SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Jason Junior (Remotely Operated Vehicle)

Jason Junior, also called JJ, was a small remotely operated vehicle (ROV) designed and built by the Deep Submergence Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI). Jason Jr. was a prototype for a larger, more capable ROV named Jason, which was being developed to complement the Argo unmanned undersea video camera sled.

Jason Jr. was first used in the exploration of the wreck of the RMS Titanic in 1986,

See Topic: “Titanic (White Star Line)”

during which it was attached to and controlled from aboard the DSV Alvin, a United States Navy manned deep-ocean research submersible operated by WHOI.

See Topic: “ALVIN submersible”

The ROV was connected to the submersible by a 300 feet (91 m) fiber optic cable, and allowed scientists to explore and photograph areas of the shipwreck that the submersible could not access. The ROV was deployed from a metal cage attached to the front of the Alvin, and controlled remotely by a pilot inside the submersible.

Jason Jr. was lost at sea in late 1991, when a barge carrying it and other equipment to the Galápagos Islands sank in the Pacific Ocean during the Jason III expedition.

Palau Republic 1998, S.G.?, Scott: 459.

Source: Wikipedia.

SANTIAGO (Cape Verde Islands)

Built in 1977 by Aalborg Vaerft, #215, for K/S Mercandia Scandia (Per Henriksen)Copenhagen as MERCANDIAN PACIFIC.
Freighter, Gt:1692/3258, Nt:1117/2276, Dw:4664/5524, Loa:96,50m. Lbpp:87,91m. B:16,03m. D:8,82m. Draft:5,61/6,80m. 12 cyl. Alpha diesel engine:3180 hp. (2339 kW.)
(other sources gives B&W)11 kn. 2 holds, 4 derricks SWL:5 tons. IMO.7526613.
1979 sold to the Government of The Republic of Cape Verde Islands, renamed in SANTIAGO.
1981 to Companhia National de Navegação 'Arca Verde', Sao Vincente.
1995 to Ciampone S.A.S. di Carrante Teresa Maria, Naples, Gt:4373, Nt:1969, Dw:5609 (derricks removed??)
1996 to Mandarin International Ltd., Valetta, Malta, renamed in TEMA.
1999 to Terminex Trading S.A., Madeira, renamed in SINES.
2001 Amar de Assante di Cupillo Michelle & C.S.A.S., Madeira.
2003 to Zotaj Shipping & Trading Co., Durrës, Albania, renamed in KNEO.
2006 to Albartin Shipping Co., Durrës, same year to Nereida Shipping Co. (manager Albartin Shipping Co.) Durrës.
(Cape Verde Islands 1980, 30 E. StG.497)
LR88/89 + 97/98 + internet.

EXPLORER cruise vessel 2002

For the International Philatelic Havana Cuba Cup 2014, Cuba issued a miniature sheet with in the margin a cruise vessel entering the port of Havana.
The only cruise ship I can find with a blue hull which visited Havana is the EXPLORER and compare the stamp with a photo I believe she is depict. She has a sister but she never visited Cuba so far I can find.
Built under yard No 962 as a cruise vessel by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany for the Royal Olympic Cruises, Piraeus, Greece.
10 July 1999 keel laid down.
19 May 2000 launched as the OLYMPIC EXPLORER, one sister the OLYMPIC VOYAGER.
Tonnage 24,318 grt, 2,500 dwt, dim. 180.40 x 25.50 x 7.30m. (draught), length bpp. 155.0m.
Powered by four Wärtsilä 9L46C diesel engines, 37,800 kW, twin shafts, speed 28 knots. With only two diesel engines running she still can make a speed of 22 knots.
Accommodation for 800 passengers.
09 March 2001 trials.
April 2001 renamed in OLYMPIA EXPLORER.
24 April 2001 sailed out with shipyard workers for a guest cruise.
27 April 2001 the owner refused the ship due to severe vibration problems, but if this was the reason or financial problems by the owner.
25 April 2002 at least was she delivered to Royal Olympic Cruises at Piraeus, under Gibraltar flag.
The same year the company changed his name to Royal Olympia Cruises.

