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One of Canada's authorities on folk music, Edith Fowke, defined folk songs this way: "A genuine folk song is not a song written within recent memory for commercial profit, but rather a song handed down by oral tradition, usually of unknown authorship and found in more than one version - since as with anything passed on by word of mouth or ear, no two people remember it exactly the same way." Canadians have a rich trove of folk music and these important links with our past are now celebrated in four commemorative stamps, each featuring a different song. This is the fourth and last issue in the popular Canadian folklore series. Folk songs cover a wide range of topics, including love, war, disasters, and everyday work. They also include ballads, dancing songs, even lullabies and children's game songs. The second stamp in this issue deals with the lumbering trade. Depicting life in the woods, "Les Raftmans" is an Ottawa valley song dating from the latter part of the 19th century. Marius Barbeau, a well-known folklorist and pioneer in collecting songs, noted that it was probably the happiest of the French-Canadian lumbermen's songs. Both French and English versions of the song can be found in the book, "Canada's Story in Song."
Canada Post Corporation. Canada's Stamps Details, No. 11, 1993, p. 19-20

The Canadian Encyclopaedia gives on the rafts: A snow road eased the hauling of logs and baulks to riverbanks by oxen or horses. With the coming of the thaw, the timber drive began. Men equipped with "jam dogs" (iron hooks), cant hooks or peaveys, and often immersed in chilly water, began the dangerous task of floating the cut-out on streams overflowing with melted snow. When more open water was reached, or where falls and rapids could be bypassed by timber slides, logs and timber were assembled into RAFTS to continue downstream to mills or to river-mouth booms (especially at Québec, Saint John and the mouth of the Miramichi River), from where they were shipped abroad. As steam power replaced water power in sawmills, it increased mill capacity and extended the season of mill operation; however, it did not break the pattern of winter logging. Although railways reduced the industry's dependence on rivers to transport timber to the mills, their initial importance was in carrying lumber from mill to market, and by the end of the century, specialized logging railways still only had a slight impact on eastern Canadian operations .

Canada 1993 43c sg1565, scott1492
The song is given on:

I'se the B'y That Builds the Boat

Canada issued in 1993 four stamps which shows us some folk songs, two of this songs have a maritime connection.
Before modern technology came into this fishing villages and harbors, which is not that long ago. Fishermen worked very hard from the morning before dawn until after dark. They were not only fishing for cod, but they also had to knit and repair nets, and made their own sails, or traps for catching wild. They often built their own boat. The hard life existence is told in their lyrics which are called “ditty songs”. This ditties tell the story of such tragic moments of shipwreck, which very often occurred in the history of Newfoundland.

One of Canada's authorities on folk music, Edith Fowke, defined folk songs this way: "A genuine folk song is not a song written within recent memory for commercial profit, but rather a song handed down by oral tradition, usually of unknown authorship and found in more than one version - since as with anything passed on by word of mouth or ear, no two people remember it exactly the same way." Canadians have a rich trove of folk music and these important links with our past are now celebrated in four commemorative stamps, each featuring a different song. This is the fourth and last issue in the popular Canadian folklore series. One stamp is dedicated to the Newfoundland dance ditty, "I'se the B'y That Builds the Boat." This tune reflects the Newfoundlander's close links to the sea. And like all folk songs, it is rooted in the experience of the common people. Dr. Leslie Bell first documented this song in the late 1920s - early, and introduced it to the rest of the country via the Leslie Bell Singers recordings. The song also appeared in "Folk Songs of Canada", and many other folk music publications.
Historical Notice Reference
Canada Post Corporation. Canada's Stamps Details, No. 11, 1993, p. 19.
The song you can find on: ... etheby.htm

Canada 1993 43c sg1566, scott1493.

