SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

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CARONIA 1905

Built as a passenger-cargo vessel under yard no 362 by John Brown & Co., Clydebank, Scotland for the Cunard SS Co. Ltd., Liverpool.
13 July 1904 launched as the CARONIA one sister the CARMANIA.
Tonnage 19,687 grt, 10,306 nrt, dim.198.12 (bpp.) x 22.01 x 12.25m.
Powered by twin quadruple expansion Q4cyl steam engines, manufactured by shipsbuilder, 1501 nhp., twin shafts, speed 16 knots.
Passenger accommodation for 300 first, 350 second and 900 third class passengers.
February 1905 completed.

RMS CARONIA was a British ocean liner, launched on 13 July 1904. She was built for Cunard by John Brown & Co. of Glasgow. She was the only ship in the Cunard fleet to be named after an American, being named after Caro Brown, granddaughter of Cunard's New York agent. She left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 25 February 1905. A successful 1906 cruise from New York to the Mediterranean led to CARONIA's being used for cruising frequently in the coming years.
On 14 April 1912 CARONIA sent first ice warning at 09:00 to RMS TITANIC reporting "bergs, growlers and field ice".
CARONIA was briefly placed on Cunard's Boston service in 1914, but the start of World War I caused her to be requisitioned as an armed merchant cruiser. She was hired as an AMC on 02 August 1914 and fitted out at Liverpool with 8 – 4.7 inch guns. 08 August 1914 commissioned as HMS CARONINA. 10 October 1914 she sailed from Liverpool for the North Atlantic patrol duties attached to the North American and West Indian Station. March 1915 refitted and rearmed with 8 – 6 inch guns. 22 September 1916 decommissioned, and converted for trooping duties in the Indian Ocean between India and South and East Africa, returning in 1918 to the Liverpool-New York run after the War.
11 January 1919 sailed from Liverpool for the first post-war commercial voyage
In March 1924 CARONIA was converted to burn oil instead of coal.
After returning to service, she sailed on a number of different routes, including:
New York/Boston from Liverpool
New York from London
New York from Hamburg (1922)
Quebec from Liverpool (1924)
New York from Havana
Her last voyage, from London to New York was on 12 September 1932, after which she was sold to be disassembled. Initially sold to Hughes Bolckow for demolition at Blyth, she was resold December 1932 to Kobe Kaiun K.K. registered at Osaka, renamed, TAISEIYO MARU and sailed to Osaka, where she was scrapped in 1933.
Turbine Experiment
CARONIA was fitted with the older quadruple-expansion engine technology; whilst the CARMANIA had turbines and proved to be the more economical of the two liners

Liberia 2016 $30 sg?, scott?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_CARONIA_(1904) http://www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?of ... el=CARONIA Armed Merchant Cruisers 1878-1945 by Osborne, Spong & Grover.

BON ACCORD RNLB lifeboat

This stamp comes from a sheet showing rescue vessels issued in the name of the Solomon Islands. As soon as I saw the building in the background I thought that this was in Aberdeen and a recent visit to the city in April 2016 confirmed it.
I am now going to make an assumption, as no serial number is shown on the stamp, that the vessel shown on the stamp is the RNLB BON ACCORD which is the Severn Class lifeboat based at Aberdeen. Every so often the lifeboat goes off for a service/refit in another port and is replaced by a boat of the same class from the RNLI relief fleet. However, this does not happen very often which makes me believe that the lifeboat shown is RNLB BON ACCORD – 17-24.
RNLB BON ACCORD was built in 2000 by Green Marine/Berthon at Lymington on the south coast of England. She has the RNLI serial number 1248 and has been based at Aberdeen since July 2000. RNLB BON ACCORD is powered by two 27 litre twin turbo intercooled Caterpiller 3412 DITA engines which deliver 1250hp each at 2300rpm. She carries 1200 gallons of diesel in her bunkers and burns, at full speed, 2 gallons of diesel per minute. She has a range of 250nm at full speed. Aberdeen Lifeboat carries a crew of 6 and, if required, a doctor. She is moored afloat, as all Severn Class Lifeboats are.

RNLB BON ACCORD is the third lifeboat to be stationed at Aberdeen, bearing the Bon Accord name. The previous two Bon Accords were built in 1853 and 1875 and stationed at Footdee and the harbour as the Beach and Harbour Lifeboats until 1924.

The name Bon Accord comes from the motto of the City of Aberdeen’s Coat of Arms. The phrase was used in the 14th century as a password by King Robert the Bruce as he and his men laid siege to Aberdeen Castle and killed the English Garrison, retaking Aberdeen for the townspeople.

Whilst in Aberdeen I was lucky enough to see BON ACCORD sailing into Aberdeen Bay on a training exercise on 18/4/2016 and was almost able to duplicate the shot shown on the stamp except my photo was taken from a road overlooking the River Dee while the shot on the stamp appears to have been taken from the river bank. The oil rig vessel FAR SCOTSMAN almost ruined the shot !

