TIMBER RAFT

TIMBER RAFT. As seen on this stamp, some timber rafts in the water and alongside a freighter loading the logs. The timber rafts is an assemblage of timber logs or lumber floated downstream or towed over water by a tug to a sawmill, or as seen on the stamp to a freighter for loading.
The logs are tied together by cables or chains to form a raft, which then is floated from one place to another. The measurement of the raft depends on the waterway the raft has to be floated down.
More info on this rafts is given: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_rafting
Nigeria 1953 1s sg76, scott

CHOKAI heavy cruiser 1932

Built as a heavy cruiser under yard No 455 by Mitsubishi, Nagasaki for the Japanese Imperial Navy.
26 March 1928 keel laid down.
05 April 1931 launched as the CHÕKAI one of the Takao class, named after Mount Chokai.
Displacement 15,781 ton, dim. 203.76 x 19.0 x 6.3m. (draught).
Powered by geared turbines, 130,000 hp, speed 35.5 knots. Range by a speed of 14 knots, 8,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 2,000 ton oil.
Armament: 10 – 20cm, 4 – 4.7 inch, up to 66 – 25mm AA guns, and 8 – 24 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 773.
01 June 1932 commissioned.
CHÕKAI was a Takao-class heavy cruiser, armed with ten 8-inch (200 mm) guns, four 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns, eight tubes for the Type 93 torpedo, and assorted anti-aircraft guns. CHOKAI was designed with the Imperial Japanese Navy strategy of the great "Decisive Battle" in mind, and built in 1932 by Mitsubishi's shipyard in Nagasaki. She was sunk in the Battle off Samar in October 1944. CHOKAI was named for Mount Chōkai.
Operational history
At the start of the Pacific War, the CHOKAI supported the invasion of Malaya and participated in the pursuit of the Royal Navy's battleship Force Z. During January and February 1942, the CHOKAI was involved in operations to seize the oil-rich Dutch East Indies and the island of Borneo. Steaming near Cape St. Jacques, the CHOKAI struck a reef, sustaining hull damage on 22 February 1942. On the 27th, she reached Singapore for repairs.
After repairs, the CHOKAI was once again assigned to a support role in an invasion, this time the landings at Iri,Sumatra, and the invasion of the Andaman Islands and the seizure of Port Blair a few days later. Afterwards, the CHOKAI sailed to Mergui, Burma.
On April 1, 1942, the CHOKAI left Mergui to participate in Operation C, a raid on merchant shipping in the Indian Ocean. First, the CHOKAI torpedoed and sank the American freighter BIENVILLE, and later on, the British steamship GANGES on 6 April. With her role in the operation successfully concluded, the CHOKAI returned to Yokosuka on 22 April 1942.
The Guadalcanal campaign
By mid-July 1942, the CHOKAI was the new flagship of Vice Admiral Mikawa Gunichi and his Eighth Fleet. She proceeded towards Rabaul. On 7 August 1942, with Guadalcanal having been invaded by the Americans, the CHOKAI headed for the Guadalcanal waters, with Vice Admiral Mikawa aboard. In the battle of Savo Island. Mikawa's squadron of heavy cruisers inflicted a devastating defeat on an Allied squadron, sinking four heavy cruisers (three American and one Australian) and damaging other ships. However, the CHOKAI sustained several hits from the cruisers QUINCY and ASTORIA disabling her "A" turret and killing 34 men. The CHOKAI returned to Rabaul for temporary repairs. For the rest of the Solomon Islands campaign, the CHOKAI would fight in an assortment of night battles with the U.S. Navy, sustaining varied, but mostly minor, damage.
Relieved as the Eighth Fleet flagship shortly after the final evacuation of Guadalcanal, the CHOKAI headed back to Yokosuka on 20 February 1943. Tasked with various minor duties for the remainder of 1943 and first half of 1944, the CHOKAI was made the flagship of the Cruiser Division Four ("CruDiv 4") on 3 August 1944. She survived a harrowing submarine attack on 23 October 1944, becoming the only undamaged ship of CruDiv 4.
Sunk in the Battle off Samar.
The CHOKAI was then transferred to Cruiser Division Five, where she survived another attack on October 24, 1944, this time by aircraft. On the morning of 25 October, the CHOKAI as a part of a large war fleet of IJN battleships, cruisers, and destroyers engaged an American force of escort carriers, destroyers, and destroyer escorts in the Battle off Samar, the Philippines, as part of the huge Battle of Leyte Gulf. Targeted by 5 in (130 mm) gunfire by the destroyers and destroyer escorts, CHOKAI was hit amidships, starboard side, most likely by the sole 5 in (130 mm) gun of the carrier WHITE PLAINS. While the 20 lb (9.1 kg) payload of the shell could not pierce the hull, it set off the deck-mounted eight Japanese Type 93 "Long Lance" torpedoes, which were especially volatile because they contained pure oxygen, in addition to their 1,080 lb (490 kg) warheads. The explosion resulted in such severe damage that it knocked out the rudder and engines, causing CHOKAI to drop out of formation. Within minutes, an American aircraft dropped a 500 lb (230 kg) bomb on her forward machinery room. Fires began to rage and she went dead in the water. Later that day, she was scuttled by torpedoes from the destroyer FUJINAMI ( 11º 22N’ 126º 22E’),which also rescued some of her crew. Two days later the FUJINAMI was itself sunk with the loss of all hands, including the CHOKAI survivors, which makes CHOKAI one of the largest vessels to be sunk with all hands aboard during World War II. This is also one of the deepest shipwrecks, possibly the deepest known, at a depth of approximately 8100 meters (26,600 ft).

