Brillant HMS (Sixth Rate, Full Rigger Frigate) 1779

HMS Brilliant was a 28-gun Enterprise-class sixth-rate frigate of the British Navy.She was first commissioned in July 1779 under the command of Captain John Ford.

She was ordered in 1776. Built in Henry Adams, Bucklers Hard Shipyard. Laid down in February 1777. Launched in 15 July 1779. Completed in 4 September 1779. Commisioned in 1779.

Length: 120 ft 6 1⁄4 in (36.735 m) (overall) 99 ft 6 in (30.33 m) (keel). Beam: 33 ft 8 in (10.3 m). Depth of hold: 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m). Sail plan: Full-rigged ship. Complement: 200 officers and men. Armament: Upperdeck: 24 × 9-pounder guns, Quarterdeck: 4 x 6-pounder guns + 4 x 18-pounder carronades Forecastle: 2 x 18-pounder carronades 12 x swivel guns.

Between July 1796 and October 1798 Her captain was Henry Blackwood. On 27 July, at Tenerife, She observed the frigates Vertu and Régénérée preparing to sail for Rochefort. At 6, the French frigates sailed and started firing on Brilliant; Régénérée was closing in on her opponent when Vertu, which had sailed large, touched the wind; .Régénérée imitated her manoeuver, but lost her mizzen and bowsprit, allowing Brilliant to flee.Vertu gave chase, but could not overhaul her opponent and returned to Tenerife. There, Régénérée replaced her rigging, and both frigates eventually arrived in Rochefort on 5 September.

On 8 September 1800 Brilliant sent the prize Dragon into Plymouth. She was a packet of 14 guns, bound for L'Orient from Guadeloupe and carrying a cargo of cocoa, coffee, indigo and cotton.

On 8 October 1807 Brilliant and Boreas captured the Danish ships St Hans and Montreal.

She was broken up at Portsmouth in November 1811

Burkina Faso, S.G.?, Scott; 1132c.

Source: Wikipedia

Kedah or Kedmah (Passenger Cargo Ship) 1927

Built by Vickers Ltd., at Barrow-in-Furness, for the Straits Steamship Co., Ltd., of Singapore, this ship was completedin October 1927. Her tonnages were 3,504 gross, 1,389 net, dimensions; 330' x 50'6" x 15'1,5" draught. She had twin screws driven by single-reduction geared turbines supplied with steam at 230 lbs./sq.in. pressure by four water-tube boilers, and had a speed of 19 knots. She had cabin accomodations amidships for eighty 1st class passengers and carried about 960 deck passengers.

She was built for the Singapore-Penang passenger and cargo service, also made a weekend run to Belawan. On the outbrake of WW-II she was requisitioned and armed with two 4" guns, one 12 pdr., and two pom-poms. As HMS Kedah she was in the last convoy to leave singapore when the japanese occupied it and was one of the first to return at the liberation in 1945, when she was flying the flag of Rear Admiral morse.

In January 1946 she arrived at Barrow for a much-needed reconditioning and while there was sold to Israeli interests who decided to have the work completed in antwerp. She was almost lost on the passage when the tow-rope broke and she was in danger of drifting on to St.Agnes Head, but the tug Salvonia picked her up and completed the voyage. In 1947 she was transferred to the Kedem Palestine Line and renamed Kedmah for trade in the Mediterranean under Zim Line management. In 1951 she was badly damaged by a collision with a wreck in Haifa Bay, but repaired returned to service.

In 1952 she was bought by Harris & Dixon, who renamed her Golden Isles and put her on their Sterling Line service from Marseilles to Malta, Cyprus, and Lebanon. Her final two years were spent on the Marseilles-Haifa run on Zim Line charter, and late in 1956 she was sold to John Cashmore, Ltd., and towed to Newport, Mon., by the tug Turmoil for scrapping.

Kedmah depicted on the buttom right corner of Israeli stamp.

Singapore, 1980, S.G.?, Scott; 345

Israel, 1995, S.G.?, Scott; 1241

Source: Merchant Ships 1910-1929 by Laurence Dunn.

