SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

EXPLORER cruise vessel 2002

For the International Philatelic Havana Cuba Cup 2014, Cuba issued a miniature sheet with in the margin a cruise vessel entering the port of Havana.
The only cruise ship I can find with a blue hull which visited Havana is the EXPLORER and compare the stamp with a photo I believe she is depict. She has a sister but she never visited Cuba so far I can find.
Built under yard No 962 as a cruise vessel by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany for the Royal Olympic Cruises, Piraeus, Greece.
10 July 1999 keel laid down.
19 May 2000 launched as the OLYMPIC EXPLORER, one sister the OLYMPIC VOYAGER.
Tonnage 24,318 grt, 2,500 dwt, dim. 180.40 x 25.50 x 7.30m. (draught), length bpp. 155.0m.
Powered by four Wärtsilä 9L46C diesel engines, 37,800 kW, twin shafts, speed 28 knots. With only two diesel engines running she still can make a speed of 22 knots.
Accommodation for 800 passengers.
09 March 2001 trials.
April 2001 renamed in OLYMPIA EXPLORER.
24 April 2001 sailed out with shipyard workers for a guest cruise.
27 April 2001 the owner refused the ship due to severe vibration problems, but if this was the reason or financial problems by the owner.
25 April 2002 at least was she delivered to Royal Olympic Cruises at Piraeus, under Gibraltar flag.
The same year the company changed his name to Royal Olympia Cruises.

First used for cruises in the Mediterranean, during the winter season she crossed the Atlantic to Port Canaveral, then used for cruises from there to the Caribbean. And east coast of Brazil.
15 January 2003 she passed the Panama Canal from the east to the west for the first time. After a voyage from Los Angeles around Cape Horn to Ft Lauderdale she returned back to the Mediterranean for the summer season commencing on 20 April 2003.
November 2003 she returned again to the USA but after September 11th the cruise industry got a problem with a lack of passengers and due to financial problems the OLYMPIA EXPLORER cancelled her December voyage to Hawaii. In March 2004 the OLYMPIA EXPLORER was seized in Los Angeles and moved to the Long Beach Harbour anchorage.
24 March 2004 she was auctioned and bought by the mortgage holder the German KfW bank, who bought the ship for US$82.7 million.
She was thereafter laid up while the new owner sought a buyer.
28 June 2004 bought by Stella Maritime LLC, Nassau, Bahamas (Management Institute for Shipboard Education, Pittsburgh, USA and renamed EXPLORER.
December 2007 sold to Explorer Maritime LLC, Monte Carlo, Monaco, under Bahamas flag and registry with homeport Nassau.
Used for Semester at Sea and with students she makes voyages which takes about 100 to 110 days around the world in spring and autumn. The summer voyages are mostly shorter between 65 to 70 days. Between the semesters the EXPLORER is used for short voyages between 20 and 30 days.
2015 In service same name and owner, managed by V Ships Leisure SAM, Monaco. IMO No 9183518.

Cuba 2014 1.00p sgMS?, scott?
http://maritimematters.com/2011/04/expl ... niversity/ Equasis. http://www.faktaomfartyg.se/olympia_explorer_2002.htm

Oneida USS (Brig) 1810

The first USS Oneida was a brig of war in the United States Navy during the War of 1812.

Oneida was built at Oswego, New York 1808–1809, under contract awarded by her first commanding officer, Lieutenant M. T. Woolsey, to Henry Eckford and Christian Bergh. Although her displacement was 243 tons by carpenter's measurement, her draft could compare with a sloop of 80 tons. This enabled her to enter the rivers feeding Lake Ontario without fear of grounding. She was delivered by the contractors in the spring of 1809, but was not equipped and sent upon the lake until the fall of 1810.

Oneida operated principally from Sackets Harbor, New York, not far from the commencement of the St. Lawrence, while the British port of Kingston lay nearly opposite in Canada.

On 5 June 1812, Oneida captured the British schooner Lord Nelson, while enforcing the Embargo Law. On 19 July, the British squadron sailed on Sackets Harbor where Oneida and her prize were anchored. After failing to gain the open lake, Oneida anchored again near a bank in a position to rake the harbor entrance. She mounted the guns from her off side ashore and presented a full battery. After an exchange of cannonade, of two hours duration, the British squadron broke off the engagement and sailed for Kingston, Canada.

