SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SAIL MANABI 2014 Ecuador

Ecuador issued in 2014 a set of 7 stamps all $ 0.75 and a label in a miniature sheet for “Sail Manabi 2014” in which school ships from South American countries visited Manabi , Ecuador from 4 till 6 May 2014.
The following ships are depict from left to right.
1) CISNE BRANCO from Brazil.
2) CUAUHTEMOC from Mexico.
3) GLORIA from Colombia.
4) LIBERTAD from Argentina.
5) ESMERALDA from Chile.
6) GUAYAS from Ecuador
7) SIMON BOLIVAR from Venezuela.
All this school ships has appeared already on stamps and can be found in the index.

Ecuador 2014 $ 0.75 sg?, scott?

CHARMING BETTY privateer

The Jersey Post gives by the stamp: The Jersey privateer CHARMING BETTY captured the French Bark ST CHARLES off Point L’Abbé on 16 January 1744 in Brittany, France. Armed with cutlasses and pistols, the crew boarded to find the French vessel leaking and almost unseaworthy so decided to let her go for a ransom of 20,000 livres. The ships captain was unable to pay and so selected a certain Thomas Garnier from the French crew to be held for ransom in Jersey where he remained detained until 1748.
In the book Jersey Sailing Ships is she given as a sloop and used as a privateer under command of Captain Nic. Fiott and owned by Lemprié & Fiott and used as a privateer from 1758-59 in the same book is given that Nicolas Fiott was a privateering captain from 1734 till 1763 on board the CHARMING BETTY and CHARMING NANCY.
If privateers captured a French vessel and found that neither the boat nor its cargo were particularly valuable, it was accepted practice for them to take a crew member as hostage on the understanding that a ransom would be paid.
But the crew of the vessel concerned were not always particularly quick to carry out their side of the bargain and restore the release of their comrade.
So it was in 1744, when the CHARMING BETTY captured the French barque ST CHARLES and demanded a ransom of 2,000 livres, which was certainly more than the vessel was worth.
Thomas Garnier was chosen as a hostage and taken to Jersey where, despite several letters now in the city archives of St Malo demanding to know why he had not been ransomed, he was to languish for four years, until the money was paid in 1748.
Captain Fiott
The same Jersey privateer was active in the Channel a decade later. In 1757, under the command of Capt Fiott, it captured a French brigatine, loaded with a valuable cargo of sugar.
The following year Fiott and his crew, accompanied by LE BURNETT took the ADVENTURER, a London vessel, away from French privateers who had captured her on a voyage from Jamaica. The prize became Fiott's and the cargo, sugar, spice, logwood, mahogany, rum, coffee and cottons fetched a great deal of money.
Returning to Jersey the CHARMING BETTY, although short-handed after putting a prize crew on the ADVENTURER, captured a Dutch vessel carrying 200 tunnes of wine from Bordeaux to St Malo.
Capt Fiott was in action again in 1759 when he captured two more ships, which together with their unidentified cargoes, are known to have been sold for 30,000 livres. That was an enormous sum at the time and shows just how profitable privateering could be if the captains and their crews were both adventurous and lucky.
Her fate not known.
The ship in the foreground is the French ST CHARLES and in the background is the CHARMING BETTY. Have not any details on the ST CHARLES.

Jersey 2014 56p sg?, scott?
http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/ ... ng_Betty''

KENWOOD CUP

The event, based in Hawaii, began in 1978 and is raced every second year. It carried the name Clipper Cup however in 1986, when a new sponsor was found, the series became known as the Kenwood Cup. The contest has evolved to the classic five-race format: two 27 mile Olympic course races; the 150 mile windward-leeward Molokai race from Honolulu to Maui and back; a 27 miler; and the testing 775 mile Round the State race. New Zealand held the trophy in 1987.

New Zealand 1987 $1.05 sg1419, scott869
Source: New Zealand Post.

Vera Cruz (Ship) 1866

Knight (Cavaliere) Giuseppe Tonello (Captain Gaspare Perissa, 1866-71) Trieste, Austria/Italy; San Marco, near Trieste, Austria; 850 tons; 19’ draught; oak hull sheeted and copper fastened, single deck; four cannons; crew 12.

