SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

VICTORY & LIBERATION stamp Jersey

On the Victory & Liberation stamps two stamps depict watercraft, the 57 p depict HMS BEAGLE: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5881 ,while the 73p depict the Swedish cargo vessel VEGA viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6198
Six stamps and a Miniature Sheet marking 70 years since Jersey’s liberation from the German occupation will be issued by Jersey Post on 9 May 2015. A collaboration between Hat-Trick Design and master engraver, Martin Mörck, the issue traces the victory of the allied forces in Europe that led to the Island’s joyous liberation in 1945.
During the first year of World War Two, as western Europe fell to the forces of Nazi Germany and France became occupied, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill decided to demilitarise the Channel Islands to save them from destruction. German troops arrived in Jersey on 1 July 1940 to take the surrender and the Channel Islands became the only part of the British Isles to be invaded and occupied during the Second World War.
“The surrender of German forces in Europe on 8 May 1945 saw the war in Europe come to an end and the following day, the islands of Jersey and Guernsey were officially liberated,” explains Chris Elligott, Jersey Post’s Philatelic Production Co-ordinator. “Liberation Day is celebrated with great enthusiasm by Islanders each year on 9 May and we felt it was important to commemorate such an important anniversary.”
The six stamps feature a series of graphic illustrations, each of which incorporates a symbolic ‘V’ for ‘Victory’ and the Miniature Sheet shows a portrait of Sir Winston Churchill together with a powerful quote from his famous victory speech ‘...and our dear Channel Islands are also to be freed today’. Chris continues: “We commissioned master engraver Martin Mörck to produce the hand engraved portrait based on an original photograph by acclaimed photographer Yousuf Karsh. A special intaglio print technique has been used which gives the sheet a unique, textured feel.”

Norwegian artist and stamp engraver, Martin Mörck, began the commission with a traditional line-drawing and describes the portrait as the most difficult engraving he has completed within his 40 year career. For the Miniature Sheet, the portrait has been combined with designs created by Hat-Trick Design, who also produced the artwork for the stamps. Islanders are able to see Martin’s original line drawing which has been signed and framed and is currently on display at Broad Street post office in St Helier.
Liberation Day falls on Saturday this year and, as a mark of respect, Jersey’s Broad Street and Rue des Pres post offices will be closed to allow all islanders the opportunity to join in the celebrations on this special day.

Jersey 2015 47/95p sg?. Scott? sgMS?, scott?
http://www.jerseystamps.com/en/News/Detail/47

SONTAY

New Caledonia issued in June 2015 three stamps to celebrate the centenary of the Caledonians involvement in the First World War.
Two stamps depict passenger’s ships which transported the troops from Caledonia to and from France.
The stamp on the left depict the SONTAY embarking 713 troops at Noumea for Marseille, on 23 April 1915.
The most right stamp depict the EL KANTARA, viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7022&p=14235&hilit=kantara#p14235
which returned the survivors home on 10 May 1919.
SONTAY built as a passenger-cargo vessel under yard No 133 by Messageries Maritimes, La Ciotat, France for account of Cie des Messageries Maritimes in Marseille.
01 December 1907 launched as the SONTAY.
Tonnage 7,236 gross, 8,000 dwt, dim. 141.35 x 16m, length bpp. 136.3m.
Powered by two triple expansion alternative coal fired steam engines, 3,300 hp, twin shafts, speed 13 knots.
Accommodation for 45 first, 194 second class passengers and 718 tween-deck passengers.
April 2008 completed.
After completing in the service between Dunkirk, Marseille, Saigon and Haiphong the maiden voyage was in June 1908.
1914 to 1916 used also as a mail-boat.
1915 She made a voyage to New Caledonia to bring troops from Noumea to France, sailed Noumea on 23 April 1915.
Requisitioned as a troopship fitted out with a 90mm gun at the stern, transported troops to Salonika, Greece.
March 1916 transported 2,250 Russian troops from the Dalny region from Saigon to Marseille.
Thereafter used as a troop transport in the Mediterranean.
24 December 1916 with on board troops from Salonika she avoided a torpedo attack by most probably the German submarine UB-47, when sailing in convoy in the Ionian Sea.
16 April 1917 when under command of Captain Lt. Mages and 325 troops and a crew of 100, from Milo to Marseille, torpedoed by the German submarine U-33 under command of Capt. Gustav Siess between Malta and Tunisia in position 35 02N 16 28E. After the impact she sank very quickly
Survivors were picked up by the gunboats MOQUEUSE and CAPRICIEUSE, 317 troops and 69 crew were rescued, Captain Mages and 39 troops/crew were missing, presumably drowned.

New Caledonia 2015 35f sg?, scott?
http://www.boutiqueopt.nc/boutique/inde ... res&id=889 http://www.frenchlines.com/ship_fr_1343.php http://www.messageries-maritimes.org/sontay.htm
http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz

CHALLENGER Customs Patrol Boat

Jersey 2002 38p sg?, scott?

Not any info.

DISCOVERY OF KING GEORGES ISLANDS 1765

1765 Discovery of king Georges islands

Born on 8th November 1723 in Nottingham, John BYRON joined the English Navy at the age of 8.

In 1740, he took part in Commodore Anson’s expedition. His ship wrecked in the Magellan Strait and it was only after 13 months of incredible sufferings that the crew got rescued.

