SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TUNE VIKING SHIP

150th Anniversary of the Tune Viking Ship Finds
150 years have passed since the first Viking ship was excavated in Norway. Archaeologist Oluf Rygh excavated the Tune ship in only 14 days from the ship burial mound in Tune. Archaeologist Even Ballangrud Andersen describes the ship: “The ship is made from clinkered oak planks, a style that was common to the Nordics. Its mast was placed just behind midship and both stern posts were raised. A special chamber had been built for the man interred in the ship and all of his burial gifts and weaponry.”
By analysing the growth rings, the ship was dated to between 905 and 910 A. D. After the ship was excavated in 1867, it was placed on a barge and sent to Fredrikstad before continuing on to Christiania. After many years in poor storage, it was moved in 1930 to its permanent home at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. Later research has concluded that the ship most likely had twelve strakes and was a fast warship used to quickly transport people.
In terms of Norway’s maritime history, the Tune ship was the first indication that the stories passed orally through the years were true. Today the Viking ships stand as iconic witnesses to more than 1,000 years on the seven seas.

Norway 2017 inland mail sg?, scott?
http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... e&id=35767

Clipper ship RACER 1851

The era of the clipper ships was dominated by a sense of romance, competition, national pride and innovative technology. The sleek and graceful ships were a symbol of modernity in America and a fundamental part of the expanding global economy. Their design concentrated on speed instead of cargo capacity, which was a great benefit to shipping companies eager to transport goods quickly. Often ship owners or Captains would commission portraits to commemorate their vessels. The RACER was a 1700 ton ship built in 1851 by Currier & Townsend at Newburyport, Massachusetts under the superintendence of her experienced commander, Capt. R. W. Steele, formerly of the packet ship Andrew Foster, and previously of the U. S. Navy. She is 207 feet long, has 42-1/2 feet breadth of beam, 28 feet depth of hold, is 7 feet high between decks . It was the first and largest ship to be built specifically for the trade route between New York and Liverpool for the St George Line. The Racer is well known from her having made the fastest passage between New York and Liverpool. Her best day's run has been 394 miles. It was fitted out with passenger accommodation and cargo space in the hold for freight. She is provided also with large loading ports, one on each side in the upper, and two on a side in the lower between decks. The RACER involved in freight and passenger transport to Australia. The “Racer” sank in 1856, after going ashore on Arklow Bank. Fortunately, all five hundred passengers and crew members were rescued. The design stamp is made after painting of Dawson, Montague
Djibouti 2013;300f.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37454888?q&versionId=48848168. http://www.maritimeheritage.org/ships/C ... html#Racer. https://springfieldmuseums.org/collecti ... l-currier/

DIANA packet ship

The stamp of Belize shows us a brig and as given on the stamp the packet ship DIANA is depict.
Lloyds Registry was not so helpful there were around that time 2 or 3 pages in Lloyds with the ships name DIANA but nowhere by that name was given if it was a packet vessel.
If she is the DIANA which is depict is doubtful I could not find any image of the ship, but the Falmouth Post Office packet ships were mostly brig rigged, and the stamp shows us a ship of that time. It looks that she was chartered by the Post Office as a packet but when and till in service I could not find.

The book “The Falmouth Packets 1689-1851 by Tony Pawlyn mentioned her twice
In 1810 she parted her anchor cable during a severe storm over the West of England, and was nearly driven ashore.
22 September 1811 she sailed for Martinique.

In 1806 the DIANA was under command of Gibbons.
1813 Her captain is given as Parsons, 190 ton and owned by Capt. & Co, Whitehaven. Till 1818 was he the captain. Built in New York?.
1819 Her owner given as Symonds and under command of Captain Sleeman
1822 Same name, owner and captain.
1824 Lloyds Registry don’t mentioned her more.

Belize 1985 75c sg849, scott?
Source: Lloyds Registry 1813-1824.

BAEK MA GANG (North Korea)

Built in 1979 by Nampo Shipyard, for Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. Nampo.
General Cargo, Dw:2740, Nt:1429, Dw:4309, Loa:100,26m. B:14m. Draft:6,40m. 1 diesel: hp.? 4x2 derricks, IMO.7944683.
20-03-2010 transferred to Paekmagang Shipping Co. Ltd. Pyongyang, renamed PAEK MA GANG.
2013 By Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. sold to Chinese breakers and arrived Shidao, Shandong on 16-04-2013.

(North Korea 2013, 15 Won, StG.?)
Internet + LR97/98

JACQUELINE- four-masted barque 1897.

A splendid four-masted steel barque, the Jacqueline a representative vessel of French build, launched in February 1897 from the yards of Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterranean at La Seyne for the wealthy firm of Paris shipowners A D Bordes and Sons and registered at Dun-kirk. Rigged with royal sails over double top and topgallant sails. Used in the South American nitrate trade.The vessel is from Marseilles and has done some fine sailing. She left on May 23,1897 sailed from Mareilles to Australia with a cargo of tiles, she had contrary weather to clearing Gibraltar June 10. After that crossed the equator July 1 in 32 38 W. Poor S E trades were met. On July 8 in 17° S , the new ship was hove to in a S S W gale for 30 hours, and it was nine days later when thev shaped east.Then commenced some excellent running. Captain Leonetti, having a new ship under himn was anxious to find what she was capable of doing with the result that tho ship is stated to have logged 15 knots per hour for four days.The prime meridian was crossed on July 24, and S S W to N W winds were carried right along to August 21 to Tasmania. Here she was becalmed and met with head winds,but it will be seen that the ship sailedI from Greenwich meridian to Tasmania in 28 days, or over 5 degrees per day right through or a 13 knot speed for the 28 days. After a most tedious time off Tasmania she picked up a sou'-wester on September 1. On that date at 8pm a sailor named Sahun fell overboard from the foreyard, A lifebuoy was thrown, and it was caught, and the man was rescued under circumstances given elsewhere. A fine run was made up the coast. The ship is an excptionally fine one being fitted up for saloon passengers in very handsome cabins which are aft, and are constructel of mahognnv, birdsoyo maple and violet ebony. The cargo-workmg appliances and the navigating deck gear are of tho most modern labour-saving kind. A running flying bridge from the poop to the foremast is built over all and the crew have most comfortable quarters in deck-houses. There are two engines - one for cargo working and tho other connected with the ballast tanks and with condensing apparatus. She is 322ft long, 45ft 7in beam and 25ft 4in deep and it is an ideal of the proportions of this most handsome vessel. 1906 sailed from Barry to Iquique in 72 days. 1907 towed against the Loup lighthouse in the Bristol Channel by two tugs which straddled the lighthouse. The Jacqueline damaged the bowsprit which was repaired at Falmouth. 1917 July 1 Left Iquique under Captain Y. Niolas with a cargo of nitrate for La Pallice. 1917 September 25 The British steamship Victoria warned the captain of the Jacqueline for submarines in position 46°25'N, 13°10'W. After the war it was established that she had been sunk by the German submarine U-101 in the Bay of Biscay the following morning. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale. .
Malawi 2013;250k.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14120744. http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships ... eline(1897).html.

BRIG-SCHOONER

The stamp inscription gives “brig-schooner” but she is rigged as a hermaphrodite brig, a term used in the late 18th centuries for a vessel that carried as many as 5 square sails on the foremast and a fore-and-aft mainsail with a gaff topsail. Numerous staysails between the masts and jibs to a long bowsprit. The type is now usually called a brigantine.

Somalia Republic 1998 300 SH SO sg?, scott?
Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
hindle
 

Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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