She was registered on May 12, 1866, as a long distance trader. Giuseppe Tonello died in 1869, and after two years of an inheritance process, his widow, Anna Tonello (née Stamare) became the sole owner of the vessel. (Their daughter Virginia was married into the Fiume branch of the Cosulich family.) The original tonnage of 850 tons was only reduced to 710 tons (corresponding to the Moorsome rule) in 1880, (although the American Register of 1870, indicated only 775 tons).

In Lloyd’s of 1870, her captain is still listed as Perissa, and in 1872, her owners are listed as: Anna Vedovaand Tonello and Antonioas Bilaffer as captain. In 1877, the captain was Diodato G. Bilaffer, and in 1878, her owners were listed as “Giovanni and Maria Ragusin and the late Marco.” Giovanni Ragusin was the captain. The Registry
from 1881 lists her tonnage as 710. She was abandoned on December 1, 1879, near (Cap) Finistere.

It should also be noted, that there was a brig of 406 tons named Vera-Cruz, that was lost in 1864, in a storm near Cape St. Vincent.

Yugoslavia 1998 , 2.00d S.G.?, Scott: 2421 .

Source: Watercraft Philately (Article by Auke Palmhof)

Akizuki IJN (Type B Class Destroyer) 1942

Akizuki was the lead ship of her class of destroyer in the Imperial Japanese Navy. Her name means “Autumn Moon.” Built in Maizuru Naval Arsenal. Laid down in 30 July 1940. Launched in 2 July 1941. Completed in 11 June 1942. Commissioned in 11 June 1942, Yokosuka Chinjufu.

Displacement: 2,700 tons standard; 3,700 tons full load; 440'3" x 38'1" x 13'7" (draught); Machinery: 2-shaft geared turbines: 52,000 SHP; 33 knots; 8,300 miles at 18 knots; Armament: 8 x 3.9"/65 cal. DP guns (4 x 2); 4 x 25 mm. AA guns (2 x 2); 4 x 24" TT (1 x 4); 6 depth charge throwers; 72 depth charges; Complement: 263.

In October 1944 Akizuki was part of the Northern Force commanded by Vice Admiral Ozawa Jisaburo, in the Japanese attack on the Allied forces supporting the invasion of Leyte. On 25 October, in the Battle off Cape Engaño, it was sunk, probably by torpedo, ENE of Cape Engaño, during the initial U.S. air attack on the Northern Force. Most sources credit the hit to aircraft of Task Force 38, but some give credit to submarine USS Halibut (SS-232).


The largest, most handsome and, in the Japanese estimation, most successful destroyers in the Imperial fleet were those of the Akizuki class. Known as the "Type B," these ships were designed primarily as antiaircraft escorts for the carrier force.

As originally conceived, they would not even have carried torpedoes, but a later desire to add an offensive capability saw the inclusion in the design of a quadruple 24" torpedo mount amidships. The main features distinguishing this class from other Japanese destroyers were their size and innovative armament. Some 50 feet longer and 700 tons heavier than the preceding Kagero’s and Yugumo’s, the Akizuki’s were able to carry a fourth main-battery turret without suffering any topweight problems as a result. These turrets were large, fully-enclosed and power-operated, and each mounted twin 3.9" high-velocity guns. Though designed as AA weapons, their high rate of fire and range of 20,000 yards made them at least the equal of their American 5-inch counterparts. From 1943 on, each destroyer was also equipped with 15 to 51- 25 mm. machine guns, the number increasing as the war progressed, and a full array of Types 21 and 22 radars.

The ships of the Akizuki class were built concurrently with those of the Yugumo class, with the first six ordered under the 1939 program and another 10, known as the Shimotsuki group, under the 1941 program. Of the latter, four were never built, Michizuki being broken up on the stocks in March 1945 to make way for suicide craft, while Hazuki, Kiyotsuki and Ozuki were all cancelled. A large number of succeeding vessels, hull numbers 777-785 of the 1942 program and 5061-5083 of the modified 1942 program, proved nothing more than expressions of wishful thinking.

