SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

«Arthur James»-fishing schooner

Fishing schooner «Arthur James» had been built in 1905. She had seen sixteen seasons and four collisions, the most recent in 1916 off Castle Island, where she sank in fifty feet of water after being run down by steamer. Every spring around March, the seiners of the mackerel fleet would fit out and prepare to head south to meet the schools of mackerel off the Carolina capes. Then, through the summer, the fleet would pursue the schools north along the coast, finding them by autumn off Nova Scotia. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “This is a view of the schooner "Arthur James" leaving Gloucester just after the turn of the century. She is heading out of the harbor at sunrise with a blustery northwest wind. Behind her is the fort section of town. Around her, at anchor and throughout the harbor, the fleet prepares to get under way. With a full load of salt and one seine boat on deck and another towing astern, the "Arthur James" is bound south.”
Somalia 2010;2500. Source: http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/details/default. asp?p=87&a=10&t. https://books. google. ru/ books?id=s2mBTh6mC.

RANKIN HMAS

Built as a guided missile submarine by Australian Submarine Corp., Port Adelaide for the Australian Navy.
12 May 1995 laid down.
07 November 2001 launched as the HMAS RANKIN (S-78), christened by Ms Patricia Rankin. She is one of the Collins class.
Displacement 3,100 ton surfaced, 3,407 ton surfaced, dim. 77.8 x 7.8 x 7m, (draught surfaced)
Powered diesel electric by 3 Hedemora/Garden Island Type V18B/14 diesels for surface speed and 3 Jeumont Schneider generators for submerged speed who deliver power to a single shaft. Hp?
1 Mac Taggart Scott DM 43,006 hydraulic motor for emergency propulsion.
Armament: Missiles, McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, torpedoes McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, or 44 mines in lieu of torpedoes.
Crew 48 plus trainees.
29 March 2009 commissioned.

HMAS RANKIN is the sixth and final submarine of the Collins class, which are operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, the boat was laid down in 1995, and commissioned into the RAN in March 2003, following major delays.
Early in her career, RANKIN was the subject of a documentary series and a coffee table book. She was the first submarine since 1987 to be awarded the Gloucester Cup.

