KAISER BARBAROSSA SMS 1901

Built as a battleship under yard No 640 by Schichau, Danzig for the Imperial German Navy.
03 August 1898 keel laid down.
21 April 1900 Launched as the KAISER BARBAROSSA, named after Frederick I. Barbarossa.
Displacement 11,599 tons full load, dim. 125.3 20.4 x 7.89 m. (draught). Lpp. 120.9 m.
Powered by triple expansion steam engines, 13,000 ihp, three shafts, speed 17.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 10 knots, 3,940 mile.
Armament: 4 – 24 cm, 18 – 15 cm, 12 – 8.8 cm and 12 – 1pdr. guns. 6 – 45 cm torpedo tubes.
Crew 39 officers and 612 enlisted.
10 June 1901 commissioned.

SMS KAISER BARBAROSSA (His Majesty's Ship Emperor Barbarossa) was a German pre-dreadnought battleship of the Kaiser Friedrich III class. The ship was built for the Imperial Navy, which had begun a program of expansion at the direction of Kaiser Wilhelm II. She was constructed at Schichau, in Danzig. KAISER BARBAROSSA was laid down in August 1898, launched on 24 April 1900, and completed in June 1901, at the cost of 20,301,000 Marks. The ship was armed with a main battery of four 24-centimeter (9.4 in) guns in two twin gun turrets.
KAISER BARBAROSSA served with the German navy from her commissioning in 1901, though her active career was limited due to two lengthy stays in drydock. The first was for repairs following damage to her rudder in 1903, which lasted until early 1905, and the second for a major modernization, which began immediately after the conclusion of repair work in 1905 and lasted until late 1907. She returned to service for another two years, before being decommissioned in 1909 and placed in the reserve division. She continued to participate in fleet training exercises for the next three years.
Following the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, KAISER BARBAROSSA and her sisters were mobilized as coastal defense ships in the V Battle Squadron and assigned to the North and Baltic Seas. She saw no combat during the war, and due to a shortage of crews, the ships were withdrawn from active duty in February 1915 and relegated to secondary duties. KAISER BARBAROSSA was briefly used as a torpedo target ship for most of 1915 and thereafter spent the remainder of the war as a prison ship in Wilhelmshaven. Following the end of the war in 1918, KAISER BARBAROSSA was decommissioned and sold for scrap metal. The ship was broken up in 1919–1920.
KAISER BARBAROSSA was 125.3 m (411 ft) long overall and had a beam of 20.4 m (67 ft) and a draft of 7.89 m (25.9 ft) forward and 8.25 m (27.1 ft) aft. She displaced up to 11,599 t (11,416 long tons; 12,786 short tons) at full load. The ship was powered by three 3-cylinder vertical triple-expansion steam engines that drove three screw propellers. Steam was provided by four Marine-type and eight cylindrical boilers, all of which burned coal. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s powerplant was rated at 13,000 indicated horsepower (9,700 kW), which generated a top speed of 18 knots (33 km/h). She had a normal crew of 39 officers and 612 enlisted men.
KAISER BARBAROSSA’s armament consisted of a main battery of four 24 cm (9.4 in) SK L/40 guns in twin gun turrets,[a] one fore and one aft of the central superstructure.[2] Her secondary armament consisted of eighteen 15 cm (5.9 inch) SK L/40 guns and twelve 8.8 cm (3.45 in) SK L/30 quick-firing guns. The armament suite was rounded out with six 45 cm torpedo tubes, all in above-water swivel mounts. The ship's belt armor was 300 mm (11.8 in) thick, and the deck was 65 mm (2.6 in) thick. The conning tower and main battery turrets were protected with 250 mm (9.8 in) of armor plating, and the secondary casemates received 150 mm (5.9 in) of armor protection.[1]
Service history
