KAISER BARBAROSSA SMS 1901

Built as a battleship under yard No 640 by Schichau, Danzig for the Imperial German Navy.
03 August 1898 keel laid down.
21 April 1900 Launched as the KAISER BARBAROSSA, named after Frederick I. Barbarossa.
Displacement 11,599 tons full load, dim. 125.3 20.4 x 7.89 m. (draught). Lpp. 120.9 m.
Powered by triple expansion steam engines, 13,000 ihp, three shafts, speed 17.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 10 knots, 3,940 mile.
Armament: 4 – 24 cm, 18 – 15 cm, 12 – 8.8 cm and 12 – 1pdr. guns. 6 – 45 cm torpedo tubes.
Crew 39 officers and 612 enlisted.
10 June 1901 commissioned.

SMS KAISER BARBAROSSA (His Majesty's Ship Emperor Barbarossa) was a German pre-dreadnought battleship of the Kaiser Friedrich III class. The ship was built for the Imperial Navy, which had begun a program of expansion at the direction of Kaiser Wilhelm II. She was constructed at Schichau, in Danzig. KAISER BARBAROSSA was laid down in August 1898, launched on 24 April 1900, and completed in June 1901, at the cost of 20,301,000 Marks. The ship was armed with a main battery of four 24-centimeter (9.4 in) guns in two twin gun turrets.
KAISER BARBAROSSA served with the German navy from her commissioning in 1901, though her active career was limited due to two lengthy stays in drydock. The first was for repairs following damage to her rudder in 1903, which lasted until early 1905, and the second for a major modernization, which began immediately after the conclusion of repair work in 1905 and lasted until late 1907. She returned to service for another two years, before being decommissioned in 1909 and placed in the reserve division. She continued to participate in fleet training exercises for the next three years.
Following the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, KAISER BARBAROSSA and her sisters were mobilized as coastal defense ships in the V Battle Squadron and assigned to the North and Baltic Seas. She saw no combat during the war, and due to a shortage of crews, the ships were withdrawn from active duty in February 1915 and relegated to secondary duties. KAISER BARBAROSSA was briefly used as a torpedo target ship for most of 1915 and thereafter spent the remainder of the war as a prison ship in Wilhelmshaven. Following the end of the war in 1918, KAISER BARBAROSSA was decommissioned and sold for scrap metal. The ship was broken up in 1919–1920.
KAISER BARBAROSSA was 125.3 m (411 ft) long overall and had a beam of 20.4 m (67 ft) and a draft of 7.89 m (25.9 ft) forward and 8.25 m (27.1 ft) aft. She displaced up to 11,599 t (11,416 long tons; 12,786 short tons) at full load. The ship was powered by three 3-cylinder vertical triple-expansion steam engines that drove three screw propellers. Steam was provided by four Marine-type and eight cylindrical boilers, all of which burned coal. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s powerplant was rated at 13,000 indicated horsepower (9,700 kW), which generated a top speed of 18 knots (33 km/h). She had a normal crew of 39 officers and 612 enlisted men.
KAISER BARBAROSSA’s armament consisted of a main battery of four 24 cm (9.4 in) SK L/40 guns in twin gun turrets,[a] one fore and one aft of the central superstructure.[2] Her secondary armament consisted of eighteen 15 cm (5.9 inch) SK L/40 guns and twelve 8.8 cm (3.45 in) SK L/30 quick-firing guns. The armament suite was rounded out with six 45 cm torpedo tubes, all in above-water swivel mounts. The ship's belt armor was 300 mm (11.8 in) thick, and the deck was 65 mm (2.6 in) thick. The conning tower and main battery turrets were protected with 250 mm (9.8 in) of armor plating, and the secondary casemates received 150 mm (5.9 in) of armor protection.[1]
Service history