Construction
RANKIN was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation on 12 May 1995. The boat was launched on 7 November 2001. She was delivered to the RAN on 18 March 2003 and commissioned on 29 March 2003, 41 months behind schedule, after major delays in the completion and fitting out of the boat due to the diversion of resources to the "fast track" submarines DECHAINEUX and SHEEEAN and repeated cannibalisation for parts to repair the other five Collins-class boats.
RANKIN was named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William RANKIN, who died when the ship he commanded, HMAS YARRA, engaged a force of five Japanese warships on 4 March 1942, to allow an Allied convoy to escape. The boat is nicknamed "The Black Knight".
Characteristics
The Collins class is an enlarged version of the Västergötland-class submarine designed by Kockums. At 77.42 metres (254.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.8 metres (26 ft) and a waterline depth of 7 metres (23 ft), displacing 3,051 tonnes when surfaced, and 3,353 tonnes when submerged, they are the largest conventionally powered submarines in the world. The hull is constructed from high-tensile micro-alloy steel, and are covered in a skin of anechoic tiles to minimise detection by sonar. The depth that they can dive to is classified: most sources claim that it is over 180 metres (590 ft),
The submarine is armed with six 21-inch (530 mm) torpedo tubes, and carry a standard payload of 22 torpedoes: originally a mix of Gould Mark 48 Mod 4 torpedoes and UGM-84C Sub-Harpoon, with the Mark 48s later upgraded to the Mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) version.
The submarine is equipped with three Garden Island-Hedemora HV V18b/15Ub (VB210) 18-cylinder diesel engines, which are each connected to a 1,400 kW, 440-volt DC Jeumont-Schneider generator. The electricity generated is stored in batteries, then supplied to a single Jeumont-Schneider DC motor, which provides 7,200 shaft horsepower to a single, seven-bladed, 4.22-metre (13.8 ft) diameter skewback propeller. The Collins class has a speed of 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph) when surfaced and at snorkel depth, and can reach 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph) underwater. The submarines have a range of 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km; 13,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) when surfaced, 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) at snorkel depth. When submerged completely, a Collins class submarine can travel 32.6 nautical miles (60.4 km; 37.5 mi) at maximum speed, or 480 nautical miles (890 km; 550 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph). Each boat has an endurance of 70 days.
Operational history
During a multinational exercise in September 2003, which was attended by RANKIN and sister boat WALLER, RANKIN successfully "sank" a Singaporean anti-submarine warfare vessel.
In 2004, a film crew was embarked aboard RANKIN for the creation of Submariners, a six-part documentary aired by SBS in 2005 and depicting life aboard a submarine. The film crew was on board from February to April 2004, during which the boat completed pre-deployment trials, participated in the submarine rescue exercise Pacific Reach, and made a diplomatic visit to Kure, Japan. They later rejoined RANKIN during the submarine's deployment to Hawaii for RIMPAC 04 in June and July. Later that year, RANKIN was also the subject of the book Beneath Southern Seas. The coffee table book, which encompasses the history of the Royal Australian Navy Submarine Service, was primarily based on photographs and interviews of RANKIN and those aboard taken by the authors during a twelve-day voyage from Sydney to Fremantle, concluding the six-month deployment started during the filming of Submariners. The 20,000 nautical miles (37,000 km; 23,000 mi) voyage—the longest undertaken by a Collins-class submarine to that date—began with workups in February, and saw the submarine visit Korea, Japan, and Hawaii, and participate in various multinational exercises before returning to Fremantle via Sydney. RANKIN was at sea for 126 days, 80% of which was spent underwater.
On 10 June 2005, RANKIN was presented with the Gloucester Cup. Presented to the RAN vessel with the greatest overall efficiency over the previous twelve months, RANKIN was the first Collins-class submarine to earn the Cup, and the first submarine to receive it since ORION in 1987. The award was again presented to RANKIN in 2008.
RANKIN was docked for a long maintenance period in 2008, but workforce shortages and malfunctions on other submarines requiring urgent attention have drawn this out: in 2010 RAN and ASC officials predicted that she would not be back in service until 2013. At the end of the works on RANKIN, personnel were transferred from HMAS FARNCOMB (which was commencing a similar period of maintenance and upgrades), and RANKIN arrived at Fleet Base West on 1 October 2014.
2018 In active service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_RANKIN_(SSG_78) and internet
Solomon Islands 2016 $35 sgMS?, scott?

SEAWOLF CLASS submarine

The class was built as a nuclear attack submarine by General Dynamics Electro Boat Co., Groton for the USA Navy. Of this class three were built commissioned between 1997 and 2005. The last JIMMY CARTER had another tonnage and dim.
Displacement 7,460 tons standard, 9,137 tons full load, dim. 1007.6 x 12.9 x 11m. (draught).
Powered by one S6W PWR nuclear reactor, 52,000 shp, one shaft, pumpjet propulsor, speed + 35 knots.
Range, unlimited, endurance, till food supplies run out.
Diving depth + 800 feet.
Armament: 8 – 26 inch torpedo tubes, 40 torpedoes, 50 missiles or 100 mines.
Crew 140.
More on this class of three ships is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf-class_submarine
2018 Al three are in active service.

I believe the USS CONNECTICUT is depict on this stamp. See photo and stamp. When I am correct the tugboat is the harbour tug USS NATCHITOCHES (799).

Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott?