In 1763, after the Seven Year's War, the rivalry between
France and Great Britain took on an economic form and the
two governments decided to take hold of the Falkland Islands, as the former were the gateway to the Pacific. Louis Antoine de Bougainville and John Byron were appointed by their respective governments to carry out that mission.

In June 1764, John BYRON left England with two ships: the frigate DOLPHIN and the sloop TAMAR . He officially took possession of the Falkland Islands, where settlers of Bougainville had
already built a camp, without him knowing it.
He then followed the wakes of Magellan, Le Maire and Roggeveen.
This is how he sailed past the Polynesian atolls of NAPUKA and TEPOTO on 7th June 1765, without being able to land because of the heavy swell and of the many armed savages lined up along the beach.

On 11th June 1765, he landed on the atoll of TAKAROA, in order to get supplies of coconuts and scurvy grass that was indispensable for his ill seamen. His account of that day remains one of the few evidences of what life was like on the atolls before the arrival of the Europeans.
He then tried to land on the atoll of TAKAPOTO, where, 43 years earlier, Roggeveen’s ship AFRICAANSCHE GALEY had wrecked, but the islanders rebuffed all landing attempts.

He gave the name “King George Islands” to the group made of 4 atolls: Ahe – Manihi – Takapoto – Takaroa and to the uninhabited island of Tikei.
Then he continued on his way, narrowly missing the discovery of Tahiti, just like Le Maire and Roggeveen before him.
-
In May 1766, he was back in England, completing a round-the-world voyage in less than two years – a record.

In 1769, John BYRON was appointed Governor of Newfoundland.
He was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral of the Blue Squadron in 1778, and then Rear Admiral of the White Squadron in 1780.
He died on 10th April 1786, and rests in Twickenham, near the Chapel of St Mary’s Church.

HMS DOLPHIN: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7660
HMS TAMAR: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9096

French Polynesia 2015 190F sg?, scott?
http://www.tahitiphilatelie.com/details ... 015&id=285

NORMAN LE BROCQ

December 1996 British government approved the purchase of a Fishery Protection Vessel at a cost of £550.000.
Built by Souter Marine Ltd., Cowes for the British Government.
04 December 1997 at Cowes named as the NORMAN LE BROCQ, named after the Jersey politician Norman Le Brocq (1922-1996)
Tonnage 17.72 ton, dim. 15.1 x 6.0 x 1.31m. (draught).
Powered by two Scania diesel engines, 550 hp, cruising speed 22 knots.
Carried a 4.7m Searider RIB with a 75hp outboard motor.
20 December 1997 she arrived at Jersey. Based at La Collette.
07 February 1998 the vessel was officially named by Mrs. Le Brocq outside the Maritime Museum at Jersey.
She can be operated as fishery protection vessel, fisheries research or as a patrol vessel. When needed she can also be used as emergency vessel. At sea she is always available to assist in any serious maritime emergencies.
2009 Was she re-engined and re-fitted at Goodchilds in Great Yarmouth, Engeland.
03 June 2012 took part in in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Thames Pageant on the River Thames at London.
2015 In service same name and owners.

Jersey 2002 68p sg?, scott?
Source: Internet but mostly copied from http://channelislandsshipping.je/page35.html

LUSITANIA

Centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA
The RMS LLUSITANIA was a British ocean liner famous for its luxurious accommodation and speed. It was, briefly, the world's largest passenger ship and holder of the Blue Riband, the unofficial trophy given to the passenger liner crossing the Atlantic Ocean in regular service with the highest speed record.

On 1 May, 1915, the LUSITANIA left New York and sailed for Liverpool. Since the outbreak of World War I, ocean voyages had become dangerous: German U-boats (submarines) hunted in British waters, continually looking for enemy vessels to sink. In fact, Germany had declared the seas around the United Kingdom a war zone and the German embassy in the United States had placed a newspaper advertisement warning people not to sail on the LUSITANIA. On 7 May, a German U-boat launched a torpedo at the LUSITANIA approximately 14 miles off the coast of Ireland, near the Old Head of Kinsale. The torpedo hit the starboard side of the LUSITANIA and, almost immediately, another explosion rocked the ship and the LUSITANIA sank within 18 minutes.

Although there had been enough lifeboats for all passengers, the severe listing of the ship while sinking prevented most of these from being launched properly. Of the 1,959 people on board, 1,198 died and 761 people were saved, many of them by boats launched from Kinsale, Queenstown (Cobh) and Cork. Nearly three days after the sinking of the LUSITANIA 150 of her victims were buried in mass graves in the Old Church cemetery, a mile north of Queenstown.

These two new stamps mark the centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA. They feature specially commissioned paintings by Vincent Killowry and depict images of the ship. The 68c stamp portrays an image of the LUSITANIA just before the torpedo hit, steaming along in relatively calm waters in fine weather. However, the €1 stamp shows the ship listing to one side after the torpedo strike and explosion which led to her sinking within 18 minutes.

Ireland 2015 68c/1Euro and a MS sg?, scott? Details and history of the ship you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7736&p=16111&hilit=lusitania#p16111
http://www.irishstamps.ie/shop/p-1531-c ... stamp.aspx
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
hindle
 

Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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