First used for cruises in the Mediterranean, during the winter season she crossed the Atlantic to Port Canaveral, then used for cruises from there to the Caribbean. And east coast of Brazil.
15 January 2003 she passed the Panama Canal from the east to the west for the first time. After a voyage from Los Angeles around Cape Horn to Ft Lauderdale she returned back to the Mediterranean for the summer season commencing on 20 April 2003.
November 2003 she returned again to the USA but after September 11th the cruise industry got a problem with a lack of passengers and due to financial problems the OLYMPIA EXPLORER cancelled her December voyage to Hawaii. In March 2004 the OLYMPIA EXPLORER was seized in Los Angeles and moved to the Long Beach Harbour anchorage.
24 March 2004 she was auctioned and bought by the mortgage holder the German KfW bank, who bought the ship for US$82.7 million.
She was thereafter laid up while the new owner sought a buyer.
28 June 2004 bought by Stella Maritime LLC, Nassau, Bahamas (Management Institute for Shipboard Education, Pittsburgh, USA and renamed EXPLORER.
December 2007 sold to Explorer Maritime LLC, Monte Carlo, Monaco, under Bahamas flag and registry with homeport Nassau.
Used for Semester at Sea and with students she makes voyages which takes about 100 to 110 days around the world in spring and autumn. The summer voyages are mostly shorter between 65 to 70 days. Between the semesters the EXPLORER is used for short voyages between 20 and 30 days.
2015 In service same name and owner, managed by V Ships Leisure SAM, Monaco. IMO No 9183518.

Cuba 2014 1.00p sgMS?, scott?
http://maritimematters.com/2011/04/expl ... niversity/ Equasis. http://www.faktaomfartyg.se/olympia_explorer_2002.htm

Oneida USS (Brig) 1810

The first USS Oneida was a brig of war in the United States Navy during the War of 1812.

Oneida was built at Oswego, New York 1808–1809, under contract awarded by her first commanding officer, Lieutenant M. T. Woolsey, to Henry Eckford and Christian Bergh. Although her displacement was 243 tons by carpenter's measurement, her draft could compare with a sloop of 80 tons. This enabled her to enter the rivers feeding Lake Ontario without fear of grounding. She was delivered by the contractors in the spring of 1809, but was not equipped and sent upon the lake until the fall of 1810.

Oneida operated principally from Sackets Harbor, New York, not far from the commencement of the St. Lawrence, while the British port of Kingston lay nearly opposite in Canada.

On 5 June 1812, Oneida captured the British schooner Lord Nelson, while enforcing the Embargo Law. On 19 July, the British squadron sailed on Sackets Harbor where Oneida and her prize were anchored. After failing to gain the open lake, Oneida anchored again near a bank in a position to rake the harbor entrance. She mounted the guns from her off side ashore and presented a full battery. After an exchange of cannonade, of two hours duration, the British squadron broke off the engagement and sailed for Kingston, Canada.

On 8 November, Oneida, flying the broad pennant of Commodore Isaac Chauncey, sailed from Sackets Harbor to intercept British ships conveying supplies to the Army at Kingston. The sloop HMS Royal George was sighted and chased into the Bay of Quinte and lost sight of during the night. Sighted again the following morning, the chase was resumed. Oneida brought up the rear of the squadron to allow the heavy guns of her schooners to open way for a close attack. Royal George cut her mooring cables and attempted to make further headway up the channel, finally making fast to a wharf under the protection of troop muskets. Royal George suffered extensive damage, and Oneida had some damage aloft with one seaman killed and three wounded, but a gale ended the engagement and the Americans returned to Sackets Harbor.

On 25 April 1813, along with other ships of the American squadron, Oneida set sail from Sackets Harbor and arrived off York, Canada (now Toronto) on 27 April with troops under General Zebulon Pike embarked. Boats were hoisted out and within two hours the brigade was ashore, soon capturing York despite the loss of General Pike. On the night of 26 May she again embarked troops and artillery and set sail with the squadron for Fort George, Canada. A landing was made about 9 a.m. on 27 May, and by noon the town and fort were taken.

Oneida made a second unopposed landing at York on 27 July liberating prisoners and seizing provisions. On 31 July 1814, Oneida made for the Niagara River to blockade British ships anchored there. She was assisted by the brig Jefferson and the schooner Sylph, while the remainder of the American Squadron blockaded Kingston. The blockade was lifted in September 1814, and Oneida returned to Sackets Harbor. Ice closed the lake in November, and peace was declared the following month.

