SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DELTUVA

The Colombian Post issued in 2018 a miniature sheet with images from Barranquilla, of which one stamp shows us the Barranquilla port with a cargo vessel.

The cargo vessel is the DELTUVA the name is visible on the bow when you enlarge the stamp.
Built as a cargo vessel under yard No b570-1/1 by Stocznia Szczecinska Nowa Z O.O. New Szczecin Shipyard in Szczecin, Poland for Clipper Eagle Shipping Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas,
09 July 1994 launched as the CLIPPER EAGLE.
Tonnage 11,542 grt, 5,366 net, 16,906 dwt, dim. 149,44 x 23.00 x 12.10m., length bpp. 138.0m, draught 6.10m.
Powered by a one 4S50MC 4-cyl. diesel engine, manufactured bu H. Cegielski, 5,720 kW. One fixed pitch propeller. Speed 14 knots.
Four holds. Two cranes each 20.0 ton lifting capacity.
Capacity, grain 21,307m², bale 21,043m².
04 October 1994 completed. IMO No 8908832.

2007 Sold to Lithuanian Shipping Co. Klaipeda, Lithuania, renamed in DELTUVA.
2016 After the Lithuanian Shipping Co, got bankrupt during a public auction the DELTUVA was bought by Pirita Shipholding Co., Geneva, Switserland, renamed PIRITA under Antigua& Barbuda flag and registry.
15 June 2017 PIRITA arrived Chittagong, Bangladesh for scrapping.

Colombia 2018 $5.000 sg?, scott? and miniature sheet al $5.000 stamps.
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.nz and internet.

FAKHR EL BIHAR Royal yacht

For a meeting between King Farouk of Egypt and King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia in 1945 at Radhwa the Saudi Arabian Post issued four stamps. The stamps are not so clear, but the vessel on the left top is the Egyptian Royal yacht FAKHR EL BIHAR on which the meeting took place.

Built as a steel hulled yacht under yard No 268 by Ramage & Ferguson, Leith, Scotland for H.H. Prince Youssouf Kamal, Alexandria, Egypt.
09 September 1930 launched as the NAZ-PERWER.
Tonnage 708 grt, 251nrt, 1.051 tm, dim. 75.98 x 9.75 x 4.98m.
Powered by two 4S.C.SA 8-cyl. oil engines, manufactured by Friedrich Krupp A.G., Kiel, 384 nhp.
Schooner rigged.
December 1930 completed.

1940 Sold to King Farouk of Egypt and renamed in FAKHR EL BIHAR.
24 January 1945 King Farouk visited King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia. The meeting between the two kings took place in Radhwa on board of the FAKHR EL BIHAR.
1949 Sold to the Egyptian Government and renamed El QUOSSEIR. Used by the Egyptian Naval Academy as training ship.
2018 In service same name and managed by the Egyptian Navy.

Source Log Book 3/70 and internet.
Saudi Arabia 1945 ½ to 10g scott 173/76

TE ARAWA waka

Hawaiki – a real island? Or a mythical place? Hawaiki is the traditional Māori place of origin. The first Māori are said to have sailed to New Zealand from Hawaiki

