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PHARAOH NECHO ships 600 B.C.

Somewhere between the years 610 and 594 B.C. some Phœnician ships, acting under instructions from Pharaoh Necho, who reigned from 612-596 BC, are said to have circumnavigated Africa, having proceeded from the Indian to the Southern Ocean, and thence round by the Atlantic and through the Pillars of Hercules home. The voyage occupied more than two years, a circumstance which was due to the fact that they always landed in the autumn and sowed a tract of country with corn, and waited on shore till it was fit to cut. In the time of Solomon the joint fleets of the Israelites and Phœnicians made voyages from the head of the Red Sea down the coasts of Arabia and Eastern Africa, and even to Persia and Beluchistan, and probably also to India. The Phœnicians were not only great traders themselves, but they manned the fleets of other nations, and built ships for other peoples, notably for the Egyptians and Persians. It is unfortunate that we have so few representations of the Phœnician ships, but we are justified in concluding that they were of the same general type as those which were used by the Greeks, the Carthaginians, and eventually by the Romans. The representations of their vessels known to be in existence were found by the late Sir Austin Layard in the palace built by King Sennacherib at Kouyunjik, near Nineveh, about 700 B.C. Though they were obviously rather symbols of ships than faithful representations, we can, nevertheless, gather from them that the warship was a galley provided with a ram, and fitted with a mast carrying a single square sail; there were also two banks of oars on each side. The steering was accomplished by two large oars at the stern, and the fighting troops were carried on a deck or platform raised on pillars above the heads of the rowers.

The vessel depict on the stamp is an Egyptian vessel from around 1600 BC and not one from around 600 BC see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14305&p=16144&hilit=ancient+Egyptian+ship#p16144
Source: ... tm#Page_27
Uganda 1989 150s sg 765, scott722

Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule.

HMS HERMES was a 20-gun class sixth-rate post ship built in Milford Dockyard in 1811. On 11 February 1812 Hermes captured the American brig Flora. Then on 26 April Hermes captured the American brig Tigress. Four days later, HERMES and BELLE POULE captured the American privateer schooner GIPSY (or Gipsey). She was on her way from New York City to Bordeaux with a cargo worth ₤50,000 when the British vessels captured her in the mid-Atlantic after a three-day chase. Gipsey surrendered twice to Hermes and twice got away again before Belle Poule caught her. Gipsey was of 300 tons (bm) and was armed with twelve 18-pounder carronades and an 18-pounder gun on a pivot mount.In September 1814, master Percy led her in an unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer. The Louisiana State Museum has a map of the battle. The attack took place on 15 September at about 4:30pm. Two of the four British vessels could not get close enough to fire. The fort was more strongly armed than expected, the British fire was ineffective, and a parallel ground attack failed. Furthermore, as she tried to withdraw, Hermes grounded under the guns of the fort. Percy evacuated her crew on boats from Sophie and then set fire to Hermes, which blew up after the fire reached her magazine at around 10pm. In all, Hermes had lost 17 killed in action, 5 mortally wounded and 19 wounded. (The medical journal of the Hermes has survived. ) She was destroyed in 1814 to prevent her falling into American hands after grounding during her unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer on Mobile Pointoutside Mobile, Alabama. On 18 January 1815, Percy faced a court martial on board Cydnus, off Cat Island (Mississippi). The court acquitted him of all blame, finding that the circumstances justified the attack and that all involved had behaved with great gallantry. HMS BELLE POULE was a Royal Navy fifth rate frigate, formerly Belle Poule, a Virginie-class frigate of the French Navy, which was built by the Crucy family's shipyard at Basse-Indre to a design by Jacques-Noël Sané. She was launched on 17 April 1802, and saw active service in the East, but in 1806 a British squadron under Sir John Borlase Warren captured her off La Palma in the Canary Islands. The Admiralty commissioned her into the Royal Navy as HMS Belle Poule. At the time of her capture Belle Poule was armed with forty 18-pounder guns, had a crew of 320 men, and was under the command of Captain Brouillac. Marengo and Belle Poule had lost 65 men killed and 80 wounded. The British on London and Amazon had 13 officers and men killed and 26 officers and men wounded. Belle Poule returned to Portsmouth on 17 May 1815. A week later she sailed for Cork. She was converted to a prison hulk in 1815. She was sold on 11 June 1816 for ₤2,700. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale: “Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule”.
Somali 2017;


The sixth issue from Maritime Malta series consists of 3 stamps featuring vessels dating back to the Order of Saint John.

