 1901. The two double ended ferries were sisters but did have minor differences.
The NEWARK was built as a double decker car-ferry under yard no 138 by T.S. Marvel in Newburg, NY for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co, in New York.
Launched as NEWARK.
Tonnage 1,308 ton, dim. 58.7 (bpp.) x 14.0m.
Powered by a triple expansion steam engine, 750 hp.
July 1902 completed.
Used in the service between New Jersey and Manhattan.
1949 Transferred to de Delaware-New Jersey Ferry Co. in Wilmington, DE. Not renamed.
September 1951 broken up in Baltimore.

Her sister was built under yard No 177 by Burlee Shipbuilding & Dry-dock Co, Mariner’s Harbour for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. New York.
Launched as the CHICAGO.
Tonnage 1,334 ton, dim. 58.9 (bpp.) x 14.0m.
Same type of engine only her horse powered was 700 hp.
1901 Completed.

Same service as the NEWARK.
1949 Transferred to Delaware New Jersey Ferry Co, Wilmington, DE not renamed.
1951 Transferred to the State of Delaware, Wilmington, not renamed.
May 1952 scrapped by Patapsco Scrap Co., Baltimore.

Source: Internet and http://www.miramarshipindex.nz
USA 1990 32c sg 2481, scott 2466.

SOMALIA SAILING SHIPS 1994

Somalia used four stamps in 1994 which show sailing ships.

150 sh Viking ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360
350 sh Junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069
600 sh galleon. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11966
1400 sh Clipper ship. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13935

Somalia 1994 150/1400sh sg?, scott?

PORTLAND HMS (F-79)

Tristan da Cunha has a close affinity to the military and in particular the Navy, from the founding of the British community nearly 200 years ago, to the present day. As the world’s most remote inhabited island, visiting naval ships have always been a welcome sight and have provided much needed support for those living on Tristan da Cunha. With a population of just 254 islanders (January 2018) resident on Tristan the arrival of a ship’s crew can almost double the local population and is often a time of great excitement and celebration.

HMS PORTLAND arrived off Tristan 14 January 2017 from South Georgia and anchored offshore. The small harbour was too small for her but personnel were ferried to the island the following day, once the Harbour Master had assessed the swell and confirmed that it was a suitable day.

She had carried out a fishery protection patrol of Tristan’s waters – the sea is rich with crawfish, one of the island’s main sources of income – before dropping anchor for 24 hours in company with tanker RFA GOLD ROVER.

As always, the short visit assured islanders the mother country had not forgotten about them and allowed the sailors the rare chance to enjoy an island few people set foot on.
http://www.pobjoystamps.com/contents/en ... Ships.html

Built as a Type 23 frigate under yard no 1052 by BAE Systems Marine (YSL) Ltd., Scotstoun near Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
February 1996 ordered.
14 January 1998 laid down.
15 May 1999 launched as the HMS PORTLAND (F-79), christened by Lady Brigstocke.
Displacement 4,900 ton, dim. 133 x 16.3 x 7.3m. (draught)
Powered: CODLAG by four 2,025 shp Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators, two GEC electric motors, 4,000 shp. and two Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C, 31,100 shp. twin screws, speed in excess of 28 knots..
Range 7,500 mile by a speed of 15 knots.
Armament: Anti-Air missiles, 1 – 32 cell Sea Wolf GWS 26 VLS canisters for 32 missiles. Anti-ship missiles 2 – quad Harpoon launchers. Anti-submarine torpedoes, 2 – twin 12.75 inch (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes.
Guns: 1 – BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun.2 – 30mm DS30m Mk2 guns or 2 – 30mm DS30B guns. 2 – mini guns and 4 General purpose machine guns.
Accommodation for 205 persons, crew 185.
Carried 1 - Lynx HMAS or 1 – Westland Merlin HML, has a flight deck and enclosed hangar.
03 May 2001 commissioned.

