SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

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CAESAR HMS 1898

Built as a battleship by the Portsmouth Navy Yard at Portsmouth for the Royal Navy.
25 March 1895 keel laid down.
02 September 1896 launched as the HMS CAESAR one of the Majestic class.
Displacement 14,890 ton light, 16,060 full load, dim. 128.3 x 22.9 x 8.2m. (draught). Length bpp. 118.9m.
Powered by two 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 12,000 hp. twin shafts, speed 17.5 knots maximum.
Armament: 4 -12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 16 – 12 pdr, 12 – 3 pdr. and 5 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 672.
13 January 1898 commissioned.

HMS CAESAR was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Roman military and political leader Julius Caesar. The ship was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, starting with her keel laying in March 1895. She was launched in September 1896 and was commissioned into the fleet in January 1898. She was armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (300 mm) guns and a secondary battery of twelve 6-inch (150 mm) guns. The ship had a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph).
CAESAR served with the Mediterranean Fleet after a brief stint in the Channel Fleet. In 1905, she resumed service with a now re-organised Channel Fleet and was also part of the Atlantic Fleet for a time. In the service of the Home Fleet from 1907, she was placed in reserve in 1912. Following the outbreak of World War I, CAESAR returned to the Channel Fleet before being transferred to the North America and West Indies Station in 1915 after a brief spell as a guard ship at Gibraltar. From 1918 to 1919 she served as a depot ship, firstly in the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas and then the Black Sea, in support of naval operations against the Bolsheviks. In this latter role, she was the last of the pre-dreadnought battleships to see service outside the United Kingdom. Returning to England in 1920, she was decommissioned and sold for scrap in 1921.
CAESAR was 421 feet (128 m) long overall and had a beam of 75 ft (23 m) and a draft of 27 ft (8.2 m). She displaced up to 16,060 tonnes (15,810 long tons; 17,700 short tons) at full combat load. Her propulsion system consisted of two 3-cylinder triple expansion engines powered by eight coal-fired cylindrical boilers. By 1907–1908, she was re-boilered with oil-fired models. Her engines provided a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) at 10,000 indicated horsepower (7,500 kW). The Majestics were considered to have handled well, with an easy roll, although they suffered from high fuel consumption. She had a crew of 672 officers and enlisted men.
The ship was armed with four BL 12-inch Mk VIII guns in twin turrets, one forward and one aft. The turrets were placed on circular barbettes, unlike six of her sisters, which retained earlier pear-shaped barbettes.[1][2] CAESAR also carried twelve QF 6-inch /40 guns. They were mounted in casemates in two gun decks amidships. She also carried sixteen QF 12-pounder guns and twelve QF 2-pounder guns. She was also equipped with five 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes, four of which were submerged in the ship's hull on the broadside, with the last in a deck-mounted launcher on the stern. CAESAR and the other ships of her class had 9 inches (229 mm) of Harvey armour, which allowed equal protection with less cost in weight compared to previous types of armour. This allowed CAESAR and her sisters to have a deeper and lighter belt than previous battleships without any loss in protection. The barbettes for the main battery were protected with 14 in (360 mm) of armour, and the conning tower had the same thickness of steel on the sides. The ship's armoured deck was 2.5 to 4.5 in (64 to 114 mm) thick.
Service history
HMS CAESAR was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, with her keel laying taking place on 25 March 1895. She was launched on 2 September 1896, and completed in January 1898.[2] The ship was commissioned at Portsmouth on 13 January to serve in the Mediterranean Fleet. Before leaving for the Mediterranean, she was attached temporarily to the Channel Fleet to serve in home waters. In May 1898, CAESAR departed the United Kingdom for her Mediterranean service, undergoing a refit at Malta in 1900–01. Captain George Callaghan was appointed to command her on 21 December 1901, succeeding Captain John Ferris. She ended her Mediterranean service in October 1903, paying off at Portsmouth on 6 October 1903 to begin a refit. Her refit completed, CAESAR was commissioned at Portsmouth on 2 February 1904 to relieve her sister ship HMS MAJESTIC as flagship of the Channel Fleet. When the Channel Fleet became the Atlantic Fleet as a result of a reorganisation on 1 January 1905, CAESAR became flagship of the Atlantic Fleet. She was relieved of this duty in March 1905, becoming 2nd Flagship of the new Channel Fleet (which had been the Home Fleet prior to the reorganisation).
On 3 June 1905, CAESAR collided with and sank the barque AFGHANISTAN off Dungeness, suffering significant damage; her bridge wings were carried away and the boats, davits, and net booms on her port side were badly damaged. CAESAR was refitted at Devonport to repair the damage. CAESAR became Flagship, Rear Admiral, Home Fleet, in December 1905. She was relieved of this duty in February 1907 and transferred back to the Atlantic Fleet to become its temporary flagship. She served in this role until May 1907. On 27 May 1907, CAESAR was recommissioned for service in the Devonport Division of the new Home Fleet, which had been formed in January 1907. During this service she underwent a refit at Devonport in 1907–08. In May 1909, CAESAR transferred to the Nore, temporarily serving as the flagship of Vice Admiral, 3rd and 4th Divisions, Home Fleet. In April 1911 she transferred to Devonport to serve in the 3rd Division, Home Fleet. On 16 January 1911, CAESAR was rammed by the barque EXCELSIOR in fog at Sheerness, suffering no serious damage. In March 1912, CAESAR was placed in commissioned reserve with a nucleus crew as part of the 4th Division, Home Fleet.
At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, CAESAR was brought back into full commission and transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet; the squadron was charged with the defence of the English Channel. During this service she helped in transporting the Plymouth Marine Division from Plymouth to Ostend, Belgium, and covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In December 1914, CAESAR was detached from the 7th Battle Squadron and transferred to Gibraltar to serve as guard ship and gunnery training ship there. In July 1915, she transferred to the North America and West Indies Station, serving as guard ship and gunnery training ship at Bermuda and patrolling the Atlantic.
Her North America and West Indies Station service ended in September 1918, when CAESAR was transferred to relieve HMS ANDROMACHE (the old second-class cruiser and former minelayer HMS LATONA) as flagship of the Senior Naval Officer, British Adriatic Squadron, at Corfu, the last British pre-dreadnought to serve as a flagship. In September 1918, CAESAR went to Malta for refit as a depot ship, during which she was equipped with repair shops and with leisure facilities such as recreation rooms and reading rooms. This conversion completed, she took up duties in October 1918 at Mudros as depot ship for the British Aegean Squadron. In January 1919 she was transferred to Port Said, Egypt, for service as a depot ship there. In June 1919, CAESAR transited the Dardanelles and transferred to the Black Sea, where she served as a depot ship for British naval forces operating against the Bolsheviks during the Russian Revolution. In this service she became the last British pre-dreadnought to serve operationally overseas. CAESAR returned to the United Kingdom in March 1920, paid off at Devonport on 23 April 1920, and was placed on the disposal list. She was sold to...

