SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Kirishima (Kongo Class Battleship) 1915

She was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. Designed by British naval engineer George Thurston, she was the third launched of the four Kongō-class battlecruisers, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Laid down in 1912 at the Mitsubishi Shipyards in Nagasaki, Kirishima was formally commissioned in 1915 on the same day as her sister ship, Haruna. Her name is derived from Mount Kirishima, an active volcano group in Kagoshima Prefecture.

Kirishima patrolled on occasion off the Chinese coast during World War I, and helped with rescue efforts following the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake.

Starting in 1927, Kirishima 's first reconstruction rebuilt her as a battleship, strengthening her armor and improving her speed. From 1934, a second reconstruction completely rebuilt her superstructure, upgraded her engine plant, and equipped her with launch catapults for floatplanes. Now fast enough to accompany Japan's growing carrier fleet, she was reclassified as a fast battleship. During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Kirishimaacted primarily as a support vessel and troop transport, moving army troops to mainland China. On the eve of World War II, she sailed as part of Vice-Admiral Chuichi Nagumo's Combined Fleet as a heavy escort for the six carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941.

As part of the Third Battleship Division, Kirishima participated in many of the Imperial Japanese Navy's early actions in 1942, providing support for the invasion of the Dutch East Indies and in the Indian Ocean raid of April 1942. During the Battle of Midway, she provided escort to Nagumo's four carriers, before redeploying to theSolomon Islands during the Battle of Guadalcanal. She escorted Japanese carrier fleets during the battles of the Eastern Solomons and Santa Cruz Islands, before sailing as part of a bombardment force under Admiral Nobutake Kondō during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. On the evening of 13 November 1942, Kirishima engaged American cruisers and destroyers alongside her sister ship Hiei. On the night of 14/15 November, in one of only two battleship duels of the Pacific War, Kirishima damaged USS South Dakota (BB-57) before being fatally crippled in turn by the battleship USS Washington (BB-56). Kirishima capsized and sank in the early morning on 15 November 1942 in Ironbottom Sound.

Grenada Grenadines 1995, S.G.?, Scott: 1721Af.

Source: Wikipedia

Britanis SS (Ocean Liner) 1932

SS Monterey (first name of her) was a luxury ocean liner launched on 10 October 1931. She was completed April 1932 and is shown in registers as a 1932 ship. Monterey was the third of the four ships of the Matson Lines "White Fleet", which were designed by William Francis Gibbs and also included SS Malolo, SS Mariposa and SS Lurline.Monterey was identical to Mariposa and very similar to Lurline.

Tonnage: 18,017 GRT, Length: 632 ft (193 m), Beam: 79 ft (24 m), Propulsion: 2 × Bethlehem geared steam turbines, 28,450 shp (21,215.16 kW), Speed: 22.84 knots, Capacity: 701 passengers (472 first class, 229 cabin class), Crew: 360

During World War II Monterey was used as a troopship operated by Matson as agents of the War Shipping Administration (WSA). Monterey was a large, fast transport capable of sailing independently and was allocated to serving Army troop transport requirements. The ship was involved in an attack on a convoy near Cape Bougaroun.

Monterey was built to promote travel to Hawaii and for Pacific Ocean liner service including regular stops in ports along the West Coast of the United States, Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia. On 12 May 1932 she took 83 passengers from New York City to the West Coast on a positioning cruise. Her maiden voyage officially began 3 June 1932 in San Francisco, California after which she made stops in Los Angeles, Honolulu, Auckland, Pago Pago, Suva, Sydney and Melbourne. She scored a public relations triumph when she carried much-appreciated supplies to the Bear of Oakland on Byrd's second expedition to the South Pole.

In World War II Monterey served as a fast troop carrier, often operating alone so she would not be slowed by formation navigation in a convoy. The United States Maritime Commission chartered her in 1941 before the US declaration of war to carry 150 Chinese, Korean and Japanese missionaries and stranded US citizens back to San Francisco. Once home, she was quickly refitted to hold 3,500 soldiers. The ship was delivered to WSA by Oceanic Steamship Company, a Matson entity, 3 December 1941 at San Francisco. On 16 December 1941 she steamed to Hawaii with 3,349 fresh troops, returning with 800 casualties of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

