SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

WINDSURFING RS:X board

The ancient Olympic Games were held over a period of 1500 years. The Games were reestablished in the late 19th century by Baron Pierre de Coubertin and the first modern Olympics took place in Athens in 1896.
Since then, the Olympic Games have been held regularly every four years, except during WWI and WWII.
The Summer Olympics constitute the largest event of any kind in the world.
The 31st modern Olympiad will commence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 5, 2016. This marks the first time that the Olympics have been hosted in South America.
Israel participated in the Olympic Games for the first time in Helsinki 1952. The infamous 1972 Munich games will eternally be mourned for the 11 members of the Israeli delegation who were murdered there - athletes, trainers and referees.
Israel won its first Olympic medal in Barcelona in 1992 and its first gold medal in Athens 2004.

Sailing - RS:X Windsurfing
Sailing is one of Israel's most prominent sports. The most prominent achievement in this field is the Olympic gold medal for windsurfing.
The RS:X windsurfer replaced the Mistral model in 2005. The RS:X was first used at the 2006 Israeli Championships and marked the transition to the younger generation of windsurfers: Gal Friedman, Olympic gold medalist from the Athens 2004 games (Mistral model) came in fourth, while Shahar Zubari won the competition. In the women's competition, Maayan Davidovich beat former World Champion Lee Korzits. Israel was represented at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing by Zubari and Davidovich, both of whom qualified for the medal sailings and Zubari even won a bronze medal.
Lee Korzits won four consecutive world championship titles and was ranked sixth in the London 2012 games. She is Israel’s most decorated athlete.
Israel will be represented at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games by Israeli windsurfers Maayan Davidovich and Shahar Zubari.
Smadar Pintov CEO, Israel Sailing Association.
Downloaded from: http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... t&id=28849

RS:X sailboard was made after a design by One Design, Neil Pryde, the designers are Jean Bouldoires & Robert Stroj and the board is made of GRP & Carbon.
Dim. 2.86 x 0.93m.
Hull weight 15.5 kg.
The mast height different between a male and female sailer, male 5.2m., female 4.9m. and also the sail area, male 9.5m², female 4.9m².
RS:X is a windsurfing discipline selected by the ISAFto replace the Mistral One Design Class class for the 2008 Summer Olympics. The discipline has similarities to formula windsurfing - mainly in that the equipment used was designed to allow windsurfing in low and moderate wind conditions with good performance.
RS:X equipment includes a board with a daggerboard, and a sail of a specified size. The board measures 286 cm in length and 93 cm in width. Unlike formula boards, it is quite heavy - 15.5 kg, which is almost twice that of regular competition formula boards, but is very similar to the weight of Raceboards such as the previous Olympic board, Mistral One Design Class. Although the Mistral board has a weight of 17 kg ready to sail, the RS:X board weighs more than 19 kg.
The RS:X seems to be a compromise between traditional Raceboards which work well in 5-35 knots, and Formula boards which go fast in 12-30 knots, and has shown itself to be competitive with past Raceboards in the medium wind range.
The shape and design of the RS:X sail is based on that of the Neil Pryde formula windsurfing sail RS4.

Israel 2016 4s10 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RS:X

JUPITER HMS 1897

Built as a battleship under yard no 273 by James & George Thomson, Clydebank, Scotland for the Royal Navy.
26 April 1894 laid down.

18 November 1895 launched as the HMS JUPITER one of the Majestic-class.
Displacement 14,820 ton, dim. 128.3 x 22.9 x 8.2m. (draught) Length bpp 118.9m.
Powered by 2 – 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, 12,000 ihp, twin shafts, speed 17 knots.

Armament: 4 – 12 inch Mk Viii, 12 – QF 6 inch, 16 – 12pdr., 12 – 3 pdr QFguns and 5 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.

February 1897 transferred to Chatham for completion.
Crew 672.

08 June 1897 completed.

HMS JUPITER was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1897, she was assigned to the Channel Fleet until 1905. After a refit, she was temporarily put in reserve before returning to service with the Channel Fleet in September 1905. In 1908 and rendered obsolete by the emergence of the dreadnought type of battleships, she once again returned to the reserve, this time with the Home Fleet. After another refit, she had a spell as a gunnery training ship in 1912.
Following the outbreak of World War I, JUPITER served with the Channel Fleet and then as a guard ship on the River Tyne. She was dispatched to Russia in February 1915 to serve as an icebreaker, clearing a route to Arkhangelsk while the regular icebreaker was undergoing a refit. She underwent her own refit later in 1915 and once completed, was transferred to the Suez Canal Patrol. She returned to England late 1916, and spent the remainder of the war based at Devonport. She was scrapped in 1920.
Design
Main article: Majestic-class battleship
HMS JUPITER was laid down by J & G Thomson, Clydebank at Clydebank on 26 April 1894 and launched on 18 November 1895. In February 1897 she was transferred to Chatham Dockyard, where she was completed in May 1897. The ship was 421 feet (128 m) long overall and had a beam of 75 ft (23 m) and a draft of 27 ft (8.2 m). She displaced up to 16,060 t (15,810 long tons; 17,700 short tons) at full combat load. Her propulsion system consisted of two 3-cylinder triple expansion engines powered by eight coal-fired cylindrical boilers. By 1907–1908, she was re-boilered with oil-fired models. Her engines provided a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) at 10,000 indicated horsepower (7,500 kW). The Majestics were considered good seaboats with an easy roll and good steamers, although they suffered from high fuel consumption. She had a crew of 672 officers and enlisted men.