«Allerton»- iron full-rigged ship

An iron full-rigged ship built in 1884 by Oswald, Mordaunt & Co., Southampton, as Yard No. 224. Dimensions 83,17×12,23×7,50 meters and 1936 tons under deck.
In 1885 the Captain J. Gyllencreutz was appointed.
In 1910 sold to owners in Valparaiso, Chile, for £ 2600 and converted into a hulk.
The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “The year is 1897 and the iron hull rigger "Allerton" makes her way up the East River, viewed from the piers of South Street. The last of the late afternoon sun just catches her toward her berth. The crew of the "Allerton" stands by on the fo-c'sle while some bystanders watch with perhaps some professional curiosity.” "Allerton" was typical of many latter day sailing ships being squeezed out of business by the competition with steam.
Somalia 2010;2500. Source:http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships/Merchant/Sail/A/Allerton(1884). http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist.

Boston Navy Yard

The earliest naval shipbuilding activities in Charlestown, Massachusettsacross the Charles River and Boston harbor to the north from the city of Boston , began during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The land for the Charlestown Navy Yard was purchased by the United States government in 1800 and the yard itself established shortly thereafter. The yard built the first US ship of the line , "USS Independence" , but was primarily a repair and storage facility until the 1890s, when it started to build steel ships for the "New Navy". By then, it was called the Boston Navy Yard. Forty-six ships have been constructed in the Boston Navy Yard, the first vessel launched being the sloop of war Frolic in 1813, and the latest the Whitney, a destroyer tender, launched in 1923. Additional vessels have been constructed for other governmental departments. No. 1 drydock, built of granite, completed in 1833 was the first drydock built in this country, and the first vessel to enter it was the famous frigate Constitution. The U. S. S. Constitution, or "Old Ironsides" as it is commonly referred to, was built by the act of Congress which authorized the building of six frigates in the year 1793. Work has commenced on the frigate at "Moulton's Point," former name of the navy yard, in 1794 and she was launched in 1797. This famous old ship participated in forty battles and never suffered defeat. In 1927 work of rebuilding her was undertaken at this yard. The necessary funds for the rebuilding were raised by popular subscription, in addition to an appropriation of three hundred thousand dollars authorized by Congress in 1930 to complete the work. In the late 1880s and 1890s, the Navy began expanding again bringing into service new modern steel hulled steam-powered warships and that brought new life to the Yard. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom.
Somalia 2010;2500.
Sources:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Navy_Yard. https://www.mca-marines.org/leatherneck ... e-barracks

DOLPHIN INS submarine

This stamp shows us a Dolphin class submarine of the Israeli Navy, the stamp is designed after a few design alternations were made in the design after a photo on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin-class_submarine and shows us the DOLPHIN the lead ship of her class.

Built as a submarine by Thyssen Nordsee Werke in Emden, Germany for the Israeli Navy.
07 October 1994 keel laid down.
12 April 1996 launched as the INS DOLPHIN.
Displacement 1,640 ton surface, 1,900 ton submerged, dim. 57.3 x 6.8 x 6.2m (draught).
Powered: Diesel electric by 3 diesels, 4,243 shp, 3,164 kW., one shaft, speed 20 knots.
Test depth more as 350m.
Armament: 6 – 533mm torpedo tubes and 4 – 650mm torpedo tubes. She has the capacity to carry anti-ship missiles, mines, decoys and stn Atlas wire-guided DM2A3 torpedoes. The surface-to—surface missile is the submarine launched Harpoon which delivers a 227 kg warhead to a range of 130 km at high subsonic speed.
Crew 35 and 10 additional.
She was fitted out at the HDW yard in Kiel, Germany, and completed on 31 July 1999.


2018 Still a unit of the Israeli Navy and in service.

Source: Wikipedia and internet.
Solomon Island 2016 $12 sg?, scott?
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Gipsy Moth IV

