PHARAOH KING SHIP

On the sheet issued by Mozambique issued in 2002 the middle stamp of the top row gives the inscription wooden boat from Egypt.
By comparing the stamp with drawings I believe she was a ship used by the Pharaoh around 1300 BC as a King Ship on the River Nile, in the wetlands and lakes of Egypt.
The hull highly decorated with lotus flowers and stripes and squares, while the fore and after castles carries the Royal symbols, on the side.
The deckhouse in the middle has steps to the roof, (not visible on the stamp) and a door in the side for entering the cabin.
She set a square sail when sailing south with the monsoon wind and drifted north with the current.
Used two paddles for steering one on each side.
Mozambique 2009 33.00MT sg?, scott?
Source: various internet sites.

TIMBER RAFT

TIMBER RAFT. As seen on this stamp, some timber rafts in the water and alongside a freighter loading the logs. The timber rafts is an assemblage of timber logs or lumber floated downstream or towed over water by a tug to a sawmill, or as seen on the stamp to a freighter for loading.
The logs are tied together by cables or chains to form a raft, which then is floated from one place to another. The measurement of the raft depends on the waterway the raft has to be floated down.
More info on this rafts is given: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_rafting
Nigeria 1953 1s sg76, scott

CHOKAI heavy cruiser 1932

Built as a heavy cruiser under yard No 455 by Mitsubishi, Nagasaki for the Japanese Imperial Navy.
26 March 1928 keel laid down.
05 April 1931 launched as the CHÕKAI one of the Takao class, named after Mount Chokai.
Displacement 15,781 ton, dim. 203.76 x 19.0 x 6.3m. (draught).
Powered by geared turbines, 130,000 hp, speed 35.5 knots. Range by a speed of 14 knots, 8,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 2,000 ton oil.
Armament: 10 – 20cm, 4 – 4.7 inch, up to 66 – 25mm AA guns, and 8 – 24 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 773.
01 June 1932 commissioned.
CHÕKAI was a Takao-class heavy cruiser, armed with ten 8-inch (200 mm) guns, four 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns, eight tubes for the Type 93 torpedo, and assorted anti-aircraft guns. CHOKAI was designed with the Imperial Japanese Navy strategy of the great "Decisive Battle" in mind, and built in 1932 by Mitsubishi's shipyard in Nagasaki. She was sunk in the Battle off Samar in October 1944. CHOKAI was named for Mount Chōkai.
Operational history
At the start of the Pacific War, the CHOKAI supported the invasion of Malaya and participated in the pursuit of the Royal Navy's battleship Force Z. During January and February 1942, the CHOKAI was involved in operations to seize the oil-rich Dutch East Indies and the island of Borneo. Steaming near Cape St. Jacques, the CHOKAI struck a reef, sustaining hull damage on 22 February 1942. On the 27th, she reached Singapore for repairs.
After repairs, the CHOKAI was once again assigned to a support role in an invasion, this time the landings at Iri,Sumatra, and the invasion of the Andaman Islands and the seizure of Port Blair a few days later. Afterwards, the CHOKAI sailed to Mergui, Burma.
On April 1, 1942, the CHOKAI left Mergui to participate in Operation C, a raid on merchant shipping in the Indian Ocean. First, the CHOKAI torpedoed and sank the American freighter BIENVILLE, and later on, the British steamship GANGES on 6 April. With her role in the operation successfully concluded, the CHOKAI returned to Yokosuka on 22 April 1942.
The Guadalcanal campaign
By mid-July 1942, the CHOKAI was the new flagship of Vice Admiral Mikawa Gunichi and his Eighth Fleet. She proceeded towards Rabaul. On 7 August 1942, with Guadalcanal having been invaded by the Americans, the CHOKAI headed for the Guadalcanal waters, with Vice Admiral Mikawa aboard. In the battle of Savo Island. Mikawa's squadron of heavy cruisers inflicted a devastating defeat on an Allied squadron, sinking four heavy cruisers (three American and one Australian) and damaging other ships. However, the CHOKAI sustained several hits from the cruisers QUINCY and ASTORIA disabling her "A" turret and killing 34 men. The CHOKAI returned to Rabaul for temporary repairs. For the rest of the Solomon Islands campaign, the CHOKAI would fight in an assortment of night battles with the U.S. Navy, sustaining varied, but mostly minor, damage.
Relieved as the Eighth Fleet flagship shortly after the final evacuation of Guadalcanal, the CHOKAI headed back to Yokosuka on 20 February 1943. Tasked with various minor duties for the remainder of 1943 and first half of 1944, the CHOKAI was made the flagship of the Cruiser Division Four ("CruDiv 4") on 3 August 1944. She survived a harrowing submarine attack on 23 October 1944, becoming the only undamaged ship of CruDiv 4.
Sunk in the Battle off Samar.
The CHOKAI was then transferred to Cruiser Division Five, where she survived another attack on October 24, 1944, this time by aircraft. On the morning of 25 October, the CHOKAI as a part of a large war fleet of IJN battleships, cruisers, and destroyers engaged an American force of escort carriers, destroyers, and destroyer escorts in the Battle off Samar, the Philippines, as part of the huge Battle of Leyte Gulf. Targeted by 5 in (130 mm) gunfire by the destroyers and destroyer escorts, CHOKAI was hit amidships, starboard side, most likely by the sole 5 in (130 mm) gun of the carrier WHITE PLAINS. While the 20 lb (9.1 kg) payload of the shell could not pierce the hull, it set off the deck-mounted eight Japanese Type 93 "Long Lance" torpedoes, which were especially volatile because they contained pure oxygen, in addition to their 1,080 lb (490 kg) warheads. The explosion resulted in such severe damage that it knocked out the rudder and engines, causing CHOKAI to drop out of formation. Within minutes, an American aircraft dropped a 500 lb (230 kg) bomb on her forward machinery room. Fires began to rage and she went dead in the water. Later that day, she was scuttled by torpedoes from the destroyer FUJINAMI ( 11º 22N’ 126º 22E’),which also rescued some of her crew. Two days later the FUJINAMI was itself sunk with the loss of all hands, including the CHOKAI survivors, which makes CHOKAI one of the largest vessels to be sunk with all hands aboard during World War II. This is also one of the deepest shipwrecks, possibly the deepest known, at a depth of approximately 8100 meters (26,600 ft).

