SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

MARIGOLD and CHRISTOPHER

MARIGOLD or MARYGOLD a wooden barque rigged vessel built in Aldeburgh, Suffolk and transferred to Plymouth in 1576.
Tonnage 30 tons burthen, armed with 16 guns.
Crew ca. 29 men.
She took part in Francis Drake expedition of five ships, which left 13 December 1577 Plymouth, at that time the MARIGOLD was under command of Captain John Thomas.
It was given that the fleet of five ships were heading for the River Nile on a trading voyage, when reaching the Morocco port Mogador it was revealed that the ships were heading for the Pacific via the Strait of Magellan.
The fleet sailed via the Cabo Verde Islands to southern Brazil were a landfall was made on 05 April 1578. During the crossing some Spanish ships were taken under which the SANTA MARIA, which was renamed in MARY, she had a Portuguese pilot Nuño da Silva on board who knew the waters of the Pacific. Then the fleet headed south along the South American coast to Puerto San Julián, Patagonia where the fleet arrived on 15 June 1578, Drake decide to overwinter there.
Three small ships the SWAN, CHRISTOPHER and MARY were abandoned there and the crew divided over the other three ships.
17 August sails were set and the three vessels headed south for the Strait of Magellan, which she entered three days later. 6 September she had passed the Strait of Magellan. Then the small fleet ran out of luck when she were running in a heavy storm which the ships scattered, the MARIGOLD was lost in the storm with all hands.
(An old story gives that Captain Thomas of the MARIGOLD used the storm to get rid of Drake and deserted the fleet, if this is true is unknown but of the MARIGOLD noting was heard again.)

CHRISTOPHER a wooden pinnace of 15 tons burthen, with 1 gun under command of Captain Tom Moone was abandoned in Puerto San Juliá.

British Virgin Island 1997 40c sg979, scott876d.
Source: Various internet sites. The complete Encyclopedia of sailing ships by Batchelor & Chant.

VIIC type U-BOAT

Type VIIC
Displacement 769 ton surfaced, 871 ton submerged, dim. 67.10 x 6.20 x 4.74m (draught) length bpp 50.50m, height 9.60m.
Speed 17.7 knots surface, 7.06 knots submerged. Range 8,500 mile by a speed of 10 knots on surface and 80 mile by a speed of 4 knots, submerged.
Armament 1 – 88/45 deck-gun with 220 rounds. 4 bow and 1 stern torpedo tubes, 14 torpedoes.
Crew 44 – 52 men.
Maximum depth circa 220 meter.
The Type VIIC was the workhorse of the German U-boat force, with 568 commissioned from 1940 to 1945. The first VIIC boat commissioned was the U-69 in 1940. The Type VIIC was an effective fighting machine and was seen almost everywhere U-boats operated, although its range of only 6,500 nautical miles was not as great as that of the larger Type IX (11,000 nautical miles), severely limiting the time it could spend in the far reaches of the western and southern Atlantic without refueling from a tender or U-boat tanker. The VIIC came into service toward the end of the "First Happy Time" near the beginning of the war and was still the most numerous type in service when Allied anti-submarine efforts finally defeated the U-boat campaign in late 1943 and 1944.
Type VIIC differed from the VIIB only in the addition of an active sonar and a few minor mechanical improvements, making it 2 feet longer and 8 tons heavier. Speed and range were essentially the same. Many of these boats were fitted with snorkels in 1944 and 1945.
They had the same torpedo tube arrangement as their predecessors, except for U-72, U-78, U-80, U-554, and U-555, which had only two bow tubes, and for U-203, U-331, U-351, U-401, U-431, and U-651, which had no stern tube.
On the surface the boats (except for U-88, U-90 and U-132 to U-136 which used MAN M6V40/46s) were propelled by two supercharged Germaniawerft, 6 cylinder, 4-stroke M6V 40/46 diesels totaling 2,800 to 3,200 PS (2,800 to 3,200 shp; 2,100 to 2,400 kW) at 470 to 490 rpm.
For submerged propulsion, several different electric motors were used. Early models used the VIIB configuration of two AEG GU 460/8-276 electric motors, totaling 750 PS (740 shp; 550 kW) with a max rpm of 296, while newer boats used two BBC GG UB 720/8, two GL (Garbe, Lahmeyer & Co.) RP 137/c electric motors or two Siemens-Schuckert-Werke (SSW) GU 343/38-8 electric motors with the same power output as the AEG motors.
Perhaps the most famous VIIC boat was U-96, featured in the movie Das Boot.