ALTAI and PEHR BRAHE

On 2 February 2016, the stamp series featuring Åland sailing ships continues with Allan Palmer's detailed paintings of the brig ALTAI and the barque PEHR BRAHE.

The six-year series started in 2015 with the issues featuring the schooner LEMLAND and the barquentine LEO. Captain and artist Allan Palmer made a comprehensive research to be able to illustrate the coming sailing ships ALTAI and PEHR BRAHE in a genuine entourage.

The brig ALTAI was built in 1859 on Vårdö for a jointly owned shipping firm with several part-owners. ALTAI chiefly transported timber on the North Sea, and she yielded good profits until taken out of use in 1876. On the stamp, ALTAI lies at anchor outside the port of Copenhagen, a common destination for taking onboard provision and buying gear.

The barque PEHR BRAHE was built in 1877 in Parainen for major shipowner Nikolai Sittkoff in Mariehamn. The barque is presumed to be the first actual deep sea ship from Åland and, sailing to Vladivostok and Nikolayevsk on the Pacific Coast in 1879, she became the first Åland ship to reach the Far East. Allan Palmer has depicted PEHR BRAHE on a long eastward voyage with a certain sail panel with studding sail described in the ship's logbook
I have, that the PEHR BRAHE was built in Haraldsholm, Pargas as a wooden 3 mast barque rigged sailing vessel.
Tonnage 560 ton, dim. 46.69 x 10.08 x 5.15m
A charter party of 13 November 1879 exist of a voyage between Nagasaki and Hong Kong..
1885 She made a voyage with hides from Montevideo to New York, https://law.resource.org/pub/us/case/re ... f.0642.pdf
1920 was she scrapped.
During her career did she have three commanders, Capt J. Isaksson, Petrell and G. Juselius.