The ship was armed with four BL 12-inch Mk VIII guns in twin turrets, one forward and one aft. The turrets were placed on pear-shaped barbettes; six of her sisters had the same arrangement, but her sisters CAESAR and ILLUSTRIOUS and all future British battleship classes had circular barbettes. JUPITER also carried twelve QF 6-inch /40 guns. They were mounted in casemates in two gun decks amidships. She also carried sixteen QF 12-pounder guns and twelve QF 2-pounder guns. She was also equipped with five 18 in (460 mm) torpedo tubes, four of which were submerged in the ship's hull, with the last in a deck-mounted launcher. JUPITER and the other ships of her class had 9 inches (229 mm) of Harvey armour, which allowed equal protection with less cost in weight compared to previous types of armour. This allowed JUPITER and her sisters to have a deeper and lighter belt than previous battleships without any loss in protectionThe barbettes for the main battery were protected with 14 in (360 mm) of armor, and the conning tower had the same thickness of steel on the sides. The ship's armored deck was 2.5 to 4.5 in (64 to 114 mm) thick. ....
Operational history
HMS JUPITER was commissioned on 8 June 1897 at Chatham Dockyard for service in the Channel Fleet. She was present at both the Fleet Review at Spithead for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria on 26 June 1897 and the Coronation Fleet Review for King Edward VII on 16 August 1902. Captain John Durnford was appointed in command in October 1899, followed by Captain Sir Archibald Berkeley Milne from December 1900. In March 1901 she visited Cork. On 1 January 1905, the Channel Fleet became the new Atlantic Fleet, making her an Atlantic Fleet unit. She was paid off at Chatham on 27 February 1905 to undergo a refit there, and her Atlantic Fleet service ended when she emerged from refit and was commissioned at Chatham into the Portsmouth Reserve on 15 August 1905. JUPITER was commissioned for service in the new Channel Fleet on 20 September 1905. This service ended on 3 February 1908 when she was paid off. By this time, JUPITER had been surpassed in the role of front-line battleship by the new "all-big-gun" dreadnought battleships inaugurated by HMS DREADNOUGHT in 1906.[
On 4 February 1908, JUPITER was recommissioned for reserve service in the Portsmouth Division of the new Home Fleet with a nucleus crew. She was flagship of the division from February to June 1909 and later second flagship of the 3rd Division, Home Fleet. During this service, she underwent refits at Portsmouth in 1909–1910, during which she received fire control equipment for her main battery, and 1911–1912. From June 1912 to January 1913 she served as a seagoing gunnery training ship at the Nore. In January 1913 she was transferred to the 3rd Fleet, and was based at Pembroke Dock and Devonport.
World War I
When World War I broke out in August 1914, JUPITER was transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet. During this service, she covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In late October 1914, JUPITER was reassigned to serve alongside her sister ship MAJESTIC as a guard ship at the Nore. On 3 November 1914, JUPITER and MAJESTIC left the Nore and relieved their sister ships HANNIBAL and MAGNIFICENT of guard ship duty on the Humber. In December 1914, JUPITER moved on to guard ship duty on the Tyne. On 5 February 1915, JUPITER was detached from her guard ship duty to serve temporarily as an icebreaker at Arkhangelsk, Russia, while the regular icebreaker there was under refit. In this duty, JUPITER made history by becoming the first ship ever to get through the ice into Arkhangelsk during the winter; her February arrival was the earliest in history there. Tsar Nicholas II authorised the striking and issue of medals commemorating the feat to all officers, petty officers and seamen (class 1, 2 and 3 respectively).
JUPITER left Arkhangelsk in May 1915 to return to the Channel Fleet, and was paid off at Birkenhead on 19 May 1915. She then began a refit by Cammell Laird there that lasted until August 1915. Her refit completed, JUPITER was commissioned at Birkenhead on 12 August 1915 for service in the Mediterranean Sea on the Suez Canal Patrol. On 21 October 1915, she was transferred to the Red Sea to become guard ship at Aden and flagship of the Senior Naval Officer, Red Sea Patrol. She was relieved of flagship duty by the troopship RIM NORTHBROOK of the Royal Indian Marine on 9 December 1915 and returned to the Suez Canal Patrol for Mediterranean service. This lasted from April to November 1916, with a home port in Port Said, Egypt.
JUPITER left Egypt on 22 November 1916 and returned to the United Kingdom, where she was paid off at Devonport to provide crews for antisubmarine vessels. She remained at Devonport until April 1919, in commission as a special service vessel and auxiliary patrol ship until February 1918, when she was again paid off. After that she became an accommodation ship. In April 1919, JUPITER became the first Majestic-class ship to be placed on the disposal list. She was sold for scrapping on 15 January 1920, and on 11 March 1920 was towed from Chatham to Blyth to be scrapped by Hughes Bolckow at Derwenthaugh on the River Tyne....