Solomon Islands 1992 80c sg747, scott728j

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_c ... h%C5%8Dkai

TURKMEN

Have not found much on this ship, only what I found on the internet. The stamp was issued by Turkmenistan in 1994 for the 115th anniversary of the creation of the Nobel Brothers Petroleum Company.
The stamp shows the tanker/tug TURKMEN the first of two diesel engine tugs ever built and used in the oil transportation.
The TURKMEN and SART were used to tow barges loaded with oil up streams the Volga River.
The diesel engines of the tanker/tugs were manufactured by another Nobel company in St Petersburg.
More info welcome.
Turkmenistan 1994 1,50 m sg39, scott40

LANDING CRAFT INFANTRY (LCI) (R)

On this stamp issued by Palau in 1990 is only one stamp important for the ship stamp collector, these stamp shows us a Landing Craft Infantry (LCI) (R) during the landings of the USA forces on the island. The stamp shows us not any No so the craft is not identified.
Of the LCI many were built and used for all kind of work during World War II.
Displacement 238 ton standard, 395 ton full load, dim. 48.31 x 7.09 x 1.80m. (draught)
Powered by 8 GM diesel engines, 1,600 hp., twin shafts, speed 16 knots.
Crew 3 officers and 21 men.
Armament 4 – 20mm Oerlikons guns.
She carried a platform for six-5 inch rocket launchers, which was fixed on the deck of the LCI, the craft had to manoeuvred in position before it could fire on her target.
The crew when fired had to take shelter below decks to escape the blast of the rocket engines.
Palau 1990 45c sg388, scott255.

B11 HMS submarine

Launched: 21-02-1906 as HMS B11
Completed: 11-07-1906
Builder: Vickers – Barrow in Furness
Length overall: 142ft 2½in
Beam: 13ft 7in
Depth: 13ft 7in
Displacement Surface 287 tons / Submerged: 316 tons
Diving Depth: 100ft
Speed Surface: 7 knots (design) 6.5 knots (service) / Submerged 13 to 13.5 knots (design) 12 knots (service)
No. of shafts: 1
Propeller: 3 blades, 5ft diameter
Armament: 2 18-inch bow torpedo tubes (4 torpedoes carried)
Endurance Surface: 1300 miles at 9 knots (design) 740 miles at full power (service) / Submerged: 22.5 miles
Complement: 15

B.11 was the last of her class to be constructed. She was completed in 1906, and like her consorts, was considerably larger than the "A" boats, displacing 280 tons on the surface and 313 tons submerged.
She was one third longer again at 135 feet and had a 12 cylinder Wolseley petrol engine developing 600 hp and giving a surface speed of around 12 knots. Her electric motors drove her at eight knots (thereabouts) submerged. Her complement was two officers and 11 men, and she was a good deal easier to control underwater than any of her predecessors.
This was because she was the first submarine to be fitted with forward hydroplanes and with their aid was able to dive under way. Previously it had been the accepted custom to stop before diving.

