SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

YORK HMS (D98)

Built as a type 42 destroyer under yard no 111 by Swan Hunter, Wallsend, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
18 January 1980 laid down.
21 January 1982 launched as the HMS YORK. (D-98).
Displacement 5,200 ton, dim. 141.0 x 15.2m.
Powered: COGOG by two Rolls-Royce Olympus TM3B gas turbines, 50,000 shp and two Rolls Royce Tyne RM1C cruise gas turbines 5,340 shp, twin shafts, speed 30 knots by use of Olympus and 24 knots by use of Tyne.
Range 4,200 mile by a speed 14 knots.
Armament: 1 x twin Sea Dart missile launchers, 40 missiles. 1 – 4.5 inch Mk 8 gun. 2 – 20 mm Oerlikon guns, 2 – Phalanx close-in-weapon system (CIWS).
Crew 287.
Carried 1 Lynx HMAS helicopter.
09 August 1985 christened by Lady Gosling and the same day commissioned.

HMS YORK was a Batch III Type 42 destroyer of the Royal Navy. Launched on 20 June 1982 at Wallsend, Tyne and Wear and sponsored by Lady Gosling, YORK was the last Type 42 built. The ship's crest was the White Rose of York, and the "red cross with lions passant" funnel badge was derived from the coat of arms of the City of York. With a maximum speed of 34 knots (63 km/h; 39 mph), she was the Royal Navy's fastest destroyer.
Operational history
1985-
In the summer of 1990, HMS YORK was serving on a routine patrol in the Persian Gulf as part of The Armilla Patrol which had been undertaken by a series of Royal Navy warships over many years. On 2 August that year, Saddam Hussein's forces invaded Kuwait. Instead of heading off to the Far East and Australia for series of "waving the flag" port visits, she remained on patrol in the Persian Gulf for an extra three months. This period was conducted when at sea mostly on a war-ready footing, involving virtually everyone onboard working Defence Watches (basically six hours on, six off) round the clock.
2001-2010
In 2001, she tested a RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile.
In 2003, YORK took part in the invasion of Iraq providing air cover and area protection for the aircraft carrier HMS ARK ROYAL. In 2004, she was fitted with the MOD 1 variant of the mark 8 4.5-inch gun. She and EDINBURGH were the only two Type 42s to be so fitted.
In July 2006, YORK joined GLOUCESTER in evacuating British citizens from Beirut in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict making several trips in and out of Lebanon, ferrying evacuees to Cyprus.
In February 2010, YORK and the auxiliary WAVE RULER were deployed to the Falkland Islands coinciding with a period of increased tensions between the United Kingdom and Argentina over the former's plans to begin drilling for oil in the seas surrounding the islands.
2011-2012
In February 2011, YORK was deployed to Malta to assist in the evacuation of British nationals from Libya. On 21 April 2011, YORK arrived at the East Cove Military Port in the Falkland Islands, beginning patrol duties for the islands.
On 12 December 2011, YORK spotted the Russian aircraft carrier ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV with its carrier group northeast of Orkney, off the coast of northern Scotland, and shadowed the carrier for a week. This was the first time ADMIRAL KUZNETSOV had deployed near UK waters and the closest in 20 years that a Russian naval task group had deployed to the UK. She then sailed around the top of Scotland and into the Atlantic past western Ireland, where she conducted flying operations with her Sukhoi Su-33 Flanker jets and Kamov Ka-27 helicopters in international airspace.
On 13 April 2012, YORK fired the last ever operational Sea Dart missiles after a thirty-year career. As such YORK completed her career without the system being operational. YORK entered Portsmouth harbour for the final time on 20 September 2012, and was decommissioned on 27 September 2012. In August 2012, the ship was put up for sale.
09 August 2015 she arrived at Aliaga, Turkey and she was scrapped there by Leyal GS.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_YORK_(D98) Miramar.
Jersey 2018 Local Mail sg?, scott?

MARSHALL ISLAND CANOE

The canoe depict on this stamp most probably is a “kor kor” it shows the canoe in the foreground with in the background the night silhouette of Hong Kong. The other stamp in this sheet shows a junk. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14069

Known as one of the fastest indigenous watercraft in the Pacific, the Marshall Islands outrigger canoe has over the years been fine-tuned to sail closer to the wind than any other modern sail craft in the world. Little has changed in the basic design of the outrigger canoes over the past 100 generations. In centuries past, the people of the Marshall Islands sailed upon ocean voyages of up to 500 miles as a matter of necessity, usually to access food. Today, sadly, canoes have been largely replaced by power boats, with most new canoes in Majuro being built for racing. Of the outer islands, only a few still use the canoes as part of their livelihood, with Ailuk Atoll being a prime example. While newly-built tradition-style outrigger canoes look extremely similar to the original boats, they are shaped not with the simple hand-hewn tools of the past, but with electric saws and planes. They are not rigged with a sail made from the fibers of the pandanus plant, but instead with modern fabrics, including tarps. Whatever their purpose, the very existence of the canoes is treasured by the community as a source of national pride.