Maldives 2015 22Rf sg?, scott? (The stamp is designed after the Revell model kit RV5093.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Ty ... #Type_VIIC U-boat net.

GLOBAL CHALLENGE ISLE OF MAN

In 2000 the Isle of Man issued 6 stamps with a value of 22p to 65p for the BT Global Challenge 2000/1, in which the yacht ISLE OF MAN took part, the yacht is visible on the FDC, but on the stamps only the sails with logo is visible.
The 22p stamp shows also a cruise vessel which is identified as the VISTAFJORD viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8616&p=17043&hilit=vistafjord#p17043
I am wondering what has happened with the ISLE OF MAN after the race, I can’t find a trace of here.
BT Global Challenge 2000/1
On 10 September, a new fleet of 72 ft (22 m) steel cutters made their debut in this race. The winner, Conrad Humphreys and crew on LG FLATRON, won four of the six legs.
QUADSTONE collided heavily in a port and starboard incident with SAVE THE CHILDREN in Wellington, NZ, and QUADSTONE retired from this leg. Skipper Alex Philips later resigned. Both boats had to be extensively repaired in New Zealand.
For the first time the race was scored on points, with equal points for each leg, though combined elapsed times are shown here for comparison.
Overall place Yacht name Skipper Points Combined
elapsed time
1 LG Flatron Conrad Humphreys 95 171d 13h 33m 49s
2 Compaq Will Oxley 86 173d 14h 59m 43s
3 BP Mark Denton 78 175d 09h 54m 33s
4 Logica Jeremy Troughton 71 175d 20h 46m 04s
5 TeamSpirit Andy Dare, John Read 68 176d 22h 34m 43s
6= Spirit of Hong Kong Stephen Wilkins 62 178d 21h 34m 43s
6= Quadstone Alex Phillips, Richard Chenery 64* 179d 11h 58m 14s
8 Norwich Union Neil Murray 60 180d 07h 58m 14s
9= Isle of Man Lin Parker 56 180d 21h 41m 18s
9= Save the Children Nick Fenton 56* 176d
10 Olympic Manley Hopkinson 37* 183d
* These teams did not finish all legs, a requirement for a position in the overall standings, but their positions are shown without displacing any other team
Kate Middleton, who married HRH Prince William to become the Duchess of Cambridge, worked as corporate crew during the buildup of the 2000/1 race.
Challenge 72 Specifications
Hull type Monohull
Builder Ten of the twelve yachts were built by Devonport, UK, the other two by Kim's Yacht Company in China.
Displacement (half load) 40 tonnes
Draught full load 10 ft (3.05m)
Ballast 12.5 tonnes
Designer Rob Humphreys
Length overall 72 ft (22 m)
Length waterline 61 ft (19 m)
Air draught 95 ft (29 m)
Hull 50A mild steel
Deck Stainless steel
Sail area (windward) 2,825 sq ft (262.5 m2)
Sail area (downwind) 4,020 sq ft (373 m2)
Water capacity 390 gal (1,775 lt)
Fuel capacity 475 gal (2,150 lt)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Ch ... e_2000.2F1

ANOREP 1 submersible

On this two MS of Niger issued in 2015 you can find COUSTEAU ship CALYPSO and the submersible ANOREP 1 built in 1966 and which now stands outside the Oceanographic Museum in Monte Carlo, Monaco. Have not any details on her.