When the 1914-18 war began the British Mediterranean Fleet based on Malta had three B-class submarines attached. They were, singularly enough, B.9, B.10, and B.11. They were sent to the Aegean Sea, there to languish without a chance of distinguishing themselves.
In November that year the Dardanelle's came into the news for a British naval squadron had bombarded the forts and the German warships GOEBEN and BRESLAU were inside and had been in action against the Russians in the Black Sea. Could nothing be done against the naval strength of Johnny Turk located somewhere near the narrows?
The young officers commanding the three British submarines were all keen to try and force a passage. The hazards were the uncertain submerged endurance of their boats the strong current and the presence of minefields. Human courage was one thing the question of electricity supply was quite another.
HMS B.11 had newer batteries so Lieut. N D Holbrook RN was selected for the task of seeking out whatever he might find and doing the greatest possible damage when he found it. On Saturday, December 12, 1914, B.11 dived at dawn off the entrance to the Dardanelle's. The dive had been postponed to the last minute because the boat would need every ampere she had.
Through the minefields and on towards the Narrows she went. Holbrook raised his periscope and there in Sari Siglar Bay he sighted a warship at anchor. Manoeuvring carefully, Holbrook fired one torpedo and hit the Turkish battleship MESSOUDIEH which immediately opened fire on the B.11 periscope and missed. A few minutes later the battleship rolled over and sank and a means of protecting the minefield against sweeping had gone.
Having thus made history, Holbrook decided to turn for home. He found that his compass, a rudimentary contraption at the best of times, had been so damaged by shellfire as to be useless. Unfortunately the current drove B.11 ashore and every Turkish land gun which could bear opened fire. Miraculously the submarine bumped off, hit the bottom more than once, dodged the mines and somehow escaped being hit.
Her periscope became fogged for quite some time leaving Holbrook to navigate blind, yet she was outside the entrance to the Dardanelle's in the early afternoon and her commander could afford to surface.
He and his crew proved that something considered impossible could be done and they and their boat made a contribution to history. Lieut. Holbrook was awarded the Victoria Cross the first of 14 submariners to be so decorated. Lieut. S T Winn his first lieutenant, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and everyone in the boat was awarded the DSC or the DSM.
Later the Turks salvaged most of the MESSOUDIEH’s guns but at Chanak they preserved a unique souvenir a piece of the B.11's torpedo that had done such damage.
In April 1915 after HMS E15 ran aground off Kephez point, HMS B11 was one of a number of boats to attempt to destroy the wreck. The attack failed.
On 20 May 1915 HMS B11 sighted SM UB-8 while on patrol off the Gulf of Smyrna. HMS B11 attempted to attack but was spotted and SM UB-8 then dived before escaping.
On 24 July 1916 the Prize court decided that the submarine's company was entitled to prize money for the sinking of MESÛDIYE, and an award of £3,500 was made, of which Holbrook received £601 10s 2d, Win £481 4s 2d, chief petty officers £240 12s 1d, and seamen £120 6s 1d. This represented three years' pay for a seaman. On 24 August 1915 the town of Germanton in New South Wales, Australia, was renamed "Holbrook" in his honour and a replica of B11 can be seen there. The submarine was relocated from Malta to Venice in October 1915 arriving on the 28th. On 11 December of the same year the submarine under the command of Lieutenant Samuel Gravener was engaged by an Austrian flying boat. The attack was unsuccessful and the plane suffered engine failure forcing it to land. Gravener attempted to attack the plane with a Maxim gun but it jammed and the plane was able to take off again before the submarine could ram it.
On 17 January 1916 the submarine managed to capture the crew of an Austrian flying boat after the aircraft had suffered engine failure while returning from a bombing raid. On 17 March it was narrowly missed by a torpedo but was unable to locate the attacker.
Later in the war B11 was converted to a surface patrol craft through raising the deck level and removing the electric motor. In addition the conning tower was replaced by a wheelhouse.
B.11 incidentally, survived the 1914-18 war as did B.9, but B.10 was bombed and sunk in harbour at Venice in 1918. B.11 was sold in 1919 and scrapped in Italy.