On 26 September 1946 the Monterey arrived at Bethlehem-Alameda Shipyard in Alameda, California for refitting and return to passenger service with Matson. Money ran out on the project after 30% of the work had been completed. For five years she sat idle in Alameda, then was purchased by the US Government in August 1952. She was towed to the mothball fleet in nearby Suisun Bay

Meanwhile, Matson was enjoying fair post-war success with Lurline and was looking to expand their passenger operation once more. Matson had a C4 "Mariner" class vessel undergoing conversion to a cruise ship for the Oceania and Australasia region; this ship was originally named Free State Mariner but Matson had renamed her Monterey. Matson bought the old mothballed SS Monterey back from the US Government on 3 February 1956 and had to come up with a new name for her: she was rechristened SS Matsonia, replacing their earlier Matsonia which had been sold to Home Lines in 1954 and subsequently renamed. The new Matsonia (ex-Monterey) first sailed from New York to San Francisco on 22 May 1957 to team up with her sister Lurline on the San Francisco – Los Angeles – Honolulu run.


Within five years, profits from passenger service had fallen to the point where Matson decided to anchor Matsonia indefinitely in San Francisco Bay. Sister ship Lurline continued to operate but suffered a major turbine problem in February 1963; one that would require costly repairs. Instead of repairing Lurline, Matson sold the well-loved ship to Chandris Lines to be rechristened Ellinis. Stung by poor public opinion regarding the maneuver, Matson rechristened the former Matsonia (ex-Monterey) as the new Lurline on 6 December 1963 and returned her to service.


By 1970, passenger receipts were down so low that Matson chose to cease passenger liner service altogether. On 25 June 1970, Lurline arrived in San Francisco to be sold to Chandris Lines. Five days later she steamed under new ownership out of the Golden Gate toward Piraeus with the new name Britanis.

At Piraeus, Britanis was greatly modified to hold 1,655 passengers, mainly by subdividing existing cabins and converting cargo holds to new cabin areas. She re-entered service on 21 February 1971, leaving Southampton bound for Sydney and back; a regular round-trip she would make for three years. In 1974 she saw service as a cruise ship in the Caribbean during winter and Europe during the summer. In May 1982 Britanis cruised between New York and Bermuda with a smaller capacity of 1,200 passengers.

In winter 1983–1984, Britanis sailed from Miami to the Caribbean, then sailed from New York in the summer. A major overhaul in 1986 included parts from her sister Ellinis (ex-Lurline), some of which went to Ellinis from Homeric (ex-Mariposa) when Homeric was scrapped in 1974. At this point, parts from three sister ships were now bound together in Britanis. The refit gave Britanis eight years of Caribbean cruising until 19 November 1994.

Britanis was chartered by the US Government in 1994 as a floating barracks for military personnel at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She suffered minor damage from an electrical fire, was repaired at US Government expense, then laid up at Tampa, Florida in late 1996.

Chandris opted to sell Britanis as part of a plan to cease cruise line operations. The ship was maintained in anchorage until 24 January 1998 when she was sold to AG Belofin Investments of Liechtenstein and renamed Belofin-1.

Her new owners intended to recoup their investment by selling the ship to scrappers, but a downturn in steel prices held them up for more than a year. On 3 July 2000 Belofin-1 was towed by the Ukrainian tug Iribis out of Tampa Bay with the former CN Marine ferry MV Bluenose lashed to her port side. The ships were bound for ship breakers in India, however, Bluenose ended up going to Mexico. Belofin-1 apparently began taking on water and listing during the voyage but nobody was on board to correct the list. The tugboat crew cut her free and Belofin-1 capsized and sank due to progressive flooding some 50 nautical miles south of Cape Town, South Africa on 21 October 2000.

Grenada Grernadines 1979, S.G.?, Scott: 329.

Source:Wikipedia.

SAIL MANABI 2014 Ecuador

Ecuador issued in 2014 a set of 7 stamps all $ 0.75 and a label in a miniature sheet for “Sail Manabi 2014” in which school ships from South American countries visited Manabi , Ecuador from 4 till 6 May 2014.
The following ships are depict from left to right.
1) CISNE BRANCO from Brazil.
2) CUAUHTEMOC from Mexico.
3) GLORIA from Colombia.
4) LIBERTAD from Argentina.
5) ESMERALDA from Chile.
6) GUAYAS from Ecuador
7) SIMON BOLIVAR from Venezuela.
All this school ships has appeared already on stamps and can be found in the index.

Ecuador 2014 $ 0.75 sg?, scott?