HMS PORTLAND is a Type 23 frigate of the British Royal Navy. She is the eighth ship to bear the name and is the fifteenth and penultimate ship of the 'Duke' class of frigates, and is named for the (now extinct) Dukedom of PORTLAND, and more particularly for the 3rd Duke, who was Prime Minister.
Operational history
2000–2010
The ship was accepted into service by the Royal Navy on 15 December 2000 and was commissioned on 3 May the following year. Present at the commissioning ceremony was PORTLAND's sponsor Lady Brigstocke, wife of Admiral Sir John Brigstocke, a former Second Sea Lord; Lady Brigstocke launched the ship in 1999.
During sea trials PORTLAND attained a top speed of 30.8 knots (57.0 km/h), the fastest speed attained by any Type 23 frigate at that time
PORTLAND assisted in the search for men lost from a capsized yacht on 3 February 2007
She was deployed to the Caribbean for seven months in 2007, intercepting 3.5 tonnes of cocaine in cooperation with a United States Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) and conducting disaster relief in Belize following Hurricane Dean
In April 2008, PORTLAND visited Liverpool with HMS Mersey and berthed at the cruise liner terminal at Prince's Dock
In June 2009 while taking part in anti-piracy operations off the Horn of Africa, PORTLAND intercepted ten alleged pirates but because the suspects were not caught in the immediate act of piracy, the vessel was unable legally to detain them.
In late April 2010, PORTLAND relieved HMS YORK on the Atlantic Patrol Task (South.
2011–Present
June 2011 saw PORTLAND conducting night Naval Gunnery practice off Gibraltar in the Mediterranean. Towards the end of the month she sailed to Edinburgh to take part in Armed Forces Day. She is the first major warship in the Royal Navy to be commanded by a woman; Commander Sarah West assumed command of HMS PORTLAND on 21 May 2012. PORTLAND spent 2012 at Rosyth in a 50-week refit that saw her upgraded with Sonar 2087, new IT systems, Sea Wolf mid-life overhaul, gun replacements, galley refurbishment and accommodation improvements. She left Rosyth on 14 December 2012 for three months of sea trials.
In August 2013, she was announced as the Fleet Ready Escort for the next two months. She is due to participate in Exercise Joint Warrior 2013.
On 2 August 2014, she completed the 7 month task of the Atlantic Patrol ship.
Captain Simon Asquith assumed command of HMS PORTLAND in September 2014.
On 20 June 2016, PORTLAND departed Devonport for a nine-month patrol covering the Middle East and the South Atlantic Ocean. PORTLAND was the last Royal Navy ship to carry Radar 996 and was the last ship to conduct a Replenishment at Sea with RFA GOLD ROVER prior to the latter ship's decommissioning.

2018 In service.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_PORTLAND_(F79). Miramar.
Tristan da Cunha 2018 45p sg?, scott?

YORK HMS (D98)

Built as a type 42 destroyer under yard no 111 by Swan Hunter, Wallsend, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
18 January 1980 laid down.
21 January 1982 launched as the HMS YORK. (D-98).
Displacement 5,200 ton, dim. 141.0 x 15.2m.
Powered: COGOG by two Rolls-Royce Olympus TM3B gas turbines, 50,000 shp and two Rolls Royce Tyne RM1C cruise gas turbines 5,340 shp, twin shafts, speed 30 knots by use of Olympus and 24 knots by use of Tyne.
Range 4,200 mile by a speed 14 knots.
Armament: 1 x twin Sea Dart missile launchers, 40 missiles. 1 – 4.5 inch Mk 8 gun. 2 – 20 mm Oerlikon guns, 2 – Phalanx close-in-weapon system (CIWS).
Crew 287.
Carried 1 Lynx HMAS helicopter.
09 August 1985 christened by Lady Gosling and the same day commissioned.