For many years, warships, such as the galley, were used by the Mediterranean naval powers. In fact this type of ship served for many years as the backbone of the Navy of the Order of Saint John. The Galley was characterised by its long, slender and shallow hull. These vessels were usually painted red with a white waterline and while most vessels at the time had sails, however the primary method of propulsion was the human strength of prisoners.

The 26c stamp depicts a model of the common galley, also known as Sensile. This was armed with five bronze cannon on the bow and propelled by 26 oars on each side. Three to five people were needed for each oar and this vessel was also rigged with two lateen sails. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

The 42c Stamp depicts a model known as the Demi Galley or the Half Galley. This was introduced in 1742 and was a smaller version of the common galley. The development of this galley came at the time when availability of prisoners as oarsmen was scarce hence the smaller number of rowers needed. This galley was equipped with one large calibre bronze cannon on the bow. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum and it is considered as the only surviving Demi Galley model known.

The 1 stamp shows a model of a brigantine. This was the ceremonial barge of the Portuguese Grand Master Antonio Manoel de Vilhena and was painted green with a white waterline. It was fitted with nine oars on each side and was not designed for long voyages, with storage space kept at a minimum. It is documented that Grand Master de Vilhena travelled to Gozo in this vessel. This model underwent extensive restoration in 1964 and it is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

Source: Joseph Abela (Heritage Malta) ... sues%2fphi
Malta 2018 0.26/1.00 Euro sg?, scott? (The 1.00 Euro has the year 2019 printed on it)


Antigua & Barbuda issued in 1988 a set of stamps and a miniature sheet for the “Sailing week yacht regatta 1988”. All stamps and sheet shows sailing yachts of which I have not any information. Of the regatta Wikipedia has the following:

Antigua and Barbuda Sailing Week is a yacht regatta held at Nelson's Dockyard, St. Johns, Antigua. It is one of Antigua's most notable events. Founded in 1967, it is cited as one of the top regattas in the world and attracts an average 150-200 yachts, 1500 participants and 5000 spectators on average annually. In 2012 the regatta was held between 29 April and 4 May. In 2005, 24 countries were represented at the regatta. There are five main races held, including the English Harbour race, and at the end of the week the event finishes with the Lord Nelson's Ball.
Antigua & Barbuda 1988 30c/$5 sg 1190/93 and sgMS 1194, Scott 1112/16


Norfolk Island has not a deep water harbour, ships are required to anchor about a kilometre or so off shore. The cargo is then transferred from the hold of the ship to lighters. The 30 feet lighters, which are a local adaption of wooden whaling boats, are then towed by launch to the jetty.
Of the whalers used on Norfolk Island after which the lighters were built see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13176&p=14506&hilit=blessing+of+the+whalers#p14506

Loading jetties are located at Kingston and Cascade, but ships cannot get close to either of them. When a supply ship arrives, it is emptied by whaleboats towed by launches, five tonnes at a time. Which jetty is used depends on the prevailing weather on the day. The jetty on the leeward side of the island is often used. If the wind changes significantly during unloading/loading, the ship will move around to the other side. Visitors often gather to watch the activity when a supply ship arrives.

Much more is given on the following URL: ... nic-fleet/ ... olk_Island
Norfolk Island 1988 39 and 55c sg452/53, scott?. 1990 5c and10c sg483/84, scott?. 1993 45c sg 541, scott? 1996 $3.70 sg627, scott?, and 45c sg 629, scott? 2000 sgMS 731, scott? 2001 45c/$1.50 sg?, scott?


The Isle of Man issued two stamps in 1974 for the 1000th centenary of King Magnus Haraldson.

Under which name he was known has in the years many times spelled differently in the documents, but most probably it was King Magnus Haraldson, when born is also not known.
He was King of the Isle of Man and on the 8p stamp his fleet is seen. Twice in the year he sailed with this fleet of between 3600-4800 sails around the British Islands as admiral of the fleet to clear the waters around the islands from pirates especially the Danes and Normans. Also his coat of arms is depict on the stamp. Why are she rowing she are under sail, and why carry the shields outboard, so far I know the shields were only used during battle in this way, and clearly not a battle took place on this stamp.
The 4p stamp shows Magnus Haraldson in a stately barge with King Edgar of England on the River Dee in Wales. The skyline of the town in the background is of the town of Chester, a mistake has been made. The skyline of the town is from a drawing of the 14th century. Of the barge I have not any info, looks she is rowed by kings, all wearing a crown, King Edgar standing in the stern.
King Magnus Haraldson died in 977, but also other years have been given.

Source: Various internet sites.
Isle of Man 1974 4½p and 8p sg51/52, scott?