Solomon Islands 1992 80c sg747, scott728j

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_c ... h%C5%8Dkai

TURKMEN

Have not found much on this ship, only what I found on the internet. The stamp was issued by Turkmenistan in 1994 for the 115th anniversary of the creation of the Nobel Brothers Petroleum Company.
The stamp shows the tanker/tug TURKMEN the first of two diesel engine tugs ever built and used in the oil transportation.
The TURKMEN and SART were used to tow barges loaded with oil up streams the Volga River.
The diesel engines of the tanker/tugs were manufactured by another Nobel company in St Petersburg.
More info welcome.
Turkmenistan 1994 1,50 m sg39, scott40

LANDING CRAFT INFANTRY (LCI) (R)

On this stamp issued by Palau in 1990 is only one stamp important for the ship stamp collector, these stamp shows us a Landing Craft Infantry (LCI) (R) during the landings of the USA forces on the island. The stamp shows us not any No so the craft is not identified.
Of the LCI many were built and used for all kind of work during World War II.
Displacement 238 ton standard, 395 ton full load, dim. 48.31 x 7.09 x 1.80m. (draught)
Powered by 8 GM diesel engines, 1,600 hp., twin shafts, speed 16 knots.
Crew 3 officers and 21 men.
Armament 4 – 20mm Oerlikons guns.
She carried a platform for six-5 inch rocket launchers, which was fixed on the deck of the LCI, the craft had to manoeuvred in position before it could fire on her target.
The crew when fired had to take shelter below decks to escape the blast of the rocket engines.
Palau 1990 45c sg388, scott255.

B11 HMS submarine

Launched: 21-02-1906 as HMS B11
Completed: 11-07-1906
Builder: Vickers – Barrow in Furness
Length overall: 142ft 2½in
Beam: 13ft 7in
Depth: 13ft 7in
Displacement Surface 287 tons / Submerged: 316 tons
Diving Depth: 100ft
Speed Surface: 7 knots (design) 6.5 knots (service) / Submerged 13 to 13.5 knots (design) 12 knots (service)
No. of shafts: 1
Propeller: 3 blades, 5ft diameter
Armament: 2 18-inch bow torpedo tubes (4 torpedoes carried)
Endurance Surface: 1300 miles at 9 knots (design) 740 miles at full power (service) / Submerged: 22.5 miles
Complement: 15

B.11 was the last of her class to be constructed. She was completed in 1906, and like her consorts, was considerably larger than the "A" boats, displacing 280 tons on the surface and 313 tons submerged.
She was one third longer again at 135 feet and had a 12 cylinder Wolseley petrol engine developing 600 hp and giving a surface speed of around 12 knots. Her electric motors drove her at eight knots (thereabouts) submerged. Her complement was two officers and 11 men, and she was a good deal easier to control underwater than any of her predecessors.
This was because she was the first submarine to be fitted with forward hydroplanes and with their aid was able to dive under way. Previously it had been the accepted custom to stop before diving.