HMS YORK was a Batch III Type 42 destroyer of the Royal Navy. Launched on 20 June 1982 at Wallsend, Tyne and Wear and sponsored by Lady Gosling, YORK was the last Type 42 built. The ship's crest was the White Rose of York, and the "red cross with lions passant" funnel badge was derived from the coat of arms of the City of York. With a maximum speed of 34 knots (63 km/h; 39 mph), she was the Royal Navy's fastest destroyer.
Operational history
1985-
In the summer of 1990, HMS YORK was serving on a routine patrol in the Persian Gulf as part of The Armilla Patrol which had been undertaken by a series of Royal Navy warships over many years. On 2 August that year, Saddam Hussein's forces invaded Kuwait. Instead of heading off to the Far East and Australia for series of "waving the flag" port visits, she remained on patrol in the Persian Gulf for an extra three months. This period was conducted when at sea mostly on a war-ready footing, involving virtually everyone onboard working Defence Watches (basically six hours on, six off) round the clock.
2001-2010
In 2001, she tested a RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile.
In 2003, YORK took part in the invasion of Iraq providing air cover and area protection for the aircraft carrier HMS ARK ROYAL. In 2004, she was fitted with the MOD 1 variant of the mark 8 4.5-inch gun. She and EDINBURGH were the only two Type 42s to be so fitted.
In July 2006, YORK joined GLOUCESTER in evacuating British citizens from Beirut in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict making several trips in and out of Lebanon, ferrying evacuees to Cyprus.
In February 2010, YORK and the auxiliary WAVE RULER were deployed to the Falkland Islands coinciding with a period of increased tensions between the United Kingdom and Argentina over the former's plans to begin drilling for oil in the seas surrounding the islands.
2011-2012
In February 2011, YORK was deployed to Malta to assist in the evacuation of British nationals from Libya. On 21 April 2011, YORK arrived at the East Cove Military Port in the Falkland Islands, beginning patrol duties for the islands.
On 12 December 2011, YORK spotted the Russian aircraft carrier ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV with its carrier group northeast of Orkney, off the coast of northern Scotland, and shadowed the carrier for a week. This was the first time ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV had deployed near UK waters and the closest in 20 years that a Russian naval task group had deployed to the UK. She then sailed around the top of Scotland and into the Atlantic past western Ireland, where she conducted flying operations with her Sukhoi Su-33 Flanker jets and Kamov Ka-27 helicopters in international airspace.
On 13 April 2012, YORK fired the last ever operational Sea Dart missiles after a thirty-year career. As such YORK completed her career without the system being operational. YORK entered Portsmouth harbour for the final time on 20 September 2012, and was decommissioned on 27 September 2012. In August 2012, the ship was put up for sale.
09 August 2015 she arrived at Aliaga, Turkey and she was scrapped there by Leyal GS.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_YORK_(D98) Miramar.
Jersey 2018 Local Mail sg?, scott?

MARSHALL ISLAND CANOE

The canoe depict on this stamp most probably is a “kor kor” it shows the canoe in the foreground with in the background the night silhouette of Hong Kong. The other stamp in this sheet shows a junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069

Known as one of the fastest indigenous watercraft in the Pacific, the Marshall Islands outrigger canoe has over the years been fine-tuned to sail closer to the wind than any other modern sail craft in the world. Little has changed in the basic design of the outrigger canoes over the past 100 generations. In centuries past, the people of the Marshall Islands sailed upon ocean voyages of up to 500 miles as a matter of necessity, usually to access food. Today, sadly, canoes have been largely replaced by power boats, with most new canoes in Majuro being built for racing. Of the outer islands, only a few still use the canoes as part of their livelihood, with Ailuk Atoll being a prime example. While newly-built tradition-style outrigger canoes look extremely similar to the original boats, they are shaped not with the simple hand-hewn tools of the past, but with electric saws and planes. They are not rigged with a sail made from the fibers of the pandanus plant, but instead with modern fabrics, including tarps. Whatever their purpose, the very existence of the canoes is treasured by the community as a source of national pride.

The other sheet shows a silhouette by daylight of Hong Kong, with on the left stamp a “walap” viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5799&p=16754&hilit=walap#p16754
And the right stamp shows a Chinese junk.

Source: http://www.canoesmarshallislands.com/ca ... s-history/
Marshall Islands 1997 32c sgMS 789, scott 624a/624b.

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

The waters around the islands are rich in fish, whale and seal. Bird cliffs, promontories, islets and precipices are nesting places for many species of seabirds. It is therefore not surprising that coastal fishing and fowling  were quite a significant part of traditional Faroese working life.
Fowling with a pole-net is far more sustainable than other fowling methods. The fowler only catches one bird at a time and, moreover, he is able to sort out certain birds, for example puffins carrying small fry for their chicks. In addition, maiming birds by shooting is avoided. It has always been forbidden to use firearms in and near bird cliffs.