On 8 November, Oneida, flying the broad pennant of Commodore Isaac Chauncey, sailed from Sackets Harbor to intercept British ships conveying supplies to the Army at Kingston. The sloop HMS Royal George was sighted and chased into the Bay of Quinte and lost sight of during the night. Sighted again the following morning, the chase was resumed. Oneida brought up the rear of the squadron to allow the heavy guns of her schooners to open way for a close attack. Royal George cut her mooring cables and attempted to make further headway up the channel, finally making fast to a wharf under the protection of troop muskets. Royal George suffered extensive damage, and Oneida had some damage aloft with one seaman killed and three wounded, but a gale ended the engagement and the Americans returned to Sackets Harbor.

On 25 April 1813, along with other ships of the American squadron, Oneida set sail from Sackets Harbor and arrived off York, Canada (now Toronto) on 27 April with troops under General Zebulon Pike embarked. Boats were hoisted out and within two hours the brigade was ashore, soon capturing York despite the loss of General Pike. On the night of 26 May she again embarked troops and artillery and set sail with the squadron for Fort George, Canada. A landing was made about 9 a.m. on 27 May, and by noon the town and fort were taken.

Oneida made a second unopposed landing at York on 27 July liberating prisoners and seizing provisions. On 31 July 1814, Oneida made for the Niagara River to blockade British ships anchored there. She was assisted by the brig Jefferson and the schooner Sylph, while the remainder of the American Squadron blockaded Kingston. The blockade was lifted in September 1814, and Oneida returned to Sackets Harbor. Ice closed the lake in November, and peace was declared the following month.

Oneida was sold 15 May 1815, but afterwards was repurchased by the Navy, laid up at Sackets Harbor, and finally sold in 1825 to a timber company in the village of Clayton, New York.

Oneida worked as a timber ship for several years before sinking in French Creek Bay near Clayton sometime in the 1830s. One of the ship's cannons is currently in Clayton's Memorial Park, while one of its anchors is in the possession of French Creek Bay Marina.

Marshall Islands 2002, S.G.?, Scott: 807f.

Source: Wikipedia.

