SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SUNNYVALE USNS

The sheetlet to celebrate the Pitcairn and United States Air Force Joint Satellite Recovery Survey Mission to Henderson Island is released on 7 July 2000 to mark the opening of the World Stamp Expo at Anaheim, Los Angeles where we will be operating a booth. The Expo is centred on the theme of Space Exploration and Travel, a topic, which has some significance to Pitcairn. Initially we intended taking a Millennium Part III stamp and developing it into a sheetlet for the exhibition, which is why both of these issue have the same date of issue.
It was Garth Harraway, Pitcairn’s former Commissioner who prompted us to search the archives for reference material on the 1966 survey conducted by the United States Air Force. Dusting off the archived files, we found one marked ‘Secret’. The file contained a report which described the purpose of the mission. The US Satellite Launching site was moved from Florida to Vandenburg airbase, just north of Los Angeles, from which satellites could be launched on a trajectory to directly cross the South Pole, without over-flying any landmass. The Pitcairn Islands lie within a few hundred miles of the crucial point at which any launch may fail when a satellite would attempt to break through the earth’s atmosphere. Uninhabited Henderson Island was identified as an ideal site for an airbase whose function would be the recovery of satellite “whether manned or not”.
The survey was completed and by personnel of the United States Air Force with assistance from the Pitcairn Islanders. The USNS SUNNYVALE a satellite recovery vessel, was the mission support vessel. Although the survey was completed and plans drawn, the proposed airstrip failed to gain support at a higher level and the project was abandoned.
The ‘Secret’ file revealed a map showing the plans for the airfield and an album of black and white photographs of the survey team in action with some tremendous aerial shots of the unusual coral pinnacles, a distinctive feature of the Henderson Island landscape. The map is reproduced on the First Day Cover of this issue and the photographs provided the artist with a wonderful reference for his design.
In 1988, Henderson Island was declared a World Heritage Site. Today it is visited by just a few cruise vessels and yachts and the Pitcairners still make regular visits to collect Miro wood to carve into souvenirs which are sold to tourists.
Another feature of the sheetlet, is the Inmarsat satellite. It is through this satellite that Pitcairner communicate by voice or fax. Inmarsat A and Inmarsat M communications systems are both used on Pitcairn today.
Source: Pitcairn Post.

SUNNYVALE: Built as a type VC2-S-AP3 cargo vessel and built under yard No V21 by the California Shipbuilding Corporation, Terminal Island, Los Angles, California for the U.S. Shipping Administration.
08 April 1944 laid down.
06 June 1944 launched as the DALTON VICTORY named after Dalton in Ohio.
Tonnage 7,612 grt, 10,750 dwt, dim. 138.8 x 18.9 x 8.89m. (draught), length bpp.133.0, displacement 4,512 ton standard, 15,589 tons full load.
Powered by one compound steam turbine, 8,500 shp, one shaft, speed 15.5 knots.
19 July 1944 completed.
Chartered as a cargo vessel by Sudden & Christenson Inc. California.
27 May 1946 returned to the Maritime Administration at Baltimore. Chartered the same day by Moore McCormack Lines Inc.
03 October 1947 returned to the Maritime Administration, laid up in the National Defence Reserve Fleet, James River Group, Lee Hall, VA.
02 April 1948 chartered by the US Army Transportation Service renamed USNS DALTON VICTORY (T-AK-256 and reclassified as a Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS).
09 August 1950 transferred to the US Navy and placed in service by the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS as USNS DALTON VICTORY (T-AK-256)
Armed with 1 – 5 inch gun, 1 – 3 inch gun, 8 – 20mm AA guns.
Crew 99.
27 October 1960 redesignated a Missile Range Instrumentation Ship and renamed USNS SUNNYVALE (T-AGM-5).
Armament removed.
15 December 1974 out of service and struck from the Naval Register.
02 January 1975 custody transferred to the Maritime Administration (MARAD) for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet.
17 July 1975 sold for scrap to National Metal & Steel Corp.
11 August 1975 withdraw from Reserve Fleet and she was scrapped at Terminal Island, CA.