Source:...

RINALDO HMS 1901

Built as a steel sloop under yard No 636 by Laird Bross, Birkenhead for the Royal Navy.
08 November 1898 laid down.
29 May 1900 launched as the HMS RINALDO one of the Condor-class.
Displacement 980 ton, dim. 62 x 9.9 x 3.51m draught, length bpp. 55 m.
Powered by 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 1,400 hp, twin shafts, speed 13 knots.
Range 3,000 mile by a speed of 10 knots. Bunker capacity 160 ton coal.
First barque rigged later altered to Barquentine and in the end complete removed.
Armament: 6 – QF 4 inch, 4 – QF 3pdr guns and 1 MG.
Crew 120-130.
26 November 1901 commissioned.

First used in South East Asia.
August 1904 she was given medical assistance to Brunei during an outbreak of smallpox there.
1914 Was she tender and training ship to HMS VIVID, Devonport Royal Naval Reserve.
When First World War broke out patrols along the Belgium Coast.
1915 In service on West, South and East Africa till May 1919.
07 May 1919 arrived at Plymouth from Africa.
? Decommissioned.
21 October 1921 sold to W. Thomas, Anglesey for scrapping.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
Sources: ships of the Royal Navy by J.J. Colledge. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Wikipedia. http://www.naval-history.net/OWShips-WW ... inaldo.htm

POLYNESIAN VOYAGE CANOE

The stamp has the inscription “The Polynesians the earliest of the Pacific explores”. And shows us a double hulled dug-out voyage canoe.
The Polynesian primary voyage craft was the double canoe made of two hulls connected by lashing crossbeams. The two hulls gave this craft stability and the capacity to carry heavy loads of migrating families and all their supplies and equipment, while a central platform laid over the crossbeams provided the needed working, living and storage space. Sails made of matting drove this ancient forerunner of the modern catamaran swiftly trough the seas, and long steering paddles enabled Polynesian mariners to keep it sailing on course.
A medium-size voyage canoe with a length of 50 to 60 feet could accommodate two dozen or so migrants, their food supplies, livestock and planting materials.

Grenada 1991 25c sg2224, scott1953.
Source: http://www.pbs.org/wayfinders/polynesian2.html

STONE FISHING

Stone fishing is a centuries-old tradition in Tahiti that is still occasionally practiced today. In the past, this particular method of fishing allowed small islands to catch enough fish to feed everyone in the community. Now, some of the islands still perform the ritual during grand occasions as a way to celebrate the tradition and invite everyone to partake in the feast that follows.
In French, the technique is called “la pêche aux cailloux.” In Tahitian, it’s known as “te tautai taora ofa’i” (tautai means “fishing instrument,” taora means “thrown,” and ofa’i is the Tahitian word for “stone”).

How Does it Work?
Stone fishing is similar to a cattle drive except the animals being “herded” are underneath the water. Powered by canoes, the locals start by beating the surface of the lagoon with heavy stones tied to ropes made of coconut fiber. This creates a frenzy that frightens the fish, coercing them toward the shore.
Once in shallow water, the canoes form a circle and drop a long line of coconut leaves around the perimeter. With a physical barrier in place, the fish are contained and therefore much easier to catch. Traditionally, the fish were collected in woven baskets made from coconut palms; but today, the fish are also sometimes speared.
The Island of Maupiti
Maupiti, a small island located west of Bora Bora, is home to approximately 1,200 inhabitants. Once every ten years, the entire population of the island takes part in a traditional stone fishing event with over 200 canoes on the water. Check out this video from the event in 2000. Although the narrative is in French, it will give you a great idea of what stone fishing is like.
The island’s most recent stone fishing celebration was the conclusion of a South Pacific UNESCO conference on sustainable development. Afterward, all the fish were released except for one caught by French Senator Richard Tuheiava, a Maupiti native.