Oneida was sold 15 May 1815, but afterwards was repurchased by the Navy, laid up at Sackets Harbor, and finally sold in 1825 to a timber company in the village of Clayton, New York.

Oneida worked as a timber ship for several years before sinking in French Creek Bay near Clayton sometime in the 1830s. One of the ship's cannons is currently in Clayton's Memorial Park, while one of its anchors is in the possession of French Creek Bay Marina.

Marshall Islands 2002, S.G.?, Scott: 807f.

Source: Wikipedia.

FLETCHER CHRISTIAN

This set of stamps issued by Pitcairn Island depict scenes from the film” Mutiny on the Bounty”. Only one stamp shows us a sailing vessel, which is the replica BOUNTY built in 1962. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12613&p=13701&hilit=bounty+replica#p13701
Fletcher Christian was born on 25 September 1764, in Eaglesfield, in Cumberland. He came from old gentry, a landed family with estates both on the Isle of Man and in Cumberland. After his lawyer father’s death when Fletcher was just three and a half years old, his mother got into financial difficulties and ran up a large debt. To avoid debtors’ prison she fled with Fletcher and his siblings to Douglas on the Isle of Man.
He went to sea at the age of 18, joining the HMS CAMBRIDGE on which William Bligh was sixth lieutenant. Since Christian was enrolled as just a ship’s boy, it is unlikely that the two had much contact and on returning Christian was discharged. On April 25, 1783, Fletcher signed on as midshipman on board HMS EURYDICE sailing for India. Christian, through seamanship competence, was made acting lieutenant after only one year’s service. By June 1785 however, the EURYDICE was back home and Christian was paid off. Looking for employment, he used his family connection with the Bethams, the family of Elizabeth Bligh, and saw Christian join the merchant ship BRITANNIA, owned by Elizabeth’s uncle and commanded by William Bligh. They sailed together on two voyages to the West Indies. On the first, Christian sailed as an ordinary seaman and on the second, Bligh made him second mate.
Christian joined the HMAV BOUNTY, on Bligh's recommendation, for the ship's breadfruit expedition to Tahiti and during the voyage Bligh appointed him acting lieutenant. Five months after arriving, the BOUNTY left Tahiti in April 1789 and headed for the Tongan Islands, but the luxurious months on the idyllic island had made the crew soft, forcing Bligh to marshal out strict punishments to bring them into line. Severely discontented by a series of brutal floggings and suffering the loss of their female companions, eighteen members of the crew, led by Christian, conspired to mutiny. On April 28th Christian and several of his followers entered Bligh’s cabin, took him captive and soon cast him and eighteen others adrift in a small boat which took them on an epic, and now famous, 3,168 nautical mile voyage.
Following the mutiny, Christian attempted to build a colony on Tubai but being unsuccessful he returned briefly to Tahiti where he married a local chief’s daughter, Maimiti, on 16 June 1789. While on Tahiti, he dropped off sixteen crewmen including four Bligh loyalists who had been left behind on BOUNTY the remaining nine mutineers, six Tahitian men and eleven Tahitian women then sailed eastward. They headed for the uncharted Pitcairn Island where they stripped BOUNTY of all that could be floated ashore before setting the ship on fire and stranding themselves. Difficult times followed with the resulting sexual imbalance, combining with the effective enslavement of the Tahitian men by the mutineers, leading to insurrection and the deaths of most of the men.
The American ship TOPAZ visited Pitcairn in 1808 and found only one man, John Adams, still alive, along with nine Tahitian women. Maimiti claimed Christian had been murdered in 1793, along with four remaining mutineers and all six of the Tahitian men. Christian was survived by Maimiti and his sons, Thursday October Christian (born 1790), and Charles Christian (born 1792) and a daughter Mary-Ann Christian (born 1793).
Christian, possibly the world’s most famous mutineer, was well thought of by his men. All of them saw their misfortunes as having been brought about by Bligh. There is no portrait or drawing of Fletcher Christian from a real life study. Bligh described Christian as…"5 ft. 9 in. high, blackish or of very dark complexion. Hair - blackish or very dark brown. Make - strong. A star tattooed (sic) on his left breast, and tattooed on the backside. His knees stand a little out and he may be called a little bow legged. He is subject to violent perspiration, particularly in his hand, so that he soils anything he handles".
All others who knew Christian agreed that he was handsome and of an athletic build. He seems to have been an honest and forthright man, normally with a happy and friendly disposition, very charming and liked by most on board the BOUNTY.