Micronesia 2014 $2.00 sg?, scott? Stamp image from internet.

Sources: http://www.rnsubs.co.uk/Boats/BoatDB2/i ... ?BoatID=29
https://www.flickr.com/photos/16118167@ ... EW-4ECXcq/

Peter Crichton

C27 HMS submarine

Builder: Vickers, Barrow in Furness
Laid down: 4 June 1908
Launched: 22 April 1909 as HMS C27
Commissioned: 14 August 1909
Class & type: C class submarine
Displacement: 290 long tons (295 t) surfaced 320 long tons (325 t) submerged
Length: 143 ft 2 in (43.64 m)
Beam: 13 ft 6 in (4.11 m)
Propulsion: 600 hp (450 kW) Vickers petrol engine, 200 hp (150 kW) electric motor, 1 screw
Speed: 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) surfaced, 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range: 2,000 nmi (3,700 km) at 7 kn (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced ; 55 nmi (102 km) at 5 kn (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Complement: 16
Armament: 2 × 18 in (457 mm) torpedo tubes (2 torpedoes)

HMS C27 along with the trawler PRINCESS LOUSE (ex-PRINCESS MARIE JOSE) sank U-23 in the Fair Isle Channel between Orkney and Shetland on 20 July 1915 during the U-boat trap tactic.
The tactic was to use a decoy trawler to tow a submarine. When a U-boat was sighted, the tow line and communication line was slipped and the submarine would attack the U-boat. The tactic was partly successful, but was abandoned after the loss of two C class submarines. In both cases, all the crew were lost.
HMS C27 was involved in the Baltic operations from 1915 to 1918.
On 16 Oct 1917 the British INDIANOLA which had been seized by Germany in Hamburg in 1914 was torpedoed and damaged by HMS C-27 in the Gulf of Riga.

HMS C27 was scuttled on 5 April 1918 outside Helsinki (Helsingfors) south of the Harmaja Light (Gråhara) to avoid seizure by advancing German forces. HMS C27 was salvaged for breaking up in Finland in August 1953. She was scuttled along with the HMS C35 by opening tubes and hatches.

Does anybody know why HMS C 27 would have 57 on her sail ?

Micronesia 2014 $2.00 sg?, scott? Stamp image from internet.

Sources: Wikipedia. http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/1008.html

Peter Crichton

CI HMS submarine

Name: HMS C1
Builder: Vickers, Barrow in Furness
Laid down: 13 November 1905
Launched: 10 July 1906
Commissioned: 30 October 1906
Fate: Sold, 22 October 1920
Class & type: C class submarine
Displacement: 287 long tons (292 t) surfaced
316 long tons (321 t) submerged
Length: 143 ft 2 in (43.64 m)
Beam: 13 ft 6 in (4.11 m)
Propulsion: 600 hp (450 kW) Vickers petrol engine, 200 hp (150 kW) electric motor, 1 screw
Speed: 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) surfaced, 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) submerged
Range: 1,500 nmi (2,800 km) at 7 kn (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced, 50 nmi (93 km) at 4.5 kn (8.3 km/h; 5.2 mph) submerged
Complement: 16
Armament: 2 × 18 in (457 mm) torpedo tubes (2 torpedoes)


HMS C1 was a British C class submarine built by Vickers, Barrow. She was laid down on 13 November 1905, launched 10 July 1906 and was commissioned on 30 October 1906.