Kaiser Wilhelm II, the emperor of Germany, believed that a strong navy was necessary for the country to expand its influence outside continental Europe. As a result, he initiated a program of naval expansion in the late 1880s; the first battleships built under this program were the four Brandenburg-class ships. These were immediately followed by the five Kaiser Friedrich III-class battleships, of which KAISER BARBAROSSA was a member. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s keel was laid down on 3 August 1898, at the Schichau-Werke in Danzig, under construction number 640. She was ordered under the contract name "A" as an addition to the fleet. KAISER BARBAROSSA was launched on 21 April 1900, and then-Vizeadmiral (Vice Admiral) Alfred von Tirpitz, the State Secretary of the Reichsmarineamt (RMA—Imperial Navy Office), gave the launching speech, and the new battleship was christened by Princess Luise Sofie of Prussia. Sea trials began on 4 May 1901, during which two tests were recorded: a 50-hour endurance test and a 6-hour speed test. The former produced a sustained speed of 15.5 kn (28.7 km/h; 17.8 mph), while the latter saw a maximum speed of 18 kn (33 km/h; 21 mph).[5] and on 10 June she was commissioned into the fleet in Kiel. The final cost of the vessel was 20,301,000 marks.
Following her commissioning, KAISER BARBAROSSA was assigned to the I Squadron of the fleet, which shortly thereafter went on a cruise to Spain. While moored in Cadiz, the ships met the four Brandenburg-class ships, which were returning from their expedition to suppress the Boxer Rebellion in China. From 22 August to 21 September, KAISER BARBAROSSA participated in the annual autumn maneuvers of the entire fleet. While in the Danzig Bay, the fleet conducted a naval review for the visiting Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. The winter cruise in December went to southern Norway. In April and May 1902, the squadron went on a training cruise to Britain, followed by a tour of the Kiel Week sailing regatta in late June. The ships then took part in another training cruise to Norway in July and then the autumn maneuvers, which began in the Baltic and concluded in the North Sea with a fleet review in the Jade. During the exercise, which lasted from 17 August to 18 September, KAISER BARBAROSSA and the rest of I Squadron were assigned to play both the role of the German fleet and hostile forces. The usual winter cruise went to Bergen, Norway that year.
In 1903, the fleet, which was composed of only one squadron of battleships, was reorganized as the "Active Battle Fleet." KAISER WILHEM DER GROSSE remained in the I Squadron along with her sister ships and the newest Wittelsbach-class battleships, while the older Brandenburg-class ships were placed in reserve in order to be rebuilt. The first quarter of 1903 followed the usual pattern of training exercises. The squadron went on a training cruise in the Baltic, followed by a voyage to Spain that lasted from 7 May to 10 June. The ship suffered some minor damage to her rudder, which necessitated temporary repairs at the Kaiserliche Werft (Imperial Shipyard) in Kiel from the end of July to 21 August. She thereafter took part in the autumn maneuvers and the winter cruise in the eastern Baltic and the Skagerrak. The autumn maneuvers consisted of a blockade exercise in the North Sea, a cruise of the entire fleet first to Norwegian waters and then to Kiel in early September, and finally a mock attack on Kiel. The exercises concluded on 12 September. The winter training cruise began on 23 November in the eastern Baltic and continued into the Skagerrak in early December. On 15 December, KAISER BARBAROSSA was decommissioned for permanent repairs to her rudder, which lasted until January 1905. She did not return to service, however, and instead began a major reconstruction.
During the modernization, four of her 15 cm guns were removed and two 8.8 cm guns were added. All twelve machine guns were removed, as was the ship's stern-mounted torpedo tube. KAISER BARBAROSSA’s superstructure was also cut down to reduce the ship's tendency to roll excessively and her military masts were replaced with lighter pole masts. The ship's funnels were also lengthened. KAISER...

GRETEL KA 1 yacht 1962

Built as a 12-metre class yacht by Lars Holvorsen Sons Pty Ltd., Sydney for Sir Frank Parker Syndicate, representing the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron.
Designed by Alan Payne. She was built as a wooden boat on iron frames.
19 February 1962 launched as the GRETEL KA 1 she was named after Sir Parker first wife Gretel who died in 1960.
Displacement 26.7 ton, dim. 21.16 x 3.58 x 2.67m. (draught), length on waterline 13.84 m.
Sail area 166.9 m².