Centenary of the creation of the Peruvian submarine fleet

See corrections as given by Mr Peter Crichton below.

Peru issued two stamps in 2011 for the 100th anniversary of the submarine forces of Peru.
The two stamps depicting 7 submarines (at that time Peru had only 6 submarines in service, (one has to be a decommissioned submarine.), So far I know the submarines have not be named. I will give the details of the six Peru submarines at that time in service.
All were built by the Howaldtswerke Deutsche Werft AG, Kiel, Germany.
Two types were built the ISLAY and ARICA of type 209/1100 and ANGAMOS, ANTOFAGASTA, PISAGUA and CHIPANA of type 209/1200.
ISLAY: built under yard No 53 as a coastal patrol submarine. Type 209/1100.
15 March 1971 laid down.
11 October 1973 launched as the ISLAY (SS-35).
Displacement 1,105 ton surfaced, 1,230 ton submerged, dim. 54.4 x 6.2 x 5.9m. (draught)
Powered by 4 MTU type 12v493 AZ80 GA3H dieselengines, 1 Siemenselectric motor, 4,600 hp, one shaft, speed 11 knots surfaced, 21 knots submerged.
Mission endurance 50 days.
Range by a speed of 4 knots, 11,300 mil surfaced. Submerged range by a speed of 20 knots, 20 mile
Armament 8 – 21 inch torpedo tubes, 14 SST-4 torpedoes.
Maximum depth 500 metre.
Crew 36.
29 August 1974 commissioned. All submarines have as homeport San Lorenzo, Peru.

ARICA: built under yard No 54. Type 209/1100
01 October 1973 laid down
05 April 1974 launched as the ARICA (SS-36)
Same details of the ISLAY.
21January 1975 commissioned.

ANGAMOS: built under yard No 131 type 209/1200
12 August 1976 ordered.
15 July 1977 laid down.
31 August 1979 launched as the ANGAMOS (SS-31).
Displacement surface 1,180 ton, submerged 1,290 ton, dim. 55.9 x 6.2 x 5.5m. (draught)
Powered diesel electric by 4 MTU type 12V493 AZ80 GA31l diesel engines, 4,600 hp, one Siemens electric motor, one shaft, speed 11 knots surfaced, 21 knots submerged.
Range by a speed of 4 knots, 11,300 mile.
Armament 8 – 21 inch torpedo tubes, 14 SST-4 torpedoes.
Crew 33.
19 December 1980 commissioned.

ANTOFAGASTA built under yard No 132 as a type 209/1200.
03 October 1977 laid down.
19 December 1979 launched as the ANTOFAGASTA (SS-32)
20 February 1981 commissioned.
Details the same as ANGAMOS.

PISAGUA built under yard No 133 as a type 209/1200.
15 August 1978 laid down.
19 October 1980 launched as the PISAGUA (SS-33).
12 July 1983 commissioned.
Same details as ANGAMOS.

CHIPANA built under yard No 134 as a type 209/1200.
01 November 1978 laid down.
19 May 1981 launched as the CHIPANA (SS-34).
20 September 1982 commissioned.
Same details as ANGAMOS.

Peru 2011 7$20c sg?, scott?
Wikipedia. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... -specs.htm

From Mr. Peter Crichton I received the following update on the stamps.
He gives two pennant numbers are easily readable on the left hand stamp.
Pennant No 42 (the boat at sea in foreground) is the ABATO, see her history and career.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7845&p=7841&hilit=abtao#p7841
Outermost of the moored boats with pennant No 43 is ANGAMOS completed in 1957 as ATUN.
Built as a patrol submarine under yard No 145 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Connecticut, USA for the Peruvian Navy. The design is based on that of the US Mackerel class. All this boats belong to the Abtao class.
27 October 1956 laid down.
05 February 1957 launched as the ATUN.
Displacement 825 ton surfaced, 1,400 ton submerged, dim. 74.1 x 6.7 x 4.3m. (draught)
Powered by two General Motors Corporation 278A diesels, 2,400 shp., and electric motors delivering power to two shafts, speed 16 knots surfaced, 15 knots submerged.
Armament 6 – 21 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 85.
01 July 1957 commissioned
1960 renamed in ANGAMOS (S-43).
Stricken 1990.