April 1909 - Section III, 3rd Division, Home Fleet
September 1914 - Sheerness (5th Flotilla)
September 1914 - Lt.Cdr. Clyfford H. Warren in Command
20th August 1916 - 4th Submarine Flotilla (Queenborough)
20th August 1916 - Lt Arthur L. Noakes in Command
1918 - Converted

C1 was equipped with wireless telegraphy. She was converted to a surface patrol boat and renamed S8 for Adriatic service.

On 23 April 1918 she was packed with dynamite to be blown up at Zeebrugge Mole. However, this did not happen.

C1 was sold 22 October 1920 to Stanlee, and resold 14 November 1921 to Young, Sunderland

Micronesia 2014 %1.20 sg?, scott? Stamp image from internet.

Sources: Wikipedia. http://www.dovermuseum.co.uk/Informatio ... -Yard.aspx

Peter Crichton.
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QUEST.

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEST.

Postby shipstamps » Fri Nov 21, 2008 3:59 pm


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Built as a wooden hulled seal catcher by the yard of Erik Linstøls Båtbyggeri at Risor, Norway for Andr. Ingebrigtsen, Høvik near Oslo.
Launched under the name FOCA I (fishery No. K-13-K)
Tonnage 204 ton gross, 126 net, dim. 111.4 x 24.9 x 14ft. (draught)
Powered by 2-cyl. steam engines of 17nhp.

March 1921 sold to Sir Ernest Shackleton after he made a short visit to Norway, she was renamed QUEST.
Shackleton would use the vessel for his expedition to the Antarctic, but she was not so suitable for the voyage, small and straight stemmed, with an awkward square rig on her mainmast. He engines were too weak, and her boilers found at sea cracked. In all ports of call she needed repairs.
17 September 1921 she sailed from the St Katharine’s Dock in London under command of Capt. Worsley.
The QUEST made calls at Lisbon, Madeira, Cape Verde and Rio de Janeiro, at Rio de Janeiro Shackleton did have a heart attack, but when the ships doctor Macklin want to make an examination, he refused, but the doctor could see that he had a heart problem.
After sailing from Rio de Janeiro bound for South Georgia, Shackleton mentally changed he seemed unnaturally listless, always the leader and full of ideas, now he had not any plans and it seemed that he had turned to the past.
04 January 1922 she arrived off South Georgia and anchored off the whaling station of Grytviken.
Early in the morning of 5 January Dr. Macklin was called to Shackleton bunk and he found him with an other heart attack, not much he could do and a few minutes later Shackleton died.

(On this expedition Shackleton was appointed an Agent of the Post Master General for this expedition, and provided with one hundred pounds worth of British postage stamps, a circular date stamp and a trio of rectangular hand-stamps of a size to fit over a pair of stamps, for three of the countries they were expected to visit; namely Tristan da Cunha, Cough Island and Enderby Land.) as given in Log Book 1983 Vol 13 page 311.

After Shackleton death, his body was send back to England for burial, but when his wife Emily got the message of his death, she decided that her husband should be buried on South Georgia.
After arrival of Shackleton’s body at Montevideo, it was send back to South Georgia. And there his body was laid to rest on 05 March 1922 in the Norwegian cemetery.

After Shackleton died, the QUEST carried on, under Wild’s command, but he was not a leader and without Shackleton he was lost, he started drinking heavily; he had never done before on sea.
Before the QUEST sailed home in June, Wild took her to Elephant Island.
16 September 1922 she arrived in Portsmouth.

1923 Sold to to W.G Oliffe, Cowes.
March 1924 sold to Schjelderups Sælfangstrederi A/S ( Capt. Thomas Schjelderup), Skånland Bø (fishery No N-94-BN). In use as a seal catcher in the Arctic, and probably as fishing vessel in between catching seasons.

1929 Took part in the search for Amundsen and Major Gilbaud who disappeared in a hydroplane in the Arctic, while searching for General Nobile and the aircrew of the airship ITALIA.
1930/31 Deployed by H.G. Watkins in the British Air Route Expedition, the QUEST surveyed some coastal waters of Greenland
1935 Chosen to transport the Anglo-Danish expedition of Lawrence Wager and Augustine Courtauld, to Greenland, a summer expedition based at Kangerlussuag, Greenland. The QUEST returned from Kangerlussuaq on 29 August 1935, she left 7 expedition members behind who were to continue work.