Lady Mary Wood (Paddle Steamer) 1842

Built in 1842 by Thomas Wilson & Co., Liverpool. Gt; 533, Diamensions; 160'8 x 25'5 x 16'6. A two cylender, 250 ihp (60 1/4" diam. X 66" stroke) steam engine, built by Fawcet Preston & Co., Liverpool, and paddle wheels gave her a speed of 12 knots. She had a wooden hull, carried 200 tons of cargo, 60 first class and 50 third class passengers.

She was launched 16 September 1841 and delivered 19 January 1842, she entered the Mediterranean service. In 1845 she was placed in the Ceylon-Singapore-Hong Kong service. When a rebellion broke out in Ceylon in 1848, Lady Mary Wood brought troops from Madras to put down the revolt, thus becoming the first steam-propelled troopship. In 1850 she attempted a Hong Kong-Shanghai service, but high customs duties at Shanghai, rigged by local merchants, forced discontinuance. She was sold in 1859 to the Indo-Netherlands Company for service between the East Indies and China.

Singapore, 1980, S.G.?, Scott, 348.

Source:Watercraft Philately

JEANIE JOHNSTON (Ireland)

Built 1998-2002 by The Jeanie Johnston (Ireland) Company Ltd., Blennerville, Tralee, for Dublin Docklands, Development Authority (operator Aiseanna Mara Teoranta)
Cost: €13.7m. port of registry Tralee, County Kerry.
Maiden voyage: March 2003, IMO number: 8633671, Call sign: EIJL, MMSI number: 250271000
Status: Museum ship
Three-masted barque, Gt:301, Displacement:518 t. (510 long tons) Length:47 m.(154' 2") o/a, 37.5 m.(123') on deck, Beam:8 m.(26' 3") Draft:4.6m.(15'1") Air draft:28m.(91'10")

Propulsion:2 × 290 hp. (216 kW.) Caterpillar 3306 diesel engines
1 × 50 kW. (67 hp.) bow thruster.
Sail plan:18 Duradon sails, 645 m2. (6,940 sq ft) sail area
Endurance:Under sail: 70 days, On 1 engine:17 days
Crew:40 (11 permanent and 29 voyage crew)

In 2003 the replica Jeanie Johnston sailed from Tralee to Canada and the United States visiting 32 US and Canadian cities and attracting over 100,000 visitors.
She took part in the Tall Ships Race from Waterford to Cherbourg in 2005 and finished 60th out of 65 ships.
Other notable Irish tall ships or sail training ships are the Asgard II (lost in the Bay of Biscay in 2008), the Dunbrody, the Lord Rank (N.I.)
and the Creidne (I.N.S.).
The replica is currently owned by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority who bought it in 2005 for a reported 2.7 million Euro,
which were used to clear outstanding loans on the vessel guaranteed by Tralee Town Council and Kerry County Council.
From 2006 to 2008 she was operated on their behalf by Rivercruise Ireland. During that time she carried approximately 980 sail trainees and over 2,500 passengers,
making regular visits to ports around Britain and Ireland, and also undertaking several trips to Spain each summer,
often carrying voyage crew who intended to join the Camino de Santiago. In between these voyages she would offer day-sails in Dublin Bay.
In early 2009 the Dublin Docklands Development Authority and Rivercruise Ireland could not reach agreement.
DDDA then offered the Department of Defence use of the ship as a training vessel for free (as a replacement for the sunken Asgard II),
but the offer was turned down.
The Department of Defence declared the Jeanie Johnston unsuitable because of her lack of speed, her required crew size of 11 and her inability to participate
in tall ships races. No alternative operator was found until mid-2010, when Galway-based company Aiseanna Mara Teoranta was appointed to operate the ship as a museum.
As of 2010, the ship is not in seagoing condition.
(Ireland 2000, 30 p. StG.?) Internet