She was built as a contender for the 1962 America Cup Races at Newport R.I., USA and was shipped to Newport by a cargo vessel in late May 1962.
It was the first time that an Australian yacht took part in an America Cup Race.
The first race was on15 September where the GRETEL under skipper Jock Sturrock met the defender the WEATHERLY under skipper Bus Mosbacher, which the GRETEL lost by 3 minutes and 43 seconds.
The second race was won by the GRETEL.
The third and fourth races were again won by the WEATHERLY, and the cup stayed in the USA.
After the America Cup Race’s she was shipped back on the PORT WYNDHAM and arrived in Australia in December 1962.
After the cup she was used as a trial horse for several challenges, 1967 for the DAME PATTIE and in 1970 for GRETEL II.
1973 Owned by the Yanchep Estates Pty. Ltd., Perth, Western Australia.
1975 Sold to the Southern Cross America’s Cup Challenge Association Ltd. Perth.
1976 Sold to the Gretel Syndicate, Yanchep, WA Australia.
From 1982 to 1993 in use as a charter yacht in Whitsundays, Australia.
1993 Sold to an unknown owner North Queensland, Australia.
2003 Sold to Doug Peterson, Porto Santo Stefano, Italy.
2005 Sold to Robbe & Berking Classics, and transported to Flensburg, Germany for restoration on their own yard there.
2014 GRETEL is still under restoration with the intention to bring her back to Australia.
Maldives 1987 2r sg1247, scott1255.
Source: http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05521.html and various other web-sites.