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Gipsy Moth IV

Postby shipstamps » Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:42 am

SG751.jpg
SG751
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SG227.jpg
SG227
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Sir Francis Chichester's epic voyage is so fresh in the public mind that it needs no further explanation. Our admiration for the man will last our lifetime. His yacht Gipsy Moth IV is the third vessel to be named after the "Gipsy Moth", the single-engined plane in which Chichester flew alone from England to Australia in the winter of 1929-30, after only three months as a qualified pilot. The Gipsy Moth II was an offshore racer purchased in 1953. Chichester won the first trans-Atlantic race in the Gipsy Moth III in 1960, when he arrived a full week ahead of his runner-up.
Particulars of the Gipsy Moth IV are: built by Camper and Nicholson Ltd., at Gosport, Hampshire in 1966. Length overall 54 ft., waterline 38 ft. 5 ins., beam 10 ft. 5 ins., draft 7 ft. 7 ins., displacement 10.4 tons (23,000 lbs.), lead keel 8,490 lbs. Thames measurement is 18.5 tons and sail area 854 sq. ft. The designers were Illingworth and Primrose, Emsworth, Hampshire.
The ketch left Plymouth on August 27, 1966 and arrived Sydney on December 12, 1966, logging 13,750 miles, via the Cape of Good Hope. Left Sydney, January 29, 1967 and arrived at Plymouth, May 28, 1967 via Cape Horn. Total distance covered on voyage 28,500 miles in 226 days at sea.
(Details written in 1967 by Ernest Argyle, Sea Breezes 11/67)
GB SG751, QatarSG227, Palau SG985ms, Cen Afr Rep SG784
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Re: Gipsy Moth IV

Postby Arturo » Fri Nov 28, 2014 5:53 pm

Gipsy Moth IV.jpg
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Gipsy Moth IV

Palau 1996, S.G.:985ms, Scott: 392.
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Re: Gipsy Moth IV

