LENA CLASS POLAR SHIPS

Hungary issued 6 stamps for the International Geophysical Year 1957-1959 of which only the 20 Fi stamp depict a research ship, in an e-mail from Mr Sitnikov he suggested that she is the OB by comparing the stamp with a photo of the ship, and after conformation from Mr. Crichton that she is one of this class, I searched the net and found that six ships of this class were built in Holland by the Kon. My de Schelde in Vlissingen (Flushing). between 1954 and 1957 the LENA, OB, YENISEY, ANGARA, BAYKAL and INDIGIRKA and only two visited around this time the Antarctic, the OB and LENA which of the two is depict is doubtfully but the stamps were issued in 1959 most probably the OB is depict she was the only of the two which was used in the third expedition 1957-1959.
Wikipedia has on this expeditions: The First Soviet Antarctic Expedition was led by Mikhail Somov; his scientific deputy was V. G. Kort. The expedition lasted from 30 November 1955 to 1957 and involved 127 expedition members and 75 crew members.
Three diesel-electric ships were used to transport the expedition. They were RV "OB" (flagship; captain I. A. Man), RV "LENA” (Captain A. I. Vetrov) and the refrigerator ship No. 7 (Captain M. A. Tsygankov) (she was later renamed in ZVAYGZNE). The final ship was used only for transporting perishables. OB and LENA were icebreakers 130m long and displacing 12,600 tons.
On the 30 November 1955 the first ship ("OB") left port at Kaliningrad.
The principal task of the expedition was to organise the main base, Mirny, and perform limited scientific observations. Other tasks were reconnaissance of sites for the inland bases Vostok and Sovetskaya; and oceanography of the Indian Ocean.

The Second Soviet Antarctic Expedition was led by Aleksei Treshnikov on the continent; the marine expedition on the "OB" was led by I. V. Maksimov. The "OB" left Kaliningrad on 7 November, 1956.
Three ships were used to transport the expedition, all diesel-electric. The two main ships were as for the first expedition: RV OB (flagship; captain I. A. Man) and RV "LENA” (Captain A. I. Vetrov). The third ship was KOOPERATSIYA (Captain A. S. Yantselevich), used mainly as a transport vessel.
The tasks of the expedition were:
Relief of the first expedition
Full scale scientific work for the International Geophysical Year (IGY)
Organisation of two IGY scientific stations near the south geomagnetic pole and pole of relative inaccessibility
An inland tractor-sledge traverse for glaciology
Oceanography


The Third Soviet Antarctic Expedition (1957–59) was led by Yevgeny Tolstikov on the continent; the marine expedition on the OB was led by I V Maksimov.
Two diesel-electric ships were used to transport the expedition. RV Ob (flagship; captain I A Man) and KOOPERATSIYA (captain A S Yantselevich), used mainly as a transport vessel. The ships arrived in Antarctica in November – December 1957. Together with the ships crews the expedition consisted of 445 men, of whom 183 were scheduled for wintering.
The tasks of the expedition were:
Relief of the 1956–1958 continental expedition and continuation of the IGY programme
Organisation of the Sovetskaya station at the pole of relative inaccessibility
Continuation of tractor-sledge traverses in central Antarctica
Oceanographic work on the OB in the southern oceans, and cartography of the coast from Mirny to the Bellingshausen Sea
The programme included 6 stations: (Mirny; Vostok; Sovetskaya; Oasis; Pionerskaya and Komsomol'skaya).
The first tractor-train to the interior left on 26 December, with 32 men. On 2 January 1958 the train arrived at Pionerskaya, and left again on the 8th. On the 17th they reached Komsomol'skaya; conditions of travel were difficult. A portion of the train (7 tractors and sledges) left on the 20th to relieve Vostok, arriving on the 27th, and delivering over 100 tons of cargo. On the 28th the train left for Komsomol'skaya, arriving on the 31st. On 3 February the train, with 27 men, left to found Sovetskaya; they reached 78° 24′ S, 87° 35′ E on the 10th, at an altitude of 3570 m. The station was rapidly constructed, and the train left on the 18th, returning to Mirny on 4 March, having completed a round trip of 4,000 km (2,500 mi).
After spending the Antarctic winter at Mirny, the Expedition undertook a second set of tractor traverses starting in September 1958. One team reached the pole of inaccessibility and established The Pole of Inaccessibility station there on 14 December.
Hungary 1959 20 fi sg1553, scott?
Russia 1956 40k sg2026, scott
1957 Prestamped envelope LENA and OB seen from behind. Lena is the ship on the left of the envelope.
1978 prestamped card

BAY QUEEN

Built as a steel hulled excursion ship by Blount Marine Corporation at Warren, Rhode Island, USA for Rent a Cruise.
Launched as the BAY QUEEN.
Tonnage 99 grt, 80 net, dim. 33.46 x 12.46 x 2.77m.
Powered by ?, speed 10 knots.
Accommodation for 400 guests 2014.
1978 Completed.