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:00 pm

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2018 Kent.jpg
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Built as a type 23 frigate under yard no 1051 by Yarrow Shipbuilders, BAE Systems, Scotstoun, Scotland for the Royal Navy.
February 1996 ordered.
16 April 1997 laid down.
27 May 1998 launched as the HMS KENT (F 78) christened by Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy.
Displacement 4.900 standard, 5,400 ton full load, dim. 133 x 16.1 x 7.3m. (draught)
Powered, CODLAG by four 2,025 shp Paxman Valenta 12 CM diesel generators, two GEC electric motors 4,000 shp and two Rolls-Royce Spey SMiC , 31,100 shp, twin shafts, speed in excess of 28 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 7,500 mile.
Armament: 1 – 32-cell Sea Wolf GWS.26 VLS anti-air-missiles, canisters for 32 Sea Wolf missiles. Two quad anti-ship-missiles, Harpoon launchers. Two – twin 12.75 inch Sting Ray anti-submarine torpedoes, torpedo tubes. 1 _BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun. 2 – 30mm DS30M Mk2 guns. 2 miniguns and 4 general purpose machine guns.
Carried 1 Lynx HMAS and 1 Westland Merlin HM1 helicopter.
Crew 185 but has accommodation for 205.
08 June 2000 commissioned.