Aland Islands 2016 0.10E and 10.00 Euro, sg?, scott?
Aland Post web-site. Lloyds Registry, Internet.

AZALEA HMS 2015

Built as a sloop under yard No 531 by Barclay, Curle & Co, Whiteinch, Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
? Laid down.
10 September 1915 launched as the HMS AZALEA (T32) one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 ihp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77.
October 1915 completed.

Of her wartime career I can’t find anything, only that in July 1917 her bow was almost blown off by a mine, and she was repaired in Malta
? Decommissoned.
01 February 1923 she was sold to J. Hornby & Sons for scrap and she was broken up the same year.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ANEMONE HMS 1915

Built as a sloop under yard No 988 by Swan, Hunter & W. Richardson, Low Walker for the Royal Navy.
January 1915 ordered.
25 January 1915 laid down.
13 May 1915 (other source 30 June 1915) launched as HMS ANEMONE (M-27), she was one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 hp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77
07 July 1915 commissioned.

The class was first built as minesweepers, with reinforced bows to improve survivability if struck by a mine.
She were refitted in 1917 to carry depth charges and re-deployed as convoy escorts.
From 15 February 1916 she joined the Smyrna patrol to blockade the Turkish coast from Cape Kaba to Latitude 38 30E included Smyrna (now called Izmir).
Her base was at Port Iere on the Greek island of Mytelene, very near to the Turkish coast.
17/18 February 1916 took part in the operations at Khios.
? Decommissioned.
06 September 1922 sold to Marple & Gillott and she was broken up at Saltash, U.K.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ALBION HMS 1901

Built as a battleship by Thames Ironwork & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Blackwall, London for the Royal Navy.
03 December 1896 keel laid down.
21 June 1898 launched as the HMS ALBION, one of the Canopus class.
Displacement 12,950 ton light, 14,320 ton full load. Dim. 132 x 23 x 7.9m (draught)
Length bpp. 18.8m.
Powered by two vertical triple expansion steam engine, 15,400 ihp., twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament:2 – 12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 10 – 12 pdr QF, 6 – 3 pdr, guns and 4 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 750.
25 June 1901 commissioned.