OTTAWA RIVER and steam tug

In 1992 Canada issued a strip of five stamps which shows us five famous waterways in Canada, only one stamp shows a vessel, a steam-tug which pulls a log raft on the Ottawa River, the tug till so far is not identified. The design is a little strange, it looks that the tug is under full steam and heading straight for the rocks, very near to the tug is a log raft, but I can’t see of the raft is connected to the tug.
The Ottawa River was the link between Montreal and the interior for early fur trading voyageurs and she is now a highway for Canadian commerce for over 300 years. It was also famous for the log-driving runs, supplying timber for colonists to build the new nation. Its strategic location, joining Ontario and Quebec, led to the decision to designate a town on its banks as the capital of the new Dominion.
Nowadays white-water rafting has replaced timber rafting on the river, and is an important contribution to Ottawa’s status as a world-class tourism destination.

Watercraft Philately 1993 page 38
Canada 1992 42c sg1494, scott1410.


For the 175th Anniversary of the death of Lord Nelson in 1981 Anguilla issued a set of stamps and one MS.
The 22p shows us Nelson’s Dockyard in Antigua, the stamp is designed by R Granger Barrett. On the stamp are two British warships depict which both has not been identified, it are three-mast ships.

Of Nelson’s Dockyard is given by Wikipedia:
Nelson's Dockyard is a cultural heritage site and marina in English Harbour, Antigua. It is part of Nelson's Dockyard National Park, which also contains Clarence House and Shirley Heights. Named after Admiral Horatio Nelson, who lived in the Dockyard from 1784 through 1787, Nelson's Dockyard is home to some of Antigua's sailing and yachting events such as Antigua Sailing Week and the Antigua Charter Yacht Meeting, as well as the 2015 and 2016 International Optimist North American Championships.
English Harbour quickly became a focal point for the establishment of a naval base in Antigua. Its position on the south side of the island meant it was well positioned to monitor the neighbouring French island of Guadeloupe. Additionally, the harbour is naturally well-suited to protect ships and cargo from hurricanes. In 1671 the first recorded ship to enter English Harbour was a yacht, the “Dover Castle.” It was chartered to the King by a Colonel Stroude for the use of the Governor of the Leeward Islands when he visited the islands under his jurisdiction and "chased ye pirates."
The first reference to the defence of English Harbour occurs in 1704 when Fort Berkeley was listed as one of the twenty forts established around the coast of Antigua. By 1707 naval ships used English Harbour as a station, but no facilities had yet been built for ship maintenance or repair. By 1723 English Harbour was in regular use by British naval ships and in September of that year the harbour gained a reputation as a safe natural harbour when a hurricane swept ashore 35 ships lying in other ports in Antigua, while the HMS HECTOR and HMS WINCHELSEA, both moored in English Harbour, suffered no damage. Soon British naval officers petitioned for the building of repair and maintenance facilities in English Harbour. In 1728 the first Dockyard, St. Helena, was built on the east side of the harbour and consisted of a capstan house for careening ships, a stone storehouse, and three wooden sheds for the storage of careening gear. There were no quarters for dockyard staff or visiting sailors and the seamen themselves conducted all work and repairs on the ships. Naval operations in English Harbour soon outgrew the small original dockyard and plans were made to develop the western side of the harbour with more facilities.
Construction of the modern Naval Dockyard began in the 1740s. Enslaved laborers from plantations in the vicinity were sent to work on the dockyard. By 1745 a line of wooden storehouses on the site of the present Copper & Lumber Store Hotel had been built and the reclamation of land to provide adequate wharves had been started. Building continued in the Dockyard between 1755 and 1765, when quarters were built for the Commander-in-Chief on the site of the Officers’ Quarters. Additional storerooms, a kitchen and a shelter for the Commander’s “chaise” were also erected. The first part of the present Saw Pit Shed was constructed, the reclamation of the wharves and their facing with wooden piles was continued, and a stone wall was built to enclose the Dockyard. Between 1773 and 1778 additional construction was undertaken. The boundary walls were extended to their present position; the Guard House, the Porter’s Lodge, the two Mast Houses, the Capstan House, and the first bay of the Canvas, Cordage, and Clothing Store were built; and the first Naval Hospital was built outside the Dockyard. Many of the buildings in the Dockyard today were constructed during a building programme undertaken between 1785 and 1794. The Engineer’s Offices and Pitch and Tar Store were built in 1788 and the Dockyard wall was extended to enclose the new building. The wharves were improved and the northern side of the Saw Pit Shed was built in the same year. In 1789 the Copper and Lumber Store was completed and by 1792 the west side of the Canvas, Cordage, and Clothing Store had been completed. The Blacksmith’s Shop also dates from this period. This building programme overlaps with Nelson’s tenure in the Dockyard from 1784 to 1787. The Sail Loft was built in 1797 adjacent to the Engineer’s Offices and Tar and Pitch Store. Around 1806 the Pay Master’s Office was built and in 1821 the Officers’ Quarters building was constructed to accommodate the growing numbers of officers who accompanied their ships to the yard. The Naval Officer’s and Clerk’s House was built in 1855 and is now home to the Dockyard Museum.
In 1889 the Royal Navy abandoned the Dockyard and it fell into decay. The Society of the Friends of English Harbour began restoration in 1951 and a decade later it was opened to the public. Among the original buildings are two hotels, a museum, craft and food shops, restaurants, and a large marina. Hiking trails radiate across the surrounding national park.
Anguilla 1981 22c sg449, scott?


