SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

BRIDAL BOAT IN HARDANGER FJORD

On this stamp issued by Norway in 1974 you see a bridal boat carrying the bride and groom and her guests dressed in traditional garb on her wedding day to or from the church some-where in the Hardanger fjord, Norway.
The painting was made in 1848 by the Norwegian landscape painter Hans Gude in collaboration with Adolph Tidemand, the painting has the title “The Bridal Procession in Hardanger” and it is a famous well know painting in Norway. When you click on this link you can see a very large image of the painting, when you enlarge the painting, the bride is sitting in the stern.
http://samling.nasjonalmuseet.no/en/object/NG.M.00467

Of the boat used I have not much information, most probably the “kirkebåt” was used, which was owned by the farmers of the district, and it was important that the boat carrying the bride should be the fastest, and stout oarsmen had to be selected among the young men of the community.

Norway 1974 1k sg 716, scott 633
Source: Internet

DAO

The three stamps issued by the Comoro Islands in 1970 shows us on the foreground three ships under sail, which Stanley Gibbons give that it are “feluccas” actual it are “dau’s” also known as “boutre” but she are a larger type.

You can find this type of vessels in the Comoro Islands and western Indian Ocean. The “dau” is a roughly constructed wooden vessel that carried cargo to the west coast of India, taken advantage of the monsoon winds. Slightly raking stem, square stern. Decked or open.
Set a large lateen to forward-raking mast; yard supported by a jibboom.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 15.2m, beamy; tonnage 50 to 60 ton.
The mosque is the Mosquée de Vendredi (old Friday mosque), which is the oldest mosque in the Medina. It was originally built in 1427, and a minaret was added in 1921.

Comoro Islands 1970 5/40f sg 91/93, scott
Source: From Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft. Internet.

AMERICA CUP yacht 1970

The stamp issued by Mali in March 1971 shows us an unnamed America cup yacht, most probably for the 1970 America Cup races in Newport, Rhode Island which was won by the America yacht INTREPID, at that time the yachts used in the race were of the 12m class. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-metre_class

The 1970 America's Cup was held in September 1970 at Newport, Rhode Island. The US defender, INTREPID, skippered by Bill (Ficker is Quicker) Ficker, defeated the Australian challenger, GRETEL II, skippered by James Hardy, four races to one
INTREPID had beaten HERITAGE and VALIANT to become the defender. (1962 winner WEATHERLY also participated in the trials, providing a fourth boat so racing could proceed more uniformly.) GRETEL II had beaten FRANCE to become the challenger

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_America%27s_Cup
Mali 1971 200f sg 271, scott?

Navicula gives that the FRANCE is depict, but I can’t find any confirmation for that.
http://www.12mrclass.com/yachts/detail/ ... 07113.html

VAKA HEKE FA outrigger Niue

The dugout outrigger canoes used in Niue were built with the same structure of the Tonga Islands and are single outrigger canoes and used for fishing, the modern canoes are small fishing craft holding from one to four men.
The outrigger is always on the left side of the hull of the canoe which are connected with two or more booms lashed to the topstrakes of the canoe, and the booms are lashed to the outrigger float.
Mostly decked fore and aft.

From Aak to Zumbra named this outrigger a “vaka heke fa” and gives the following information:
Used in the Niue Islands and central Pacific; a four men fishing canoe. Dugout hull, washstrakes and end decking sewn on; slender; elongated ends taper on all sides, rounded bottom. Hull spread with curved pieces lashed to three booms, which also serve as thwarts; stringers cross atop the booms above the washstrakes. Sharp ended, cylindrical float attached by two pairs of oblique stanchions and a single vertical one.
She are paddled by using lanceolate-bladed paddles.
The canoe has to be light in weight due to the waters around the island are deep and the canoe has to be carried out of the water on shore after use.
Length 7.6m, beam 0.4m depth 0.46 – 0.6m.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.
Niue 1950 2d sg 115, scott96, 1970 3c sg 155, scott?, 1999 20c sg?, scott 741a.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