SS DALTON VICTORY was built as Victory ship used as a cargo ship for World War II. She was launched by the California Shipbuilding Company on June 6, 1944 and completed on July 19, 1944 as a Greenville Victory-class cargo ship. The ship’s United States Maritime Commission designation was VC2- S- AP3, hull number 21. She was acquired by the U.S. Navy in 1950 and renamed the USNS DALTON VICTORY (T-AK-256).
In 1960 she was renamed USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5) and rebuilt and placed in service as a missile range instrumentation ship, and assigned to the Pacific Missile Range, where she performed missile tracking duties.
Constructed in Los Angeles, California
DALTON VICTORY (T-AK-256) was built by California Shipbuilding Corporation, Los Angeles, California, and was completed in 1944.
Acquired by MSTS as a cargo ship
DALTON VICTORY was acquired by the Navy and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) in a noncommissioned status on 9 August 1950.
Assigned as a missile tracking ship
On 27 October 1960 DALTON VICTORY was reconfigured as a missile range instrumentation ship and renamed USNS SUNNYVALE (T-AGM-5).
USNS SUNNYVALE carried out a multitude of duties in the Pacific Ocean through 1962, including operations in support of the Pacific Missile Range, Point Mugu, California.
Inactivation
SUNNYVALE was placed out of service at an unknown date, and was struck from the Navy List on 15 December 1974. She was disposed of by the U.S. Maritime Administration on 17 July 1975. Broken up at Terminal Island by National Metal & Steel Corp. in 1975.

Pitcairn Island 2000 $5.00 sgMS?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USNS_Dalt ... _(T-AK-256) http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/13/130256.htm

JEUNE RICHARD privateer

Of the French privateer JEUNE RICHARD I could not find much, French sources on the internet does not mention the action with the WINDSOR CASTLE, (one source mentioned her as built in 1797 as the POINT DE LODI later renamed in POMPÉE before she got the name JEUNE RICHARD, her homeport Bordeaux and under command of Captain Nicolas Rousse?) So in the French maritime history it was not an imported action.
Schooner rigged, (the Cuba 13c stamp show her as a full rigged barque vessel.) Tonnage 250 ton.
At the time of action she had a crew of 92 men and an armament of 6 - 9pdrs. and one 16 pdr. on a swivel and 8 – 12 pdrs. Other sources give she had only 8 – 12 pdrs.

She was six days out on a fresh cruise, armed with 8 long 12 pdrs. and 92 men when the action took place.
After the action a crew list was found on the JEUNE RICHARD contained a roll of 120 men, and from this it can only be constructed that she had already made a prize or two.
On her previous cruise she had taken six of which apparently, only the POPE had proven stubborn, but she had finally succumbed to an over-whelming number of boarders, the crew of the POPE lost 3-4 men.
Shortly before noon on 01 October 1807 when the packet came within gun range, the privateer hoisted the French flag and started firing her guns. The packet replied with her stern chasers, and a sort of desultory running battle took place for a little of an hour by which time the privateer was closed in to the packet with a broadside in readiness and a party prepared to board.
In an aggressive manner the French captain hailed over for the packet to strike her colours. Upon receiving a firm refusal he closed in alongside the packet’s starboard quarter, fired his broadside, and grappled the packet. The privateer broadside put ten of Rodger’s men out of action. The casualties aboard the privateer at this moment in time is not recorded but they were probably of a similar number. The high boarding nets were frustrating the French boarding party and they hacked away at it with their swords and cutlasses, two men had what resembles sickles on long poles and they were trying to cut the ridge rope that held up the netting. As soon as they began their attempt to board, ten men were ready to repulse them, they thrust their pikes and cutlasses through the netting and brought down nine of ten and this action persuaded the rest to retire.
The French captain then tried to get the vessel clear of the packet so that he could make full use of his cannons but the packets main yard was caught up in the schooner rigging. Unable to extricate his schooner. Unable to extricate his schooner the French captain made another attempt to board.
While they prepared for this Captain Rodgers had managed to manoeuvre one of his 6 pdr. guns so that it would bear on the schooner deck. It was loaded with double grape shot, a canister shot and a package containing 100 musket balls. He waited for the moment when they made the move and then fired. It devastate the boarding party, completely demoralised them, and those that were not dead crippled or benumbed abandoned their quarters and scrambled to safety. Seeing this Captain Rodgers had the schooner‘s bowsprit lashed to the packet and then rallied 4 or 5 men to follow him aboard he privateer. There was little resistance, just a short scuffle here and there and after a short time Rodgers and his five men commanded the deck. Many had fled below deck fearing another raking blast from the 6 pdr, they now had no other option but surrender. Because those below still outnumbered him. Rodgers ordered them up one by one and as they did so they were placed in their own irons which they had on deck in readiness to place on the British.
The JEUNE RICHARD had 21 men killed, 33 wounded. On the WINDSOR CASTLE 3 were dead but 10 others were seriously wounded and all the rest were slightly wounded or injured in some way.
Captain Rodgers took his prize to Barbados. It was against the British Post Office regulations for any of their packet ships to take prizes, however, as the Admiralty graciously waived its right to prize money in favour of the WINDSOR CASTLE and the Post Office made a concession, the captain and crew got the prize money as well as a purse of £130 from the Merchants of England. The captain was presented with a sword of honour and a silver cup.
After arrival in Barbados the JEUNE RICHARD disappears from the history books, fate unknown.