Kaiser Wilhelm II, the emperor of Germany, believed that a strong navy was necessary for the country to expand its influence outside continental Europe. As a result, he initiated a program of naval expansion in the late 1880s; the first battleships built under this program were the four Brandenburg-class ships. These were immediately followed by the five Kaiser Friedrich III-class battleships, of which KAISER BARBAROSSA was a member. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s keel was laid down on 3 August 1898, at the Schichau-Werke in Danzig, under construction number 640. She was ordered under the contract name "A" as an addition to the fleet. KAISER BARBAROSSA was launched on 21 April 1900, and then-Vizeadmiral (Vice Admiral) Alfred von Tirpitz, the State Secretary of the Reichsmarineamt (RMA—Imperial Navy Office), gave the launching speech, and the new battleship was christened by Princess Luise Sofie of Prussia. Sea trials began on 4 May 1901, during which two tests were recorded: a 50-hour endurance test and a 6-hour speed test. The former produced a sustained speed of 15.5 kn (28.7 km/h; 17.8 mph), while the latter saw a maximum speed of 18 kn (33 km/h; 21 mph).[5] and on 10 June she was commissioned into the fleet in Kiel. The final cost of the vessel was 20,301,000 marks.
Following her commissioning, KAISER BARBAROSSA was assigned to the I Squadron of the fleet, which shortly thereafter went on a cruise to Spain. While moored in Cadiz, the ships met the four Brandenburg-class ships, which were returning from their expedition to suppress the Boxer Rebellion in China. From 22 August to 21 September, KAISER BARBAROSSA participated in the annual autumn maneuvers of the entire fleet. While in the Danzig Bay, the fleet conducted a naval review for the visiting Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. The winter cruise in December went to southern Norway. In April and May 1902, the squadron went on a training cruise to Britain, followed by a tour of the Kiel Week sailing regatta in late June. The ships then took part in another training cruise to Norway in July and then the autumn maneuvers, which began in the Baltic and concluded in the North Sea with a fleet review in the Jade. During the exercise, which lasted from 17 August to 18 September, KAISER BARBAROSSA and the rest of I Squadron were assigned to play both the role of the German fleet and hostile forces. The usual winter cruise went to Bergen, Norway that year.
In 1903, the fleet, which was composed of only one squadron of battleships, was reorganized as the "Active Battle Fleet." KAISER WILHEM DER GROSSE remained in the I Squadron along with her sister ships and the newest Wittelsbach-class battleships, while the older Brandenburg-class ships were placed in reserve in order to be rebuilt. The first quarter of 1903 followed the usual pattern of training exercises. The squadron went on a training cruise in the Baltic, followed by a voyage to Spain that lasted from 7 May to 10 June. The ship suffered some minor damage to her rudder, which necessitated temporary repairs at the Kaiserliche Werft (Imperial Shipyard) in Kiel from the end of July to 21 August. She thereafter took part in the autumn maneuvers and the winter cruise in the eastern Baltic and the Skagerrak. The autumn maneuvers consisted of a blockade exercise in the North Sea, a cruise of the entire fleet first to Norwegian waters and then to Kiel in early September, and finally a mock attack on Kiel. The exercises concluded on 12 September. The winter training cruise began on 23 November in the eastern Baltic and continued into the Skagerrak in early December. On 15 December, KAISER BARBAROSSA was decommissioned for permanent repairs to her rudder, which lasted until January 1905. She did not return to service, however, and instead began a major reconstruction.
During the modernization, four of her 15 cm guns were removed and two 8.8 cm guns were added. All twelve machine guns were removed, as was the ship's stern-mounted torpedo tube. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s superstructure was also cut down to reduce the ship's tendency to roll excessively and her military masts were replaced with lighter pole masts. The ship's funnels were also lengthened. KAISER...