Ilala II

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Ilala II

Postby shipstamps » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:14 pm

SG26.jpg
SG26
Click image to view full size
SG549.jpg
SG549
Click image to view full size
SG731.jpg
SG731
Click image to view full size
Ilala II.jpg
Click image to view full size
The motorship Ilala II built for service on Lake Nyasa, is featured a Nyasaland stamp of the Is. 3d. denomination and shown off Monkey Bay on the lake-1,400 miles from the coast and almost 1,600 ft. above sea level..The ship had of course to be built and dismantled before being shipped in pieces and erected on the edge of the lake.
In 1949 the Nyasaland Railways gave the contract for this specialised construction to Yarrow and Co. Ltd., Scotstoun, Glasgow who have been builders of shallow-draft craft for re-erection almost since the firm's foundation in 1866 on the Thames. In point of fact the Ilala II is herself an interesting link with the earlier history of the company for the first Ilala was built at Poplar in 1875 at a cost of £6,000. She was built to fulfil an oft-expressed wish of David Livingstone in connection with the suppression of slavery on Lake Nyasa. The old Ilala was named after the area in which Chitambo's village is situated where Livingstone died in 1873 and where his heart is interred.
In all, the Ilala II cost £120,000 and was brought in pieces by rail from Beira to Chipoka on the lake shore. Of the 780 cases in which the parts were transported the heaviest weighed 18 tons and the lightest 78 lbs. The construction of the vessel was carried out under the supervision of Sir J. H. Biles and Company and Livesey and Henderson, consulting engineers to Nyasaland Railways.
Every care has been taken to ensure that she will be able to stand up to the severe gales encountered on Lake Nyasa. The hull of the ship is sub-divided into eight watertight compartments by seven transverse bulkheads—almost double the number required for an orthodox vessel of her size. The design provides for an adequate reserve of stability and was drawn up after extensive tests had been carried out at the National Physical Laboratory. The hull embodies all the recommendations of this institution. The Ilala II is 172 ft. long (overall) and can carry a total of 365 passengers. She has a gross tonnage of 620, a moulded breadth of 301/2 ft., and a loaded draft of 7 ft. 4 in. Deadweight cargo capacity is
100 tons and a crew of 38 carried. There is accommodation on the promenade deck for the master, two officers and 12 first-class passengers in 10 well-appointed cabins. Also on the promenade deck are a large dining saloon, well-equipped toilets, bathrooms and a galley for first class passengers.
Six second-class passengers are carried and have two large cabins on the main deck forward with an adjacent dining saloon. The after end of the main deck comprises the third-class section with provisions for 350 passengers and a saloon in the hold amidships. Propelling machinery comprises two sets of Crossley 5-cylinder oil engines, rated at 425 b.h.p. for 400 r.p.m., giving a service speed of 12 knots. Early in 1951 the vessel was named and launched on the lake in the presence of the Bishop of Nyasaland and a large crowd of Africans, Europeans and Indians by Lady Colby, wife of the Governor of Nyasaland, Sir Geoffrey Colby.
Monkey Bay is near Cape Maclear where the first Scottish Mission in Central Africa was founded in 1875 by Doctor Laws who brought out the first Ilala to the lake in that year. It is interesting to recall that this pioneer craft was shipped out in pieces to Cape Town in the holds of the Walmer Castle, thence up the East coast to the mouth of the Zambesi in the schooner Hara where she was assembled to sail up the Zambesi and Shire rivers to Murchison Cataracts.
Here she was dismantled and carried overland by 800 Africans to the Upper Shire River at Matope where she was re-assembled so that she could sail into Lake Nyasa-380 miles long—seven months after leaving the United Kingdom. The Ilala was in service on the lake for 28 years in which she carried out excellent work in suppressing the slave trade then carried on by Arab dhows. Eventually the Ilala was dismantled and taken from the lake, ending her career towing barges at Chinde where she was broken up.
SG26. Sea Breezes 1/60
Malawi SG487, 549, 731, 931.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: aukepalmhof, Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 86 guests