The other sheet shows a silhouette by daylight of Hong Kong, with on the left stamp a “walap” viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5799&p=16754&hilit=walap#p16754
And the right stamp shows a Chinese junk.

Source: http://www.canoesmarshallislands.com/ca ... s-history/
Marshall Islands 1997 32c sgMS 789, scott 624a/624b.

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

FOWLING IN FAROE ISLANDS

The waters around the islands are rich in fish, whale and seal. Bird cliffs, promontories, islets and precipices are nesting places for many species of seabirds. It is therefore not surprising that coastal fishing and fowling  were quite a significant part of traditional Faroese working life.
Fowling with a pole-net is far more sustainable than other fowling methods. The fowler only catches one bird at a time and, moreover, he is able to sort out certain birds, for example puffins carrying small fry for their chicks. In addition, maiming birds by shooting is avoided. It has always been forbidden to use firearms in and near bird cliffs.

2018 Faroes Philatelic

DUGOUT on Rio Tieté

For the Lubrapex 95 exposition Brazil issued two stamps and a miniature sheet which mostly shows in margin fish, animals and birds living around or in Rio Tieté. One stamp in this miniature sheet shows us also a dugout canoe. I have tried to find a Brazilian name but so far I could find she are on this river called “canoa”. The canoe is partly covered and is rowed or poled.

Among the main Brazilian waterways, one of the most important is the Tietê-Paraná river. This basin is located between the South, Southeast and Central West regions. It is a very important waterway for the transportation of agricultural production in the states of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Goias and part of Rondônia, Tocantins and Minas Gerais

More info on the Rio Tieté is given by Wikipedia on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiet%C3%AA_River
Brazil 1995 084c sg2723, scott 2555 and 1.50r sgMS2724, scott2556b

TRUMPETER HMS 1988

Built as an Archer-class patrol boat by Vosper Thornycroft for the Royal Navy.
Launched as the HMS TRUMPETER (P294)
Displacement 54 ton, dim. 20.8 x 5.8 x 1.8m. (draught)
Powered by two Rolls-Royce M800T diesels, 1,590 bhp., twin shafts, speed 14 knots, maximum more.
Range 550 mile.
Armament 1 – Oerlikon 20mm cannon on foc’s’le. 3 General purpose machine guns.
Crew 18 when training, normal 12.
1988 commissioned.

HMS TRUMPETER is an Archer-class patrol vessel P2000-type patrol and training vessel of the British Royal Navy. TRUMPETER is assigned to Cambridge University Royal Naval Unit, having previously been the training ship of the Bristol University Royal Naval Unit.
Operational history
She served in the Gibraltar Squadron alongside RANGER commencing 1991 under commanding officer Lieutenant Richard Morris. With RANGER she was deployed on the Thames for the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant to assist in security and partake in the pageant. She also assisted in security for the 2012 London Olympics.
2018 In service.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_TRUMPETER_(P294)
Jersey 2018 local mail sg?, scott?

Boynes Islands

In early 1772, he was assigned command of the third French expedition sent in search of the fabled Terra Australis with the vessels “Fortune” and “Gros Ventre”. The expedition discovered the isolated Kerguelen Islands north of Antarctica in the southern Indian Ocean and claimed the archipelago for France before returning to Mauritius. “The Boynes Islands”, or “Iles de Boynes” are four small islands of the Kerguelenarchipelago, lying some 30 kilometres (19 miles) south of Presqu'ile Rallier du Baty on the main island, just south of the 50 south parallel (50°01′S 68°52′E). They were discovered in 1772 by the first expedition of Yves-Joseph de Kerguelen-Trémarec. They were named after the marquis de Boynes, the French Secretary of the Navy of the period. Except the disputed claim to Adélie Land, “Boynes Islands” are the most southerly French land.
TAAF 2018;0,85e.
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%8Eles_de_Boynes. https://en.wiki.ng/wiki/Yves-Joseph_de_ ... C3%A9marec.
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Douglas 1