CHARMING BETTY privateer

The Jersey Post gives by the stamp: The Jersey privateer CHARMING BETTY captured the French Bark ST CHARLES off Point L’Abbé on 16 January 1744 in Brittany, France. Armed with cutlasses and pistols, the crew boarded to find the French vessel leaking and almost unseaworthy so decided to let her go for a ransom of 20,000 livres. The ships captain was unable to pay and so selected a certain Thomas Garnier from the French crew to be held for ransom in Jersey where he remained detained until 1748.
In the book Jersey Sailing Ships is she given as a sloop and used as a privateer under command of Captain Nic. Fiott and owned by Lemprié & Fiott and used as a privateer from 1758-59 in the same book is given that Nicolas Fiott was a privateering captain from 1734 till 1763 on board the CHARMING BETTY and CHARMING NANCY.
If privateers captured a French vessel and found that neither the boat nor its cargo were particularly valuable, it was accepted practice for them to take a crew member as hostage on the understanding that a ransom would be paid.
But the crew of the vessel concerned were not always particularly quick to carry out their side of the bargain and restore the release of their comrade.
So it was in 1744, when the CHARMING BETTY captured the French barque ST CHARLES and demanded a ransom of 2,000 livres, which was certainly more than the vessel was worth.
Thomas Garnier was chosen as a hostage and taken to Jersey where, despite several letters now in the city archives of St Malo demanding to know why he had not been ransomed, he was to languish for four years, until the money was paid in 1748.
Captain Fiott
The same Jersey privateer was active in the Channel a decade later. In 1757, under the command of Capt Fiott, it captured a French brigatine, loaded with a valuable cargo of sugar.
The following year Fiott and his crew, accompanied by LE BURNETT took the ADVENTURER, a London vessel, away from French privateers who had captured her on a voyage from Jamaica. The prize became Fiott's and the cargo, sugar, spice, logwood, mahogany, rum, coffee and cottons fetched a great deal of money.
Returning to Jersey the CHARMING BETTY, although short-handed after putting a prize crew on the ADVENTURER, captured a Dutch vessel carrying 200 tunnes of wine from Bordeaux to St Malo.
Capt Fiott was in action again in 1759 when he captured two more ships, which together with their unidentified cargoes, are known to have been sold for 30,000 livres. That was an enormous sum at the time and shows just how profitable privateering could be if the captains and their crews were both adventurous and lucky.
Her fate not known.
The ship in the foreground is the French ST CHARLES and in the background is the CHARMING BETTY. Have not any details on the ST CHARLES.

Jersey 2014 56p sg?, scott?
http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/ ... ng_Betty''

KENWOOD CUP

The event, based in Hawaii, began in 1978 and is raced every second year. It carried the name Clipper Cup however in 1986, when a new sponsor was found, the series became known as the Kenwood Cup. The contest has evolved to the classic five-race format: two 27 mile Olympic course races; the 150 mile windward-leeward Molokai race from Honolulu to Maui and back; a 27 miler; and the testing 775 mile Round the State race. New Zealand held the trophy in 1987.

New Zealand 1987 $1.05 sg1419, scott869
Source: New Zealand Post.

Vera Cruz (Ship) 1866

Knight (Cavaliere) Giuseppe Tonello (Captain Gaspare Perissa, 1866-71) Trieste, Austria/Italy; San Marco, near Trieste, Austria; 850 tons; 19’ draught; oak hull sheeted and copper fastened, single deck; four cannons; crew 12.

She was registered on May 12, 1866, as a long distance trader. Giuseppe Tonello died in 1869, and after two years of an inheritance process, his widow, Anna Tonello (née Stamare) became the sole owner of the vessel. (Their daughter Virginia was married into the Fiume branch of the Cosulich family.) The original tonnage of 850 tons was only reduced to 710 tons (corresponding to the Moorsome rule) in 1880, (although the American Register of 1870, indicated only 775 tons).

In Lloyd’s of 1870, her captain is still listed as Perissa, and in 1872, her owners are listed as: Anna Vedovaand Tonello and Antonioas Bilaffer as captain. In 1877, the captain was Diodato G. Bilaffer, and in 1878, her owners were listed as “Giovanni and Maria Ragusin and the late Marco.” Giovanni Ragusin was the captain. The Registry
from 1881 lists her tonnage as 710. She was abandoned on December 1, 1879, near (Cap) Finistere.