Solomon Islands 2014 $5.00 sg?, scott?

Sources: http://aberdeen-lifeboat.org.uk/lifeboats/. The Lifeboat Service in Scotland, Station by Station by Nicolas Leach. Lifeboat Directory, A Complete Guide to British Lifeboats by Nicholas Leach and Tony Denton (lists all current lifeboats, those that have been sold on to other lifeboat agencies in other countries and many of the older lifeboats that have been sold in to private hands or preserved. An excellent reference work; PCC).

Peter Crichton.

ARRC Autonomous Rescue & Recovery Craft

From a sheet of rescue vessels issued in the name of the Maldives.
Delta has launched one of the largest RIB’s in the world. After years of development, Seawork 2005 saw the first public appearance of this latest model at the cutting edge of RIB technology.
Designated the AARC (Autonomous Rescue & Recovery Craft) this Delta 19m has many novel features. The sponsons are a hybrid construction that allows the craft to take advantage of the energy absorption properties of an air filled tube with the damage resistance of closed cell foam. Carbon fibre shafts have permitted the engines to be placed in the optimum position without the weight penalty that conventional steel shafts would incur, and the cabin is a double decker.
The ARRC is an integral part of "Jigsaw", BP's innovative Rescue initiative for their North Sea platforms which will provide enhanced Rescue & Recovery arrangements. In an emergency, helicopters will be deployed from strategically located platforms with the ARRC acting as the marine element. Each ARRC will have a crew of six including a fully trained paramedic and is capable of operating in seas of 7 m significant wave height.
In the event of an emergency rescue, the ARRC has the facilities on board to house 21 survivors in comfort and to perform essential triage and basic life-saving initiatives including Cannulation, Intubation and Haemorrhage Control. In addition the ARRC has a clear aft deck area that enables a "Helivac" of seriously injured survivors to be completed in the severest of sea states.
Powered by twin 1000 hp CAT 18's linked to Hamilton 521 Waterjets and with the latest onboard Navigation & Ship control systems linked to Hi Visibility LCD displays she is capable, in continuous mode, of cruising at 30 kts. Top speed is currently commercially sensitive but dependent on loaded condition it is understood to be well in excess of 35 kts.
Following the initial sea trials in early June, Delta Managing Director Charles Dyas said that he was delighted that such a leading edge craft should perform so well "out of the box" commenting that the performance predicted by one of the most comprehensive series of tank tests ever undertaken in a boat of this size were born out in real life.
The initial production plan for all boats was for the hull and deck to be moulded by a specially formed company, Delta ARRC Ltd (DAL), in Stockport, Cheshire, England. The superstructures for boats 01, 02 were moulded by Blondecell and their successors, Composite Mouldings Ltd, and the remainder at Stockport by DAL.
Initially, it was planned that fitting out, and joining of the superstructure to the deck would take place at Holyhead Marine in Anglesey, Wales. In the event, only boats 01 to 04 were fitted out at Holyhead, and boats 05 to 08 were assembled at the Wear Dry Dock, Sunderland, England as the result of an internal decision by DAL.
Eight ARRC's which are due to come into service with BP are specifically engineered for their Rescue & Recovery role but this craft is obviously so versatile that derivatives for other Patrol duties are already under development.
Two ARRCs were carried on board BP’s Caledonian class oil rig supply vessels on special launching cradles. In April 2015 BP announced that it intended to end the use of autonomous rescue and recovery craft (ARRC) and end the provision of the Jigsaw helicopter capability for search and rescue provision.

In April2015 the company stated that it was terminating the use of the ARRC vessels — introduced in 2009 to improve safety in the North Sea — as they were frequently underused.

The end of the Jigsaw helicopter came as a result of the decommissioning of the BP Miller platform where the Jigsaw helicopter was based.

While the Jigsaw helicopter has been replaced by a new employer-funded SAR helicopter, this is based at Aberdeen International Airport and can only provide rescue and recovery, and medevac cover for offshore workers out to around 160 nautical miles from the shore.

Whilst in Aberdeen in April 2016 I was told that the 8 ARRC vessels are now laid up at South Queensferry Marina, near the Forth Road Bridge. The launching cradles have been removed from the Caledonian class rig supply vessels.

The vessels were named – 01 ERIK, 02 SCOTT, 03 PAUL, 04 IAN, 05 EUAN, 06 JAMES, 07 ALASTAIR and 08 DAVID.

I am attaching some of my photos of the ARRCs and one of their Mother Vessels. The ARRCs and smaller rescue craft carried my rig supply and rescue vessels are referred to as Daughter Craft.

Sources: http://www.journalofoceantechnology.com ... id=6&jot... (Reviews & Papers). http://hotribs.com/03press/198-delta-ri ... a-ribs.asp. https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-d ... yY15nKTWos. David Dodds of Aberdeen.