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Douglas 1

Postby shipstamps » Sun Sep 21, 2008 6:19 pm


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Built in 1858, this steamer was the fastest then afloat and had the unusual distinction of serving on both sides during the American Civil War. In 1862 she was sold to agents for the Confederate States of America and made eighteen blockade-running trips under the name 'Margaret and Jessie' before being captured and sold to the Federal Navy. She was commissioned as U.S.S. Gettysburg and shared in the capture of five Confederate runners.
This label depicts the first Douglas of the company which introduced straight stems to the fleet. In other respects she was a startling contrast to her predecessors in that she was exceptionally long and narrow-gutted. On trial her speed was17.25 knots, and she usually made the run between Liverpool and Douglas in about 4 hrs. 20 min. and also was reputedly the fastest steamer afloat at that time.
In 1862 she was acquired by Fraser, Trenholm and Company, Confederate Agents, for the purpose of running the Federal blockade in the American Civil War. Painted grey and rechristened Margaret and Jessie she had a most successful career until driven ashore at Nassau, in the Bahamas, by the Federal ship Rhode Island in June 1863. The engines of the Douglas were to be seen on Nassau beach for over 80 years after the incident. This vessel was also the first 2-funnelled steamer built for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company and was the last built for the line by Robert Napier. She was a ship of 700 gross tons on dimensions: 205 ft. (b.p.) x 26 ft. x 14 ft. and was completed in 1858.

SG171 IOM Post Office and Sea Breezes 7/54
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Re: Douglas 1

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Sep 23, 2009 8:58 pm

Built as a paddle steamer by Robert Napier & Co. at Glasgow for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company Ltd.
28 May 1858 launched under the name DOUGLAS (I)
Tonnage 700 ton gross, dim. 205.0 x 26.0 x 14.0ft.
Side lever steam engine hp? Speed during trials 17¼ knots.
She was the first steamer of the company with an upright stem.
Building cost £17.500, plus KING ORRY built in 1842, in part exchange.

After completing used in the ferry service between Liverpool and Douglas.
Her fastest crossing between these two ports was in 4 hours and 20 minutes.
After 4 years service for the company she was sold, nominally to Cunard Wilson & Co., but really to Fraser, Trenholm & Co., the American Confederate Agents. She was sold for £24.000.

Painted gray and renamed MARGARET AND JESSIE and used for the blockade running during the Civil War in America. She was then owned by John Fraser and Company at Charleston, and under command of Capt. William Wilson, she made four voyages between Nassau and Charleston.
13 Feb. 1863, she sailed for her first voyage from Charleston, and returned on 24 March from Nassau.
06 April sailed out again to Nassau and returned on 20 May.
31 May sailed out again to Nassau.
The Union cruiser RHODE ISLAND chased her then, and she ran aground off Eleuthera

The following comes from the newspaper Nassau Guardian of 3 June 1863.

We have to record this evening an other unjustifiable outrage committed by a Federal gunboat within the prescribed limits of our shores. On Saturday last the MARGARET AND JESSIE under Capt. Wilson, from Charleston for this port, was fallen in with by the federal steamer RHODE ISLAND off Abaco, and chased till she arrived close to the shore of Jennes Point, Eleuthera.
There would be no legal cause of complaint had the pursuit and firing ceased as soon as the MARGARET AND JESSIE approached within the distance of three miles from the land; but as she neared the coast, and was only 20 yards of, that is between the reef and the land, the gunboat, which was not more than from a quarter to a half-a-mile distant, commenced pouring in broadside after broadside, varying the performance with shot, grape and shell- not only to the imminent danger of all on board (and there were ladies among the passengers), but to serious alarm of the inhabitants of the Island, who suddenly found themselves subjected to a sharp and decisive bombardment. The missiles fired from the RHODE ISLAND ploughed up the earth in various directions, and came in close proximity to, it not actually passing through, dwellings, and drove people to seek refuge between rocks and other protections. This was kept up for miles, and at length the MAGARET AND JESSIE received a shot through her boiler, and another through her bows, which forced her to take the beach, then only fifty yards distant.

Some day later she was refloated and arrived at Nassau, after repair sailed out again for Charleston where she arrived on 16 June.

She was then sold to the Import and Export Company, and came under the command of Capt. Robert Lockwood, and continued her career in blockade running until captured by the US Federal Navy.

07 July, sailed again out for Nassau and returned, (date not given.) Her last voyage from Charleston was when she sailed again in July (not a date given) from that port.
When she was trying to enter Wilmington, the FULTON, KEYSTONE STATE and NANSEMOND off Wilmington, N.C, captured her on 5 Nov. 1863.
She was purchased from the New York Prize Court by the Federal Navy and commissioned GETTYSBURG at the New York Navy Yard on 2 May 1864. She was named of the southern USA Pennsylvania, site of one of the most important battles of the Civil War 1 – 3 July 1863. It was at the dedication of the National Cemetery on the battleground 19 November 1863 that President Lincoln delivered his immortal Gettysburg Address.
She came under command of Lieutenant Roswell H. Lamson.
She is then given with a tonnage of 950 tons, dim. 221 x 26.3 x 13.6ft. Speed 15 knots.
Crew 96.
Armament 1 – 30 pdr. Parrott, 2 – 12 pdr. guns and 4 – 24 pdrs howitzer.