British Virgin Islands 1970 15c sg250, scott? . Cuba 1971 13c sg1847, scott?, 1987 1p sgMS?, scott? More info is given on the WINDSOR CASTLE on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8437
Source: Internet and Log Book Volume 12 page 90-94 and written by E.J. Hogan.

COLOMBO (Brazil)

Built in 1865-'66 by A.C. Rennie, Greenwich for the Brazilian Navy.
Ironclad Warship, displacement:858 tons, L:50.29m. B:10.66m. Depth:4.57m. Draft:2.43m. steam engine:240 hp. 2 shafts, 10.5 kn. Armament:8-70 mm. Whithworth cannons.
Participation in the Paraguayan war and bombarded fort Huamaitá in 1867.
1880 out of service.

(Gambia 2001, 10 D. StG.?)
Internet.

CARMEN sloop 1811

On 5 December 2016 Argentina issued a new stamp in honour of the Greek sailors who fought for the Argentine independence, Pedro Samuel Spiro and Nicolas Jorge Colmaniatis, they fought under orders of Admiral Guillermo Brown.
The vessel on the stamp is designed after a watercolour of the sloop CARMEN painted by the Argentine maritime painter Emilio Biggeri (1907-1977).

Information on the sloop CARMEN you can find: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9586&p=9871&hilit=carmen#p9871

Argentine 2016 $11 sg?, scott?
Source: Argentine Post.

The island, Sint Eustatius. "First Salute"

The name of the island, “Sint Eustatius”, is the Dutch name for Saint Eustace, a legendary Christian martyr.The island was seen by Christopher Columbus in 1493 and claimed by many different nations. From the first settlement, in the 17th century until the early 19th century, St. Eustatius changed hands twenty-two times. In 1636, the chamber of Zeeland of the Dutch West India Company took possession of the island that was then reported to be uninhabited. As of 1678, the islands of St. Eustatius, Sint Maarten and Saba fell under direct command of the Dutch West India Company, with a commander stationed on St. Eustatius to govern all three. At the time, the island was of some importance for cultivation of tobacco and sugar. The island sold arms and ammunition to anyone willing to pay. It was one of the few places from which the young United States could obtain military stores. The good relationship between St. Eustatius and the United States resulted in the noted "First Salute". On November 16, 1776, Captain Isaiah Robinson[9] of the 14-gun American brig Andrew Doria,[10] sailed into the anchorage below St. Eustatius' Fort Oranje. Robinson announced his arrival by firing a thirteen gun salute, one gun for each of the thirteen American colonies in rebellion against Britain. Governor Johannes de Graaff replied with an eleven gun salute from the cannons of Fort Oranje. International protocol required a two gun less acknowledgement of a sovereign flag. The Andrew Doria flew the Continental Colors of the fledgling United States. It was the first international acknowledgment of American independence.[Note 1] The Andrew Doria had arrived to purchase munitions for the American Revolutionary forces. She was also carrying a copy of the Declaration of Independence which was presented to Governor De Graaff. An earlier copy had been captured on the way to Holland by the British. U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt came to St. Eustatius in 1939 to recognize the importance of the 1776 "First Salute". He presented a large brass plaque to St. Eustatius which is displayed today under a flagpole atop the walls of Fort Oranje. The plaque reads:"In commemoration to the salute to the flag of the United States, Fired in this fort November 16. 1776, By order of Johannes de Graaff, Governor of Saint Eustatius, In reply to a National Gun-Salute, Fired by the United States Brig of War Andrew Doria, Under Captain Isaiah Robinson of the Continental Navy, Here the sovereignty of the United States of America was first formally acknowledged to a national vessel by a foreign official. Presented by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President of the United States of America"
Caribish Nederland 2016;88,0c. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sint_Eustatius

RIVER ADADA (Nigeria)

Built in 1978-'79 by Brodogradiliste i Tvornica Dizel Motora, Split, #290, for the Nigerian National Shipping Line, Lagos.
General cargo, Gt:13,165/9016, Nt:6699/4322, Dw:16,487/12,000, Loa:174.96m. Lbpp:166.17m. B:22.84m. Depth:13.01m. Draft:-/9.17m. 6 cyl. Sulzer/R.O. Tvornica Dizel Motora '3 Maj', Rijeka diesel:14,400 bhp. (10,592 kW.) 18.25 kn. 2 thrusters controllable pitch propellers forewards, 5 holds, 1 derrick SWL:80 tons, 7 derricks SWL:22 tons. TEU:428, pass:6, IMO.7716672, call sign:5NEC, strengthened for heavy cargoes, ice class 3.
In 1996 sold to Power Shipping S.A., St. Vincent, renamed RIVER, same year to Mediterranean Victory Marine Ltd., Cyprus, renamed AXION I.
08-2004 to Aseanise Ventures Ltd., St. Vincent, renamed LEONIS, 2008 to View Finance Business Corp., Panama, renamed LEONIS I.
27-07-2008 sold for US$8.2 million for scrapping in Chittagong.