Peter Crichton
__._,_.___

Louisa Craig- barque 1876

The iron barque Louisa Craig was built as the «Peru» in1876 for Robertson, esq. She measured 183 ft. in length, 30 ft. beam, 710 gross tons. Captain James Craig, later owner of Craig lines, was the first master on her maiden voyage to the west coasts of North and South America, then to Buenos Aires and back to the west coast, home to Falmouth for orders and then Hamburg. Captain James Craig handed over command to Captain R. Smith who sailed her round the world, to Adelaide, Valparaiso, Talcahuana and back to Europe, arriving in August 1879. During the next twenty seven years, under various owners, part owners and masters she traded in many countries making a number of voyages to New Zealand. In 1906 she came under the flag of Craig Ltd. and was placed in the trans-Tasman trade. In 1907 her name was changed to the «Louisa Craig» and she was re-painted in the line's livery of painted ports, black bulwarks and grey hull. This accentuated her lines and she was generally admitted to be the most beautiful and striking ship in Australia. She made thirty voyage in the intercolonial trade and one to the Pacific Islands under the ownership of Craig and then, in 1916 she was sold to G.H.Scales of Wellington and placed in the trans-Pacific trade to the west coast of North America. After her first voyage Scales changed her name to «Raupo». She remained under ownership of Scales until 1921 when she was laid up in Wellington. In 1922 she was sold as a coal hulk and towed to Lyttelton. After years as a coal hulk she was gradually cut down to the waterline for her iron, and then, in 1937, she was towed to Quail Island in Lyttelton Harbour and beached. The design stamp is made after painting of Roger Morris:«Вarque Louisa Craig sailing up the Northern Wairoa River to Kopu».
Malawi 2011;k250;SG? Source:http://www.seapainter.com/Louisa-Craig.Northern-Wairoa.html

«Ulcoats»-the little clipper 1863

The «Ulcoats», one of the White Star ships, was an iron barque of 671 tons, built at Liverpool in 1863. She was iron and her registered tonnage was 671. She was a small ship but a little clipper belonging to the same line which owned the Thermopylae. She made her maiden trip to Auckland, leaving London on September 29, 1863, with 137 passengers, and arriving at Auckland on January 22, 1864, making the passage in 115 days, a very good run for a vessel of her size. Captain Chambers, who was in command, reported that owing to very adverse weather in the Channel, where she was detained eight days, and subsequent light winds, the vessel was thirty days fetching Madeira. She experienced good north-east and south-east trade winds, and on December 10 passed the meridian of the Cape, running down her longitude in the parallel of 46deg south, with strong winds and fine weather with the exception that on December22 she encountered a cyclone, in which fore and main topsails and lifeboat were lost. Cape Maria Van Dieman was sighted on january 10; thence the barque was baffled on the coast with light airs and calms, the vessel taking another 12 days to reach Auckland. Among the passengers by the Ulcoats on this voyage were Mr Wesley Spragg and others who have made good citizens. The Ulcoats, after discharging, sailed for Port Chalmers, arriving there on march 13, 1864. She landed 54 passengers for Dunedin, and then loaded at that port for London. According to the book «White Wings» - Sir Henry Brett. The design stamp is made after painting of Roger Morris: «The Aberdeen White Star ship Ulcoats bringing immigrants to Auckland on June 16th. 1865.»
Malawi 2011;k350;SG?
Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.anc ... lcoats.htm. http://www.seapainter.com/Ulcoats-Auckland.html

Manus canoe

Тhe name of the Manus is the traditional name for a group of fishing people who inhabit coastal areas Manus. These people were good sailors and traders. The Manus live in houses on the sea and understand various means of navigation the canoe and the use of the great fishnet . They have knowledge of the moon and stars and of those kinds of magic in which betel and lime are used. The Manus are a sea-dwelling peoples. The Manus, in their large, single outrigger canoes, control the fishing and the trade of the south coast, and are the middlemen between Usiai and the island Matankor. There are two kinds of canoe: those used for fishing and those used for traveling. Single-fishing canoe of the Manus Islands in the northwest part of the group. Dugout hull; sides generally raised with washstrakes, sewn on. Raked ends elongated, terminating in a platform. Thwarts rested on notches in the hull or, where present, in the washstrakes; a gunwale pole rested on the thwarts and outrigger booms. Sharp ended float, about two thirds the length of the hull, attached by 3 booms. Each boom flanked by flexible spars along its outer part; spars turned down toward the ends and were lashed outside the multiple vertical stanchions that connected the booms and float. Single mast, stepped between the gunwale pole and the hull and braced from the platform. The triangular Oceanic lateen mat sail set; boom at the foot forked against the mast, holding the sail up obliquely.
Papua New Guinea 2009;K3,0;SG?
Sources: A. Haddon, J. Hornell: Canoes of Oceania.1937.Volume II. Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
hindle
 

Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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