A fast strong steamer, GETTYSBURG was assigned blockading duty with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and departed New York 7 May 1864. She arrived at Beaufort, N.C. 14 May and from there took station at the entrance to the Cape Fear River.

For the next 7 months, Gettysburg was engaged in the vital business of capturing blockade-runners carrying supplies to the strangling South. She captured several ships, and occasionally performed other duties. On 8 October, for instance, she rescued six survivors from schooner HORNE, which had capsized in a squall.

GETTYSBURG took part in the attack on Fort Fisher 24-25 December 1864. Gettysburg assisted with the devastating bombardment prior to the landings by Army troops, and during the actual landings stood close to shore to furnish cover for the assault. GETTYSBURG’s boats were used to help transport troops to the beaches.

With the failure of the first attack on the formidable Confederate works; plans were laid for a second assault, this time including a landing force of sailors and marines to assault the sea face of the fort. In this attack, 15 January 1865, Gettysburg again engaged the fort in the preliminary bombardment, and furnished a detachment of sailors under Lieutenant Lamson and other officers in a gallant assault, which was stopped under very ramparts of Forth Fisher. Lamson and a group of officers and men were forced to spend the night in a ditch under Confederate guns before they could escape. Through failing to take the sea face of Fort Fisher, the attack by the Navy diverted enough of the defenders to make the Army assault successful and insure victory. Gettysburg suffered two men killed and six wounded in the assault.

GETTYSBURG spent the remaining months of the war on blockade duty off Wilmington, and operated from April to June between Boston and Norfolk carrying freight and passengers. She decommissioned 23 June 1865 at New York Navy Yard.

Recommissioning 3 December 1866, GETTYSBURG made a cruise to the Caribbean Sea, returning to Washington on 18 February, where she decommissioned again 1 March 1867.

GETTYSBURG went back in commission 3 March 1868 at Norfolk and put to sea 28 March on special service in the Caribbean. Until July 1868, she visited various ports in the area, protecting American interests, among them Kingston, Jamaica; Havana, Cuba; and ports of Haiti. Between 3 July and 13 August GETTYSBURG assisted in the laying of a telegraph cable from Key West to Havana, and joined with scientists from the Hydrographic Office in a cruise to determine the longitudes of West Indian points using electric telegraph. From 13 August 1868 to 1 October 1869, she cruised between various Haitian ports and Key West, again helping to maintain peace in the area and protecting American interests. GETTYSBURG arrived New York Navy Yard 8 October 1869, decommissioned the same day, and entered the yard for repairs.

GETTYSBURG was laid up in ordinary until 6 November 1873, when she again commissioned at Washington Navy Yard. She spent several months transporting men and supplies to the various Navy yards on the Atlantic coast and on 25 February 1874 anchored in Pensacola harbour to embark members of the survey team seeking routes for an inter-oceanic canal in Nicaragua. GETTYSBURG transported the engineers to Aspinwall, panama and Greystone, Nicaragua, and returned them to Norfolk 10 May 1874. After several more trips on the Atlantic coast with passengers and supplies, the ship again decommissioned 9 April 1875 at Washington Navy yard.

Recommissioned 21 September 1875, GETTYSBURG departed Washington for Norfolk, where she arrived 14 October. Assigned to assist in another of the important Hydrographic Office expeditions in the Caribbean, she departed Norfolk 7 November. During the next few months she contributed markedly to safe navigation in the West Indies in surveys that led to precise charts. She returned to Washington with the scientific team 14 June, decommissioning 26 June.

GETTYSBURG recommissioned 20 September 1876, for special duty to the Mediterranean, where she was to obtain navigational information about the coast and islands of the area. GETTYSBURG departed Norfolk 17 October for Europe. During the next two years, she visited nearly every port in the Mediterranean, taking soundings and making observations on the southern coast of France, the entire coastline of Italy, and the Adriatic Islands. GETTYSBURG continued to the coast of Turkey, and from there made soundings on the coast of Egypt and other North African points, Sicily and Sardinia.

While visiting Genoa, 22 April 1879, GETTYSBURG rescued the crew of a small vessel which had run upon the rocks outside the breakwater. Her iron plates corroded from years of almost uninterrupted service and her machinery weakened. GETTYSBURG decommissioned 06 May 1879 and she was sold on 8 May 1879. Later that year scrapped at Naples.


Sources: West Coast Steamers by Duckworth and Langmuir. Charleston’s Maritime Heritage 1670-1865 by P.C.Coker III. Log Book Volume 9 page 156.
http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook ... 4/ch03.htm



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