SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

ELIZABETH 1577

ELIZABETH: She was one of the ships of Francis Drake expedition to the Pacific, which sailed from Plymouth on 13 December 1577.
Were built unknown, tonnage 80 tons burthen, 16 guns and under command of Captain John Winter who was the second in command of the fleet.
The voyage is well known, and I will not repeat it.
After passing the Strait of Magellan on 8 October 1578 the ELIZABETH in a strong gale lost contact with the GOLDEN HIND and Captain de Winter decided to return back to England, thinking that the GOLDEN HIND had sunk.
02 June 1579 she arrived back in Plymouth, with part of the loot they had made on the voyage.
Fate unknown.

British Virgin Islands 1997 40c sg983, scott876h

MARIA or MARY

Not much is known of the MARY which is given on the stamp as MARIA, only that it was a Spanish ship, some sources give a Portuguese ship.
While in the Cape Verde Islands, the fleet captured six Spanish ships, including the SANTA MARIA, which contained the Portuguese pilot Nuňo da Silva who knew the waters of the Pacific. His ship was renamed the MARY and put under command of Thomas Doughty, a gentleman adventurer aboard
Most of the captured ships Drake get rid of, but the SANTA MARY joined his fleet. On the Argentinian coast during a storm she lost contact with the fleet, later she joined the fleet again but it was found that she was severe damaged in the storm and her hull was rotten. Drake decided to destroy her before she were passing the Strait of Magellan.

Source: Various internet sites.
British Virgin Islands 1997 40c sg984, scott876i.

SWAN 1577

Of the SWAN not much I known, there were two ships with the name SWAN used by Drake and the sources sometimes mix up the two. .
Drake used a SWAN (1) on his early expeditions to the West Indies, so far not depict on a stamp.
He made two voyages to the West Indies, in 1570 and 1571, of which little is known, the vessel used was the SWAN (1) a flyboat of 50 tons. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flyboat
In 1572, he embarked on his first major independent enterprise. He planned an attack on the Isthmus of Panama, known to the Spanish as Tierra Firme and the English as the Spanish Main. This was the point at which the silver and gold treasure of Peru had to be landed and sent overland to the Caribbean Sea, where galleons from Spain would pick it up at the town of Nombre de Dios. Drake left Plymouth on 24 May 1572, with a crew of 73 men in two small vessels, the PASCHA (70 tons) and the SWAN (1) (25 tons? ), to capture Nombre de Dios.
His first raid was late in July 1572. Drake and his men captured the town and its treasure. When his men noticed that Drake was bleeding profusely from a wound, they insisted on withdrawing to save his life and left the treasure. He recovered but did not have sufficient men to crew both ships and three pinnaces, he decided to abandon the SWAN (1), she was set on fire.
Drake marauding for almost one year the coast of Panama before he sailed home with his loot, Arrived Plymouth 09 August 1573.

SWAN (2) depict on the British Virgin Island stamp. Where and when built I could not find.
It is given she was a flyboat of 25 ton, armed with 5 guns. And she sailed with Drake’s fleet on 15 November 1577 from Plymouth under command of John Chester.
She was abandoned due to not sufficient men to man the other ships of the fleet at Puerto San Julián, Patagonia on 17 August 1578. Other sources give that she was broken up on the coast of Argentina, and her useable parts divided across the other ships of the fleet.

British Virgin Islands 1887 40c sg981, scott876f.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Drake

Fishing in Barbados

This set issued by Barbados in 1991 of four stamps shows us “Fishing in Barbados”
1) 5c The afterdeck of a fishing vessel with boxes of fish catched that day. Watercraft on stamps II, ATA Handbook 156 gives that she is the ERICA.
2) 50c Catching of a fish by a line.
3) 75c Cleaning of fish, with in the background an open fishing boat.
4) $2.50 Weighing of a swordfish, with in the background a fishing launch.

Barbados 1991 5c/$2.50 sg 952/55, scott799/802.

ROYNDIN FRIOA

Faroe Islands issued one stamp in 2016 which shows us Nólsoyar Páll with behind him a square sail on a mast, most probably not belonging to the ROYNDIN FRIOA, she was as given rigged as a schooner but more a sail of a Viking ship. By the stamp is given:

How is a national hero created?
These are semi-mythical figures whose names are imprinted in the national consciousness and apparently survive changing tastes and political currents quite effortlessly. If you ask a Faroese whom he considers to be the national hero of our small island nation, the answer will almost certainly be: Nólsoyar Páll. And the reason is like winning the lottery - he was the right man at the right time, intelligent, combative and stubborn - along with the paradoxical fact that his worldview, ideas and behaviour were completely and utterly Unfaroese - at least in the eyes of his contemporaries.
Out into the big world
Poul Poulsen Nolsøe was born in 1766. In the following year a Copenhagen merchant, Niels Ryberg, built a transit warehouse in Torshavn to avoid trade restrictions imposed because of the American Revolution and the war between England and France. Ryberg‘s trade opened the door to the outside world in a society that had largely remained stagnant since the Middle Ages, dominated by monopolistic trade practices which severely affected growth and development in the country. In a twenty-year period ships arrived in the Faroes from all corners of the world and this was bound to make its mark on the population. It suddenly became possible to be concerned with things other than mere subsistence agriculture, coastal fishing and the hunting of birds and pilot whales.
It was in this time of prosperity that Poul Nolsøe grew up. He received good education, studied navigation and eventually became a seaman. After a few years of sailing on the route between the Faroe Islands and Denmark, he went ahead and sailed across the seas for some years, serving for instance as an officer on Danish and American ships. In 1798 Nolsøe appeared again as a mate, and later captain, on monopoly vessels. He got married and had a daughter, but his young wife died just a few years later. The following year he married again and settled down as a farmer in Biskupsstøð, in what is now the town of Klaksvík. At that time, the Ryberg era was over and the Faroe Islands were slowly descending into the pre-1767 condition.
ROYNDIN FRIOA
It goes without saying that an active and well-travelled man like Poul Nolsøe found it hard to adapt to the sluggish way of life as a farmer in a stagnant society. He quickly joined the company of like-minded people who wanted free trade, free access to foreign market, free enterprise and community growth. Together with two of his companions, Nolsøe wanted to purchase a vessel for freight and fishing. They were, however, unable to obtain loans for the purchase, so instead in 1804 they bought the wreck of a ship that had run aground at Hvalba in Suðuroy.
The wreckage was transported to Vágur where Poul and his brothers built a small ship in record time. It was 14.5 m long, 4.4 m wide and about 2.5 m deep. August 6th saw the launching of the first ship built in the Faroes since the Middle Ages. It was named ROYNDIN FRIDA (The Lovely Experiment) and that same month they did some exploratory fishing in Faroese waters. An eyewitness report in 1805 states that ROYNDIN FRIOA had been rigged as a schooner, and was in other respects “a masterpiece.”
Travels and Struggle with Officialdom
The launching of ROYNDIN FRIOA proved to be the inception of a bitter and turbulent dispute between Poul Nolsøe and his like-minded compatriots on one hand and government officials on the other. The Royal Trade Monopoly enjoyed exclusive rights to import indispensable items as well as the rights to export goods specified in the tariff list. In 1805 Poul Nolsøe made two trips with ROYNDIN FRIOA, the first to Bergen carrying Faroese coal and the other to Copenhagen, also with a coal cargo. Due to the import restrictions they did not bring any cargo back to the Faroes.
At the end of spring fishing season the following year Nolsøe went on an actual trading trip. He would bring woollen sweaters, dried fish and cod-liver oil since these goods were not covered by the tariff list. Officials in Torshavn dispatched a letter of protest to the Danish authorities – forbidding him to bring any goods back home. Nolsøe protested and sought permission to bring freight home for his own account. He received a partial promise to do this, but time dragged on and he was in a hurry to return home for the summer fishing season. Finally he refused to wait any longer. He bought goods, declared them as freight to Kristiansand in Norway and set out to sea. The Danish authorities realized that he had provided wrong information and a message was dispatched to the Faroe Islands to the effect that the cargo of ROYNDIN FRIOA should be seized and Nolsøe brought before a court of law.
This was the beginning of a bizarre and protracted litigation. It was difficult for the officials to appear convincing, since they themselves were involved in various semi-corrupt side affairs - and moreover were unable to prove that Nolsøe was a smuggler. He himself claimed that the goods had been transferred to a Swedish vessel on the open sea. In the end Nolsøe was convicted of breaking quarantine rules. He was fined 735 dollars for selling goods on the high seas but acquitted of black market trading.
The authorities had not heard the last from Poul Nolsøe. He was an excellent poet – and in the winter of 1806-07 he wrote the brilliant libellous verse “Fuglakvæðið” (Poem of Birds) where he exposes his opponents, the officials, as rapacious birds of prey terrorizing and exploiting the country’s peaceful bird population.
In June 1807 Poul Nolsøe sailed back to Copenhagen with a delegation wishing to apply for a trial period of free trade, negotiate fairer prices and more advantageous terms and conditions. These were troubled times. The war between France and England had entered a new phase and Denmark’s neutrality was threatened. Crown Prince Frederik (later Frederik VI) who ruled on behalf of his insane father was staying in Kiel in Holstein. The four Faroese delegates travelled to Kiel to submit their petition.
Crown Prince Frederik was much more accommodating than the treasury and the chancellery of commerce. He ordered that the seized goods be returned and the ship provided with freight to bring back home to the Faroes. Things looked promising for Poul Nolsøe and his delegation, but time dragged on. The crisis between Denmark and England deteriorated. In July the British sent a large naval and invasion force into the Baltic Sea to force Denmark to surrender its fleet which the British feared would end up in the hands of Napoleon. Despite intense negotiations, England sent forces ashore, besieged Copenhagen and bombarded the city until it surrendered and turned in all of the country’s naval ships.
This humiliating treatment resulted in Denmark siding with the French in the war which would have disastrous consequences for the Faroe Islands. After the surrender, Nolsøe sought permission from the British admiral to sail back to the Faroe Islands with a cargo of grain. ROYNDIN FRIOA came back home in early October and the grain was unloaded in Suðuroy.
Nine months passed until the next ship arrived with grain supplies. Conditions deteriorated in the Faroe Islands, pirates ravaged the islands, pursuing cargo ships from Denmark. Despite the obvious hardships, Governor Løbner would not allow ROYNDIN FRIOA to sail with cargo. Instead he wanted Poul Nolsøe to sail to Norway or Denmark bringing intelligence from the Faroes. During the first half of 1808, two English pirates caused havoc in the Faroe Islands and Governor Løbner had to surrender the garrison without...