HMS KENT is a Type 23 Duke class frigate of the British Royal Navy, and the twelfth ship to bear the name, although technically she is named after the dukedom rather than the county. Sponsored by Princess Alexandra, The Hon Lady Ogilvy (daughter of the late Prince George, Duke of Kent), KENT was launched on 28 May 1998 and commissioned on 8 June 2000. She was the first ship to enter Royal Navy service in the 21st Century.
KENT's lineage boasts sixteen Battle Honours from the three given to the first KENT of 46 guns built in 1653, to the five awarded to the ninth and tenth KENTs of World War I and World War II.
Service History
March 2002 saw KENT return from the Persian Gulf after a five-month record-breaking mission under Commander John Clink. KENT seized more than £4 million of oil and illegal cargo: a record for the time. This mission also included the boarding of MV ISMAEL, a vessel which strayed in and out of Iranian waters to avoid capture - waters which KENT was forbidden to enter.
16 January 2006 saw KENT deploy on a 28-day training mission, under Commander Gavin Pritchard, to gunnery drills and firing off Gibraltar. This course was for the benefit of students on the Principal Warfare Officer course. This deployment included a two-day visit to Tunisia and a three-day visit to Barcelona.
March 2006 saw the Football Association Chief Executive Brian Barwick visit KENT to show him around a modern Type 23 frigate. Mr Barwick was a guest at the RN vs. RAF football match at Havant, the tour around KENT was a pre-match treat for the FA chief.
On 12 June 2006 KENT started a six-month deployment to Gibraltar, Malta and the Suez canal. Saturday 16 June saw the traditional Gibraltar Rock race, this time Leading Chef Paddy Crawford won the race in a time of 24 minutes. Games of 'Bucket ball' and tug-of-war were additional sports the crew engaged in. KENT then sailed to the Suez Canal, where the crew took part in the traditional race-against-the-ship with rowing machines, taking turns to see if the crew could 'beat' the ship to the end of the canal. Eighty-one crewmembers rowed 2 kilometres to make the attempt, winning the ship in a combined time of 162 kilometres (101 mi) in 10 hrs 34 mins.
During a visit to Soudha Bay, Crete, the ruby anniversary of the meeting of John and Susan Hardwick aboard the previous KENT was celebrated in style aboard the latest ship to bear the name. Mr Hardwicke was a LSA(V) aboard the County-class predecessor to KENT when the then Miss Sittingbourne boarded. Ironically, the logistics officer on the ship at that time was Lieutenant Commander Mark Hardwick, son of the celebrating couple.
10 August 2006 saw crew from KENT visit the Abeer2 school, in Kuwait City. The school provides education, care and therapy for children with Autism. In true Royal Navy style, 'Jack' set to work with paint and hammers to decorate the school and mend a roof in 45 degree Celsius heat. Needless to say the crest of the ship was amongst the items painted on the wall.
KENT was in the Northern Persian Gulf working 22-day patrols safeguarding the oil platforms and checking shipping in the area as per United Nations Security Council Regulations. KENT later conducted a self-maintenance period at Port Rashid, Dubai. After 60 days of patrols, 47 security sweeps of vessels approaching the oil platforms and 515 queries of merchant vessels, KENT left the Northern Persian Gulf and set sail home. A four-day visit to Muscat in Oman followed, which included training with the Omani Navy. A hockey game resulted in a pleasing 7-0 victory.
In Mumbai, HRH Prince Andrew visited KENT.
15:00 hours, 5 November 2006 saw KENT hand over her duties to HMS SUTHERLAND in Salalah, Oman. Later on her way home, KENT made a goodwill visit to Beirut on Friday 17 November. The ship featured on national news and the crew visited some of the local sites.
After Beirut, KENT visited Souda Bay and then the port of Civitavecchia, Italy. Algiers was the next stop, showcasing training to the Algerian Navy. A television conference and the chance to experience traditional Algerian food in the traditional style followed.
February 2007 saw KENT awarded the Thales fleet active ASW award 2005/2006. Due to the busy period of deployments, the award ceremony had to be delayed until 2007. December 2007 saw KENT preparing for the customary Operational Sea Training period, training with aircraft and sea boat operations. With quieter evenings, quiz nights and sports television were the order of the day, along with 'Secret Santa' delivering inappropriate gifts for selected crew January 2008 saw preparations for OST continuing afoot ready for the initial materials and safety audit.
February 2008 HMS KENT was in refit for replacement of two of the four Paxman Valenta diesel engines.
March 2008 saw an invitation from the Second Sea Lord to a Ladies Night aboard HMS Victory. Operational Sea Training sees the customary missions around the fictional port of Freeport, played by HMNB Devonport. This exercise involves political tensions and seeing how the crew responds to escalation in a proportional, measured manner. Later in the OST exercises in April, the crew of KENT dealt with a simulated earthquake aftermath in the fictional 'island' of Bull Point at Devonport. The 'Away Team' had to respond to the needs of the survivors in the same manner as they would in a real situation - dealing with injuries, restoring water and food supplies and providing safe shelter.
May 2008 saw KENT off the Channel Islands providing a demonstration of the Royal Navy to the local islanders. This was also the first Jersey Boat Show with KENT the largest vessel on show. The following Thursday saw the culmination of Operational Sea Training
Saturday 31 May 2008 saw KENT get underway from 'The Wall' at Portsmouth for a six-month deployment to South Asia and the Far East. This voyage included visits to countries such as Russia, China, Japan and Indonesia, as well as participation in various multi-national exercises.
July 27th 2008, saw HMS KENT hosting a solemn memorial service over the historic shipwreck of HMS EXETER (68) in the Java Sea. KENT left the Indonesian port of Surabaya (just as EXETER had on the evening of 28th February 1942, on her last fateful voyage), performed the ceremony and then continued on to Jakarta. Aboard were a BBC film crew and four of HMS EXETER’s veteran survivors, along with several British dignitaries and high ranking naval officers.
On her way home, a stop-off at Gibraltar saw the crews of KENT and IRON DUKE race up the Rock in the traditional 'rock race', which is 3 miles (4.8 km) long and ascends 1,300 feet (400 m). Midshipman Cator was the winner with a time of under 24 minutes
In June 2010, KENT was sent on a mission to Sweden. The celebration of the official Queen's Birthday Party was held on board the British Warship in Gothenburg harbour, the first time that the event has been held outside Stockholm. After a stop at Hanö island where tribute was paid to the fifteen British sailors who rest there, KENT then continued to Stockholm to join the celebrations for the Wedding of Victoria, Crown Princess of Sweden, and Daniel Westling. In December 2010, KENT was withdrawn from the deployable fleet and entered overhaul. Her Commander, Nick Cooke-Priest moved to command IRON DUKE, leaving second-in-command, Lieutenant Commander Alasdair Peppe in charge.
2011 to present
In July 2013, KENT was deployed to the Horn of Africa on anti-priracy and anti-drug missions. She worked with the Combined Maritime Forces and returned home in October 2013
In October 2014, KENT deployed to the Persian Gulf alongside USS CARL VINSON and other US Navy fleet units in the US Fifth Fleet's area of responsibility to help in efforts against smugglers, pirates, terrorists and also in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. The ship visited many countries in the far east, including Bahrain, and Jordan. HMS KENT returned in May 2015.
In late 2016, KENT entered the Frigate Refit Complex in Devonport for an extensive refit which will include the fitting of the SeaCeptor missile system in place of Sea Wolf.
Changing Rooms
On September 2, 2000, men and women on board HMS KENT participated in a Changing Rooms special to give the ship's mess rooms a makeover.
2016 In service.
Jersey 2018 Local Mail. Sg?, scott?
Posts: 5429
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

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