HMS ALBION was a British Canopus-class predreadnought battleship. Commissioned into the Royal Navy in 1901, she served on the China Station until 1905. She was then employed as part of the Channel Fleet until 1907, at which time she began service with the Atlantic Fleet. Following the outbreak of World War I, she saw action in operations against German Southwest Africa in 1914 and also served in the Dardanelles campaign against the Turks, supporting the landings at Gallipoli. She remained in the Mediterranean until 1916, and then returned to the United Kingdom for service as a guard ship for the remainder of the war. She was scrapped in 1920.
Technical Description
HMS ALBION was laid down by Thames Iron Works at Leamouth, London on 3 December 1896. Tragedy struck when she was launched on 21 June 1898; after the Duchess of York christened her, a wave created by ALBION's entry into the water caused a stage from which 200 people were watching to collapse into a side creek, and 34 people, mostly women and children, drowned. This was probably one of the first ever ship launchings to be filmed. ALBION's completion then was delayed by late delivery of her machinery. She finally began trials late in 1900, during which she was further delayed by machinery and gun defects, and she was not finally completed until June 1901.
ALBION was designed for service in the Far East, and to be able to transit the Suez Canal. She was designed to be smaller (by about 2,000 tons), lighter, and faster than her predecessors, the Majestic-class battleships, although she was slightly longer at 430 feet (131 meters). In order to save weight, she carried less armour than the Majestics, although the change from Harvey armour in the Majestics to Krupp armour in ALBION meant that the loss in protection was not as great as it might have been, Krupp armour having greater protective value at a given weight than its Harvey equivalent. Still, her armour was light enough to make her almost a second-class battleship.
Part of her armour scheme included the use of a special 1-inch (2.54 mm) armoured deck over the belt to defend against plunging fire by howitzers that France reportedly planned to install on its ships, although this report proved to be false.[
ALBION had four 12-inch (305-mm) 35-calibre guns mounted in twin turrets fore and aft, mounted in circular barbettes that allowed all-around loading, although at a fixed elevation. She also mounted twelve 6-inch (152-mm) 40-calibre guns (sponson mounting allowing some of them to fire fore and aft) in addition to smaller guns, and four 18-inch (457-mm) submerged torpedo tubes.
The Canopus-class ships were the first British battleships with water-tube boilers, which generated more power at less expense in weight compared with the cylindrical boilers used in previous ships. The new boilers led to the adoption of fore-and-aft funnels, rather than the side-by-side funnel arrangement used in may previous British battleships. The Canopus-class ships proved to be good steamers, consuming 10 tons of coal per hour at full speed, with a high speed for battleships of their time, a full two knots faster than the Majestics.[
Pre-World War I
HMS ALBION was commissioned on 25 June 1901 at Chatham Dockyard, by Captain W. W. Hewett and a complement of 779 officers and men, to relieve battleship BARFLEUR on the China Station. She arrived at Hong Kong on 11 September 1901, and relieved BARFLEUR as second flagship of the China Station, based in that city. Captain Martyn Jerram was appointed in command in March 1902. During her time on the station, she underwent refits at Hong Kong in 1902 and 1905.
In 1905, the United Kingdom and Japan ratified a treaty of alliance, reducing the requirement for a large British presence on the China Station, and the Royal Navy recalled all its battleships from the station. At Singapore, ALBION rendezvoused with her sister ships OCEAN and VENGEANCE and battleship CENTURION , and on 20 June 1905 the four battleships departed to steam in company to Plymouth, where they arrived on 2 August 1905.
ALBION then became part of the Channel Fleet. She soon suffered a mishap, colliding with battleship DUNCAN at Lerwick on 26 September 1905, but suffered no damage. ALBION transferred to the commissioned Reserve on 3 April 1906, and underwent an engine and boiler refit at Chatham. On 25 February 1907, ALBION paid off at Portsmouth.
On 26 February 1907, ALBION recommissioned at Portsmouth for temporary service with the Portsmouth Division of the Home Fleet. She returned to full commission on 26 March 1907 to begin service in the Atlantic Fleet. During this service, she underwent a refit at Gibraltar in 1908 and at Malta in 1909. She was with the fleet that visited London from 17 July to 24 July 1909 to be entertained by the citizens of the city, and on 31 July 1909 was present at the fleet review of the Home and Atlantic Fleets at Cowes by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.
ALBION ended her Atlantic Fleet service by paying off on 25 August 1909. She then began service at the Nore as parent ship of the 4th Division, Home Fleet. She became a unit of the 3rd Fleet at the Nore in May 1912 and underwent a refit at Chatham that year. She was stationed at Pembroke Dock in 1913.
World War I
When World War I broke out in August 1914, ALBION was assigned to the 8th Battle Squadron, Channel Fleet. On 15 August 1914, she became second flagship of the new 7th Battle Squadron. On 21 August 1914, she was sent to the Saint Vincent-Finisterre Station to provide battleship support to cruiser squadrons operating in the Atlantic in case German Navy heavy ships broke out into the open Atlantic. On 3 September 1914, she transferred her flag, becoming a private ship, and moved to the Cape Verde-Canary Islands station to relieve her sister ship CANOPUS there.
ALBION was transferred to the Cape of Good Hope Station in South Africa in October 1914, where she took up duty as a guard ship at Walvis Bay through November 1914. In December 1914 and January 1915, she participated in Allied operations against German Southwest Africa.
Dardanelles campaign
ALBION transferred to the Mediterranean in January 1915 to participate in the Dardanelles campaign. She took part in the bombardment of the Ottoman Turkish forts guarding the outer entrance to the Dardanelles on 18 February 1915 and 19 February 1915. ALBION, MAJESTIC and TRIUMP became the first Allied battleships to enter the Turkish Straits during the Dardanelles campaign on 26 February 1915 when they made the initial attack on the inner forts. ALBION then supported the first Allied landings in late February 1915 and early March 1915.
In action against Ottoman forts on 1 March 1915, ALBION took repeated hits but sustained no serious damage. She participated in the main attack on the forts on 18 March 1915, and supported the main landings at V Beach at Cape Helles on 25 April 1915. On 28 April 1915 she suffered significant damage from Ottoman shore batteries during an attack on Krithia, forcing her to retire to Mudros for repairs. Back in action on 2 May 1915, she again suffered damage necessitating repairs at Mudros.
On the night of 22–23 May 1915, ALBION beached on a sandbank off Gaba Tepe and came under heavy fire from Ottoman...

Canoe of Bilibili.New Guinea.

