SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

VARIOLA and DENEB fishing schooners

The Seychelles issued in 1989 four stamps for the 25th Anniversary of the African Development Bank (ADB). Two stamps show us fishing schooners used in the waters off the Seychelles.

The two schooners depict show on the R3 the VARIOLA and on the R10 the DENEB.

Fishing schooners in the Seychelles, which are wooden-hull, decked vessels, usually between 10 and 13 m LOA and equipped with a three- or four-cylinder diesel inboard engine, with two holds of 500–3 000 kg capacity to keep the catch cool and fresh till discharging.
Schooners do trips averaging 8 days on the edge of the Mahe and Amirantes plateaus.

2017 If she are still in service I could not find, and more information on the two fishing vessels is required.

Seychelles 1989 R3/R19 sg 765/766, scott 694/695

WHALING IN THE 19th CENTURY at TRISTAN DA CUNHA

Whaling during the 19th century in the waters off Tristan da Cunha was very important for the people of the island and on 29 August 1988 the island issued four stamps and a souvenir sheet which illustrate whaling scenes of the 19th century. The stamps and souvenir sheet depict sailing whaling ships and whale-boats.

The 10p value shows whalers aboard a whaler trying out whale blubber. This was the process of butchering the whale and rendering its blubber into oil. It took two to three days to process a single whale.

The 20p value depict harpoon guns. The top shows us a greener whaling harpoon gun, and the lower is a swivel harpoon gun.

The 30p value depicts the art of whale-men, known as scrimshaw. A jack-knife was usually all that was needed for carving whale teeth and bone. The designs that ornamented many of the pieces (such as the sailing ship on the whale tooth) were usually inscribed with a sail-needle and then darkened by rubbing in a mixture of oil and lamp sooth.

The 50p value shows us two whaling ships (till so far not identified) and whale boats.

The £1 souvenir sheet depicts whaling ships and whaleboats in the margin.

Tristan da Cunha 1988 10p/50p sg 452/455 MS 456, scott434/438.
Source: Watercraft Philately 1993 page 74.

SUPERSPORT YACHT CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

THE AIRFOIL CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

SARIMANOK outrigger

In 1985 Bob Hobman built a. outrigger canoe the SARIMANOK made of a ghio tree and sails made entirely of vegetable elements, not a single nail was used. The outrigger was built mostly after plans of a Filipino “vinta” model.
Not any navigational instruments were on board, and the crew relied only on the stars to set course.
The name given to the outrigger was SARIMANOK she was named after a Sarimanok bird in Filipino Mindanao mythology, a reincarnation of a goddess who fell in love with a mortal man. Today it symbolized in the Filipino wealth and prestige.
From two books of which the quotations I got from Mr. Jung (with thanks) comes the following.

Madagascar - The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World by Peter Tyson pages 257-258.
I quote:
To find out, a Briton named Bob Hobman decided to build a replica of the king of boat the first Malagasy might have used and, in the manner of the Norwegian Thor Heyerdahl, try to sail it from Java to Madagascar, making no landfalls, using no modern navigation aids, and subsisting solely on foods the ancient Malagasy might have eaten. The 60-foot double outrigger canoe was built entirely of wood and bamboo, with palm-weave sails and rattan bindings instead of nails; it had no motor, radio or sextant. On June 3, 1985, the SARIMANOK, as the vessel was christened, set sail from Java. “They had an unending, horrible voyage,” Dewar told me. “There were problems with the boat. More or less continuous high seas, strong winds, and frequent storms. All the time they’re filming this damn thing, filming the boat falling to pieces and so forth.” After one stop on Cocos (Keeling) Island to let off a sick crew member (and bring on some tinned food), Hobman’s crew, against all odds, managed to go the distance to Madagascar in 49 days. But by then they had lost their ability to steer the craft, and they drifted past the northern tip of the island and into the Mozambique Channel. “On the boat they had this sealed, watertight container with a button,” Dewar told me. “If they pushed the button, it would turn on a radio beacon that would identify where they were and would send out a distress signal.” “Just like the original Malagasy might have had,” I said. “Exactly. Well, they finally gave up und pushed the button.” A French coast guard ship came out from the Comoros and towed them back to the island of Mayotte, where they promptly saddled with a hefty bill for the rescue. The crew then hired a local boat to tow the ailing craft to Madagascar, where, on September 5, the SARIMANOK finally came to rest on Nosy Be, on the beach by the Holiday Inn, “About a year later, a group of these people came back to try to raise money in Madagascar- which strikes one as a somewhat humorous effort- to refurbish the SARIMANOK and memorialize it,” Dewar said. “On of them gave a lecture in Diego Suarez while I was in town. He delivered it in English, with simultaneous translation, to a crowd of about 60, at least half of whom were under the age of 12. I think they left disappointed in terms of finding anyone to take care of the SARIMANOK.” But Jean-Aimé Rakotoarisoa, a leading Malagasy archeologist and a close friend of Dewar’s, had a different take on what the SARIMANOK voyagers had accomplished, Dewar told me. “They had done marvelous work, Jean-Aimé felt, solving problems that we archeologists had not been able to solve before. We now know that the first place settled in Madagascar was the Holiday Inn in Nosy Be, and we know that Americans must have settled the island first, because there we have proof: the built the Holiday Inn.”
Unquote.