2018 Faroes Philatelic
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PENELOPE HMS 1798

The full index of our ship stamp archive

PENELOPE HMS 1798

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:43 pm

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Built as a frigate by George Parsons, Bursledon for the Royal Navy.
04 May 1797 ordered.
June 1797 keel laid down.
26 September 1798 launched under the name HMS PENELOPE.
Tonnage 1.051 ton (bm), dim. 150.0 x 39.8 x 13.0ft.
Armament: 30 – 18pdrs., quarter deck 6 – 9pdrs. and 8 –32pdrs. carronades, forecastle 2 – 9pdrs. and 4 – 32pdr carronades.
Crew 294.
From 30 September till 30 November 1798 at Portsmouth fitted out and completed.
Building cost £36.988.

October 1798 commissioned under command of Capt. Charles Paget.
03 January 1799 sailed for Madeira with an East Indies convoy.
March 1799 command was taken over by Capt. Henry Blackwood.
05 September 1799 sailed for the Mediterranean.
26 January 1800 she took the Spanish xebec NUESTRA SEÑORA DEL CARMEN (16-gun) under command of Don Estevanno Barcello and a crew of 130 men.
She was part of a squadron, which blockaded Malta, and when the French GUILLAUME TELL escaped from Malta in the night of 29 March 1800 the HMS PENELOPE sighted her.

The following comes from the logbook of the PENELOPE on the capture of this ship.

Luffed under her stern, and gave him the larboard broadside, bore up under the larbour quarter and gave him the starboard broadside, receiving from him only his stern-chase guns. From this hour till daylight, finding that we could place ourselves on either quarter, the action continued in the foregoing manner, and with such success on our side that, when day broke, the GUILLAUME TELL was found in a most dismantled state.

At 05.00 am the HMS LION arrived and a little later the HMS FOUDROYANT and after a gallant resistance in which she totally was dismasted, the GUILLAUME TELL struck her flag.

The PENELOPE lost 2 men in the fight and had 2 wounded.
She towed her prize to Syracuse after she returned to her station off Malta, till this island surrendered on 05 September 1800.
Then she accompanied Lord Keith in his campaign against the French in Egypt, before she set sail for home, where she arrived on 19 March 1802 at Spithead.
May 1802 under command of Capt. William Broughton.
August 1802 sailed for the Mediterranean, later in 1803 under command of temporally Capt. Charles Pater in Lord Keith squadron in the North Sea.
May 1804 took part in the attack on Ver Huell’s convoy off the Belgian coast in support of the cruiser RATTLER and AIMABLE. She got 3 men killed and 4 wounded.
26 August 1806 took part in the chase of the French Le VÉTÉRAN near Belle Isl. off the French coast.
1807 Under command of Capt. John Dick in the Channel Fleet.
13 February 1808 sailed for Halifax.
Early 1809 took part in the blockade of Guadeloupe and capture of Martinique.
September 1810 paid off at Plymouth and put in reserve.
Between August 1813 and February 1814 refitted in a troopship at Plymouth.
November 1813 re-commissioned under command of Cmdr. Charles Sullivan, after her refit was completed sailed for Halifax.
Sullivan was relieved in December 1814 by Cmdr. James Galoway.
31 March 1815 she sailed from Spithead for Canada, the crossing of the North Atlantic was uneventful, but when passing the New Foundland Banks she met large icefields, strong winds and thick fog.
27 April 1815 she entered the St Lawrence and passed 28th Magdalen Island. At the 30th April a course was set to keep her clear from the land, 08.00pm she was in 71 fathoms, and a half hour later during heavy snowfall she struck a rock and grounded hard.
How many men were lost in and later on shore is not know, I have from upwards 40 to 216, which were frozen or drowned. Comdr. Galoway was saved.

(She must be the vessel on the port side of the GUILLIAM TELL the only frigate and with one deck; the other two English Navy vessels were two deckers)

Source: Shipwrecks of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Eras by Grocott. http://www.cronab.demon.co.uk
British Warships in the Age of Sail 1793 –1817. Some other web-sites.
Malta 2006 29c sg?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
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