Sisterships #291 RIVER OJI, #292 RIVER OLI, #293 RIVER MAJIDUN, # 294 RIVER GURARA, #295 RIVER OSHUN, #296 RIVER OGBESE, #297 RIVER MAJE.

(Gambia 1983, 50b. StG.503)
LR88/89 + Internet
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GENERAL GODDARD

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GENERAL GODDARD

Postby shipstamps » Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:28 pm


Click image to view full size
St Helena did issue a 6p stamp on 17 December 1973, which shows use the British East Indiaman GENERAL GODDARD, which captured seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
In June 1795 news reached St Helena that the Dutch Revolutionary Party had joined France in the war against England.
Captain William Taylor Money was at St Helena at that time with the GENERAL GODDARD during his fifth voyage from India.
In haste he fitted his ship out for battle, to intercept a Dutch merchant fleet known to be nearing the island.
The GENERAL GODDARD got help from the HMS SCEPTRE a 3rd Rate 64 gun ship, and the packet SWALLOW.

18 May 1795 a Dutch fleet of 16 VOC ships sailed from the Cape, escorted by two warships the SCIPIO and KOMEET bound for the Netherlands. Due to bad weather and adverse winds, eight ships returned to the Table Bay where she arrived on 20 May. One day later the eight ships sailed out again, but had lost the contact with the convoy.
14 June 1795 were these 8 ships captured by the British ships off St Helena. (Not much is given in the Dutch books I have on the VOC about this loss)

The HMS SCEPTER under command of Captain Essington arrived at St Helena in May with a convoy of homebound ships, and she brought the news that armies of France had overran the Netherlands.
Then the packet SWALLOW arrived on 2 June from the Cape with the news that an important Dutch convoy was underway from the Cape to the Netherlands.
Capt Essington made a request to the Governor of St Helena that some of the East Indiamen of the company could be put under his orders, to assist them in the search and capturing of the Dutch convoy.
The MANSHIP, GENERAL GODDARD and the SWALLOW were put under his command, and some troops from the island embarked on this vessels.
03 June this small squadron sailed out and the search for the Dutch convoy began. Five other East Indiamen were prepared to join the squadron, the ASIA, LORD HAWKESBURY, ESSEX, AIRLY CASTLE and BUSBRIDGE. All available space on the island was loaded with the goods unladed from the ships, even the church was used.

The LORD HAWKESBURY, after sailing and in an attempt to weather the island, split her sails, and returned to St Helena. The ESSEX got also in problems when her fore-top-mast sprung. The BUSBRIDGE was the only ship what made contact with the squadron.

10 June one of the ships of the Dutch fleet the HOUGLY was seized and send to the roads of St Helena accompanied by the SWALLOW, after she delivered her at the roads the SWALLOW returned to the squadron with a number of additional seamen to reinforce the squadron.
The weather was not so good; a lot of gales and the MANSHIP and BUSBRIDGE lost the contact with the squadron.
On the afternoon of 14 June, seven sails were sighted on the weather bow, steering down before the wind.
GENERAL GODDARD sailed through the Dutch convoy on about 01.00 a.m. and was fired at, without returning fire.
The next morning at day-break, the Dutch fleet was still on the starboard bow of the HMS SCEPTRE and SWALLOW, and at 07.00 a.m. she displayed Dutch colours, whilst their commodore fired a gun to leeward. This was repeated by the SCEPTRE, and Capt. Essington supposed it would be followed by
‘heaving to’ of the Dutch ships, but the Dutch ships sailed on, three shots fired by the SCEPTRE ahead of the Dutch convoy did not give the result the British hoped for.
A signal was given to the GENERAL GODDARD to chase the Dutchmen to the SCEPTRE, when the GENERAL GODDARD instantaneously appeared under a cloud of canvas and was laid alongside the Dutch commodore ship ALBLASSERDAM who from her imposing appearance thought that she was a warship, and the ALBLASSERDAM followed Money’s directions to bear down.
The Dutch crews of the other ships fired several shots to the SCEPTRE and at the boats that were sent out with boarding parties. After the SCEPTRE did give a few broadsides the Dutch surrendered. At the same time the ASIA and BUSBRIDGE arrived and all seven Dutch vessels were boarded and taken as a prize, without the loss of any person.
All the ships came to anchor in the night of 17 June on the road of St Helena.
01 July the SCEPTRE with her prizes and British convoy sailed for England, the prizes arrived at Shannon, Ireland, where she were sold. The ZEELELIE (not visible on stamp) which had attempted to escape was wrecked off the Scilly Islands that year.