FLETCHER CHRISTIAN

This set of stamps issued by Pitcairn Island depict scenes from the film” Mutiny on the Bounty”. Only one stamp shows us a sailing vessel, which is the replica BOUNTY built in 1962. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12613&p=13701&hilit=bounty+replica#p13701
Fletcher Christian was born on 25 September 1764, in Eaglesfield, in Cumberland. He came from old gentry, a landed family with estates both on the Isle of Man and in Cumberland. After his lawyer father’s death when Fletcher was just three and a half years old, his mother got into financial difficulties and ran up a large debt. To avoid debtors’ prison she fled with Fletcher and his siblings to Douglas on the Isle of Man.
He went to sea at the age of 18, joining the HMS CAMBRIDGE on which William Bligh was sixth lieutenant. Since Christian was enrolled as just a ship’s boy, it is unlikely that the two had much contact and on returning Christian was discharged. On April 25, 1783, Fletcher signed on as midshipman on board HMS EURYDICE sailing for India. Christian, through seamanship competence, was made acting lieutenant after only one year’s service. By June 1785 however, the EURYDICE was back home and Christian was paid off. Looking for employment, he used his family connection with the Bethams, the family of Elizabeth Bligh, and saw Christian join the merchant ship BRITANNIA, owned by Elizabeth’s uncle and commanded by William Bligh. They sailed together on two voyages to the West Indies. On the first, Christian sailed as an ordinary seaman and on the second, Bligh made him second mate.
Christian joined the HMAV BOUNTY, on Bligh's recommendation, for the ship's breadfruit expedition to Tahiti and during the voyage Bligh appointed him acting lieutenant. Five months after arriving, the BOUNTY left Tahiti in April 1789 and headed for the Tongan Islands, but the luxurious months on the idyllic island had made the crew soft, forcing Bligh to marshal out strict punishments to bring them into line. Severely discontented by a series of brutal floggings and suffering the loss of their female companions, eighteen members of the crew, led by Christian, conspired to mutiny. On April 28th Christian and several of his followers entered Bligh’s cabin, took him captive and soon cast him and eighteen others adrift in a small boat which took them on an epic, and now famous, 3,168 nautical mile voyage.
Following the mutiny, Christian attempted to build a colony on Tubai but being unsuccessful he returned briefly to Tahiti where he married a local chief’s daughter, Maimiti, on 16 June 1789. While on Tahiti, he dropped off sixteen crewmen including four Bligh loyalists who had been left behind on BOUNTY the remaining nine mutineers, six Tahitian men and eleven Tahitian women then sailed eastward. They headed for the uncharted Pitcairn Island where they stripped BOUNTY of all that could be floated ashore before setting the ship on fire and stranding themselves. Difficult times followed with the resulting sexual imbalance, combining with the effective enslavement of the Tahitian men by the mutineers, leading to insurrection and the deaths of most of the men.
The American ship TOPAZ visited Pitcairn in 1808 and found only one man, John Adams, still alive, along with nine Tahitian women. Maimiti claimed Christian had been murdered in 1793, along with four remaining mutineers and all six of the Tahitian men. Christian was survived by Maimiti and his sons, Thursday October Christian (born 1790), and Charles Christian (born 1792) and a daughter Mary-Ann Christian (born 1793).
Christian, possibly the world’s most famous mutineer, was well thought of by his men. All of them saw their misfortunes as having been brought about by Bligh. There is no portrait or drawing of Fletcher Christian from a real life study. Bligh described Christian as…"5 ft. 9 in. high, blackish or of very dark complexion. Hair - blackish or very dark brown. Make - strong. A star tattooed (sic) on his left breast, and tattooed on the backside. His knees stand a little out and he may be called a little bow legged. He is subject to violent perspiration, particularly in his hand, so that he soils anything he handles".
All others who knew Christian agreed that he was handsome and of an athletic build. He seems to have been an honest and forthright man, normally with a happy and friendly disposition, very charming and liked by most on board the BOUNTY.

Rumours have persisted for more than two hundred years that Christian's murder may have been faked, that he had left the island and that he made his way back to England around 1808. Although highly unlikely, this claim has led to speculation that will probably never cease. Many scholars believe that the rumours of Christian returning to England helped to inspire Samuel Taylor Coleridge in writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

Pitcairn Island 2014 20c/3.00 sg?, scott?
http://www.stamps.gov.pn/FletcherChristian.html

U-309 (Submarine) 1943

German submarine U-309 was a Type VIIC U-boat of Nazi Germany’s Kriegsmarine during World War II.

See Topic: “U-Boat Type V11C”

The submarine was laid down on 24 January 1942 at the Flender Werke yard at Lübeck, launched on 5 December 1942, and commissioned on 27 January 1943 under the command of “Oberleutnant zur See” Hans-Gert Mahrholz. She sailed on nine combat patrols, but damaged only one ship, before being sunk off Scotland on 16 February 1945.

After training with the 8th U-boat Flotilla at Königsberg, U-309 was transferred to the 11th U-boat Flotilla based in Bergen on 1 August 1943, Norway, for front-line service. The U-boat departed Kiel on 26 August, arriving at Bergen seven days later, on 1 September. From there she sailed out into the Norwegian Sea on 13 September, and arrived in Trondheim six days later on the 18th. As U-309 was then reassigned to the 9th U-boat Flotilla based at Brest in France. She left Trondheim on 25 September, and sailed out into the mid-Atlantic to patrol, before arriving at Brest on 7 November. During this patrol, on 30 September, U-309 suffered her only casualty, when “Mechanikergefreiter” Erich Jungmann was lost overboard while working out on deck.

U-309 's next patrol took her from Brest, on 19 December 1943, out into the Atlantic west of Ireland, then back to Bordeaux on 14 February 1944. In April 1944 the U-boat was fitted with a Schnorchel underwater-breathing apparatus.