She has also carried the names STAR OF CHICAGO III and STAR OF MILWAUKEE.
It looks that she has been rebuild, with a new deck added, when you compare the ship on the stamp with a photo of the ship as the CORNUCOPIA PRINCESS.
2014 Owned by Cornucopia Cruise Lines Inc. Perth Amboy, New York and carries now the name CORNUCOPIA PRINCESS.
In use as a party boat in New York harbour.
Liberia 1987 15c sg1660, scott1066b.
Source: http://shipbuildinghistory.com/history/ ... blount.htm
http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/pls/webpls/ ... _name_list and internet.

DRAGON

Have not much on her, only that her homeport is Gdynia, Poland, summers she makes short trips and during the winter season she is in use as a restaurant moored in Gdynia, since 2007. Where built and when I could not find.
Galleon DRAGON is a mock pirate ship, designed for tourist cruises on the high seas, even in winter. It has a length of 45 m, width 8.20 m, 4 masts and can carry 200 passengers. In addition to the open deck - also has an extensive room on the lower level. The central part of this room is - the heart of DRAGON - a large bar. The bartenders, masters of their profession, were chosen from among the best in the country.
Guinea 2013 40000 Fc sg?, scott? (The tall sailing ship in the margin is the DAR MLODZIEZY.)
Source: various internet sites.

KOSSUTH ss (Hungary)

Built in 1914 by Ganz-Danubius, Budapest for MFRT as FERENCZ FERDINAND FOHERCZEG.
Sidewheel steamer, Length:61,80m. Beam:15,54m. Depth:2,50m. Draft:1,30m. 2 cyl. compound diagonal engine:580 hp. Passengers:1350.
Passenger steamer on the Danube.
Renamed RIGO (1919), then LEANYFALU (1930)
Heavily rebuilt after World War II and returned to service in 1953 named KOSSUTH.
Reboilered in 1965 with second hand boiler from the sunken German paddle tug REGENSBURG.
Withdrawn after the 1978 season.
Moored at Ujpest and used as the house boat and refectory for employees of MAHART
In 1984 she became a floating sanatorium, but in 1986 she was converted to a museum ship.
Eventually moored at the Chain Bridge (Szechenyi lanchid) in central Budapest as a restaurant with a small maritime museum owned by the Budapest Transport Museum.
In 1995, due to lack of finances, the Museum subcontracted the ship's operation and maintenance to the private company, Kossuth Múzeumhajó Kft (Kossuth Museum Ship Ltd)
The 5-year contract required the company to pay a monthly fee to the museum and to renovate the vessel before a 10-year extension to the operation contract was granted.
The hull was renovated in 2000 by SKL at Komarno.
Later water ingress led to contractual argument between the various parties as to the exact scale of work undertaken during the renovation contract which is yet to be resolved.
Now marketed as the Venhajo Restaurant, run by EURÓPA Rendezvényiroda Kft. who also operate modern vessels on Danube cruises.
The company are also partners in the ZOLTAN FOUNDATION, which owns the Nezmely Ship Museum, which provides technical management for the museum on the KOSSUTH.
Entry to the small museum display on the engine room companionway is free. The ship is also a public restaurant with rooms available for private hire.
Taken to Komarno docks for major reburbishment work in the summer of 2008.
(Hungary 1964,1,5 Ft. StG.2028) Historic Ships, Norman J. Brouwer +Steamships of Europe, A. Deayton + Internet.

CAP MALEAS

In 2013 the Solomon Islands issued some Miniature Sheets for “Special Transport” of which only one depict a ship, the container ship CAP MALEAS.
Built as a containership under yard No 313 by Guangzhou Wenchong Shipyard, Guangzhou, China for St Samuel Shipping Company Ltd., Limassol, Cyprus.
08 June 2004 laid down.
25 September 2004 launched as the KONRAD SCHULTE.
Tonnage 18,334 grt, 10,287 net, 23,679 dwt., dim. 175.0 x 27.43 x 14.3m., length bpp. 165.0m, draught 10.9m.
Powered by one MAN B&W 7S60MC diesel engine, 15,785 Kw, one shaft speed 19 knots.
One bow thruster 900 kW.
Container capacity 1740 teu’s including 260 reefer containers.
Handling gear two 40 tons cranes.
03 January 2005 completed and delivered as the CAP MALEAS.