Classic Ships of Islam: From Mesopotamia to the Indian Ocean von Dionysius Agius, page 103
I quote:
People of southeastern origin settled in Madagascar and the Comoro Islands in the second half of the first millennium CE; the language of Madagascar today is Malagasy of an Austronesian family with strong ties to Ma’anyan and the Borito languages of Borneo. How they reached Madagascar is interesting and something which has intrigued a number of scholars. One voyage, undertaken by Bob Hobman and his crew on 6 August 1985, proved that Neolithic navigators could have crossed over from Indonesia to Madagascar on an outrigger canoe, the SARIMANOK, a hollowed-out trunk of a huge ghio tree with sails woven from plant fibres. The voyage lasted 63 days.
Unquote.

The SARIMANOK is now in the Oceanographic Museum of Nosy Be, Malagasy.

Malagasy Republic 1987 60f, 150f sg 617/18
Cocos (Keeling) Islands 1987 36c sg160, scott?

BOM vessels

Gambia issued a set of stamps in 1991 for the 100th anniversary of the death of Vincent van Gogh 1853-1890.
One of this stamps shows use the “beach at Scheveningen during a calm day” painted in 1882 by van Gogh.
The three vessels on the painting on the beach are bom vessels for more info see. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11475&p=12256&hilit=panorama#p12256

Gambia 1991 1d.25 sg 1246, scott 1147.
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Blake HMS 1808

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Blake HMS 1808

Postby shipstamps » Tue Aug 26, 2008 5:07 pm

SG350.jpg
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H.M.S. Blake was a 3rd Rate of 74 guns, 1,701 tons builders' measurement, length 172 ft., beam 48 ft., draft 18 ft. She was launched at Deptford Dockyard on August 23, 1808, her crew being 590 men. On July 28, 1809, the Blake (first of the name), was commanded by Capt. Edward Codrington, and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Lord Gardner, when she sailed from the Downs in a fleet of 246 men-of-war of various kinds commanded by Rear-Admiral Sir Richard Strachan, with his flag in H.M.S. Venerable.
Some 400 transports accompanied the expedition, carrying some 40,000 troops under the Earl of Chatham. Many of the men-of-war removed their lower-deck guns and carried horses. The expedition set forth to destroy all the French ships in the Schelde, and at Antwerp; to destroy the dockyards at Antwerp, Flushing and Ter Neuze; and to render the Schelde no longer navigable for big ships.
The expedition was of a military rather than a naval brigade in the capture of the island of Walcheren; and in the bombardment, siege and capture of Flushing. During the attack on Flushing, the Blake ran aground on the Dog Sand, but was got off in three hours. Apparently the Earl of Chatham was a little fonder of his own personal comfort than of work, and after the island of Walcheren, with its batteries, basins and arsenals, had been reduced, the British force withdrew. In June 1811, the Blake, commanded by Capt. Edward Codrington, in company with the Centaur and Invincible, was employed in co-operating with the Spanish patriots on the shores of the Mediterranean, and in rescuing many hundreds of them from the butchery of the French at Tarragonna, after the city was in their hands. The following September the Blake assisted in the seizure of the harbour at Tarragonna, and in the capture and destruction of the French shipping.
There has been some confusion over the ultimate fate of the Blake, In "The King's Ships", by Lieut. H. S. Lecky, he states that she was broken up after some 40 years' service as receiving ship at Portsmouth. He then goes on to state that the second Blake was a 2.decked 91-gun screw ship built at Pembroke in 1863.
J. J. Colledge in his book "Ships of the Royal Navy" however records that the first Blake of 1808, was used as a prison ship in January 1814, and was sold on October 17, 1816. The second Blake, he states was a 3rd Rate of 74 guns, 1701 tons b.m., 174 ft. x 48 ft., built at Deptford in 1808 as the Bombay. She was renamed Blake on April 28, 1819 and was on harbour service in 1828. She was sold for breaking up at Portsmouth on December 12, 1855. SG350
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Re: Blake HMS 1808

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:42 pm

April – May 1813 fitted out for Ordinary at Portsmouth, where she was fitted out as a temporary prison ship at Portsmouth from December 1813 till January 1814. The same year recommissioned in the navy under command of Lieutenant George Forbes. She was sold for £3,500 to broken up on 17 October 1816.

St Vincent issued three stamps in 1972 for the 200th berth bicentenary of Sir Charles Brisbane, after a career in the Royal Navy was he appointed Governor of St Vincent in 1808 till he died in 1827.
20c Shows a portrait of Sir Charles Brisbane and his coat of arms.
30c HMS ARETHUSA. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8022&p=8018&hilit=ARETHUSA#p8018
$1 HMS BLAKE.
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