Twelve Akizukis were actually built, most of them serving in the 41st and 61st Destroyer Divisions. Six survived the war, but four of those, Yoizuki, Haruzuki, Hanazuki and Natsuzuki, were completed too late to see action outside of Japanese home waters. Though favorite targets of U.S. submarines, only one ship of the class was actually sunk by a submarine. Two were lost to air attack and three in surface actions – an interesting breakdown considering their original design as antiaircraft escorts.

Their swept-back lines and large single funnel made the Akizukis very similar in appearance to light cruiser Yubari, and in fact U.S. forces would consistently misidentify these ships as cruisers. And that appreciation was not so wide of the mark, considering their frequent employment in place of cruisers as squadron flagships. Their bridges were actually a bit too cramped for the addition of an admiral and his staff, and their turn of speed inferior to that of most of their contemporaries. But the Akizukis continued as favorites in the role of destroyer leader, and three were lost while so employed.

All in all, the Akizuki class represented an excellent, versatile design, and the vessels turned in solid performances. Lead-ship, Akizuki herself, compiled the most impressive record, fighting from Guadalcanal to Leyte Gulf with but one significant break in service due to damage. And Teruzuki surely dealt her enemies some terrible blows one bloody night in Ironbottom Sound. But the most notable action of any of the class was

Hatsuzuki's last fight off Cape Engano, an exhibition of such tenacity and selflessness as to rank with that of the American destroyers off Samar.

Grenada Grenadines 1995 $2,00, S.G.?, Scott: 1721Ae.

Source: Watercraft Philately (Article by Myron Molnau).

Source: Wikipedia

Ashigara IJN (Heavy Cruiser) 1929

Ashigara was a Myōkō-class heavy cruiser of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The other sister ships of her class were Myōkō, Nachi, and Haguro. She was named after a mountain on the border of Kanagawa and Shizuoka prefectures, also known as Mount Kintoki.

The ships of this class displaced 13,300 tons, were 204 m (669 ft) long, and were capable of 36 knots. They carried one aircraft and their main armament were ten 8 inch guns. Ashigara was laid down at the Kawasaki shipyard in Kobe on April 11, 1925, launched on April 22, 1928, and was commissioned into the Imperial Navy on August 20, 1929.

In World War II she took part in the Invasion of the Philippines in December 1941. In the Battle of the Java Sea on March 1, 1942 she shared in the sinking of the cruiser HMS Exeter and the destroyer HMS Encounter.

From 1942 to 1944 she was assigned to guard duties and troop transportation and saw no action.

In the Battle of Leyte Gulf on October 24, 1944, Ashigara, with Captain Hayao Miura in command, was assigned to Vice Admiral Kiyohide Shima's force along with Nachi and eight destroyers. This force entered Surigao Straiton October 25 after Admiral Shoji Nishimura's First Raiding Force had been destroyed, following the losses of Fusō and Nishimura's Yamashiro along with their escorts in the hands of Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf's fleet and aircraft, in which during this action Nishimura was killed aboard the Yamashiro. Ashigara and Nachi fired their torpedoes and retreated (Nachi with damage from a collision with Mogami).

In December 1944 Ashigara took part in an attempted attack on the American landings on Mindoro in the Philippines along with the Ōyodo and the destroyers Kiyoshimo, Asashimo, Kasumi, Kaya, Kashi, and Sugi. On December 26 she came under air attack and was damaged by a 227 kg (500 lb) bomb, but was able to shell the American beachhead on December 27 of the same year.

On June 8, 1945, Ashigara left Batavia for Singapore with 1,600 troops on board, escorted by the destroyer Kamikaze. In the Bangka Strait the two ships came under attack from three Allied submarines, USS Blueback, HMS Trenchant and HMS Stygian. Kamikaze attacked Trenchant with gunfire, forcing her to submerge, and then with depth charges, but Trenchant's C.O., Commander Arthur Hezlet, spotted Ashigara and fired eight torpedoes at her at about 12:15. Ashigara was hit five times at a range of 4,000 yards and capsized at 12:37 Kamikaze rescued 400 troops and 853 crew, including C.O. Miura.