MADONNA OF HYDRA on the stamp is given PANAGIA TIS YDRAS, after trying to find anything on this vessel with not much luck, at least I found a painting of the ship depict on the stamp but not much more as what is given below.
At that time around 1800 the isle of Hydra in Greece had many ship-owners and around 120 ships which were sailing in the Mediterranean and some were crossing the Atlantic to America. During the Greek War of Independence (1821-1832) many ships of Hydra were used as warships.
The stamp shows us a three-masted wooden cargo vessel, lateen rigged.
In 1804 three ships from Hydra sailed with a cargo of wine to Montevideo and returned with pelts.

Greece 1978 5d sg1444, scott?


A new set of stamps has been released on the subject of William Hodges, the artist who accompanied Captain Cook when he was first to land on the Island in 1775.
Entitled 'William Hodges: The Art of Discovery', the set of four stamps and a First Day Cover were released on September 30th.
William Hodges was born in London. In 1772 he was appointed draughtsman on Captain James Cook's second voyage and he is best known for the paintings and sketches of the places he visited during that journey, including Antarctica and Easter Island. The apparent purpose of the second voyage was to search for evidence of a mythical, but much speculated upon, southern continent.
The Admiralty brief to Hodges was “to make drawings and paintings of such places as they may touch at worth notice, in their intended voyage” and to “give a more perfect idea thereof that can be formed from written descriptions only”. While Hodges drew coastal views for navigation purposes, his main work was to gather material for landscape paintings. During the course of their three-year journey, the crews of Cook's RESOLUTION and its sister? ship ADVENTURE, were exposed to extreme weather conditions, environments and peoples. These ranged from the icy wastes of Antarctic waters to the first Pacific landfall in the dense rain forest of New Zealand's Dusky Sound, from the complex, hierarchical cultures of the cluster of Society Islands to the most geographically remote of all Polynesian societies, Easter Island.
Cook's expedition circumnavigated the globe at very high southern latitude, and on January 17th 1773 became the first to cross the Antarctic Circle. Cook discovered the South Sandwich Islands and was first to land on South Georgia. He mapped the islands and took possession of South Georgia for Britain.
The voyage required Hodges to respond to a staggering range of subjects, from the fantastical shapes of sea-worn ice to panoramic renderings of island cliffs and shores. He was asked to produce not only studies of the landscape, but portraits and botanical drawings. The artist proved remarkably flexible. Faced with exotic and unfamiliar landscapes, he was able to modify his conventional ways of working. These paintings were some of the first landscapes to use light and shadow for dramatic purposes. Hodges' use of light as a compositional element in its own right was a marked departure from the classical landscape tradition and contemporary art critics complained that his use of light and colour contrasts gave his paintings a rough and unfinished appearance.
On his return to London, Hodges was employed to supervise the production of engravings to illustrate the official account of the voyage. He also produced a series of epic paintings to commemorate the voyage.
The sketch of Cook's ship RESOLUTION in a stream of pack-ice that features on one of the 70p stamps is owned by 'The Captain Cook Memorial Museum'. The other 70p stamp features one of Hodges' epic paintings from the voyage, 'A View of the Monuments of Easter Island'. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7408&p=11098#p11098
The 95p stamp features Hodges' portrait of Captain Cook.
The etching on the £1.15 stamp is taken from an original print entitled “Possession Bay in the Island of South Georgia. Drawn from nature by W. Hodges. Engrav'd by S. Smith”, this engraving was included in the book “A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the World”, by James Cook.

