VULTURE

By the stamp is given by Jersey post: Captain Peter Duval was a wanted man in the port of Bayonne, France. Around the year 1800, he commanded a small lugger named the VULTURE and engaged in harassing a large French brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. As the Captain drew up alongside the French opened fire but missed the smaller vessel which successfully scored cannon hits direct on to the brig’s hull.
Downloaded from the internet:
VULTURE was one of the most successful privateers in the Napoleonic Wars, which started badly for Jersey. Commanded by Capt Peter Duval, she brought in 16 prizes from the Bay of Biscay between 1795 and 1798.
Capt Duval was wanted man in the port of Bayonne, whose merchants had sufferred badly from his success. They set a trap, disguising a brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. Duval could not resist so seemingly easy a target and pulled alongside demanding their surrender. The French opened fire and missed.
What they had not taken account was the difference in height between the two ships. The VULTURE was a small lugger of 100 tons, four guns and 27 men, the brig's guns fired over her head but the VULTURE’s cannon all scored direct hits on the French ship's hull. They were forced to withdraw, having only managed to inflict slight damage on the VULTURE’s rigging.
Snipe
VULTURE was still successful in 1812 when, commanded by Captain Francis Le Feuvre and accompanied by another privateer, EARL ST VINCENT, she captured an American vessel, the SNIPE, which was attempting to run a blockade off the French coast at Bordeaux.
The SNIPE’s cargo was sold at public auction at L'Hotel de Deal in St Helier on 7 October. It consisted of:
• 212 cases of white sugar from Havanna
• 51 sacks of spices
• 10 barrels of Rocou
• 28 bales of cotton
• 151 sacks of cocoa
• 709 bales of coffee
• 248 half bales of Bourbon coffee
• 838 sacks of Java coffee
• 389 sacks of coffee
• 10 barrels of coffee
• 205 sacks of pepper
• 24 sacks of indigo
• 146 bear skins
After the sale the 216-tonne ship itself was auctioned. The new owners renamed it the MARS and it also became a privateer. Under Captain Noe Le Sueur she captured the SPEEDWELL, whose American crew were disgusted to discover they had been taken by a ship that not long before had been one of their own.

Jersey 2014 46p sg?, scott?
http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/The_''Vulture''

JERSEY PRIVATEERS and PIRATES

In the days when the easiest method of transportation goods in bulk was by water, unscrupulous members of seafaring communities saw its disruption as an ideal way of making money. Piracy was frowned on by authorities unless the ship happened to belong to an enemy power in which case a blind eye may have been turned. Despite this, piracy was a criminal offence unless it was sanctioned by the state and termed ‘privateering’.
In 1689, the practice of issuing ‘Letters of Marques’ became common, effectively a licence to thieve on the high seas and commissions were issued to vessels authorising their owners to attack and plunder the King’s enemies during war time. Any prize was sold and the profit was divided amongst the State, the ship owners and the crew.
Previously, the English Civil war period saw a blossoming of privateering activity in Jersey under Sir George Carteret who started with just one galley, built up his fleet of privateers to about a dozen by arming his prizes. Of course it was not only Jersey which issued Letters of Marques and by 1652, the Channel had been infested by freelance privateers, flying the flags of all nations and bringing the islands to a stranglehold.
Once legalised, Jersey ship owners were quick to take advantage of the situation with the numbers of vessels and captured prizes rising steadily during the French wars. The heyday of the Jersey privateering, however was the 18th century. In the first two years of the French War 1793-1802, 42 local boats and 900 Jerseymen were captured by the French, representing two thirds of the island’s shipping and 4% of the population. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, peace came to Europe and privateering fell into disuse until it was finally abolished in 1856 bringing with it the end of an era which had brought prosperity to the island.
Jersey 2014 46p/£1.20 and Souvenir Sheetlet £2.91 sg?. Scott?
Source: Jersey Stamp Bulletin Autumn 2014.

46p Shows the lugger VULTURE on the right and a French ship.
69p Shows CUMBERLAND in the background of the stamp.
56p Shows the CHARMING BETTY capturing the French bark ST CHARLES.
£1.20 Shows the CHARMING NANCY capturing the French Le HERON.