Rumours have persisted for more than two hundred years that Christian's murder may have been faked, that he had left the island and that he made his way back to England around 1808. Although highly unlikely, this claim has led to speculation that will probably never cease. Many scholars believe that the rumours of Christian returning to England helped to inspire Samuel Taylor Coleridge in writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

Pitcairn Island 2014 20c/3.00 sg?, scott?
http://www.stamps.gov.pn/FletcherChristian.html

U-309 (Submarine) 1943

German submarine U-309 was a Type VIIC U-boat of Nazi Germany’s Kriegsmarine during World War II.

See Topic: “U-Boat Type V11C”

The submarine was laid down on 24 January 1942 at the Flender Werke yard at Lübeck, launched on 5 December 1942, and commissioned on 27 January 1943 under the command of “Oberleutnant zur See” Hans-Gert Mahrholz. She sailed on nine combat patrols, but damaged only one ship, before being sunk off Scotland on 16 February 1945.

After training with the 8th U-boat Flotilla at Königsberg, U-309 was transferred to the 11th U-boat Flotilla based in Bergen on 1 August 1943, Norway, for front-line service. The U-boat departed Kiel on 26 August, arriving at Bergen seven days later, on 1 September. From there she sailed out into the Norwegian Sea on 13 September, and arrived in Trondheim six days later on the 18th. As U-309 was then reassigned to the 9th U-boat Flotilla based at Brest in France. She left Trondheim on 25 September, and sailed out into the mid-Atlantic to patrol, before arriving at Brest on 7 November. During this patrol, on 30 September, U-309 suffered her only casualty, when “Mechanikergefreiter” Erich Jungmann was lost overboard while working out on deck.

U-309 's next patrol took her from Brest, on 19 December 1943, out into the Atlantic west of Ireland, then back to Bordeaux on 14 February 1944. In April 1944 the U-boat was fitted with a Schnorchel underwater-breathing apparatus.

In June and July 1944 U-309 made two short patrols in the Bay of Biscay, before finally achieving success during her fifth patrol. The U-boat sailed from Brest on 12 July 1944 and into the English Channel. There, at 21:00 on 24 July, she fired three LuT pattern-running torpedoes at Convoy FTM-47, en route from Juno Beach in Normandy to Southend, and hit the 7,219 ton British Liberty ship Samneva. Badly damaged, the ship was beached at Southampton, but then broke in two and was declared a total loss. U-309 returned to Brest on 3 August.

As the French bases fell to the advancing Allies, U-309 was transferred again, this time to the 33rd U-boat Flotilla based at Flensburg. Under her new commander Oberleutnant zur See Herbert Loeder she left La Pallice on 29 August 1944, and sailed around the British Isles to Stavanger, Norway, arriving on 13 October. The U-boat left there after only two days, sailing to Flensburg by the 21st.
U-309 left Germany on 30 January 1945, sailing to Horten in Norway, arriving there on 2 February. She departed on 8 February, and headed into the waters east of Scotland.

There, on 16 February 1945, U-309 was shadowing Convoy WN-74 into the Moray Firth when she was detected by the Canadian River class frigate Saint John with ASDIC (sonar). The first attack on the U-boat produced some oil on the surface. Two further attacks were carried out using the Hedgehog anti-submarine mortar, which produced more oil. The fourth attack using depth charges produced wreckage including charts, signal books and cork insulation material. U-309 sank in position 58°09′N 02°23′W . All 47 aboard were lost.

The wreck of what is believed to be U-309 was located on 17 May 2001, 25 miles off Wick in 62 metres (203 ft) of water. There are no identifying features, but the Type VIIC U-boat is close to the reported position of U-309 's sinking, and the damage sustained is consistent with that caused by depth charges. However there is a possibility that the wreck may be the U-1020, which went missing in the North Sea in November 1944 and has never been found. However, a deck gun mount was found on the wreck, which would rule out the possibility of it being U-1020.