When the 1914-18 war began the British Mediterranean Fleet based on Malta had three B-class submarines attached. They were, singularly enough, B.9, B.10, and B.11. They were sent to the Aegean Sea, there to languish without a chance of distinguishing themselves.
In November that year the Dardanelle's came into the news for a British naval squadron had bombarded the forts and the German warships GOEBEN and BRESLAU were inside and had been in action against the Russians in the Black Sea. Could nothing be done against the naval strength of Johnny Turk located somewhere near the narrows?
The young officers commanding the three British submarines were all keen to try and force a passage. The hazards were the uncertain submerged endurance of their boats the strong current and the presence of minefields. Human courage was one thing the question of electricity supply was quite another.
HMS B.11 had newer batteries so Lieut. N D Holbrook RN was selected for the task of seeking out whatever he might find and doing the greatest possible damage when he found it. On Saturday, December 12, 1914, B.11 dived at dawn off the entrance to the Dardanelle's. The dive had been postponed to the last minute because the boat would need every ampere she had.
Through the minefields and on towards the Narrows she went. Holbrook raised his periscope and there in Sari Siglar Bay he sighted a warship at anchor. Manoeuvring carefully, Holbrook fired one torpedo and hit the Turkish battleship MESSOUDIEH which immediately opened fire on the B.11 periscope and missed. A few minutes later the battleship rolled over and sank and a means of protecting the minefield against sweeping had gone.
Having thus made history, Holbrook decided to turn for home. He found that his compass, a rudimentary contraption at the best of times, had been so damaged by shellfire as to be useless. Unfortunately the current drove B.11 ashore and every Turkish land gun which could bear opened fire. Miraculously the submarine bumped off, hit the bottom more than once, dodged the mines and somehow escaped being hit.
Her periscope became fogged for quite some time leaving Holbrook to navigate blind, yet she was outside the entrance to the Dardanelle's in the early afternoon and her commander could afford to surface.
He and his crew proved that something considered impossible could be done and they and their boat made a contribution to history. Lieut. Holbrook was awarded the Victoria Cross the first of 14 submariners to be so decorated. Lieut. S T Winn his first lieutenant, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and everyone in the boat was awarded the DSC or the DSM.
Later the Turks salvaged most of the MESSOUDIEH’s guns but at Chanak they preserved a unique souvenir a piece of the B.11's torpedo that had done such damage.
In April 1915 after HMS E15 ran aground off Kephez point, HMS B11 was one of a number of boats to attempt to destroy the wreck. The attack failed.
On 20 May 1915 HMS B11 sighted SM UB-8 while on patrol off the Gulf of Smyrna. HMS B11 attempted to attack but was spotted and SM UB-8 then dived before escaping.
On 24 July 1916 the Prize court decided that the submarine's company was entitled to prize money for the sinking of MESÛDIYE, and an award of £3,500 was made, of which Holbrook received £601 10s 2d, Win £481 4s 2d, chief petty officers £240 12s 1d, and seamen £120 6s 1d. This represented three years' pay for a seaman. On 24 August 1915 the town of Germanton in New South Wales, Australia, was renamed "Holbrook" in his honour and a replica of B11 can be seen there. The submarine was relocated from Malta to Venice in October 1915 arriving on the 28th. On 11 December of the same year the submarine under the command of Lieutenant Samuel Gravener was engaged by an Austrian flying boat. The attack was unsuccessful and the plane suffered engine failure forcing it to land. Gravener attempted to attack the plane with a Maxim gun but it jammed and the plane was able to take off again before the submarine could ram it.
On 17 January 1916 the submarine managed to capture the crew of an Austrian flying boat after the aircraft had suffered engine failure while returning from a bombing raid. On 17 March it was narrowly missed by a torpedo but was unable to locate the attacker.
Later in the war B11 was converted to a surface patrol craft through raising the deck level and removing the electric motor. In addition the conning tower was replaced by a wheelhouse.
B.11 incidentally, survived the 1914-18 war as did B.9, but B.10 was bombed and sunk in harbour at Venice in 1918. B.11 was sold in 1919 and scrapped in Italy.

Micronesia 2014 $2.00 sg?, scott? Stamp image from internet.