MERCATOR. Gerardus 1512-1594

Gerardus Mercator  is best known for his work in cartography, in particular theworld map of 1569 based on a new projection which represented sailing courses of constant bearing as straight lines. He was the first to use the term " atlas " for a collection of maps.Before Mercator's time, world maps were basically useless to navigators plotting voyages of discovery and trade. The maps may have shown landmasses correctly, but generally they did not show proportional distance and direction so navigators could not plot a compass course. In his map, Mercator drew straight, equidistant longitude lines, perpendicular to latitude lines, forming a grid which could be used to accurately determine sea routes. Mercator created and published numerous other maps, many of which were posthumously published by his son as Atlas' or Cosmographic Meditations on the Structure of the World . This marked the first use of the world atlas in connection with a book of maps. Mercator also introduced the use of italics to the text of maps.                                                                                                                                                                      Mercator was born Gerhard Kremer on March 5, 1512, in Rupelmonde, Flanders, and changed his name when he became a student at the University of Louvain in1530. Though Mercator studied philosophy and theology, he also developed an interest in astronomy, mathematics, geography, art and engraving. He studied the first two subjects under Gemmy Phrysius, a cartographer and mathematician.While Mercator lived in Louvain, from 1530 until 1552, Mercator made scientific instruments and worked as a surveyor, while makings his first maps and globes. His earliest globe was finished about 1536, and he published his first map in 1537. Its subject was Palestine. In 1844, Mercator was imprisoned for several months in Louvain for heresy, though he was set free due to lack of evidence. In 1552, Mercator moved to Duisberg in what is now Germany, where he was employed by the Duke of Cleves. Mercator did his most significant work under Cleves's patronage in Duisberg.  In 1569, Mercator designed his Great World Map to facilitate sea travel, inspired by his contact with sea captains and navigators. His grid based of equidistant meridians (longitude lines) and parallels (latitude lines) drawn perpendicularly is known as a graticule. Mercator's graticule allowed constant compass bearing to be plotted as a straight line. While Mercator's map was useful for navigators because it preserved constant compass directions, it had drawbacks. Landmasses were not depicted in their true area and proportions, except at the equator. The further from the equator the landmass is, the bigger it looks on Mercator's map. Hence, Greenland looks much larger than the continent of South America, though it is really half its size. The North and South Poles cannot be projected at all. But the relationships between these landmasses are correctly depicted. Mercator's innovation did not become widespread until 1599, when Edward Wright published corrective tables for navigator's use.                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mercator also designed, engraved, and published many maps of Europe and its different parts. In 1554, for example, he published an accurate, detailed map of Europe. Eventually, 107 of these maps appeared in the atlas published by his son in 1595. Mercator also built globes on commission, including a one made of crystal and wood for the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V. Mercator died in Duisberg on December 2, 1594.

Guinea 2012; 40000fg,5000fg,15000fg,20000fg;SG?
Belgium 2012;3f;SG?
Source:

http://www.madehow.com/inventorbios/54/ ... cator.html

By Anatoly

T-91 (Patrol Boat) 1970

This coastal patrol craft is one of three patrol boats built by Royal Thai Naval Dockyard, Bangkok. Commissioned in 1971.

Displacement; 87,5 tons standart, 104,3' x 17,5'. Draft; 5,5', 2 diesels, 1600 bhp, two screws, speed; 25 knots, Armament; 1 x 40 mm and 1 x 20 mm guns. Range; 700 miles at 21 knots, complement; 21.

Thailand 1979, S.G.?, Scott; 898.

Source: Janes Figthing Ships

Pioneer (Tugboat) 1859

She belongs to Colonial Government in Natal. She was built in 1859 in Marshall Bros., Shields shipyard. Gt. 95, nt. 51; diamentions; 89'4" x 18'5" x 9'3"; steam engine of 40Hp.


She was Port Natal's first tugboat. In 1877, she was sold to Port Shepstone Shipping Co. and used as a coaster. She was wrecked at Port St. Johns on 11 Jun 1902.

On the stamp, she is shown around 1870.

The stamp set was designed by Sheila Nowers and printed by the Government Printer, Pretoria.

South Africa 1994 1.35 R, S.G.? Scott: 890.

Source: D. Rodlie; Lloyd's Lists 1863-64.

NORVEGIA (Nw.)