Source: South Georgia Post.
South Georgia 2010 70/1.15 sg?, scott?


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby shipstamps » Wed Oct 15, 2008 4:16 pm

Built by the Schiffs en Maschinenebau A.G., Manheim, Germany for the German Navy.
18 May 1942 launched under the name AGIR.
Tonnage 676 gross, 199 net. Dim. 186.0 x 29.1ft.
Powered by a 9-cyl. Sulzer diesel engine, ?hp, speed ?.
1942 Delivered.

After the war taken by the United Kingdom and brought to England.
Rebuilt in a salvage tug, renamed HERCULES in 1949.
1950 Based at Gibraltar.
1954 Sold to Denizicilik Bankasi T.A.O., Kurturlu A.S., Istanbul, renamed in HORA.
From 1954 till 1958 as salvage tug at Büyükedere, Turkey.
From 1958 till 1968 as salvage tug at Izmir, Turkey.
1968 Taken over by the Port Authorities of Izmir and used as stationary pilot boat by Izmir port.
1970 Sold to Maden Tetkik Arama, and rebuild in an oceanographic survey vessel, the company is controlled by the Turkish Government.
Renamed in MTA SISMIK-I.
Tonnage 750 gross, 275 net, 353 dwt. Dim. 56.75 x 8.87 x 3.96m. (draught)
Powered by one Nohab-Polar diesel, 1.050 hp., one propeller, speed 13 knots.(most probably her engine then also replaced)
Bunker capacity 100 tons.
Number of berths total for 42 persons.
1972 She came in the news when there was a conflict between Greece and Turkey over coastal waters around Greek islands near the Turkish coast. The MTA SISMIK-I sailed then to these waters under escort of Turkish destroyers to carry out some survey work.

2006 given by IMO No. 5154806, owned and managed by MTA Enstitusu at Istanbul.
Call sign TCVR.

Source: Lloyds Register 1955/56. Navicula. Some web-sites.
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Postby Arturo » Thu Feb 06, 2014 9:40 pm

MTA Sismik1.jpg
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MTA Sismik 1.jpg
MTA Sismik 1.jpg (6.82 KiB) Viewed 458 times
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MTA Sismik 1 was built by Danziger Werft in Danzig for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. Named Ägir, she was launched on May 18, 1942. After World War II, she was taken by the United Kingdom to England, where she was rebuilt in a salvage tug, and renamed Hercules in 1949. She was based in Gibraltar from 1950 until 1954 when she was sold to Turkey.

Her Turkish owner, the “Denizcilik Bankası” renamed her Hora and put her as salvage tug in service four year long from 1954 in Istanbul, and then ten years long in İzmir. In 1968, she was acquired by the Port Authority of Izmir to be used as stationary pilot boat.

In 1975, MTA (the General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in Ankara) purchased the ship Hora to transform her into a research vessel, and renamed her MTA Sismik 1 (Picture1). After fitting her with up to date technology equipment for subsea geophysical exploration at seas around Turkey, she was commissioned in 1976.

MTA Sismik 1 is 56.45 m long, with a beam of 8.80 m and a max. draft of 3.90 m. Assessed at 720 GT and 275 NRT, the ship is propelled by a 1,050 hp (780 kW) diesel engine. She has a speed of 12 knots in service.

The ship's crew consists of 7 officers and 16 seamen. Research work is conducted by 12 scientists aboard. She has an autonomous endurance of 25 days
Finally in 2005, it was decided that the more than 60-year old ship has completed her service life. She was donated to Istanbul Technical University's Faculty of Maritime to be used as a training ship (Picture 2)

Still in Service as of 2014.

Turkey 1977 (400 krş.)

Source: Wikipedia
Posts: 723
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:11 pm

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