GRETEL KA 1 yacht 1962

Built as a 12-metre class yacht by Lars Holvorsen Sons Pty Ltd., Sydney for Sir Frank Parker Syndicate, representing the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron.
Designed by Alan Payne. She was built as a wooden boat on iron frames.
19 February 1962 launched as the GRETEL KA 1 she was named after Sir Parker first wife Gretel who died in 1960.
Displacement 26.7 ton, dim. 21.16 x 3.58 x 2.67m. (draught), length on waterline 13.84 m.
Sail area 166.9 m².

She was built as a contender for the 1962 America Cup Races at Newport R.I., USA and was shipped to Newport by a cargo vessel in late May 1962.
It was the first time that an Australian yacht took part in an America Cup Race.
The first race was on15 September where the GRETEL under skipper Jock Sturrock met the defender the WEATHERLY under skipper Bus Mosbacher, which the GRETEL lost by 3 minutes and 43 seconds.
The second race was won by the GRETEL.
The third and fourth races were again won by the WEATHERLY, and the cup stayed in the USA.
After the America Cup Race’s she was shipped back on the PORT WYNDHAM and arrived in Australia in December 1962.
After the cup she was used as a trial horse for several challenges, 1967 for the DAME PATTIE and in 1970 for GRETEL II.
1973 Owned by the Yanchep Estates Pty. Ltd., Perth, Western Australia.
1975 Sold to the Southern Cross America’s Cup Challenge Association Ltd. Perth.
1976 Sold to the Gretel Syndicate, Yanchep, WA Australia.
From 1982 to 1993 in use as a charter yacht in Whitsundays, Australia.
1993 Sold to an unknown owner North Queensland, Australia.
2003 Sold to Doug Peterson, Porto Santo Stefano, Italy.
2005 Sold to Robbe & Berking Classics, and transported to Flensburg, Germany for restoration on their own yard there.
2014 GRETEL is still under restoration with the intention to bring her back to Australia.
Maldives 1987 2r sg1247, scott1255.
Source: http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05521.html and various other web-sites.