Built in 1919 by Jac. M. Iversen at Son (Nw.) for Skibs A/S Freda (Winge & Co.) Kristiana (now Oslo) as VESLE PER.
Sealer, Gt:285, Nt:126, L:34,84m. B:8,14m. D:4,24m. 2 cyl steam engine:350 hp. wooden hull.
in 1927 sold to Bryde & Dahls Hvalfangerselskab A/S (Lars Christiansen) Sandefjord, renamed in NORVEGIA, '27 -'31 trips to Antarctica.
1931 sold to A/S Kvitøy, Aalesund, renamed in KVITØY, 19-03-1933 sunk in the White Sea.
(AAT 1979/80 50 c. StG.50)

Nimanoa (Ketch) 1929

She was the Government vessel of Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony, and carried administrative and treasury officers about the group of Islands, consisting of about forty, and covering an east to west distance of about 2000 miles.

She also carried mails, sometimes rations and also occasionally lepers to the Makogai Leper Asylum in Fiji.

She was, to quote a late Treasurer of the Colony, “a ketch-rigged auxiliary engined abortion” built in 1929 and just over 100 feet long, with a tonnage of 100.

She looks attractive enough on the stamp. The ketch was lying at Tarawa when the Japanese invaded the Island. Her chief officer, who was senior officer aboard at the time, decided to run her on the reef and so prevent her falling into Japanese hands. This he successfully accomplished in the face of enemy machine-gun fire. The Japanese, on their temporary departure from the island left the ship’s company on Tarawa, thinking escape impossible. All, however, managed to get to Fiji. The remains of the Nimanoa can still be seen at low tide.

Gilbert & Ellice Islands 1939 S.G? Scott:49.

Source: Watercraft Philately
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MELLA (451)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

MELLA (451)

Postby shipstamps » Thu Feb 19, 2009 3:42 pm


Click image to view full size
Built under yard No 561 as a patrol frigate by Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Co, Lauzon, Canada for the Royal Canadian Navy.
30 November 1943 keel laid down.
06 July 1944 launched as the HMCS CARLPLACE (K644) one of the River Class frigates. She was named after the town Carleton Place near Ottawa, Canada.
Displacement 1.445 ton standard, 2.217 ton full load, dim. 301.5 x 36.6 x 9ft. (draught).
Powered by two triple expansion steam engines, 5.500 hp., speed 19 knots.
Armament 2 – 4 inch, 4 – 20mm, Hedgehog.
13 December 1944 commissioned at Ottawa.

She was the last Royal Canadian Navy frigate to enter service during World War II.
When in route to Halifax on her maiden voyage she suffered serious ice damage to her hull, and after arrival Halifax she underwent several weeks of repairs there, later in Philadelphia.
From Philadelphia she steamed to Bermuda for a work up period.
24 March 1945 returned in Halifax.
In April she got orders to join EG 16 at Londonderry, Northern Ireland and sailed there via the Azores.
05 May she sailed from Londonderry for duty as an escort for a convoy between the U.K and Gibraltar.
Late May she returned to Canada for tropicalization refit in Saint John, New Brunswick which begun on 02 June. The refit to make her suitable to operate in tropical waters was continued on 10 July at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.
20 August the refit was called off, (end of World War II.)
13 November 1945 decommissioned at Halifax, and laid up at Shelburne.

1946 Sold to the Dominican Republic and converted in a presidential yacht, renamed PRESIDENTE TRUJILLO (F-101), named after at that time President of Dominican Republic.
1962 After the family Trujillo lost there grip of power on the country, she was renamed MELLA (451) and used as a yacht- training vessel by the navy of the Dominican Republic.
Armed with 1 – 76.2mm, 2 – 40mm and 4 – 20mm guns. Also fitted out with an American radar installation.
Based at Santo Domingo.

2003 Was she offered free by the Dominican Republic to Carleton Place, but they had to bring the vessel on their own account to Canada.
But she was in a bad shape and not much was left of the original vessel and the offer was not accepted.

2009 Most probably laying idle in some place or scrapped, can not find anything on her more on the internet.

Dominican Republic 1983 15c sg1527.

Source: http://www.gocadets.ca/carlplace/carlplace.html http://www.navyleague.ca Jane’s .
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