It should also be noted, that there was a brig of 406 tons named Vera-Cruz, that was lost in 1864, in a storm near Cape St. Vincent.

Yugoslavia 1998 , 2.00d S.G.?, Scott: 2421 .

Source: Watercraft Philately (Article by Auke Palmhof)
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

GENERAL GODDARD

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GENERAL GODDARD

Postby shipstamps » Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:28 pm


Click image to view full size
St Helena did issue a 6p stamp on 17 December 1973, which shows use the British East Indiaman GENERAL GODDARD, which captured seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
In June 1795 news reached St Helena that the Dutch Revolutionary Party had joined France in the war against England.
Captain William Taylor Money was at St Helena at that time with the GENERAL GODDARD during his fifth voyage from India.
In haste he fitted his ship out for battle, to intercept a Dutch merchant fleet known to be nearing the island.
The GENERAL GODDARD got help from the HMS SCEPTRE a 3rd Rate 64 gun ship, and the packet SWALLOW.

18 May 1795 a Dutch fleet of 16 VOC ships sailed from the Cape, escorted by two warships the SCIPIO and KOMEET bound for the Netherlands. Due to bad weather and adverse winds, eight ships returned to the Table Bay where she arrived on 20 May. One day later the eight ships sailed out again, but had lost the contact with the convoy.
14 June 1795 were these 8 ships captured by the British ships off St Helena. (Not much is given in the Dutch books I have on the VOC about this loss)

The HMS SCEPTER under command of Captain Essington arrived at St Helena in May with a convoy of homebound ships, and she brought the news that armies of France had overran the Netherlands.
Then the packet SWALLOW arrived on 2 June from the Cape with the news that an important Dutch convoy was underway from the Cape to the Netherlands.
Capt Essington made a request to the Governor of St Helena that some of the East Indiamen of the company could be put under his orders, to assist them in the search and capturing of the Dutch convoy.
The MANSHIP, GENERAL GODDARD and the SWALLOW were put under his command, and some troops from the island embarked on this vessels.
03 June this small squadron sailed out and the search for the Dutch convoy began. Five other East Indiamen were prepared to join the squadron, the ASIA, LORD HAWKESBURY, ESSEX, AIRLY CASTLE and BUSBRIDGE. All available space on the island was loaded with the goods unladed from the ships, even the church was used.

The LORD HAWKESBURY, after sailing and in an attempt to weather the island, split her sails, and returned to St Helena. The ESSEX got also in problems when her fore-top-mast sprung. The BUSBRIDGE was the only ship what made contact with the squadron.

10 June one of the ships of the Dutch fleet the HOUGLY was seized and send to the roads of St Helena accompanied by the SWALLOW, after she delivered her at the roads the SWALLOW returned to the squadron with a number of additional seamen to reinforce the squadron.
The weather was not so good; a lot of gales and the MANSHIP and BUSBRIDGE lost the contact with the squadron.
On the afternoon of 14 June, seven sails were sighted on the weather bow, steering down before the wind.
GENERAL GODDARD sailed through the Dutch convoy on about 01.00 a.m. and was fired at, without returning fire.
The next morning at day-break, the Dutch fleet was still on the starboard bow of the HMS SCEPTRE and SWALLOW, and at 07.00 a.m. she displayed Dutch colours, whilst their commodore fired a gun to leeward. This was repeated by the SCEPTRE, and Capt. Essington supposed it would be followed by
‘heaving to’ of the Dutch ships, but the Dutch ships sailed on, three shots fired by the SCEPTRE ahead of the Dutch convoy did not give the result the British hoped for.
A signal was given to the GENERAL GODDARD to chase the Dutchmen to the SCEPTRE, when the GENERAL GODDARD instantaneously appeared under a cloud of canvas and was laid alongside the Dutch commodore ship ALBLASSERDAM who from her imposing appearance thought that she was a warship, and the ALBLASSERDAM followed Money’s directions to bear down.
The Dutch crews of the other ships fired several shots to the SCEPTRE and at the boats that were sent out with boarding parties. After the SCEPTRE did give a few broadsides the Dutch surrendered. At the same time the ASIA and BUSBRIDGE arrived and all seven Dutch vessels were boarded and taken as a prize, without the loss of any person.
All the ships came to anchor in the night of 17 June on the road of St Helena.
01 July the SCEPTRE with her prizes and British convoy sailed for England, the prizes arrived at Shannon, Ireland, where she were sold. The ZEELELIE (not visible on stamp) which had attempted to escape was wrecked off the Scilly Islands that year.