A painting, which depicts this battle, was made by the British artist Thomas Luny (1759 – 1837) for Captain Money of the GENERAL GODDARD (other source gives the painting was made for Robert Wigram the owner); the painting is now in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
After this painting the stamp is designed. Not the complete painting is shown but only the central portion of the painting.
The ZEELELIE and HMS SCEPTRE and the packet SWALLOW are not shown on the stamp.
The GENERAL GODDARD, in foreground of stamp, with the six remaining Dutch ships, which can be seen in the background of the stamp.

The VOC ships taken were used regular between Holland and the Far East after she were built, the URL gives a search engine for the VOC ships http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten/DAS/search for more information on the voyages.
The SURCHEANCE is not given, so most probably she was never used from Holland, or a hired vessel.

ALBLASSERDAM: Named after a town in the Netherlands. Built in 1782 on the yard of the VOC at Zeeland for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
1150 ton.
She sailed from Ceylon in 1795, with a cargo on board with a total value of 457.491 Dutch Guilder, under command of Capt. Klaas Keuken, with on board 165 persons, one died during the voyage and 11 disembark at the Cape.

MENTOR: Built on the VOC yard of Zeeland in 1789 for the Chamber of the VOC in Zeeland.
Tonnage 560 ton.
Sailed from Batavia on 22 November 1794, with a cargo on board with a total value of 61.361 Dutch Guilder. She was under command of Capt. Ulke Barendsz with on board 50 persons.

(I believe this MENTOR is also depict on the British Indian Ocean Territory stamp issued in 1999 60p sg 229, not any MENTOR is mentioned in Rowan Hackman book on the “Ships of the East India Company”. The year on the stamp is the same as when the MENTOR was built)

MEERMIN: (Mermaid). Built in 1782 at the VOC yard at Amsterdam for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
Tonnage 500 ton.
Sailed in 1795 from Batavia under command of Capt. Gerard Ewoud Overbeek with on board 40 persons.

DORDWIJK: Built in 1787 in Rotterdam for the Chamber of the VOC of Delft/Rotterdam.
Tonnage 800 ton
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Hendrik Willem Ketjen with on board 40 persons.

GENERAL GODDARD:
Built in 1782 by Randall, Rotherhite for William Money.
30 January 1782 launched under the name GENERAL GODDARD.
She made her first voyage under command of Captain Thomas Foxall for the British East India Company to Bombay, she made three voyages more to India, before she was sold in 1790 to Robert Wigram.
Her next voyage to Bengal was under command of Capt. Thomas Wakefield, thereafter she made a voyage under command of Captain W.T.Money, and during this voyage she assisted HMS SCEPTRE in the capture of seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
Thereafter she made one more voyage under command of Captain Thomas Graham from 1796 till 1798 to the Coromandel Coast and Bengal.
1798 After her arrival back in England, sold as a West Indiamen for the trade to the West Indies.
January 1800 taken by a Spanish 1st Rate, 80 gun and a frigate, 32 guns off Cuba, while on a passage from London to Jamaica and taken to Havana.
Then she disappears in history.
Tonnage 799 tons, dim. 116.7 x 35.11 x 14.9ft.

VROUWE AGATHA: (Lady Agatha). Built ?, she was hired by the Chamber of the VOC of Amsterdam.
Tonnage 900 ton.
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Herman Pieter Murk, crew ?
On board was a cargo with a total value of 115.960 Dutch Guilders.

SURCHEANCE: Bought in 1786.
Tonnage 768 ton.
Sailed 22 November 1794 from Batavia under command of Capt. Christiaan Zummack, crew ?
Cargo on board with a total value of 81.527 Dutch Guilder.
1795 The SURCHEANCE was lost on her voyage between St Helena and the U.K.

Source: Van Compagnie naar Koopvaardij by Dr. E S van Eyck van Heslinga. Log Book Volume 14 page 234. http://www.bweaver.nom.sh/brooke/brooke_ch8.html Ships of the East India Company by Rowan Hackman.
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