In June and July 1944 U-309 made two short patrols in the Bay of Biscay, before finally achieving success during her fifth patrol. The U-boat sailed from Brest on 12 July 1944 and into the English Channel. There, at 21:00 on 24 July, she fired three LuT pattern-running torpedoes at Convoy FTM-47, en route from Juno Beach in Normandy to Southend, and hit the 7,219 ton British Liberty ship Samneva. Badly damaged, the ship was beached at Southampton, but then broke in two and was declared a total loss. U-309 returned to Brest on 3 August.

As the French bases fell to the advancing Allies, U-309 was transferred again, this time to the 33rd U-boat Flotilla based at Flensburg. Under her new commander Oberleutnant zur See Herbert Loeder she left La Pallice on 29 August 1944, and sailed around the British Isles to Stavanger, Norway, arriving on 13 October. The U-boat left there after only two days, sailing to Flensburg by the 21st.
U-309 left Germany on 30 January 1945, sailing to Horten in Norway, arriving there on 2 February. She departed on 8 February, and headed into the waters east of Scotland.

There, on 16 February 1945, U-309 was shadowing Convoy WN-74 into the Moray Firth when she was detected by the Canadian River class frigate Saint John with ASDIC (sonar). The first attack on the U-boat produced some oil on the surface. Two further attacks were carried out using the Hedgehog anti-submarine mortar, which produced more oil. The fourth attack using depth charges produced wreckage including charts, signal books and cork insulation material. U-309 sank in position 58°09′N 02°23′W . All 47 aboard were lost.

The wreck of what is believed to be U-309 was located on 17 May 2001, 25 miles off Wick in 62 metres (203 ft) of water. There are no identifying features, but the Type VIIC U-boat is close to the reported position of U-309 's sinking, and the damage sustained is consistent with that caused by depth charges. However there is a possibility that the wreck may be the U-1020, which went missing in the North Sea in November 1944 and has never been found. However, a deck gun mount was found on the wreck, which would rule out the possibility of it being U-1020.

Palau 2004, S.G.?, Scott: 777d.

Source: Wikipedia.

VIKRAM ICGS 33

Built in 1981-'83 by Magazon Dock Ltd. for the Indian Coast Guard.
Displacement:1220 tonnes, L:74,10m. (243.1') B:11,40m. (37') Draught:3,20m. (10.5')
2 SEMT-Pielstick 16 PA6 V280 diesel engines:12.800 hp. 22 kn. armament:40 mm./60 Bofors Mk3 AA, 2 single 7,62 mm. MG, complement:96.
Date of launch 29 Sept. 1981, date of commission 26 Dec. 1983, date of decommission 19 Jan. 2012.
The vessels (9) in this class are 74 metres (243') long with a beam of 11.4 metres (37') and are armed with a Mantra Defense Lynx optronic-directed 40mm 60 cal Bofors Mk3 AA gun or dual 30mm CRN 91 Naval Gun. They are powered by two SEMT-Pielstick 16 PA6 V280 diesel engines driving two propellers. The vessels are equipped with pollution control equipment, two firefighting monitors, a four-tonne crane. They also carry diving equipment, two RIB inspection crafts, a launch and a hangar for a light helicopter. The Vikram-class vessels have an air-conditioned accommodation for a crew of 11 officers and 85 enlisted sailors.
A derivative of this has been exported to Mauritius as the MCGS Barracuda.
(India 2006, 5 R. StB.?)
Internet.

SANDHAYAK INS J-18

Built in 1980-'81 by Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers, Goa Shipyard Ltd.
Survey ship, Displecment:1929 tonnes, L:87,80m. B:12,80m. Draft:3,43m. 2 diesel engines:7720 hp. 16 kn. complement:178, armament:1-40mm./60 gun, helicopter deck.