1936/37 Count Gaston Micard chartered the QUEST, under command of Capt. Ludolf Schelderup, for an expedition to East Greenland; the expedition overwintered at the mouth of Loch Fyne (74N).
During the overwintering the crew of the QUEST caught 162 fox.
End July 1937 the QUEST returned to Europe making calls at Scoresbysund and Ammassalik.

January 1939 sold to Skips-A/S Quest (Ivar Austad, Tromsø) (fishery No T-24-T.
A 4-cyl 2tv Wichmann diesel engine was installed, 350 bhp.
Still used as a seal catcher, and probably in regular fishing in between seasons.

When war broke out in Norway in April 1940 she was catching seals near New Foundland, and she came under Notraship control.
Upon hearing of the German invasion in Norway she proceeded to St John’s.
November 1940 hired by the Royal Navy, as a minesweeper in the West Indies/Caribbean.
July 1941 handed back to Notraship.

March 1942 she was scheduled for convoy SC 76 from Halifax, but she did not sail.
April 1942 requisitioned by Den Konglige Norske Marine (Royal Norwegian Navy). Intended for use in Operation “Fritham 2” at Spitsbergen, Svalbard in May that year, but this was cancelled.
Then she shows up in convoy SC 83 which sails from Halifax in May 1942.

September 1942 returned to Nortraship.
21 June 1943 hired by the Royal Navy as water carrier, till 1945.

10 October 1945 laid up.
19 July 1946 returned to owner.

05 May 1962 while catching seal off the north coast of Labrador, she sprang a leak and sank due to ice.
The crew was rescued by the Norwegian seal catchers NORVARG, POLARFART, POLARSIRKEL and KVITFJELL.

Ascension 1972 4 and 4½p sg 160/1, scott 161/2
South Georgia 1972 20p sg 35, scott 34
Tristan da Cunha 1971 1½p sg 149, scott 153.

Source: Mostly copied from http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleetpq.html Shackleton by Roland Huntford. Ships of the Royal Navy Vol. II by Colledge. Log Book. Some other web-sites.
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Re: QUEST.

Postby hindle » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:49 pm

The Quest was suffering from a bent and misaligned propshaft, which caused a lot of engine problems, hence the many stops en route.

When Shackleton died, Len Hussey injected ether into his heart in a vain attempt to revive him.

Richard A. Hindle.
hindle
 

Re: QUEST.