PRODROMOS

From Mr. Sitnikov I got an image of the German tanker PRODROMOS on an artistic stamped envelope from Russia issued on 10 April 2014, and some photo’s
Built as a hopper barge under yard no 614 by Lobnitz & Co. Ltd., Renfrew, Scotland for the Cie Universelle du Canal Maritime de Suez, Port Said, Egypt.
23 May 1906 launched as the PRIMUS.
Tonnage 601 gross, dim. 57.6 x 11.0 x 2.7m (draught), length bpp 54.9m.
Powered by a steam engine(s) ?
June 1906 completed.
1910 Renamed in PORTEUR No, 36 by owners.
14 March 1938 Sold to Vayannis Cairactides, Piraeus, Greece for £1,900 and renamed PRODROMOS, She was rebuilt in a tanker by the new owners. Two 3-cyl. Diesel engines, manufactured by Bolinder-Munktell, Sweden, 236 hp, each, twin shafts, speed 9 knots.
Tonnage 877 grt, 424 nrt.
08 November 1940 requisition by Greek Government
April 1941 abandoned by her crew in Selinia, Salamis Island, Greek.
After Athens was occupied by German Forces in 27 April 1941 the PRODROMOS was taken as a prize and transferred to the German Navy, not renamed. In service by the navy as a tanker.
1942 Was the German Mediterranean company Hamburg the owner of the PRODROMOS.
After 14 April 1944 the Russian submarine M-111 on patrol off Cape Tarkhankut, Crimea sighted on 17th April the PRODROMOS escorted by the HELGA a transport. M-111 fired torpedoes which missed their target.
PRODROMOS took part in the evacuation of the German troops and her allies from the Crimea to Constanta in April/May 1944
09 May 1944 sunk by the German Navy at Sevastopol according German sources, the Russian sources give, taken by Soviet shore artillery in Sevastopol, by looking at the photo’s it looks that the German forces put her on fire, but she did not sink and was later taken by the Soviets. Anyhow she looks a complete wreck and she was not used again, most probably scrapped at situ.
Russia stamped envelope 2014.
Sources: Mr. Sitnikov. http://historisches-marinearchiv.de/pro ... _value=475
http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz
http://www.worldwar2.ro/arr/?article=776

Seute Deern (Three Masted Bark) 1919

Built in Gulfport Shipbuilding Company, Gulfport, Bremerhaven, Germany in 1919; Gt. 721,38, nt. 630,26; 178.58’ x 36.17’ x 14.76’ (draught) [54.43m (61.45m oa) x 11.30m x 4.6m]; wood hull, barque rig with steel spars, 1.107sq.m. sail area; crew: 10.

Built as Elizabeth Bandi for the Marine Company, Mobile, Alabama, U.S., she was originally a four-masted coastal schooner, but later rebuilt as an auxiliary barque. At the time of her construction, there was an enormous need of trading vessels, hence, hundreds of ships were built. But there was a lack of good dry wood for their construction, so many of the ships were built from fresh wood (Pitchpine). This caused some problems, particularly on Elizabeth Bandi’s first voyage. Loaded with wood, the fresh wood that had been used in her construction, started to twist. As well, it was attacked by worms eating the outer planks, causing her to become leaky. The crew constantly manned the pumps to prevent her from sinking, and when they finally made their destination, she needed extensive repairs before she was able to continue.

Until 1931, the Elizabeth Bandi had sailed under the American flag, but was then sold to a Finnish owner
(William Uskanen) and renamed Bandi. As Bandi, she was primarily involved in the wood export to England. The change from the salty American waters, to the north Baltic Sea, was well suited for her hull. The Baltic Sea water did not contain beetles or wood worms. In 1935, she was sold to W. Uskanen, whose company coincidentally, was called Laiva Bandi. The brokerage firm of Yrjaenen & Kumpp of Bereederung, was in charge of her cargoes. But, they soon had problems finding enough cargo for the ship.

She was sold on Nov. 7, 1938 for 26,500 realm Marks to Germany. The new owner, J. T. Essberger of Hamburg, had the four-masted sailing ship overhauled completely to a three-mast bark. The change began Dec. 16, 1938 with Blohm & Voss (Hamburg) and on June 15, 1939, the nearly new sail-school ship, Seute Deeern, was activated. Up to the end of the Second World War the Seute Deern serviced within the Baltic Sea as a freight and training ship. At the end of war, the bark wound up in Luebeck. The shipping company Essberger brought Seute Deern in June 1946, with the help of a tractor, between Travemuende to Schlichting. There, she was converted into a hotel ship. One year later, the Seute Deern was moved to Hamburg and continued to be used as a hotel and restaurant ship, at the famous “couch place” of the old Ferry VII dock.

The Emder Gastwirtin Erna Hardisty bought her and transferred her to Emden, where she was fastened in December 1964.

On June 22, 1966, she was dragged from Emden to Bremerhaven and its new couch place was in Bremerhaven.