Sources: http://www.rnsubs.co.uk/Boats/BoatDB2/i ... ?BoatID=29
https://www.flickr.com/photos/16118167@ ... EW-4ECXcq/

Peter Crichton

C27 HMS submarine

Builder: Vickers, Barrow in Furness
Laid down: 4 June 1908
Launched: 22 April 1909 as HMS C27
Commissioned: 14 August 1909
Class & type: C class submarine
Displacement: 290 long tons (295 t) surfaced 320 long tons (325 t) submerged
Length: 143 ft 2 in (43.64 m)
Beam: 13 ft 6 in (4.11 m)
Propulsion: 600 hp (450 kW) Vickers petrol engine, 200 hp (150 kW) electric motor, 1 screw
Speed: 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) surfaced, 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range: 2,000 nmi (3,700 km) at 7 kn (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced ; 55 nmi (102 km) at 5 kn (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Complement: 16
Armament: 2 × 18 in (457 mm) torpedo tubes (2 torpedoes)

HMS C27 along with the trawler PRINCESS LOUSE (ex-PRINCESS MARIE JOSE) sank U-23 in the Fair Isle Channel between Orkney and Shetland on 20 July 1915 during the U-boat trap tactic.
The tactic was to use a decoy trawler to tow a submarine. When a U-boat was sighted, the tow line and communication line was slipped and the submarine would attack the U-boat. The tactic was partly successful, but was abandoned after the loss of two C class submarines. In both cases, all the crew were lost.
HMS C27 was involved in the Baltic operations from 1915 to 1918.
On 16 Oct 1917 the British INDIANOLA which had been seized by Germany in Hamburg in 1914 was torpedoed and damaged by HMS C-27 in the Gulf of Riga.

HMS C27 was scuttled on 5 April 1918 outside Helsinki (Helsingfors) south of the Harmaja Light (Gråhara) to avoid seizure by advancing German forces. HMS C27 was salvaged for breaking up in Finland in August 1953. She was scuttled along with the HMS C35 by opening tubes and hatches.

Does anybody know why HMS C 27 would have 57 on her sail ?

Micronesia 2014 $2.00 sg?, scott? Stamp image from internet.

Sources: Wikipedia. http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/1008.html

Peter Crichton
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MELLA (451)

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MELLA (451)

Postby shipstamps » Thu Feb 19, 2009 3:42 pm


Click image to view full size
Built under yard No 561 as a patrol frigate by Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Co, Lauzon, Canada for the Royal Canadian Navy.
30 November 1943 keel laid down.
06 July 1944 launched as the HMCS CARLPLACE (K644) one of the River Class frigates. She was named after the town Carleton Place near Ottawa, Canada.
Displacement 1.445 ton standard, 2.217 ton full load, dim. 301.5 x 36.6 x 9ft. (draught).
Powered by two triple expansion steam engines, 5.500 hp., speed 19 knots.
Armament 2 – 4 inch, 4 – 20mm, Hedgehog.
13 December 1944 commissioned at Ottawa.

She was the last Royal Canadian Navy frigate to enter service during World War II.
When in route to Halifax on her maiden voyage she suffered serious ice damage to her hull, and after arrival Halifax she underwent several weeks of repairs there, later in Philadelphia.
From Philadelphia she steamed to Bermuda for a work up period.
24 March 1945 returned in Halifax.
In April she got orders to join EG 16 at Londonderry, Northern Ireland and sailed there via the Azores.
05 May she sailed from Londonderry for duty as an escort for a convoy between the U.K and Gibraltar.
Late May she returned to Canada for tropicalization refit in Saint John, New Brunswick which begun on 02 June. The refit to make her suitable to operate in tropical waters was continued on 10 July at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.
20 August the refit was called off, (end of World War II.)
13 November 1945 decommissioned at Halifax, and laid up at Shelburne.

1946 Sold to the Dominican Republic and converted in a presidential yacht, renamed PRESIDENTE TRUJILLO (F-101), named after at that time President of Dominican Republic.
1962 After the family Trujillo lost there grip of power on the country, she was renamed MELLA (451) and used as a yacht- training vessel by the navy of the Dominican Republic.
Armed with 1 – 76.2mm, 2 – 40mm and 4 – 20mm guns. Also fitted out with an American radar installation.
Based at Santo Domingo.

2003 Was she offered free by the Dominican Republic to Carleton Place, but they had to bring the vessel on their own account to Canada.
But she was in a bad shape and not much was left of the original vessel and the offer was not accepted.

2009 Most probably laying idle in some place or scrapped, can not find anything on her more on the internet.

Dominican Republic 1983 15c sg1527.

Source: http://www.gocadets.ca/carlplace/carlplace.html http://www.navyleague.ca Jane’s .
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