The innermost boat is either DOS DE MAYO (S-41) or IQUIQUE (S-44).
DOS DE MAYO built under yard No 140 by Electric Boat Co., Groton.
12 May 1952 laid down.
06 February 1954 launched as the LOBO.
Same details as the ATUN. Except that she had also a 1 – 5 inch deck-gun aft the conning tower..
14 June 1954 commissioned.
1957 Renamed in DOS DE MAYO (S-41).
Stricken 1999.

IQUIQUE built under yard No 146 by Electric Boat Co., Groton.
27 October 1955 laid down.
05 February 1957 launched as the MERLIN.
Same details as the ATUN.
01 October 1957 commissioned.
1960 renamed in IQUIQUE (S-44).
Stricken 1993.
The other three boats are a mixture of photos of the 209 class.

Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. The World’s Navies edited by Chris Chant.

SHEEAN SSG-77 HMAS

Built as a submarine by Australian Submarine Corporation, Port Adelaide for the Australian Navy.
17 February 1994 laid down.
01 May 1999 launched as the HMAS SHEEAN SSG-77, one of the Collins class.
Displacement 3,051 ton surfaced, 3,353 ton submerged. Dim. 77.42 x 7.8 x 7m. at waterline.
Powered by 3 Garden Island-Hedemora type V18B/14. diesel motors , 6,035 shp., 3 Jeumont Schneider generators, 7,345 shp. 1 Jeumont-Schneider DC motor, one shaft, speed surface 12 knots, submerged 21 knots.
Range by a speed of 10 knots, 11,000 mile surface. Submerged 37 mile by a speed of 21 knots.
Test depth over 180 metre.
Crew 42 and 12 trainees, later in 2009 58 crew.
Armament 6 – 21 inch bow torpedo tubes, payload 22 torpedoes. UGM-84C sub-Harpoon Anti ship missiles or 44 Stonefish Mark III mines.
25 February 2001 commissioned.
HMAS SHEEAN (SSG 77) is the fifth of six Collins class submarines operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).
Named for Ordinary Seaman Edward Sheean—the only submarine of the class to be named for an enlisted sailor—the boat was laid down in 1994 and launched in 1999. SHEEAN and sister boat DECHAINEUX were modified during construction as part of the "fast track" program—an attempt to fix the problems affecting the Collins class, and put at least two fully operational submarines in service before the last Oberon class submarine was decommissioned.
Construction
SHEEAN was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation, on 17 February 1994, launched on 1 May 1999 by Mrs. Ivy Hayes, Teddy Sheean's sister, and commissioned into the RAN on 23 February 2001.The issues with the Collins class highlighted in the McIntosh-Prescott Report and the pressing need to have combat-ready submarines in the RAN fleet with the pending decommissioning of OTAMA, the final Oberon class submarine in Australian service, prompted the establishment of an A$1 billion program to bring SHEEAN and sister boat DECHAINEUX up to an operational standard as quickly as possible, referred to as the "fast track" or "get well" program. The fast track program required the installation of reliable diesel engines, fixing the hydrodynamic noise issues with the class by modifying the hull design and propeller, and providing a functional combat system.
The original Rockwell International-designed combat system had been cancelled, but because there wasn't enough time to evaluate the replacement system to include it in the "fast track" program, the two submarines were fitted with components from the old Rockwell system, which were augmented by commercial off-the-shelf hardware and software. Even with the enhanced Rockwell system, it was believed that the capabilities of the fast track Collins boats was only equivalent to the Oberons.
On 14 December 2000, SHEEAN and DECHAINEUX arrived at HMAS STIRLING , following the completion of sea trials. SHEEAN was named for Ordinary Seaman Edward "Teddy" Sheean, who manned an Oerlikon and fired on Japanese aircraft attacking the corvette HMAS ARMIDALE, dying when the ship sank. SHEEAN is the only submarine named after an enlisted sailor.