Grenada Grenadines 1995, S.G.?, Scott: 1721Ag.

Tanzania 1995, S.G.?, Scott: 1352g.

Source: Wikipedia
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Ilala II

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Ilala II

Postby shipstamps » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:14 pm

SG26.jpg
SG26
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SG549.jpg
SG549
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SG731.jpg
SG731
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Ilala II.jpg
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The motorship Ilala II built for service on Lake Nyasa, is featured a Nyasaland stamp of the Is. 3d. denomination and shown off Monkey Bay on the lake-1,400 miles from the coast and almost 1,600 ft. above sea level..The ship had of course to be built and dismantled before being shipped in pieces and erected on the edge of the lake.
In 1949 the Nyasaland Railways gave the contract for this specialised construction to Yarrow and Co. Ltd., Scotstoun, Glasgow who have been builders of shallow-draft craft for re-erection almost since the firm's foundation in 1866 on the Thames. In point of fact the Ilala II is herself an interesting link with the earlier history of the company for the first Ilala was built at Poplar in 1875 at a cost of £6,000. She was built to fulfil an oft-expressed wish of David Livingstone in connection with the suppression of slavery on Lake Nyasa. The old Ilala was named after the area in which Chitambo's village is situated where Livingstone died in 1873 and where his heart is interred.
In all, the Ilala II cost £120,000 and was brought in pieces by rail from Beira to Chipoka on the lake shore. Of the 780 cases in which the parts were transported the heaviest weighed 18 tons and the lightest 78 lbs. The construction of the vessel was carried out under the supervision of Sir J. H. Biles and Company and Livesey and Henderson, consulting engineers to Nyasaland Railways.
Every care has been taken to ensure that she will be able to stand up to the severe gales encountered on Lake Nyasa. The hull of the ship is sub-divided into eight watertight compartments by seven transverse bulkheads—almost double the number required for an orthodox vessel of her size. The design provides for an adequate reserve of stability and was drawn up after extensive tests had been carried out at the National Physical Laboratory. The hull embodies all the recommendations of this institution. The Ilala II is 172 ft. long (overall) and can carry a total of 365 passengers. She has a gross tonnage of 620, a moulded breadth of 301/2 ft., and a loaded draft of 7 ft. 4 in. Deadweight cargo capacity is
100 tons and a crew of 38 carried. There is accommodation on the promenade deck for the master, two officers and 12 first-class passengers in 10 well-appointed cabins. Also on the promenade deck are a large dining saloon, well-equipped toilets, bathrooms and a galley for first class passengers.
Six second-class passengers are carried and have two large cabins on the main deck forward with an adjacent dining saloon. The after end of the main deck comprises the third-class section with provisions for 350 passengers and a saloon in the hold amidships. Propelling machinery comprises two sets of Crossley 5-cylinder oil engines, rated at 425 b.h.p. for 400 r.p.m., giving a service speed of 12 knots. Early in 1951 the vessel was named and launched on the lake in the presence of the Bishop of Nyasaland and a large crowd of Africans, Europeans and Indians by Lady Colby, wife of the Governor of Nyasaland, Sir Geoffrey Colby.
Monkey Bay is near Cape Maclear where the first Scottish Mission in Central Africa was founded in 1875 by Doctor Laws who brought out the first Ilala to the lake in that year. It is interesting to recall that this pioneer craft was shipped out in pieces to Cape Town in the holds of the Walmer Castle, thence up the East coast to the mouth of the Zambesi in the schooner Hara where she was assembled to sail up the Zambesi and Shire rivers to Murchison Cataracts.
Here she was dismantled and carried overland by 800 Africans to the Upper Shire River at Matope where she was re-assembled so that she could sail into Lake Nyasa-380 miles long—seven months after leaving the United Kingdom. The Ilala was in service on the lake for 28 years in which she carried out excellent work in suppressing the slave trade then carried on by Arab dhows. Eventually the Ilala was dismantled and taken from the lake, ending her career towing barges at Chinde where she was broken up.
SG26. Sea Breezes 1/60
Malawi SG487, 549, 731, 931.
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