In 1972, she was taken over by the German navigation museum and thoroughly restored. In April 1983, she was renovated into a restaurant ship once again and operated by the Hotel Naber.


Germany, 2003, 2.60 €, S.G.?, Scott; ?.

Source: ; http://www.janmaat.de/seuted.

Snipe Class Dinghy

The Snipe is a 15 1⁄2 foot, 2 person, one design racing dinghy. Designed by William Crosby in 1931, she has evolved into a modern, tactical racing dinghy with fleets around the world. The Snipe is simple, making it easy to sail and trailer. The boat is recognized by the International Sailing Federation as an International Class and is sailed in 26 different countries. There have been over 30,000 Snipes constructed worldwide.

The global Snipe slogan is "Serious sailing, Serious fun".

The Snipe class has both developed and attracted some of the sailing world's top competitors. The top two olympic medalists in sailing Torben Grael and Paul Elvstrøm have competed in the Snipe. Grael, winner of five Olympic medals, began his world class career by winning a junior Snipe world championship, and subsequently two world championships.Elvstrøm was Snipe world champion in 1959 having won three of his four Olympic golds and world championships in the Finn and 505 class.

She can be sailed by all types of persons, no matter their age, their weight, or their sex. Co-ed crews are very popular in Snipe sailing.

Perhaps because of the very limited evolutions of the boat allowed over the years, there is an excellent second-hand market.

Regattas are held in most countries and local, regional, national and international championships offer great opportunities to compete at different levels of skills.
She is also easy and cheap to transport.

During a meeting of the Florida West Coast Racing Association in march, 1931, Bill Crosby promised to publish a new trailer boat design in the magazine "The Rudder". This was done on the July, 1931 issue, and the new boat was called "Snipe". The first unit was built in Pass Christian, Mississippi and was issued sail number 1 of the class in September, 1931. By may, 1932, 150 boats were already registered, and by the end of the year the number reached 250. In July, 1936, the class was the largest racing class in the world.

Brazil, 1962, S.G.?, Scott; 941.

Brazil, 1979, S.G.?, Scott; 1611.

Source: Wikipedia
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CHAMPION HMS 1880

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CHAMPION HMS 1880

Postby shipstamps » Mon Dec 22, 2008 4:11 pm


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Built under yard No 207 as a corvette, steel hulled clad with two layers of teak wood by John Elder & Co. Govan, Scotland for the Royal Navy.
17 August 1876 keel laid down.
01 July 1878 launched under the name HMS CHAMPION one of the Comus class of which nine were built. She was the third vessel under this name in the Royal Navy.
Displacement: 2.380 tons, dim. 225.0 (bpp) x 44.6 x 19.3ft.
Powered by a 3-cyl. horizontal compound steam engine 2310 ihp., speed 13 knots, single shaft.
Bunker capacity 470 tons coal, range by 10 knots 3.840 miles.
Armament: 2 x 7 inc MLR, 12 x 64 pdr. guns.
Ship rigged, and fitted out with a hoisting screw.
Underwater hull was copper sheathed.
Crew 265.
07 December 1880 completed, based at Sheerness.

The intention was to use the class as scout vessel for the fleet but due to the slow speed, the class was mainly used for protection across the globe.
The class was designed by Nathaniel Barnaby.
Around 1885 rearmed with 4 – 6 inch BL MK III, 8 – 5 inch BL MK III, 4 – 3pdr. BL QF and two light guns., 6 – MG. and two TCs.
April 1886 she visited Amoy, China.
1890 Based in the Pacific.
August 1891 under command of Capt. Frederick St Clair, co-operated with some French, American and German warships by landing men at Valparaiso, Chile to protect the western consulates during a Chilean revolution.
1893 She visited Pitcairn Island under command of Capt. Rookes. He prepared a criminal code and reorganized the Governments system on the island.
26 June 1897 present at the Naval Review at Spithead in celebration of the Diamond Jubilee.
1904 Placed in harbour duty, and became a stokers training ship in Chatham,
1915 Renamed CHAMPION (old) when a new CHAMPION was built.
23 June 1919 sold to Hughes Bolckow, Blyth for scrapping.

Pitcairn Island 1988 $5 sg 326 and 1999 $3 sg 552.

Source: Conways All the World’s Fighting Ships 1860 – 1905. The Sail & Steam Navy List by Lyon & Winfield.
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