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Dec 04, 2017 8:33 pm

1981 sir francis chicester (3).jpg
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Wikipedia has the following on the yacht GIPSY MOTH IV.
GIPSY MOTH IV is a 53 ft (16 m) ketch that Sir Francis Chichester commissioned specifically to sail single-handed around the globe, racing against the times set by the clipper ships of the 19th century. The name, the fourth boat in his series, all named GIPSY MOTH, originated from the de Havilland Gipsy Moth aircraft in which Chichester completed pioneering work in aerial navigation techniques.
Background and design
After being nursed back to health from a suspected lung abscess by his wife, Chichester undertook two single-handed Transatlantic races from Plymouth to New York in 1960 and 1964 in GIPSY MOTH. He won the '60 race and was runner-up in the '64 race. During the '64 race he became inspired to challenge the times set by the tea and wool clipper ships. The clippers took an average of 123 days to make their passage, so Chichester set himself the target of making the passage in 100 days. He subsequently wrote his book Along the Clipper Way, which charts the voyage taken by 19th century wool clippers returning from Australia.
In 1965 Chichester commissioned Gosport-based ship yard Camper and Nicholsons to build the boat, designed by John Illingworth and Angus Primrose. Launched in March 1966, she is 38 ft 6 in (11.73 m) on the waterline and 53 ft (16 m) overall, with a hull constructed of cold-moulded Honduras mahogany. The scheduled displacement (to follow Chichester's requirements of maximum weight) was 10.4 tons, after trials increased by 1 ton of added ballast to cope with insufficient righting moment. Ketch rigged, she has a sail area of 854 sq ft (79.3 m2), extendable with a spinnaker to over 1,500 sq ft (140 m2). The boat incorporated the maximum amount of sail for the minimum amount of rigging, whilst employing tiller based self-steering using design principles established by Blondie Hasler that could enable steerage from the skipper's bunk, essential for solo sailing for a voyage of this length.
1967 voyage
GIPSY MOTH IV set out from Plymouth on 27 August 1966 with 64-year-old Sir Francis at the helm. This was not uneventful, and Chichester later recalled three moments where he noted that the trip was almost over. The first was when part of the frame holding the wind vane self-steering failed, when still 2,300 miles (3,700 km) from Sydney. Not wanting to put in at Fremantle, Western Australia, Chichester spent three days balancing sails and experimenting with shock-cord lines on the tiller, once again getting the boat to hold a course to enable her to cover 160 miles (260 km) a day.
An exhausted Chichester entered Sydney harbour for a stopover 107 days later. He enlisted the help of America's Cup designer Warwick Hood, who added a piece to the boat's keel to provide GIPSY MOTH IV with better directional stability to stop her broaching, but the modification did nothing to improve her stability.
One day out on the return trip via Cape Horn, the boat was rolled in a 140-degree capsize. Chichester calculated the angle by measuring the mark on the cabin roof made by a wine bottle. He commented in his diary and in a later interview with Time magazine that he knew she would self-right as she was designed to, but was concerned by the incident as this was a light storm and he still had to pass Cape Horn, where the third and most significant event of the voyage would occur:
"The waves were tremendous. They varied each time, but all were like great sloping walls towering behind you. The kind I liked least was like a great bank of gray-green earth 50' (15 m) high and very steep. Image yourself at the bottom of one. My cockpit was filled five times and once it took more than 15 minutes to drain. My wind-reading machine stopped recording at 60 knots. My self-steering could not cope with the buffeting....I had a feeling of helplessness."
Just as he thought all hope was lost and he was alone, on exiting the cockpit one day he was followed by the British Antarctic Survey vessel HMS PROTECTOR (A146), and later the same day a Royal Air Force plane broke through the clouds. On 28 May 1967 having logged 28,500 miles (45,900 km) in just 274 days (226 days actual sailing time), the voyage claimed the following records:
Fastest voyage around the world by any small vessel
Longest non stop passage that had been made by a small sailing vessel (15,000 miles (24,000 km))
More than twice the distance of the previous longest passage by a singlehander
Twice broke the record for a singlehander's week's run by more than 100 miles (160 km)
Established a record for singlehanded speed by sailing 1,400 miles (2,300 km) in 8 days
Because of the boat lacking of directional stability (despite fin extension) and righting moment, Chichester commented:
"Now that I have finished, I don't know what will become of GIPSY MOTH IV. I only own the stern while my cousin owns two thirds. My part, I would sell any day. It would be better if about a third were sawn off. The boat was too big for me. GIPSY MOTH IV has no sentimental value for me at all. She is cantankerous and difficult and needs a crew of three - a man to navigate, an elephant to move the tiller and a 3'6" (1.1 m) chimpanzee with arms 8' (2.4 m) long to get about below and work some of the gear."
In his book The Circumnavigators Don Holm describes GIPSY MOTH IV as "perhaps one of the worst racing yachts ever built." The boat was too big and too demanding for the 65-year-old skipper.
Greenwich