VOLTAIRE 1911

Built as a battleship under yard No 1006 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France for the French Navy.
20 July 1907 laid down.
16 January 1909 launched as the VOLTAIRE one of the Danton Class.
Displacement 18.310 ton standard, 19,763 full load, dim. 144.9 x 25.8 x 9.2m. (draught)
Powered by four Parsons steam turbines, 22,500 shp., four shafts, speed 19 knots.
Armament: 2 x 2- 305mm/45 Modéle guns, 16 x 1 – 75mm/65 Modéle guns, 10 x 1 – 47 Hotchkiss guns, 2 – 450mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 681.
01 August 1911 completed.
VOLTAIRE was one of the six Danton class semi-dreadnought battleships built for the French Navy in the late 1900s. Shortly after World War I began, the ship participated in the Battle of Antivari in the Adriatic Sea and helped to sink an Austro-Hungarian protected cruiser. She spent most of the rest of the war blockading the Straits of Otranto and the Dardanelles to prevent German, Austro-Hungarian and Turkish warships from breaking out into the Mediterranean. VOLTAIRE was hit by two torpedoes fired by a German submarine in October 1918, but was not seriously damaged. After the war, she was modernized in 1923–25 and subsequently became a training ship. She was condemned in 1935 and later sold for scrap.
Design and description
Although the Danton-class battleships were a significant improvement from the preceding Liberté class, they were outclassed by the advent of the dreadnought well before they were completed. They were not well liked by the navy, although their numerous rapid-firing guns were of some use in the Mediterranean.
VOLTAIRE was 146.6 meters (481 ft 0 in) long overall and had a beam of 25.8 meters (84 ft 8 in) and a full-load draft of 9.2 meters (30 ft 2 in). She displaced 19,736 metric tons (19,424 long tons) at deep load and had a crew of 681 officers and enlisted men. The ship was powered by four Parsons steam turbines using steam generated by twenty-six Belleville boilers. The turbines were rated at 22,500 shaft horsepower (16,800 kW) and provided a top speed of around 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph). VOLTAIRE, however, reached a top speed of 20.7 knots (38.3 km/h; 23.8 mph) during her sea trials. She carried a maximum of 2,027 tonnes (1,995 long tons) of coal which allowed her to steam for 3,370 nautical miles (6,240 km; 3,880 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph).
VOLTAIRE’s main battery consisted of four 305mm/45 Modèle 1906 guns mounted in two twin gun turrets, one forward and one aft. The secondary battery consisted of twelve 240mm/50 Modèle 1902 guns in twin turrets, three on each side of the ship. A number of smaller guns were carried for defense against torpedo boats. These included sixteen 75 mm (3.0 in) L/65 guns and ten 47 mm (1.9 in) Hotchkiss guns. The ship was also armed with two submerged 450 mm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes. The ship's waterline armor belt was 270 mm (10.6 in) thick and the main battery was protected by up to 300 mm (11.8 in) of armor. The conning tower also had 300 mm thick sides.
Wartime modifications
During the war 75 mm anti-aircraft guns were installed on the roofs of the ship's two forward 240 mm gun turrets. During 1918, the mainmast was shortened to allow the ship to fly a captive kite balloon and the elevation of the 240 mm guns was increased which extended their range to 18,000 meters (20,000 yd).
Career
Construction of VOLTAIRE was begun on 26 December 1906 by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée in La Seyne-sur-Mer and the ship was laid down on 20 July 1907. She was launched on 16 January 1909 and was completed on 1 August 1911. The ship was assigned to the Second Division of the 1st Squadron (escadre) of the Mediterranean Fleet when she was commissioned. The ship participated in combined fleet maneuvers between Provence and Tunisia in May–June 1913 and the subsequent naval review conducted by the President of France, Raymond Poincaré on 7 June 1913. Afterwards, VOLTAIRE joined her squadron in its tour of the Eastern Mediterranean in October–December 1913 and participated in the grand fleet exercise in the Mediterranean in May 1914.
World War I
In early August 1914, the ship cruised the Strait of Sicily in an attempt to prevent the German battlecruiser GOEBEN and the light cruiser BRESLAU from breaking out to the West. On 16 August 1914 the combined Anglo-French Fleet under Admiral Auguste Boué de Lapeyrère, including VOLTAIRE, made a sweep of the Adriatic Sea. The Allied ships encountered the Austro-Hungarian cruiser SMS ZENTA, escorted by the destroyer SMS ULAN, blockading the coast of Montenegro. There were too many ships for ZENTA to escape, so she remained behind to allow ULAN to get away and was sunk by gunfire during the Battle of Antivari off the coast of Bar, Montenegro. VOLTAIRE subsequently participated in a number of raids into the Adriatic later in the year and patrolled the Ionian Islands. From December 1914 to 1916, the ship participated in the distant blockade of the Straits of Otranto while based in Corfu. On 1 December 1916, some of her sailors, transported to Athens by her sister MIRABEAU, participated in the Allied attempt to ensure Greek acquiescence to Allied operations in Macedonia. VOLTAIRE spent part of 1917 through April 1918 based at Mudros to prevent GOEBEN from breaking out into the Mediterranean.
The ship was overhauled from May to October 1918 in Toulon. While returning to Mudros on 10 October, the ship was torpedoed by UB-48 off the island of Milos. Despite being struck by two torpedoes, she able to make temporary repairs at Milos before sailing to Bizerte for permanent repairs. VOLTAIRE was based in Toulon throughout 1919 and was modernized in 1922–25 to improve her underwater protection. The ship became a training ship in 1927 and was condemned in 1935.
She was later sold for scrap and broken up from May 1938.
Liberia 2014 $100 sg?, scott?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_battleship_Voltaire

AZZURRA III (I-10)

The Yacht Club Costra Smeralda and backed by Prince Aga Khan did have four yachts at its disposal for the 1986 Louis Vuitton Cup in Perth, Australia the AZZURRA I (I 4), AZZURRA II (I 8), AZZURRA III (I 10) and AZZURRA IV (I 11).
For the Louis Vuitton races was chosen the AZZURRA III (I-10) as the official challenger, representing the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
She was built as a 12-metre class yacht by SAI Ambrosini , Passignano, Italy for Consorzio Italiana America’s Cup 83’ (Ganni Agnelli & Karim Aga Khan), Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Vallicelli.
1986 Launched as the AZZURRA III (I-10).
Displacement? , dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2,72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.