VOLTAIRE 1911

Built as a battleship under yard No 1006 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France for the French Navy.
20 July 1907 laid down.
16 January 1909 launched as the VOLTAIRE one of the Danton Class.
Displacement 18.310 ton standard, 19,763 full load, dim. 144.9 x 25.8 x 9.2m. (draught)
Powered by four Parsons steam turbines, 22,500 shp., four shafts, speed 19 knots.
Armament: 2 x 2- 305mm/45 Modéle guns, 16 x 1 – 75mm/65 Modéle guns, 10 x 1 – 47 Hotchkiss guns, 2 – 450mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 681.
01 August 1911 completed.
VOLTAIRE was one of the six Danton class semi-dreadnought battleships built for the French Navy in the late 1900s. Shortly after World War I began, the ship participated in the Battle of Antivari in the Adriatic Sea and helped to sink an Austro-Hungarian protected cruiser. She spent most of the rest of the war blockading the Straits of Otranto and the Dardanelles to prevent German, Austro-Hungarian and Turkish warships from breaking out into the Mediterranean. VOLTAIRE was hit by two torpedoes fired by a German submarine in October 1918, but was not seriously damaged. After the war, she was modernized in 1923–25 and subsequently became a training ship. She was condemned in 1935 and later sold for scrap.
Design and description
Although the Danton-class battleships were a significant improvement from the preceding Liberté class, they were outclassed by the advent of the dreadnought well before they were completed. They were not well liked by the navy, although their numerous rapid-firing guns were of some use in the Mediterranean.
VOLTAIRE was 146.6 meters (481 ft 0 in) long overall and had a beam of 25.8 meters (84 ft 8 in) and a full-load draft of 9.2 meters (30 ft 2 in). She displaced 19,736 metric tons (19,424 long tons) at deep load and had a crew of 681 officers and enlisted men. The ship was powered by four Parsons steam turbines using steam generated by twenty-six Belleville boilers. The turbines were rated at 22,500 shaft horsepower (16,800 kW) and provided a top speed of around 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph). VOLTAIRE, however, reached a top speed of 20.7 knots (38.3 km/h; 23.8 mph) during her sea trials. She carried a maximum of 2,027 tonnes (1,995 long tons) of coal which allowed her to steam for 3,370 nautical miles (6,240 km; 3,880 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph).
VOLTAIRE’s main battery consisted of four 305mm/45 Modèle 1906 guns mounted in two twin gun turrets, one forward and one aft. The secondary battery consisted of twelve 240mm/50 Modèle 1902 guns in twin turrets, three on each side of the ship. A number of smaller guns were carried for defense against torpedo boats. These included sixteen 75 mm (3.0 in) L/65 guns and ten 47 mm (1.9 in) Hotchkiss guns. The ship was also armed with two submerged 450 mm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes. The ship's waterline armor belt was 270 mm (10.6 in) thick and the main battery was protected by up to 300 mm (11.8 in) of armor. The conning tower also had 300 mm thick sides.
Wartime modifications
During the war 75 mm anti-aircraft guns were installed on the roofs of the ship's two forward 240 mm gun turrets. During 1918, the mainmast was shortened to allow the ship to fly a captive kite balloon and the elevation of the 240 mm guns was increased which extended their range to 18,000 meters (20,000 yd).
Career
Construction of VOLTAIRE was begun on 26 December 1906 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée in La Seyne-sur-Mer and the ship was laid down on 20 July 1907. She was launched on 16 January 1909 and was completed on 1 August 1911. The ship was assigned to the Second Division of the 1st Squadron (escadre) of the Mediterranean Fleet when she was commissioned. The ship participated in combined fleet maneuvers between Provence and Tunisia in May–June 1913 and the subsequent naval review conducted by the President of France, Raymond Poincaré on 7 June 1913. Afterwards, VOLTAIRE joined her squadron in its tour of the Eastern Mediterranean in October–December 1913 and participated in the grand fleet exercise in the Mediterranean in May 1914.
World War I
In early August 1914, the ship cruised the Strait of Sicily in an attempt to prevent the German battlecruiser GOEBEN and the light cruiser BRESLAU from breaking out to the West. On 16 August 1914 the combined Anglo-French Fleet under Admiral Auguste Boué de Lapeyrère, including VOLTAIRE, made a sweep of the Adriatic Sea. The Allied ships encountered the Austro-Hungarian cruiser SMS ZENTA, escorted by the destroyer SMS ULAN, blockading the coast of Montenegro. There were too many ships for ZENTA to escape, so she remained behind to allow ULAN to get away and was sunk by gunfire during the Battle of Antivari off the coast of Bar, Montenegro. VOLTAIRE subsequently participated in a number of raids into the Adriatic later in the year and patrolled the Ionian Islands. From December 1914 to 1916, the ship participated in the distant blockade of the Straits of Otranto while based in Corfu. On 1 December 1916, some of her sailors, transported to Athens by her sister MIRABEAU, participated in the Allied attempt to ensure Greek acquiescence to Allied operations in Macedonia. VOLTAIRE spent part of 1917 through April 1918 based at Mudros to prevent GOEBEN from breaking out into the Mediterranean.
The ship was overhauled from May to October 1918 in Toulon. While returning to Mudros on 10 October, the ship was torpedoed by UB-48 off the island of Milos. Despite being struck by two torpedoes, she able to make temporary repairs at Milos before sailing to Bizerte for permanent repairs. VOLTAIRE was based in Toulon throughout 1919 and was modernized in 1922–25 to improve her underwater protection. The ship became a training ship in 1927 and was condemned in 1935.
She was later sold for scrap and broken up from May 1938.
Liberia 2014 $100 sg?, scott?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_battleship_Voltaire

AZZURRA III (I-10)

The Yacht Club Costra Smeralda and backed by Prince Aga Khan did have four yachts at its disposal for the 1986 Louis Vuitton Cup in Perth, Australia the AZZURRA I (I 4), AZZURRA II (I 8), AZZURRA III (I 10) and AZZURRA IV (I 11).
For the Louis Vuitton races was chosen the AZZURRA III (I-10) as the official challenger, representing the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
She was built as a 12-metre class yacht by SAI Ambrosini , Passignano, Italy for Consorzio Italiana America’s Cup 83’ (Ganni Agnelli & Karim Aga Khan), Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Vallicelli.
1986 Launched as the AZZURRA III (I-10).
Displacement? , dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2,72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.