In Māori mythology, ARAWA was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled Aotearoa (New Zealand).
The Te ARAWA confederation of Māori iwi and hapu (tribes and sub-tribes) based in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty areas of New Zealand trace their ancestry from this waka
Construction of the canoe
Eventually, a large tree was felled and from this the waka which eventually came to be known as Te ARAWA was formed. The men who turned this log into a beautifully decorated canoe were Rata, Wahieroa, Ngaahue and Parata. "Hauhau-te-rangi" and "Tuutauru" (made from New Zealand greenstone brought back by Ngaahue) were the adzes they used for this time-consuming and intensive work. Upon completion, the waka was given the name Ngaa raakau kotahi puu a Atua Matua (also known as Ngaa raakau maatahi puu a Atua Matua).
The waka was eventually completed and berthed in Whenuakura Bay while Tama-te-kapua, in his capacity as rangatira (chief) of the canoe, set about trying to find a tohunga (priest) for the journey. Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife Kearoa were tricked by Tama-te-kapua to board the canoe to perform the necessary appeasement incantations to the gods prior to the canoe's departure. However, while they were on board, Tama-te-kapua signalled his men to quickly set sail, and before Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife could respond they were far out to sea
Voyage to Aotearoa
One of the more dramatic stories pertaining to the voyage to Aotearoa occurred because Tama-te-kapua became desirous of Kearoa. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed the glint in Tama-te-kapua's eye and took precautions to protect his wife during the night while he was on deck navigating by the stars. This was done by tying one end of a cord to her hair and holding the other end in his hand. However, Tama-te-kapua untied the cord from Kearoa's hair and attached it to the bed instead. He then made love to her, following this pattern over a number of nights. One night however, he was nearly discovered in the act by Ngātoro-i-rangi, but just managed to escape. In his haste he forgot the cord. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed this and therefore knew that Tama-te-kapua had been with Kearoa. He was furious and, in his desire to gain revenge, raised a huge whirlpool in the sea named Te korokoro-o-te-Parata ("The throat of Te Parata"). The waka was about to be lost with all on board but Ngātoro-i-rangi eventually took pity and caused the seas to become calm (Steedman, pp 99-100).
One incident that occurred during this drama was that all the kūmara (sweet potato) carried on the waka were lost overboard, save for a few that were in a small kete being clutched by Whakaotirang Immediately after the calming of the seas, a shark (known as an ARAWA) was seen in the water. Ngātoro-i-rangi immediately renamed the waka Te ARAWA, after this shark, which then accompanied the waka to Aotearoa, acting in the capacity of a kai-tiaki (guardian).
The ARAWA waka then continued on to Aotearoa without incident, finally sighting land at Whangaparaoa where feather headdresses were foolishly cast away due to greed and due to the beauty of the pohutukawa bloom. Upon landfall, an argument took place with members of the Tainui canoe over a beached whale and the ownership thereof. Tama-te-kapua again resorted to trickery and took possession of it despite rightful claim of the Tainui. . The canoe then travelled north up the coast to the Coromandel Peninsula, where Tama-te-kapua first sighted the mountain Moehau, a place he was later to make home. Heading south again, it finally came to rest at Maketu, where it was beached and stood until being burnt by Raumati of Taranaki some years later.
Some items of note that were brought to Aotearoa on the ARAWA, other than the precious kūmara saved by Whakaotirangi, was a tapu kōhatu (stone) left by Ngātoro-i-rangi on the island Te Poito o te Kupenga a Taramainuku just off the coast of Cape Colville. This stone held the mauri to protect the Te ARAWA peoples and their descendants from evil times (Stafford, 1967, p17). In addition, the waka brought over two gods, one called Itupaoa, which was represented by a roll of tapa, and another stone carving now possibly buried at Mokoia Island, Lake Rotorua.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARAWA_(canoe)
New Zealand 1906 ½d sg 370, scott ?

INAUGURATION OF THE PORT OF LOME

For the inauguration of the port of Lome and the 8th anniversary of Independence the Togo Post issued a set of stamps.

The 20f stamp shows us the inauguration of the port with in the background a tug and cargo vessels, which are not identified.
Lomé is the main port for the trade of goods. It was established by the Germans in the early 1900s. From the wooden wharf to the current modern facilities, this port has been the centre of major changes. Today (2018) , it is one of the deepest–water ports in the whole West African region, handling over 80% of the international trade of Togo. Lomé is also an important transit point for landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.
The Port of Lomé lies in the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic coast), in the extreme southwestern corner of the country. Its modernization started in the 1960s. The deepwater harbor was completed/inaugurated in 1968. It was initially planned for a 400,000-ton annual traffic, but currently handles a traffic estimated over 6 millions tons.
The increased capacity of the Port of Lomé has facilitated the shipping of phosphates and other major export products, such as cocoa, coffee, copra, cotton, and palm products. It has also positioned Lomé as one of the main port for the international trade of neighboring landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.

Source: http://dlca.logcluster.org/display/publ ... CB9087590E
Togo 1968 30f sg 590 scott?

LANDING OF THE MAORI IN NEW ZEALAND AROUND 1350.

Landing of Maori in New Zealand around 1350, in the background of the stamp you see a double hulled waka prow.

Maori history was transmitted orally from generation to generation in pre-European times. A continuing examination of the traditions, archaeological, linguistic and cultural evidence, has discredited the 'great fleet theory' of the Maori arrival in New Zealand. The consensus among scholars now is that the Polynesians originally moved into the Pacific from the west, spread eastwards, and that the Maori came most recently from the eastern Pacific (that is from Tahiti or the Marquesas). They began to arrive here in small groups, starting more than 1000 years ago, probably via islands to the north-east. The scene depicted on the stamp is an original conception by the artist of the arrival of one of the canoes The Maoris have been pictured as arriving in a state of physical exhaustion, the inevitable consequence, despite their magnificent seafaring skills, of weeks spent in open canoes.

The first Maori arrived in the canoe ARAWA or TAINUI.

New Zealand 1940 ½d sg613, scott?
Source: New Zealand Post.

CANOE PROW MAKING BY MAORI

Canoe Prow.
This 1d stamp shows us the making of a canoe prow by the Maori in New Zealand before 1800 by which the New Zealand Post gives:
When it is considered that the Māori did not process metal tools and relied upon stone and bone, the intricacy and beauty of the wood carving that was produced is incredible.

New Zealand 1906 1d sg 371, scott ?.
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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