At the Louis Vuitton Races off Freemantle in 1986 under skipper Mauro Pelaschier she reached only the 11th ranking.
1987 Sold to G. Clausen, Hamburg, Germany and renamed FRATZZ.
1994 Sold to Jurgen Rohel, Hamburg and again renamed AZZURRA III.
2014 Still sailing, same name and owner.
Solomon Islands 1986 $1 sg570a, scott573j
Source: Various internet sites. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05391.html

AZZURRA (I-4) yacht 1981

The Grenada Grenadines stamp shows the yacht AZZURRA with the year 1981, not a sail no visible, four yachts with the name AZZURRA have been built in Italy between 1982 and 1986 the first was completed in 1982 as the AZZURRA (I 4). She took part in America Cup Races in 1983, likely she is depict.
AZZURRA (I 4) was built as a 12-metre class yacht by Off. Meccaniche Ing. Mario Cobau at Pesaro, Italy for the Consorzio Sfida Italiana America’s Cup 1983 (Gianni Agnelli &Karim Aga Khan.) Representing Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Valicelli.
19 July 1982 launched as the AZZURRA (I 4)
Displacement 25.650 tons, dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2.72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.
Sail area 166.65 m².
The AZZURRA (I 4) competed in the 1983 Louis Vuitton Cup races in Newport RI, she reached the semi-finals, finished third in the semi-finals.
Used then as trial horse for the Italian yachts for the America Cup Races in 1986/87
In 1987 was she not more sailing.
2014 On display at the Centro Sportivo of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo.
More info is given on: http://www.sy-pacificwave.com/Pages/Pac ... igree.aspx

Grenada Grenadines 1987 70c sg861, scott864.
Source: Internet and http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05384.html

AUSTRALIA KA 5 yacht 1977

AUSTRALIA KA 5 was built Steve E.Ward Co., Cove Harbor, Western Australia for the America Cup Challenge ’77 Ltd. (Alan Bond), Yanchep Western Australia.
Designed by Ben Lexcen & Johan Valentijn.
February 1977 launched as the AUSTRALIA KA 5.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 19.81 x 3.71 x 2.74m. (draught), length on waterline 13.71 m.
Sail area: 160 m².

AUSTRALIA (KA-5) is an Australian 12-metre-class America's Cup racing yacht that twice challenged unsuccessfully for the America's Cup in 1977 and 1980. Designed by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn for Alan Bond, Australia failed to win a single race against the 1977 defender, COURAGEOUS (US-26), but managed to win one race against the 1980 defender, FREEDOM (US-30). Australia resides in Sydney, Australia, and is currently located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.
Design and Construction
AUSTRALIA was designed during 1976 by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn. Both men spent seven months experimenting with 1/9th scale models in the University of Delft test tank in the Netherlands.
AUSTRALIA is a conventional design and has been described as a "Courageous-style boat".It has v-shaped mid-ship sections, a low freeboard, large bustle and a low aft run finishing in a wide U-shaped transom. Its fore overhang is very narrow and round shaped in its lowest part. The cockpits are shallow, keel is thin and the ballast is placed very low. The elliptical mast is made in extruded aluminum. AUSTRALIA was approximately 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb) lighter than COURAGEOUS and it was hoped that by lowering the freeboard and taking a penalty on length, AUSTRALIA would prove faster than the US boat.
AUSTRALIA was built by Steve Ward in Perth and launched in February 1977. AUSTRALIA then sailed in sea trials against Alan Bond's 1974 challenger, SOUTHERN CROSS (KA-4), off Yanchep in Western Australia. The older boat remained a trial horse for AUSTRALIA during the 1977 America's Cup series
1977 America's Cup challenge
For the 1977 America's Cup, AUSTRALIA went to Newport and raced against the 1970 Australian challenger, GRETEL II (KA-3), the Swedish entrant, SVERIGE (S-3), and the French challenger, FRANCE (F-1), led by Baron Bich. Eventually, AUSTRALIA won the right to challenge for the Cup by defeating SVERGE 4–0.
However AUSTRALIA lost to the US defender, CCOURAGEOUS, 4–0. Ben Lexcen, who initially stayed in Australia during the challenge, went to Newport an was disappointed to find that AUSTRALIA had a poor-quality mast from SOUTHERN CROSS and that AUSTRALIA's sails were flat, heavy and of poor quality. AUSTRALIA was never really competitive and COURAGEOUS won the series easily.
1980 America's Cup challenge
Initially, Alan Bond suggested dropping AUSTRALIA and designing a new boat for the 1980 series. Ben Lexcen, however, was convinced that AUSTRALIA's hull – with a few modifications – was a good design and that its performance would improve with a new rig and sails. The hull had its keel made sharper at the bottom, and the bustle was lowered slightly and made larger to help improve the steering.
AUSTRALIA’s competitors for challenging the Americans were: SVERIGE, back for a second time; FRANCE III (F-3), a new yacht for Baron Bich, and the British challenger LIONHEART (K-18). LIONHEART was a fast boat, partly because it was fitted with a ‘bendy' mast which hooked aft several feet at its tip giving it 10 per cent extra unmeasured sail area on its main sail. In light winds, that gave the British boat a strong advantage.
Seeing the British boat's speed, the AUSTRALIA camp decided to copy the mast. The ‘bendy' rig added to AUSTRALIA’s speed and it became a very competitive boat defeating the US defender FREEDOM (US-30) in the second race of the series. However, the late adoption of the ‘bendy' mast meant that AUSTRALIA’s crew were experimenting with the newly cut sails and lacked the necessary confidence in them to win. In any case, the ‘bendy' mast was only effective in light winds. In the final two races, the wind blew hard enough to cancel out whatever advantage it gave AUSTRALIA and FREEDOM won the series convincingly 4–1.
After 1980
Following the 1980 challenge, AUSTRALIA was sold to the British "Victory" syndicate headed by Peter de Savary. Renamed ‘'TEMERAIRE, the boat became a trial-horse for VICTORY 82 (K-21) and VICTORY 83 (K-22) for the 1983 America's Cup that was ultimately won by AUSTRALIA II (KA-6)
In 1985, Australia returned to Sydney after being bought by Syd Fisher in 1985 to be the trail horse for Fisher's "East Australia America's Cup Defence" syndicate defender, STEAK AND KIDNEY (KA-14). Australia was eventually refitted as a charter boat in 2004 and was acquired by the Australia 12m Historic Trust in 2011
Today, Australia is located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.