The Sandhayak class of survey ships is a serie of eight vessels built by Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata and Goa Shipyard, Ltd., Vasco for the Indian Navy. The vessels are powered by two diesel engines and have a top speed of 16 knots.
Sandhayak-class survey ships are equipped with a range of surveying, navigational and communication systems. The ships are designed to undertake shallow coastal and deep oceanic hydrographic survey and collect oceanographic and geophysical data required for the production of digital navigational charts and publications. Besides carrying out their primary role of hydrographic survey, they can also assist in times of war and natural calamities as troop transports and casualty holding ships.
(India 2006, 5 R. StG.?) ship on the left.
Internet
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

MTA SISMIK I

The full index of our ship stamp archive

MTA SISMIK I

Postby shipstamps » Wed Oct 15, 2008 4:16 pm

Built by the Schiffs en Maschinenebau A.G., Manheim, Germany for the German Navy.
18 May 1942 launched under the name AGIR.
Tonnage 676 gross, 199 net. Dim. 186.0 x 29.1ft.
Powered by a 9-cyl. Sulzer diesel engine, ?hp, speed ?.
1942 Delivered.

After the war taken by the United Kingdom and brought to England.
Rebuilt in a salvage tug, renamed HERCULES in 1949.
1950 Based at Gibraltar.
1954 Sold to Denizicilik Bankasi T.A.O., Kurturlu A.S., Istanbul, renamed in HORA.
From 1954 till 1958 as salvage tug at Büyükedere, Turkey.
From 1958 till 1968 as salvage tug at Izmir, Turkey.
1968 Taken over by the Port Authorities of Izmir and used as stationary pilot boat by Izmir port.
1970 Sold to Maden Tetkik Arama, and rebuild in an oceanographic survey vessel, the company is controlled by the Turkish Government.
Renamed in MTA SISMIK-I.
Tonnage 750 gross, 275 net, 353 dwt. Dim. 56.75 x 8.87 x 3.96m. (draught)
Powered by one Nohab-Polar diesel, 1.050 hp., one propeller, speed 13 knots.(most probably her engine then also replaced)
Bunker capacity 100 tons.
Number of berths total for 42 persons.
1972 She came in the news when there was a conflict between Greece and Turkey over coastal waters around Greek islands near the Turkish coast. The MTA SISMIK-I sailed then to these waters under escort of Turkish destroyers to carry out some survey work.

2006 given by http://www.equasis.org IMO No. 5154806, owned and managed by MTA Enstitusu at Istanbul.
Call sign TCVR.

Source: Lloyds Register 1955/56. Navicula. Some web-sites.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: MTA SISMIK I

Postby Arturo » Thu Feb 06, 2014 9:40 pm

MTA Sismik1.jpg
Click image to view full size
MTA Sismik 1.jpg
MTA Sismik 1.jpg (6.82 KiB) Viewed 144 times
Click image to view full size
MTA.jpg
MTA.jpg (7.72 KiB) Viewed 144 times
Click image to view full size
MTA Sismik 1 was built by Danziger Werft in Danzig for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. Named Ägir, she was launched on May 18, 1942. After World War II, she was taken by the United Kingdom to England, where she was rebuilt in a salvage tug, and renamed Hercules in 1949. She was based in Gibraltar from 1950 until 1954 when she was sold to Turkey.

Her Turkish owner, the “Denizcilik Bankası” renamed her Hora and put her as salvage tug in service four year long from 1954 in Istanbul, and then ten years long in İzmir. In 1968, she was acquired by the Port Authority of Izmir to be used as stationary pilot boat.

In 1975, MTA (the General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in Ankara) purchased the ship Hora to transform her into a research vessel, and renamed her MTA Sismik 1 (Picture1). After fitting her with up to date technology equipment for subsea geophysical exploration at seas around Turkey, she was commissioned in 1976.

MTA Sismik 1 is 56.45 m long, with a beam of 8.80 m and a max. draft of 3.90 m. Assessed at 720 GT and 275 NRT, the ship is propelled by a 1,050 hp (780 kW) diesel engine. She has a speed of 12 knots in service.

The ship's crew consists of 7 officers and 16 seamen. Research work is conducted by 12 scientists aboard. She has an autonomous endurance of 25 days
Finally in 2005, it was decided that the more than 60-year old ship has completed her service life. She was donated to Istanbul Technical University's Faculty of Maritime to be used as a training ship (Picture 2)

Still in Service as of 2014.

Turkey 1977 (400 krş.)

Source: Wikipedia
Arturo
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:11 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 10 guests

Sponsored Links