At the Louis Vuitton Races off Freemantle in 1986 under skipper Mauro Pelaschier she reached only the 11th ranking.
1987 Sold to G. Clausen, Hamburg, Germany and renamed FRATZZ.
1994 Sold to Jurgen Rohel, Hamburg and again renamed AZZURRA III.
2014 Still sailing, same name and owner.
Solomon Islands 1986 $1 sg570a, scott573j
Source: Various internet sites. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05391.html

AZZURRA (I-4) yacht 1981

The Grenada Grenadines stamp shows the yacht AZZURRA with the year 1981, not a sail no visible, four yachts with the name AZZURRA have been built in Italy between 1982 and 1986 the first was completed in 1982 as the AZZURRA (I 4). She took part in America Cup Races in 1983, likely she is depict.
AZZURRA (I 4) was built as a 12-metre class yacht by Off. Meccaniche Ing. Mario Cobau at Pesaro, Italy for the Consorzio Sfida Italiana America’s Cup 1983 (Gianni Agnelli &Karim Aga Khan.) Representing Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Valicelli.
19 July 1982 launched as the AZZURRA (I 4)
Displacement 25.650 tons, dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2.72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.
Sail area 166.65 m².
The AZZURRA (I 4) competed in the 1983 Louis Vuitton Cup races in Newport RI, she reached the semi-finals, finished third in the semi-finals.
Used then as trial horse for the Italian yachts for the America Cup Races in 1986/87
In 1987 was she not more sailing.
2014 On display at the Centro Sportivo of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo.
More info is given on: http://www.sy-pacificwave.com/Pages/Pac ... igree.aspx

Grenada Grenadines 1987 70c sg861, scott864.
Source: Internet and http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05384.html

MOHAWK HMS (5)

HMS MOHAWK was an 'Archer' class torpedo cruiser of the Royal Navy, built by J. & G. Thompson at Glasgow and launched on 6 February 1886.
Displacement:1770 tons, L:68,60m. B:11m. Draught:4,40m. 4 boilers, 2-2 cyl. compound steam engines:2500 ihp. 16,5 kn. crew:176, armament:6-6" (5 tons) guns, 8-3 pounder QF guns, 2 machine guns, 1 light gun, 4 torpedo tubes.

Commenced service on the Australia Station in December 1897. During the Boxer Rebellion in China, she escorted the New South Wales Naval Brigade to Peking before commencing service on the China Station. On 24 April 1901 she was paid off into the Fleet Reserve at Chatham.
She returned to England in 1905 and was sold to Garnham for £4850 for breaking up at Chatham.

(Oman 1977, 3 B.)
Internet.

“MOÇAMEDES” (Port.)

Built in 1946-'47 by Bartram & Sons, Sunderland, #315, for Companhia Nacional de Navegação, Lisbon.
Cargo vessel, Gt:5508, Nt:3295, Dw:9266, Loa:137,60m. Lbpp:130,39m. Br:17,92m. D:8,05m. Draught:7,93m. Doxford diesel:4850 hp. 13,5 kn. pass:12 in 8 cabins, crew:43, 4 holds:15.093m³.
Service Lisbon - Mozambique.
In 1973 sold for scrap to Chi Shun Hwa Steel Co. Ltd., Kaohsiung.