On delivery chartered by NYK, Japan for the service between the Far East and east coast South America or between the Far East and Durban, South Africa.
Spring 2008 renamed again KONRAD SCHULTE and chartered by Hamburg-Sud for 12 months.
2014 Chartered by Safmarine for the West Africa service.
Equasis gives for 2014 same name and owner, IMO NO 9292125, managed by Schulte Shipmanagement-Cypres, Limassol. Under Cyprus flag.
Solomon Islands 2013 $7 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites, http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz

VAKA

The importance of sea transport to Tokelau is something that has not diminished over time. It is still an essential part of Tokelauan life, for getting between islands, and for fishing and retrieving materials. Issue information
The Tokelau vaka has aspects of canoe design that are unique to Tokelau. A vaka is a large five-man canoe made for fishing, which reflects Tokelau’s communal approach to catching fish. The vaka’s distinctive features include how it is constructed.
Unlike smaller canoes, the vaka is constructed in segments from different trees and ‘sewn’ together with a cord. This technique is not practiced elsewhere due to other Polynesian islands having larger trees to work with than Tokelau. The reasoning for building the vaka in sections is it is made from the kanava tree, which grows in a tapering and twisting fashion. This means only the lower sections of the trunks of the tree are fit for sculpting into the vaka.
45c Traditional Vaka
The vaka is a central tool in Tokelau, not only for fishing, but for travelling between atolls. The islands of Tokelau differ in their natural resources, so it is necessary to travel between the islands to retrieve them.
$1.40 Sculpting the Vaka
After the vaka has been carved and ‘sewn’ together, it is then caulked with coconut fibre or marine glue to make it watertight.
$2.00 Fishing from Vaka
There are several different types of canoes constructed in Tokelau, though a vaka usually refers to a large five-man canoe made for fishing. This reflects Tokelau’s communal approach to catching fish.
$3.00 Returning to Shore
This stamp shows the vaka in action as the men return to shore with their catch for the day. The importance of sea travel in day-to-day life continues to shape Tokelauan society today.
Tokelau 2014 45/300C SG?, Scott? and sgMS?, scott?
Tokelau FDC.
Source: New Zealand Post web-site.

SPAR GEMINI

Thanks to Mr. Peter Crichton who after a long time found out via the IMO No on the bridge (almost unreadable) that the vessel IMO No is 9307580 which belongs to the Norway bulker SPAR GEMINI.
Peter gives also that on the photo the name of the SPAR GEMINI deliberately has been removed, photos of the ship shows clearly her name.
Built as a bulker under yard no CX4211 by Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Co. Ltd., Jiangyin, China for Spar Shipping A/S, Bergen, Norway.
08 June 2006 keel laid down.
10 November 2006 launched as the SPAR GEMINI.
Tonnage 32,474 grt, 17,790 net, 53,460 dwt. Dim. 183.05 x 32.26 x 17.5m., length bpp. 183.3m.
Grain capacity 65,900 m³.
Powered by one B&W 2 SA 6-cyl diesel manufactured by Hudong Heavy Machinery Co. Ltd., 9,480 kW, one shaft, speed 14 knots.
Four cranes of 36 ton.
01 February 2007 delivered, NIS (Norway registered), homeport Bergen.

2014 In service, same name and owners, managed by Navigb Bulk Asia Pte. Ltd., Singapore.
Imo No.9307580.

Togo 2014 7500F sgMS?, scott? The SPAR GEMINI is the vessel in front of the stamp, then Peter has found out that the vessel on the left of the stamp has a badge on the bow which looks the coat of arms of the town Hamburg, so most probably a container ship belonging to an owner from Hamburg. Behind the two ships you can see the bow of a Hanjin Line of South Korea container ship. The grey hulled ship in the margin of the stamp is most probably a chartered Cosco vessel from the Far East the name is in Western and Eastern letters on the bow, but unreadable. Images received from Mr. Sitnikov with thanks.
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Class NK Register of Ships.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size
Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
hindle
 

Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

tmp101.jpg
Click image to view full size
tmp102.jpg
Click image to view full size
Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 3712
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot] and 19 guests

Sponsored Links
cron