Palau 2004, S.G.?, Scott: 777d.

Source: Wikipedia.
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GENERAL GODDARD

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GENERAL GODDARD

Postby shipstamps » Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:28 pm


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St Helena did issue a 6p stamp on 17 December 1973, which shows use the British East Indiaman GENERAL GODDARD, which captured seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
In June 1795 news reached St Helena that the Dutch Revolutionary Party had joined France in the war against England.
Captain William Taylor Money was at St Helena at that time with the GENERAL GODDARD during his fifth voyage from India.
In haste he fitted his ship out for battle, to intercept a Dutch merchant fleet known to be nearing the island.
The GENERAL GODDARD got help from the HMS SCEPTRE a 3rd Rate 64 gun ship, and the packet SWALLOW.

18 May 1795 a Dutch fleet of 16 VOC ships sailed from the Cape, escorted by two warships the SCIPIO and KOMEET bound for the Netherlands. Due to bad weather and adverse winds, eight ships returned to the Table Bay where she arrived on 20 May. One day later the eight ships sailed out again, but had lost the contact with the convoy.
14 June 1795 were these 8 ships captured by the British ships off St Helena. (Not much is given in the Dutch books I have on the VOC about this loss)

The HMS SCEPTER under command of Captain Essington arrived at St Helena in May with a convoy of homebound ships, and she brought the news that armies of France had overran the Netherlands.
Then the packet SWALLOW arrived on 2 June from the Cape with the news that an important Dutch convoy was underway from the Cape to the Netherlands.
Capt Essington made a request to the Governor of St Helena that some of the East Indiamen of the company could be put under his orders, to assist them in the search and capturing of the Dutch convoy.
The MANSHIP, GENERAL GODDARD and the SWALLOW were put under his command, and some troops from the island embarked on this vessels.
03 June this small squadron sailed out and the search for the Dutch convoy began. Five other East Indiamen were prepared to join the squadron, the ASIA, LORD HAWKESBURY, ESSEX, AIRLY CASTLE and BUSBRIDGE. All available space on the island was loaded with the goods unladed from the ships, even the church was used.

The LORD HAWKESBURY, after sailing and in an attempt to weather the island, split her sails, and returned to St Helena. The ESSEX got also in problems when her fore-top-mast sprung. The BUSBRIDGE was the only ship what made contact with the squadron.

10 June one of the ships of the Dutch fleet the HOUGLY was seized and send to the roads of St Helena accompanied by the SWALLOW, after she delivered her at the roads the SWALLOW returned to the squadron with a number of additional seamen to reinforce the squadron.
The weather was not so good; a lot of gales and the MANSHIP and BUSBRIDGE lost the contact with the squadron.
On the afternoon of 14 June, seven sails were sighted on the weather bow, steering down before the wind.
GENERAL GODDARD sailed through the Dutch convoy on about 01.00 a.m. and was fired at, without returning fire.
The next morning at day-break, the Dutch fleet was still on the starboard bow of the HMS SCEPTRE and SWALLOW, and at 07.00 a.m. she displayed Dutch colours, whilst their commodore fired a gun to leeward. This was repeated by the SCEPTRE, and Capt. Essington supposed it would be followed by
‘heaving to’ of the Dutch ships, but the Dutch ships sailed on, three shots fired by the SCEPTRE ahead of the Dutch convoy did not give the result the British hoped for.
A signal was given to the GENERAL GODDARD to chase the Dutchmen to the SCEPTRE, when the GENERAL GODDARD instantaneously appeared under a cloud of canvas and was laid alongside the Dutch commodore ship ALBLASSERDAM who from her imposing appearance thought that she was a warship, and the ALBLASSERDAM followed Money’s directions to bear down.
The Dutch crews of the other ships fired several shots to the SCEPTRE and at the boats that were sent out with boarding parties. After the SCEPTRE did give a few broadsides the Dutch surrendered. At the same time the ASIA and BUSBRIDGE arrived and all seven Dutch vessels were boarded and taken as a prize, without the loss of any person.
All the ships came to anchor in the night of 17 June on the road of St Helena.
01 July the SCEPTRE with her prizes and British convoy sailed for England, the prizes arrived at Shannon, Ireland, where she were sold. The ZEELELIE (not visible on stamp) which had attempted to escape was wrecked off the Scilly Islands that year.