(Mozambique 1957, 2,5 E. StG.510) 3rd ship from the left
Internet.
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Ilala II

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Ilala II

Postby shipstamps » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:14 pm

SG26.jpg
SG26
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SG549.jpg
SG549
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SG731.jpg
SG731
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Ilala II.jpg
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The motorship Ilala II built for service on Lake Nyasa, is featured a Nyasaland stamp of the Is. 3d. denomination and shown off Monkey Bay on the lake-1,400 miles from the coast and almost 1,600 ft. above sea level..The ship had of course to be built and dismantled before being shipped in pieces and erected on the edge of the lake.
In 1949 the Nyasaland Railways gave the contract for this specialised construction to Yarrow and Co. Ltd., Scotstoun, Glasgow who have been builders of shallow-draft craft for re-erection almost since the firm's foundation in 1866 on the Thames. In point of fact the Ilala II is herself an interesting link with the earlier history of the company for the first Ilala was built at Poplar in 1875 at a cost of £6,000. She was built to fulfil an oft-expressed wish of David Livingstone in connection with the suppression of slavery on Lake Nyasa. The old Ilala was named after the area in which Chitambo's village is situated where Livingstone died in 1873 and where his heart is interred.
In all, the Ilala II cost £120,000 and was brought in pieces by rail from Beira to Chipoka on the lake shore. Of the 780 cases in which the parts were transported the heaviest weighed 18 tons and the lightest 78 lbs. The construction of the vessel was carried out under the supervision of Sir J. H. Biles and Company and Livesey and Henderson, consulting engineers to Nyasaland Railways.
Every care has been taken to ensure that she will be able to stand up to the severe gales encountered on Lake Nyasa. The hull of the ship is sub-divided into eight watertight compartments by seven transverse bulkheads—almost double the number required for an orthodox vessel of her size. The design provides for an adequate reserve of stability and was drawn up after extensive tests had been carried out at the National Physical Laboratory. The hull embodies all the recommendations of this institution. The Ilala II is 172 ft. long (overall) and can carry a total of 365 passengers. She has a gross tonnage of 620, a moulded breadth of 301/2 ft., and a loaded draft of 7 ft. 4 in. Deadweight cargo capacity is
100 tons and a crew of 38 carried. There is accommodation on the promenade deck for the master, two officers and 12 first-class passengers in 10 well-appointed cabins. Also on the promenade deck are a large dining saloon, well-equipped toilets, bathrooms and a galley for first class passengers.
Six second-class passengers are carried and have two large cabins on the main deck forward with an adjacent dining saloon. The after end of the main deck comprises the third-class section with provisions for 350 passengers and a saloon in the hold amidships. Propelling machinery comprises two sets of Crossley 5-cylinder oil engines, rated at 425 b.h.p. for 400 r.p.m., giving a service speed of 12 knots. Early in 1951 the vessel was named and launched on the lake in the presence of the Bishop of Nyasaland and a large crowd of Africans, Europeans and Indians by Lady Colby, wife of the Governor of Nyasaland, Sir Geoffrey Colby.
Monkey Bay is near Cape Maclear where the first Scottish Mission in Central Africa was founded in 1875 by Doctor Laws who brought out the first Ilala to the lake in that year. It is interesting to recall that this pioneer craft was shipped out in pieces to Cape Town in the holds of the Walmer Castle, thence up the East coast to the mouth of the Zambesi in the schooner Hara where she was assembled to sail up the Zambesi and Shire rivers to Murchison Cataracts.
Here she was dismantled and carried overland by 800 Africans to the Upper Shire River at Matope where she was re-assembled so that she could sail into Lake Nyasa-380 miles long—seven months after leaving the United Kingdom. The Ilala was in service on the lake for 28 years in which she carried out excellent work in suppressing the slave trade then carried on by Arab dhows. Eventually the Ilala was dismantled and taken from the lake, ending her career towing barges at Chinde where she was broken up.
SG26. Sea Breezes 1/60
Malawi SG487, 549, 731, 931.
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