After the death of Chichester at the age of 71 on 26 August 1972, GIPSY MOTH IV was put on permanent display at Greenwich, in a land-locked purpose-built dry dock next to CUTTY SARK. The yacht was open to the public for many years, but eventually due to general deterioration from allowing visitors to walk across her decks, was permanently closed to visitors, remaining on display at Greenwich. This was referred to in the song Single Handed Sailor by the band Dire Straits.
Restoration
GIPSY MOTH IV remained undisturbed but gently rotting until, in 2003, Paul Gelder, editor of the London-based sailing magazine Yachting Monthly, launched a campaign to restore the yacht and sail her around the world in 2006 on the 40th anniversary of Chichester's epic voyage, and the 100th birthday of the magazine. He enlisted the support of The Blue Water Round the World Rally, a club-style cruising rally that the magazine had been covering since 1995.
In 2004, in a joint proposal with Yachting Monthly and GIPSY MOTH IV's owners, The Maritime Trust, the yacht was purchased by the United Kingdom Sailing Academy (UKSA) for the sum of £1 and a Gin and tonic (Sir Francis' favourite tipple). She was taken by road to Camper and Nicholson's yard in Gosport, where she had been built and launched in 1966, for restoration. Although C&N did the work at cost price, the restoration cost more than £300,000. As part of the yacht's restoration, the original B&G Navigation equipment was replaced with up to date electronics, but the original devices were left on a covering panel to maintain the feel of the 1966 build.
Second voyage
GIPSY MOTH IV set sail from Plymouth Sound on the first leg of the 2005-07 Blue Water Round the World Rally on 25 September 2005. She had a mixture of experienced crew and teams of disadvantaged youth on board, including:
Skipper: Richard Bagget
First mate: Dewi Thomas
Crew Leader: Paul Gelder (Editor of Yachting Monthly)
Crew: Matthew Pakes (Isle of Wight), Peter Heggie (Plymouth), Elaine Cadwell (Scotland)
The first leg took just over two weeks to reach Gibraltar, the official starting point for the Blue Water Round the World Rally. After crossing the Bay of Biscay to make landfall in Bayona, Spain, where Paul Gelder left to return to the UK, there was a crew change at Vilamoura, Portugal, and Tom Buggy joined the yacht as Crew Leader for the rest of the leg. Yachting Monthly's Dick Durham sailed the next leg and crew leader to the Canary Islands, where James Jermain took over as Mate to Richard Baggett for the Atlantic crossing to Antigua. The yacht went through the Panama Canal in February 2006 and headed for the Galapagos islands and the Marquesas.
On April 29, 2006, after a navigational error, GIPSY MOTH ran aground on a coral reef at Rangiroa, an atoll in the Tuamotus, known as The Dangerous Archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. She was just 200 miles (320 km) from her next landfall, Tahiti. The yacht was seriously damaged. After six days, a major salvage operation was undertaken with Smit, the Dutch big ship experts who were called in by the UKSA, with local help from Tahiti and Rangiroa. After a day-and-a-half spent patching up the holes in the hull with sheets of plywood, the yacht was successfully towed off the reef into deep water on a makeshift 'sledge'. She was towed to Tahiti and put on a cargo ship to be taken to New Zealand. In Auckland, Grant Dalton's America's Cup team donated help and premises at their HQ in Viaduct Harbour, and the yacht underwent a second restoration. After two weeks or so she was sailing again on 23 June 2006.
Her return leg was via Cairns and Darwin, in Australia; Indonesia, Singapore, Phuket, Sri Lanka, the Red Sea, Suez Canal and the Mediterranean. She docked in Gibraltar for a crew change, with skipper John Jeffrey joined by British teenagers: Grant McCabe (Plymouth), Kerry Prideaux (Lynton, Devon), Glen Austin (Isle of Wight) - the last of 90 disadvantaged young people who had crewed the yacht on her 28,264-mile (45,486 km) voyage round the world. She was accompanied into Plymouth by a flotilla of small craft, GIPSY MOTH IV docked at West Hoe Pier on 28 May 2007, as she did exactly 40 years earlier. She was welcomed home by Giles Chichester, son of Sir Francis.
For some time GIPSY MOTH IV lay in Lymington Marina, stored at the end of a line of yachts for sale in the boat yard. Her asking price was £250,000. In November 2010, she was sold to new British owners and remained at Cowes on display to the public.
GIPSY MOTH IV sailed at classic regattas in the summer of 2011, including Suffolk Yacht Harbour Classic Regatta (18–19 June), JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race (25 June), Panerai British Classic Week (16–23 July) and Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week (6–13 August). She was one of a number of important vessels which were moored along the route of the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, to celebrate the diamond jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. Due to her size, she was not part of the flotilla of vessels, and instead was moored with other vessels at St Katharine Docks, in a display known as the Avenue of Sail.[6]
As of 12 March 2017, GIPSY MOTH IV is undergoing maintenance at Bucklers Hard Boat Yard in Hampshire prior to her returning to public view on the 28th of March.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gipsy_Moth_IV

Great Britain 1967 1s9d SG751, Qatar 1976 2r sg SG227, Palau 1996 $3 sgMS 985, scott 392. Cen Afr Rep 1981 200fr. SG784, scott C 255 ( the vessel depict is not the GIPSY MOTH IV but a sailing cargo vessel and not identified.)
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