French Polynesia 1991 25f/62f sg621/23, scott571/573.
Downloaded from: https://blog.tahiti.com/2012/07/17/gone ... ian-style/ b

NIGHT HAWK HMT

Built as a steam trawler under yard no 645 by Cochrane & Sons, Selby for Pioneer Steam Fishing Co. Ltd., Grimsby.
14 August 1915 launched as the NIGHT HAWK.
Tonnage 307 gross, 150 net, dim. 40.23 x 7.31 x 3.90m.
Powered by one 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine manufactured by C. D. Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull, 89 nhp, speed ?
January 1916 completed.

History
14.8.1915: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.645) for The Pioneer Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby as NIGHT HAWK.
1.1.1916: Registered at Grimsby (GY822).
3.1.1916: Completed (Alick (Alec) Black, manager).
2.1916: Sold to The Grimsby Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (George E. J. Moody, manager).
3.1916: Requisitioned for war service as a minesweeper (1-6pdr HA) (Ad.No.1936). Employed on escort duties. Based Devonport.
By 12.3.1919: Returned to owner at Grimsby.
1926: Sir George E. J. Moody appointed manager.
7.2.1934: On an Icelandic trip off Isafjord sustained damage after striking an ice flow.
1.1939: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, manager).
1.6.1940: Requisitioned for war service as an auxiliary patrol vessel (P.No.FY.1858) (Hire rate £86.19.8d/month).
10.1940: Fitted out as a minesweeper. Based Plymouth with M/S Group 76.
8.1941: Sold to North Star Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Aberdeen.
22.9.1941: Grimsby registry closed.
25.9.1941: Registered at Aberdeen (A517).
1944: Employed on auxiliary patrol duties.
1944: Sold to Parkholme Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood (Harvey Wilfred Wilson, Grimsby, manager). Aberdeen registry closed. Registered at Grimsby (GY15).
1945: Sold to Milford Fisheries Ltd, Milford Haven (Owen W. Limbrick, manager).
8.1946: Returned to owner.
24.8.1948: Landed at Fleetwood (Skipper Arthur Harvey) after nine day trip on herring, 1,350 boxes grossed £2,250.
6.1954: Laid up at Milford due to NCB further increase in price of bunker coal.
29.6.1956: Alongside in Milford. Two men scalded by steam when boiler door joint blew.
2.1959: Sold to Jacques Bakker en Zonen, Bruges for breaking up.
25.2.1959: Last landing at Milford.
28.2.1959: Sailed Milford for Zeebruges.
2.3.1959: Delivered Bruges, and broken up by J. Bakker & Zonen at Zelzate, Belgium, at that time she carried still the name NIGHT HAWK.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
http://www.fleetwood-trawlers.info/inde ... hawk-gy15/ http://www.llangibby.eclipse.co.uk/milf ... t_hawk.htm
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WILLIAM CORY

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WILLIAM CORY

Postby shipstamps » Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:47 pm


Click image to view full size
Built under yard No 28 as a steel hullede cargo vesselby the yard of C. Mitchell & Co., Newcastle for William Cory and John Nixon, Cardiff.
23 May 1957 launched under the name WILLIAM CORY.
Tonnage 1.578 grt.1.238 net, dim. 244.5 x 35.2 x 17.8ft.
Powered by 2 steam engines 180hp.
Three masts, schooner rigged.
Her registered owner was H.Taylor.

She was built for the purpose of developing the South Wales trade, in which Wm Cory Jr. had taken an interest with John Nixon.
Carried two thin funnels abreast, right aft, the stamp shows one funnel, a design fault on the stamp.
She was chartered by Glass Elliot & Company for cable work, later by the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company.

1858 Laid Cable between Suffolk and the Netherlands, and from Cromer to Helgoland, Germany.
1861 From Algiers to Toulon, and from Otranto to Corfu in the Mediterranean.
1866 Landed the eastern end of the new Atlantic cable at Valentia, Ireland, and the Lowestoft to Norderney section from the Indo-European cable.
1869 The French Atlantic cable from St Pierre et Miquelon to Duxbury, Mass. USA.
1870 Carried part of the red Sea cable for the Indo-European cable.
Marseille to Bona together with CS SCANDERIA.
1870 Laid the cable between Penang and Singapore.

1882 Her registered owner is given as J.Fenwick & Son, London.
1888 Her registered owner is given as R. Jobson and Co., West Hartlepool.
1896 Transferred to Wm. Cory and Son Ltd.
May 1900 Sold to Dutch shipbreakers and broken up in Dordrecht, Netherland.

Ireland 1979 13p sg 457, scott 464

Source: http://www.atlantic-cable.com/stamps/Ca ... ndexbc.htm World Ships publication: One Hundred Years Cory Fleet.
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