SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DAO

The three stamps issued by the Comoro Islands in 1970 shows us on the foreground three ships under sail, which Stanley Gibbons give that it are “feluccas” actual it are “dau’s” also known as “boutre” but she are a larger type.

You can find this type of vessels in the Comoro Islands and western Indian Ocean. The “dau” is a roughly constructed wooden vessel that carried cargo to the west coast of India, taken advantage of the monsoon winds. Slightly raking stem, square stern. Decked or open.
Set a large lateen to forward-raking mast; yard supported by a jibboom.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 15.2m, beamy; tonnage 50 to 60 ton.
The mosque is the Mosquée de Vendredi (old Friday mosque), which is the oldest mosque in the Medina. It was originally built in 1427, and a minaret was added in 1921.

Comoro Islands 1970 5/40f sg 91/93, scott
Source: From Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft. Internet.

AMERICA CUP yacht 1970

The stamp issued by Mali in March 1971 shows us an unnamed America cup yacht, most probably for the 1970 America Cup races in Newport, Rhode Island which was won by the America yacht INTREPID, at that time the yachts used in the race were of the 12m class. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-metre_class

The 1970 America's Cup was held in September 1970 at Newport, Rhode Island. The US defender, INTREPID, skippered by Bill (Ficker is Quicker) Ficker, defeated the Australian challenger, GRETEL II, skippered by James Hardy, four races to one
INTREPID had beaten HERITAGE and VALIANT to become the defender. (1962 winner WEATHERLY also participated in the trials, providing a fourth boat so racing could proceed more uniformly.) GRETEL II had beaten FRANCE to become the challenger

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_America%27s_Cup
Mali 1971 200f sg 271, scott?

Navicula gives that the FRANCE is depict, but I can’t find any confirmation for that.
http://www.12mrclass.com/yachts/detail/ ... 07113.html

VAKA HEKE FA outrigger Niue

The dugout outrigger canoes used in Niue were built with the same structure of the Tonga Islands and are single outrigger canoes and used for fishing, the modern canoes are small fishing craft holding from one to four men.
The outrigger is always on the left side of the hull of the canoe which are connected with two or more booms lashed to the topstrakes of the canoe, and the booms are lashed to the outrigger float.
Mostly decked fore and aft.

From Aak to Zumbra named this outrigger a “vaka heke fa” and gives the following information:
Used in the Niue Islands and central Pacific; a four men fishing canoe. Dugout hull, washstrakes and end decking sewn on; slender; elongated ends taper on all sides, rounded bottom. Hull spread with curved pieces lashed to three booms, which also serve as thwarts; stringers cross atop the booms above the washstrakes. Sharp ended, cylindrical float attached by two pairs of oblique stanchions and a single vertical one.
She are paddled by using lanceolate-bladed paddles.
The canoe has to be light in weight due to the waters around the island are deep and the canoe has to be carried out of the water on shore after use.
Length 7.6m, beam 0.4m depth 0.46 – 0.6m.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.
Niue 1950 2d sg 115, scott96, 1970 3c sg 155, scott?, 1999 20c sg?, scott 741a.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.

BAOBAO canoe

The “BAOBAO” or “boopaa” used in the Tonga Islands, central Pacific, it is a roughly hewn single outrigger paddling canoe used for fishing inshore or just outside the reefs. Detail vary somewhat from island to island. Dugout hull, slight tumble home to sides; bottom rounded transversely with rocker fore-and-aft, with stern ending above the waterline. Solid vertical ends; break in the sheer line near ends. Two or three straight booms lashed atop the gunwales, cross to the pointed float. Booms and float attached by pairs of over-crossed stanchions, or by double U-shaped flexible withes.
Carries 1-4 people, length 3 – 5m, and depth 0.31 – 0.38m.

Gilbert & Ellice Islands 1939 1½d sg 45, scott 42 and 2d sg 46, scott? 5d sg sg 49, scott 46.1956 2d sg 66, scott? and 5d sg 69, scott? and 10sh sg 75, scott? 1971 35c sg 184, scott? and 35c sg192, scott? 1975 35c sg 259, scott?
Gilbert Islands 1976 2c sg 5, scott?, and 35c sg 20, scott? and 35c sg
Source: Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
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Neuralia