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:38 pm

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Shackleton-Rowett Expedition (1921-22) was the last to be led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was sponsored by Mr. John Quiller Rowett and ultimately was led by Captain [Commander] Frank Wild. The three were photographed in 1921 looking out from the bridge of the QUEST when they paid a visit to Southampton to supervise the fitting out of the ship prior to the expedition. The 45p stamps are based on this photograph in an unusual Triptych format.
The expedition proposed an ambitious two year programme of Antarctic exploration but before any work had begun Shackleton tragically died aboard ship on 5th January. The QUEST had only just arrived at South Georgia and on 4th January anchored off Grytviken, where Shackleton went ashore to visit the old whaling establishment once again. Returning to QUEST he retired to his cabin to write what was to be the final entry in his diary. “It is a strange and curious place” he wrote. “A wonderful evening. In the darkening twilight I saw a lone star hover: gem like above the bay”.
The expedition had numerous objectives including a circumnavigation of the Antarctic continent and the mapping of 2,000 miles of uncharted coastline, a search for wrongly charted sub-Antarctic islands and investigations into the possible mineral resources in these lands and an ambitious scientific research programme. It was unrealistic for so few men to achieve all of these objectives within two years. There was no single main goal other than perhaps Shackleton’s wish to return south once more.
Shackleton himself referred to the expedition as pioneering. There was an aircraft (that ultimately was not used) and all manner of new gadgets including a heated crow’s nest and overalls for the lookouts, a wireless set, an odograph that could trace and chart the ship’s route automatically, a deep-sea sounding machine and a great deal of photographic equipment.
Such gadgets were made possible by the sponsorship of the businessman John Quiller Rowett. Having made a fortune in the spirits industry Rowett had a desire to do more than simply make money. Following the First World War he was a notable contributor to several charitable causes. He was also a school-friend of Shackleton’s at Dulwich College and he undertook to cover the entire costs of the expedition. According to Wild, without Rowett’s generosity the expedition would have been impossible: “His generous attitude is the more remarkable in that he knew there was no prospect of financial return, and what he did was in the interest of scientific research and from friendship with Shackleton.” His only recognition was the attachment of his name to the title of the expedition. Sadly in 1924, aged 50, Rowett took his own life believing his business fortunes to be in decline.
After the death of Shackleton, Frank Wild took over as expedition leader and chose to proceed in accordance with Shackleton’s plans. The QUEST, shown on the 50p stamps leaving London, at Ascension and in Ice, was the smallest ship to ever attempt to penetrate the Antarctic ice and despite several attempts the most southerly latitude attained was 69°17′s. The ship returned to South Georgia at the onset of winter. QUEST remained in South Georgia for a month, during which time Shackleton’s old comrades erected a memorial cairn to their former leader, on a headland overlooking the entrance to Grytviken harbour.
QUEST finally sailed for South Africa on 8th May where the crew enjoyed the hospitality of the Prime Minister, Jan Smuts, and many local organizations. They also met Rowett’s agent with a message that they should return to England rather than continuing for a second year. Their final visits were to St Helena, Ascension Island and St Vincent.
In the end the expedition achieved little of real significance. The lack of a clearly defined objective combined with the failure to call at Cape Town on the way south to collect important equipment (including parts for the aeroplane) added to the serious blow of Shackleton’s death, which ultimately overshadowed the expedition’s achievements.
The expedition has been referred to as the final expedition of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Those that followed were of a different nature and belonged to the mechanical age.
Ascension Island 2012 45p/50p sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.stampland.net/?p=7765#more-7765

£1.50p – Dr Alexander Macklin and “Quest
Alexander Macklin was born in India in 1889, the son of a Doctor and he was of course to follow in his father’s footsteps.
Soon after qualifying he applied to join Shackleton’s Imperial Transantarctic Expedition and was accepted as one of two doctors. As well as his surgeon’s duties he was put in charge of the ship’s dogs and was also assigned a team of sledge dogs to drive.
The skills of the two surgeons were put to the test with a range of ailments including Gangrene, Heart Problems and at least one Nervous Breakdown as well as the more mundane problems that would affect all of those living in difficult circumstances in freezing weather on Elephant Island for so long.
On return to England, Macklin joined the army as an officer in the Medical Corps serving in France and Russia during the First World War. He won the Military Cross (M.C.) for bravery in tending the wounded under fire and later joined Shackleton in Russia in the fight against the Bolsheviks.
Shackleton invited Macklin to join him again for the Quest expedition in 1922 as the ship’s surgeon together with a number of fellow crewmen from the earlier expedition. On Shackleton’s death at South Georgia, it fell to Macklin to prepare the body for transport to South America and then for burial on South Georgia.
Although some members of the crew left the Quest following the death of Shackleton, the bulk of the crew took the vessel back to the UK and on the morning of 19th May 1922, the Quest was spotted off the coast of Tristan da Cunha.
Many of the crew visited Edinburgh of the Seven Seas and Dr Macklin stayed in the cottage of Bob Glass although he was later to record that he had a problem with a “small army of marauders” which kept him awake. Macklin, who was in charge of stores arranged to leave a large amount of stores behind prior to the departure of the Quest six days later.
In 1926 Macklin established a medical practice in Dundee, Scotland where he would work for the next 21 years. During World War II, he served in the Medical Corps in East Africa as a Lieutenant Colonel and died on 21 March1967.
Tristan da Cunha 2014 £1.50 sg?, scott?
Source: Tristan da Cunha post web-site
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