Characteristics
The Collins class is an enlarged version of the Kockums Västergötland class submarine. At 77.42 metres (254.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.8 metres (26 ft) and a waterline depth of 7 metres (23 ft), displacing 3,051 tonnes when surfaced, and 3,353 tonnes when submerged, they are the largest conventionally powered submarines in the world.[9][10] The hull is constructed from high-tensile micro-alloy steel, and are covered in a skin of anechoic tiles to minimise detection by sonar.[11][12] The depth that they can dive to is classified: most sources claim that it is over 180 metres (590 ft),
The submarine is armed with six 21-inch (530 mm) torpedo tubes, and carry a standard payload of 22 torpedoes: originally a mix of Gould Mark 48 Mod 4 torpedoes and UGM-84C Sub-Harpoon, with the Mark 48s later upgraded to the Mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) version.[10][15][16]
Each submarine is equipped with three Garden Island-Hedemora HV V18b/15Ub (VB210) 18-cylinder diesel engines, which are each connected to a 1,400 kW, 440-volt DC Jeumont-Schneider generator.[10][15] The electricity generated is stored in batteries, then supplied to a single Jeumont-Schneider DC motor, which provides 7,200 shaft horsepower to a single, seven-bladed, 4.22-metre (13.8 ft) diameter skewback propeller.[10][17] The Collins class has a speed of 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph) when surfaced and at snorkel depth, and can reach 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph) underwater.[10] The submarines have a range of 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km; 13,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) when surfaced, 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) at snorkel depth.[10] When submerged completely, a Collins class submarine can travel 32.6 nautical miles (60.4 km; 37.5 mi) at maximum speed, or 480 nautical miles (890 km; 550 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph).[10] Each boat has an endurance of 70 days.[10]
Operational history
The submarine participated in RIMPAC 02, where SHEEAN was able to penetrate the air and surface anti-submarine screens of an eight-ship amphibious task force, then successfully attacked both the amphibious assault ship USS TARAWA and the dock landing ship USS RUSMORE . During two weeks of combat trials in August 2002, SHEEAN demonstrated that the class was comparable in the underwater warfare role to the Los Angeles class nuclear-powered attack submarine USS OLYMPIA. The two submarines traded roles during the exercise and were equally successful in the attacking role, despite OLYMPIA being larger, more powerful, and armed with more advanced torpedoes than SHEEAN.
In 2006, SHEEAN was presented with the Gloucester Cup for being the RAN vessel with the greatest overall efficiency over the previous twelve months.
SHEEAN was docked for a long maintenance period in 2008, but workforce shortages and malfunctions on other submarines requiring urgent attention have drawn this out: RAN and ASC officials predicted that she will not be back in service until 2012. The maintenance period ended in late 2012, and SHEEAN spent the rest of the year working back up to operational status. The submarine was formally returned to service on 23 February 2013.
On 16 July 2013, SHEEAN was damaged while berthed at the Australian Marine Complex. Combi Dock III, a freighter owned by Dutch company Combi Lift and intended to supply the Gorgon gas project, broke free of moorings during a storm, and drifted into the submarine, causing damage to SHEEAN 's propeller and steering apparatus. COMBI DOCK III was impounded by the Australian government until 13 September, when Combi Lift agreed to pay for the damages.
2015 In service.