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Neuralia

Postby shipstamps » Mon Oct 20, 2008 5:21 pm

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SG212
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British India liner Neuralia, well-known for her many years of service to the nation as a troop transport. With her sister ship Nevasa, she was designed for the United Kingdom-Calcutta service of the British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. and was launched by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd. on September 12, 1912.
A vessel of 9,082 gross tons (later increased to 9,182), she had a deadweight capacity of 9,920 tons on a draft of 28 ft. 4 ins. Her overall length was 500 ft. and she had a beam of 58 ft. and depth of 34 ft. There were three complete decks.
Two quadruple-expansion engines having cylinder dimensions of 231/4 ins., 33 ins., 47 ins, and 68 ins, in diameter and a stroke of 48 ins, drove twin screws and took steam at 215 lbs. per sq. in. from seven single-ended coal-fired cylindrical boilers. The machinery gave the ship a normal speed of 141/2 knots. Accommodation was provided for 128 first and 98 second-class passengers.
The Neuralia (her name was a shortened version of that borne by a hill station in Ceylon) had hardly time to settle down to regular service when the First World War began and she was requisitioned as a troopship. In June 1915 she was converted into a hospital ship and among the places she visited were Suvla Bay and Salonika during the Dardanelles campaign that year. After the armistice she was released and following a refit reverted to her normal commercial life once more, on the United Kingdom—India or East Africa services.
In 1925 the ship was converted into a permanent troopship for the British Government. For the next 14 years she carried out trooping voyages to many parts of the world, principally between Southampton and India, but also to and from Malta, Egypt and Singapore. Her normal peace time complement of troops was about 1,000 men. Although a transport, she remained under British India ownership and management and in the 1930s she initiated a scheme of carrying parties of schoolboys on cheap cruises to Scandinavian waters during the non-trooping seasons—an idea which may be regarded as the forerunner of the present British India educational cruises.
In 1940 the Neuralia was one of the ships in the second convoy carrying Australian troops which reached the Eastern Mediterranean in the late spring, shortly before Italy declared war. After disembarking the troops at Port Said, she sailed to Cyprus, returning with a full complement of Cypriots anxious to leave an island threatened with occupation. She next sailed from Port Said through the Straits of Gibraltar to Dakar where she embarked 2,000 French native troops and set course for the Bay of Biscay. On passage news was received of the fall of France and the vessel put back to Dakar, disembarked the troops and then sailed for Gibraltar.
There followed a period of carrying refugees, some of them to Jamaica. On returning from the last of these trips, the convoy in which the Neuralia was sailing was repeatedly attacked by U-boats over a period of several days.
When Japan declared war, the Neuralia was one of several British India ships employed in taking refugees from Rangoon. Two days after the city fell to the Japanese, she was lying at Madras when orders were received to proceed to Port Blair, in the Andaman Islands, and take off all who wished to leave. She set out across the Bay of Bengal escorted most of the way by a cruiser. Sailing unharmed through the Manners Strait, which had been mined, she passed the reefs outside the entrance to Port Blair and succeeded in entering the inner harbour, a feat never before performed by a vessel of her size. Taking on board all who wished to be evacuated, she sailed again a few hours later, at two o'clock in the morning, guided through the reefs by a launch showing a small light in her stern.
She spent 1943 partly in the Far East and partly in the Mediterranean, where, among other duties, she carried troops to Tripoli, Augusta, Taranto and Naples, and found herself at the end of April 1944 at Algiers. From this port she sailed for Glasgow and a quick refit and then proceeded to London, where she joined other ships preparing for the invasion of Normandy. On June 5, 1944, she passed down the river and at dawn next day was at her "battle station" opposite the "Omaha" and "Utah" beaches.
The Neuralia sailed back and forth between the beaches and Southampton until the following October, when she returned to London for a major overhaul. During the period she had made 14 trips and carried a total of 27,000 men of the Imperial and United States Armies. After Normandy she sailed, via the Azores, to Alexandria and then made three voyages to Greece, carrying Greek prisoners-of-war from Egypt. She also took Greek troops from Athens to various parts of Greece.
Then came her last mission. She was ordered to take some 1,700 Yugo-Slav refugees, who had been living in camps in the Canal Zone, back to their native country, now freed from German occupation. She set out for the port of Spalato, now called Split, on the Adriatic coast. Reaching there during the last week of April 1945, she landed her passengers and put to sea again for Taranto, where she was scheduled to take on board a full complement of German prisoners-of-war. She never arrived.
The vessel was coming round the heel of Italy, just turning into the Gulf of Taranto, on May 1, 1945, when at 02.00 hours she was shaken by a violent explosion. She had struck a mine which had exploded in the engine room, immediately flooding that vital space, and it seemed unlikely that she could survive for very long.
The order was given to abandon ship, but the Neuralia did not sink at once, remaining afloat until dawn, when she started to list to port. Soon she was on her beam ends and then started to sink by the stern, and as the after end of the ship disappeared from view, the forepart reared up out of the water and hung motionless for a few moments before it gradually slipped back out of sight among a froth of bubbles.
Thus sank the Neuralia a week before Germany's unconditional surrender. For more than 30 years she had been sailing the seas as a trooper and had served through two world wars.
SG212 Sea Breezes 7/67
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