Dominica 1987 $3 sg1055, scott1017. (The yacht in the background carries a sail No but hard to read can she be the SVERIGE (S3)?)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05360.html

COLUMBIA US 16 yacht 1958

COLUMBIA a 12-metre class yacht built by Nevins, City Island for New York Yacht Club (Sears-Cunningham Syndicate), New York.
She was built for the America’s Cup 1958 races and designed by Olin Stephens.
1958 Launched as the COLUMBIA US 16.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 20.19 x 3.61 x 2.80m. (draught), length on waterline 14.30m.
Sail area 169.55 m².

In the defender series the COLUMBIA competed against three other USA yachts during the summer of 1958 and she was the winner.
The COLUMBIA under skipper Briggs Cunningham she was the defender of the cup against the British yacht SCEPTRE.
The 1958 America Cup Race was sailed off Newport, Rhode Island from 20 September till 26 September. The COLUMBUS won all 4 races, and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
She took also part in the defender trials for the 1962, 1964 and 1967 America’s Cup competitions.
1960 Sold to Paul Shields, New York.
1964 Sold to Thomas Douglas, Newport Beach Ca.
1975 Sold to Swedish Syndicate for the America Cup, Goteborg, Sweden, she kept her name COLUMBIA.
First half of 1976 sold to Handelsbolaget Modern Boating, Goteborg.
Second half of 1976 sold to Pelle Petterson, Lars Wiglund, Stellan Westerdahl, Goteborg.
1978 Sold to Xaver Rouget-Luchaire (Societe des Regates Rochelaises, La Rochelle, France, not renamed.
1985 Sold to Bernard Pollet, Cannes, France.
1997 Sold to Paul Gardener and Bill Collins, Newport, RI, USA.
2000 Sold to Alain Hanover & Daniel Hanover, Newport RI.
2014 Restored to her old glory she is now for charter and races at Newport RI, same name and owners.

Grenada 1987 10c sg1611, scott1479.
Grenadines of Grenada 1992 $1 sg1582, scott1479
Solomon Island 1986 30c sg570a, scott?

Source: Wikipedia. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05327.html
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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