Maldives 2015 22Rf sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_Sheean_(SSG_77)
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Ilala II

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Ilala II

Postby shipstamps » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:14 pm

SG26.jpg
SG26
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SG549.jpg
SG549
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SG731.jpg
SG731
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Ilala II.jpg
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The motorship Ilala II built for service on Lake Nyasa, is featured a Nyasaland stamp of the Is. 3d. denomination and shown off Monkey Bay on the lake-1,400 miles from the coast and almost 1,600 ft. above sea level..The ship had of course to be built and dismantled before being shipped in pieces and erected on the edge of the lake.
In 1949 the Nyasaland Railways gave the contract for this specialised construction to Yarrow and Co. Ltd., Scotstoun, Glasgow who have been builders of shallow-draft craft for re-erection almost since the firm's foundation in 1866 on the Thames. In point of fact the Ilala II is herself an interesting link with the earlier history of the company for the first Ilala was built at Poplar in 1875 at a cost of £6,000. She was built to fulfil an oft-expressed wish of David Livingstone in connection with the suppression of slavery on Lake Nyasa. The old Ilala was named after the area in which Chitambo's village is situated where Livingstone died in 1873 and where his heart is interred.
In all, the Ilala II cost £120,000 and was brought in pieces by rail from Beira to Chipoka on the lake shore. Of the 780 cases in which the parts were transported the heaviest weighed 18 tons and the lightest 78 lbs. The construction of the vessel was carried out under the supervision of Sir J. H. Biles and Company and Livesey and Henderson, consulting engineers to Nyasaland Railways.
Every care has been taken to ensure that she will be able to stand up to the severe gales encountered on Lake Nyasa. The hull of the ship is sub-divided into eight watertight compartments by seven transverse bulkheads—almost double the number required for an orthodox vessel of her size. The design provides for an adequate reserve of stability and was drawn up after extensive tests had been carried out at the National Physical Laboratory. The hull embodies all the recommendations of this institution. The Ilala II is 172 ft. long (overall) and can carry a total of 365 passengers. She has a gross tonnage of 620, a moulded breadth of 301/2 ft., and a loaded draft of 7 ft. 4 in. Deadweight cargo capacity is
100 tons and a crew of 38 carried. There is accommodation on the promenade deck for the master, two officers and 12 first-class passengers in 10 well-appointed cabins. Also on the promenade deck are a large dining saloon, well-equipped toilets, bathrooms and a galley for first class passengers.
Six second-class passengers are carried and have two large cabins on the main deck forward with an adjacent dining saloon. The after end of the main deck comprises the third-class section with provisions for 350 passengers and a saloon in the hold amidships. Propelling machinery comprises two sets of Crossley 5-cylinder oil engines, rated at 425 b.h.p. for 400 r.p.m., giving a service speed of 12 knots. Early in 1951 the vessel was named and launched on the lake in the presence of the Bishop of Nyasaland and a large crowd of Africans, Europeans and Indians by Lady Colby, wife of the Governor of Nyasaland, Sir Geoffrey Colby.
Monkey Bay is near Cape Maclear where the first Scottish Mission in Central Africa was founded in 1875 by Doctor Laws who brought out the first Ilala to the lake in that year. It is interesting to recall that this pioneer craft was shipped out in pieces to Cape Town in the holds of the Walmer Castle, thence up the East coast to the mouth of the Zambesi in the schooner Hara where she was assembled to sail up the Zambesi and Shire rivers to Murchison Cataracts.
Here she was dismantled and carried overland by 800 Africans to the Upper Shire River at Matope where she was re-assembled so that she could sail into Lake Nyasa-380 miles long—seven months after leaving the United Kingdom. The Ilala was in service on the lake for 28 years in which she carried out excellent work in suppressing the slave trade then carried on by Arab dhows. Eventually the Ilala was dismantled and taken from the lake, ending her career towing barges at Chinde where she was broken up.
SG26. Sea Breezes 1/60
Malawi SG487, 549, 731, 931.
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