FORT WILLIAM Engraving by Elisha Kirkall

This stamp issued by India in 1990 shows us an engraving by the artist Elisha Kirkall of the British East India Company “Fort William” at Calcutta and in front of the fort on the River Gangus British ships, the ships are not identified but most probably company ships.

By the engraving is given:
Mezzotint engraving by Elisha Kirkall (c.1682-1742) after George Lambert (1710-65) of Fort William at Calcutta published in London in 1735. This print is after the painting in the Court Room of the British East India Company's house in Leadenhall Street in London. Calcutta was founded on the banks of the River Hooghly by Job Charnock in 1690. In the foreground, there are a number of English vessels, three of which are firing salutes. Behind, Fort William shows two lines of battlements that enclose Government House and over the roof rises the steeple of St Anne's Church, which was consecrated in 1709. The fort was destroyed by the forces of Siraj-ud-Daulah the Nawab of Bengal in 1757. A new Fort William was constructed to the south of the city in Gobindpore and designed by John Brohier.

Source: http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex ... 00000.html
India 1990 6r sg1433, scott1342
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Tynwald

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Tynwald

Postby shipstamps » Wed Jan 14, 2009 4:04 pm


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Tynwald was built by Robert Napier and launched in 1846. With a gross tonnage of 700, she had dimensions: 188 ft. (b.p.) x 27 ft. x 13 ft 6 in. and was rigged as a barquentine. Her cost was £21,500 and she was in service until 1866 when she was sold. A particular point of interest is that her figure head represented a Manx - Scandinavian king in armour.
British Sailors Society label. SG543 Sea Breezes7/54
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Re: Tynwald

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Jul 07, 2009 9:48 pm

She was built as an iron 3-mast paddle steamer by R.Napier & Sons at Glasgow for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company Ltd.
Launched on 28 April 1846 under the name TYNWALD, named after the ancient hull or mound upon which the laws of the island are yearly promulgated.
Tonnage 700 tons, dim. 188 x 13.6 x 16.6ft.
Oscillating steam engine 280 nhp, speed around 18/19 knots.
She carried a figurehead of a full length Manx Scandinavian king in armor. Had a clipper bow.
Had accommodation for 781 passengers.
Building cost £ 21.500.

Used in the passenger and cargo service between Liverpool and the Island of Man. Her cabins were elegantly furnished and decorated and there was a large deck-saloon.
Her first voyage from Liverpool to Douglas a distance of 84 miles, she covered in 4 hours and 18 minutes.
When on charter with the Liverpool and Belfast Company in December 1846 she collided with the mail steamer URGENT during dense fog, damaged one of her paddleboxes. There was a repair bill of £386 but the company claimed from the other party the nice sum of £2.004 in compensation for damage and loss of earnings, the claim was settled for £ 1.489.
During the winter seasons in 1850 she was chartered for a voyage to the Mediterranean, she made calls in Gibraltar, Genoa and Leghorn before returning home, she made the roundtrip in 30 days.
December 1863 in collision with the Naval brig WILD WAVE, costing the company £1.128.
During 1861 she carried the new appointed Lieutenant Governor Pigott to the island, he settled in Douglass.
From 1863 was she only used as cargo vessel.
1866 Sold for £5.000 to Caird and Co in part payment for TYNWALD II. Broken up the same year.

On the stamp she is depict moored alongside in the port of Douglas.

Source: West Coast Steamers by Duckworth and Langmuir. Island Lifeline by Connery Chappell. Some websites but lost the URL.
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