The best canoe seen by explorers were at Bilibili of Madang Province which is the center of a flourishing pottery industry, the canoes being largely employed in this trade: The canoes are from 20 to 30 feet long; each end of the hull is produced into a long point flattened above, to which Ovulum shells are fastened. Many canoes have two washstrakes on each side which are frequently painted with representations of fishes, turtles, and birds. Canoe have the breakwater as having fastened to it in front a carved forwardly protecting spur to which tassels are attached. The two booms are curved and each is connected to the rather weak float (about 14 feet long) by two pairs of undercrossed sticks. Amidships on the booms is a platform on which is erected a kind of cabin resembling a large cage in which merchandise (pottery), provisions, and weapons, are stored; a potsherd with glowing charcoal in a layer of sand is carried on the platform. The roof forms a second platform and has lateral railings. There is a two mast. Each mast carries a small quadrangular mat sail, they diverge fore and aft from two-storied platform. The end of the mast is often adorned with a roughly carved wooden bird or a ruddled Nautilus shell. The Bilibili natives are not great sailors. They may go as far as Karkar ( Dampier lsland) a distance of 40 miles, and never go out of sight of land, nor do they put to sea in rough weather but on the whole the sea here is calm. The Bilibili canoes of a smaller build are exactly like those at Bongu. Тhe anchor as a piece of tree trunk, the partially cut-off branches of which form hooks; it is weighted with one large or several small stones which are bound on with rattan, and a strong rattan serves at a cable, this use how a sinker for a fishtrap. There are three sizes of paddles for men, women, and children, besides the steering paddle which are large and rough. The grips of the paddles have the grip carved and often pierced, or as in some steering paddles, with a human head but there is no crutch.
Papua New Guinea 2009;K3.70;SG?
Sources:A. Haddon, John. Hornell: Canoes of Oceania.1937.Volume II. http://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania/Oceania.html
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MELLA (451)

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MELLA (451)

Postby shipstamps » Thu Feb 19, 2009 3:42 pm


Click image to view full size
Built under yard No 561 as a patrol frigate by Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Co, Lauzon, Canada for the Royal Canadian Navy.
30 November 1943 keel laid down.
06 July 1944 launched as the HMCS CARLPLACE (K644) one of the River Class frigates. She was named after the town Carleton Place near Ottawa, Canada.
Displacement 1.445 ton standard, 2.217 ton full load, dim. 301.5 x 36.6 x 9ft. (draught).
Powered by two triple expansion steam engines, 5.500 hp., speed 19 knots.
Armament 2 – 4 inch, 4 – 20mm, Hedgehog.
13 December 1944 commissioned at Ottawa.

She was the last Royal Canadian Navy frigate to enter service during World War II.
When in route to Halifax on her maiden voyage she suffered serious ice damage to her hull, and after arrival Halifax she underwent several weeks of repairs there, later in Philadelphia.
From Philadelphia she steamed to Bermuda for a work up period.
24 March 1945 returned in Halifax.
In April she got orders to join EG 16 at Londonderry, Northern Ireland and sailed there via the Azores.
05 May she sailed from Londonderry for duty as an escort for a convoy between the U.K and Gibraltar.
Late May she returned to Canada for tropicalization refit in Saint John, New Brunswick which begun on 02 June. The refit to make her suitable to operate in tropical waters was continued on 10 July at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.
20 August the refit was called off, (end of World War II.)
13 November 1945 decommissioned at Halifax, and laid up at Shelburne.

1946 Sold to the Dominican Republic and converted in a presidential yacht, renamed PRESIDENTE TRUJILLO (F-101), named after at that time President of Dominican Republic.
1962 After the family Trujillo lost there grip of power on the country, she was renamed MELLA (451) and used as a yacht- training vessel by the navy of the Dominican Republic.
Armed with 1 – 76.2mm, 2 – 40mm and 4 – 20mm guns. Also fitted out with an American radar installation.
Based at Santo Domingo.

2003 Was she offered free by the Dominican Republic to Carleton Place, but they had to bring the vessel on their own account to Canada.
But she was in a bad shape and not much was left of the original vessel and the offer was not accepted.

2009 Most probably laying idle in some place or scrapped, can not find anything on her more on the internet.

Dominican Republic 1983 15c sg1527.

Source: http://www.gocadets.ca/carlplace/carlplace.html http://www.navyleague.ca Jane’s .
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