A painting, which depicts this battle, was made by the British artist Thomas Luny (1759 – 1837) for Captain Money of the GENERAL GODDARD (other source gives the painting was made for Robert Wigram the owner); the painting is now in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
After this painting the stamp is designed. Not the complete painting is shown but only the central portion of the painting.
The ZEELELIE and HMS SCEPTRE and the packet SWALLOW are not shown on the stamp.
The GENERAL GODDARD, in foreground of stamp, with the six remaining Dutch ships, which can be seen in the background of the stamp.

The VOC ships taken were used regular between Holland and the Far East after she were built, the URL gives a search engine for the VOC ships http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten/DAS/search for more information on the voyages.
The SURCHEANCE is not given, so most probably she was never used from Holland, or a hired vessel.

ALBLASSERDAM: Named after a town in the Netherlands. Built in 1782 on the yard of the VOC at Zeeland for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
1150 ton.
She sailed from Ceylon in 1795, with a cargo on board with a total value of 457.491 Dutch Guilder, under command of Capt. Klaas Keuken, with on board 165 persons, one died during the voyage and 11 disembark at the Cape.

MENTOR: Built on the VOC yard of Zeeland in 1789 for the Chamber of the VOC in Zeeland.
Tonnage 560 ton.
Sailed from Batavia on 22 November 1794, with a cargo on board with a total value of 61.361 Dutch Guilder. She was under command of Capt. Ulke Barendsz with on board 50 persons.

(I believe this MENTOR is also depict on the British Indian Ocean Territory stamp issued in 1999 60p sg 229, not any MENTOR is mentioned in Rowan Hackman book on the “Ships of the East India Company”. The year on the stamp is the same as when the MENTOR was built)

MEERMIN: (Mermaid). Built in 1782 at the VOC yard at Amsterdam for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
Tonnage 500 ton.
Sailed in 1795 from Batavia under command of Capt. Gerard Ewoud Overbeek with on board 40 persons.

DORDWIJK: Built in 1787 in Rotterdam for the Chamber of the VOC of Delft/Rotterdam.
Tonnage 800 ton
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Hendrik Willem Ketjen with on board 40 persons.

GENERAL GODDARD:
Built in 1782 by Randall, Rotherhite for William Money.
30 January 1782 launched under the name GENERAL GODDARD.
She made her first voyage under command of Captain Thomas Foxall for the British East India Company to Bombay, she made three voyages more to India, before she was sold in 1790 to Robert Wigram.
Her next voyage to Bengal was under command of Capt. Thomas Wakefield, thereafter she made a voyage under command of Captain W.T.Money, and during this voyage she assisted HMS SCEPTRE in the capture of seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
Thereafter she made one more voyage under command of Captain Thomas Graham from 1796 till 1798 to the Coromandel Coast and Bengal.
1798 After her arrival back in England, sold as a West Indiamen for the trade to the West Indies.
January 1800 taken by a Spanish 1st Rate, 80 gun and a frigate, 32 guns off Cuba, while on a passage from London to Jamaica and taken to Havana.
Then she disappears in history.
Tonnage 799 tons, dim. 116.7 x 35.11 x 14.9ft.

VROUWE AGATHA: (Lady Agatha). Built ?, she was hired by the Chamber of the VOC of Amsterdam.
Tonnage 900 ton.
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Herman Pieter Murk, crew ?
On board was a cargo with a total value of 115.960 Dutch Guilders.

SURCHEANCE: Bought in 1786.
Tonnage 768 ton.
Sailed 22 November 1794 from Batavia under command of Capt. Christiaan Zummack, crew ?
Cargo on board with a total value of 81.527 Dutch Guilder.
1795 The SURCHEANCE was lost on her voyage between St Helena and the U.K.

Source: Van Compagnie naar Koopvaardij by Dr. E S van Eyck van Heslinga. Log Book Volume 14 page 234. http://www.bweaver.nom.sh/brooke/brooke_ch8.html Ships of the East India Company by Rowan Hackman.
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