A painting, which depicts this battle, was made by the British artist Thomas Luny (1759 – 1837) for Captain Money of the GENERAL GODDARD (other source gives the painting was made for Robert Wigram the owner); the painting is now in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
After this painting the stamp is designed. Not the complete painting is shown but only the central portion of the painting.
The ZEELELIE and HMS SCEPTRE and the packet SWALLOW are not shown on the stamp.
The GENERAL GODDARD, in foreground of stamp, with the six remaining Dutch ships, which can be seen in the background of the stamp.

The VOC ships taken were used regular between Holland and the Far East after she were built, the URL gives a search engine for the VOC ships http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten/DAS/search for more information on the voyages.
The SURCHEANCE is not given, so most probably she was never used from Holland, or a hired vessel.

ALBLASSERDAM: Named after a town in the Netherlands. Built in 1782 on the yard of the VOC at Zeeland for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
1150 ton.
She sailed from Ceylon in 1795, with a cargo on board with a total value of 457.491 Dutch Guilder, under command of Capt. Klaas Keuken, with on board 165 persons, one died during the voyage and 11 disembark at the Cape.

MENTOR: Built on the VOC yard of Zeeland in 1789 for the Chamber of the VOC in Zeeland.
Tonnage 560 ton.
Sailed from Batavia on 22 November 1794, with a cargo on board with a total value of 61.361 Dutch Guilder. She was under command of Capt. Ulke Barendsz with on board 50 persons.

(I believe this MENTOR is also depict on the British Indian Ocean Territory stamp issued in 1999 60p sg 229, not any MENTOR is mentioned in Rowan Hackman book on the “Ships of the East India Company”. The year on the stamp is the same as when the MENTOR was built)

MEERMIN: (Mermaid). Built in 1782 at the VOC yard at Amsterdam for the Chamber of the VOC at Amsterdam.
Tonnage 500 ton.
Sailed in 1795 from Batavia under command of Capt. Gerard Ewoud Overbeek with on board 40 persons.

DORDWIJK: Built in 1787 in Rotterdam for the Chamber of the VOC of Delft/Rotterdam.
Tonnage 800 ton
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Hendrik Willem Ketjen with on board 40 persons.

GENERAL GODDARD:
Built in 1782 by Randall, Rotherhite for William Money.
30 January 1782 launched under the name GENERAL GODDARD.
She made her first voyage under command of Captain Thomas Foxall for the British East India Company to Bombay, she made three voyages more to India, before she was sold in 1790 to Robert Wigram.
Her next voyage to Bengal was under command of Capt. Thomas Wakefield, thereafter she made a voyage under command of Captain W.T.Money, and during this voyage she assisted HMS SCEPTRE in the capture of seven Dutch East Indiamen off St Helena.
Thereafter she made one more voyage under command of Captain Thomas Graham from 1796 till 1798 to the Coromandel Coast and Bengal.
1798 After her arrival back in England, sold as a West Indiamen for the trade to the West Indies.
January 1800 taken by a Spanish 1st Rate, 80 gun and a frigate, 32 guns off Cuba, while on a passage from London to Jamaica and taken to Havana.
Then she disappears in history.
Tonnage 799 tons, dim. 116.7 x 35.11 x 14.9ft.

VROUWE AGATHA: (Lady Agatha). Built ?, she was hired by the Chamber of the VOC of Amsterdam.
Tonnage 900 ton.
22 November 1794 she sailed from Batavia under command of Capt. Herman Pieter Murk, crew ?
On board was a cargo with a total value of 115.960 Dutch Guilders.

SURCHEANCE: Bought in 1786.
Tonnage 768 ton.
Sailed 22 November 1794 from Batavia under command of Capt. Christiaan Zummack, crew ?
Cargo on board with a total value of 81.527 Dutch Guilder.
1795 The SURCHEANCE was lost on her voyage between St Helena and the U.K.

Source: Van Compagnie naar Koopvaardij by Dr. E S van Eyck van Heslinga. Log Book Volume 14 page 234. http://www.bweaver.nom.sh/brooke/brooke_ch8.html Ships of the East India Company by Rowan Hackman.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 18 guests

Sponsored Links
cron