SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

MONKCHESTER 1865

Built as a composite clipper ship built of wood with iron frames by the yard of Messrs Peverill in Sunderland for A, Strong in North Shields. Till her end was she owned by the Strong family.
Launched as the MONKCHESTER.
Tonnage 549 gross, dim. 148 x 30 x 18ft.
Barque rigged, and sheated in felt and yellow metal, fastened with copper bolts.
1865 Delivered to owners.

She was built for the trade between the U.K and Australia, with general cargo to Australia and mostly wool as return voyage.
Her second voyage she made in 95 days from the Lizard to Cape Moreton
Of all the years in service I can’t find much on her, she was a lucky ship without much mishap.
October 1876 she left the U.K under command of Captain Lees and a crew of 18 men bound for Brisbane, were she safely arrived, I found that she on 30 January 1877 sailed from Queensland fully loaded with a cargo of coal bound for Hong Kong, the last what was heard of her was on 3rd April 1877. Can’t not figure out what has happened with her, most probably the cargo of coal got on fire where after she foundered with all hands.
The stamp design is based on the 1865 painting by John Scott, a noted English oil painter from Newcastle.

Australia $1.40 sg?, scott?
Various internet sites. Press release of Australian Post.

ARABIAN 1852

Built as a wooden ship by James Nevins, St John’s N.B., Canada most probably a speculation, at that time many ships were built in Canada, were shipbuilding was much cheaper at that time, compared with the British built ships.
Launched as the ARABIAN.
Tonnage 1,067 ton, dim. 163.2 x 31.3 x 22.9ft.
Ship rigged.
1852 completed.
She sailed from Canada most probably loaded with timber to the U.K. were she was bought for £14,000 by Pilkington and Wilson in Liverpool (White Star Line).
26 October 1852 she sailed from Liverpool under command of Captain Bannatyne with on board 292 steerage passengers bound for Melbourne, were she arrived on 15 February 1853. The passage took 84 days.
She loaded then coal for Calcutta.
After arrival in Melbourne the passengers complained that she were shamefully treated during the voyage, the food was below all standers from what you could expect. Captain Bannatyne was in Liverpool later fined with a fine of £50.
03 January 1854 she sailed from Liverpool with 350 steerage passengers to Portland, Australia were she arrived on 19 September 1854.
Thereafter used in the cargo trade between U.K. and Australia.
12 November 1860 when moored alongside the Railway Pier, Sandridge (Melbourne), she arrived there with a full general cargo from the U.K. Most cargo was already unloaded except some iron what was still on board.
Captain Harding who had also his wife on board got instructions after discharging to proceed to Chili.
At 11pm that day after he had already retired to bed, he was awaked by the ringing of the ship’s bell. After arriving on deck he found his ship on fire in the forecastle. All hands were called and with the assistance of the crews from the LIGHTNING and RESULT, efforts were made to control the flames. The fire spread rapidly to the fore hatch and the tug SOPHIA was sent to tow the ARABIAN clear of the pier. She was soon a mass of flames fore and aft, the flames spreading to the rigging and rising to the royal masthead. At midnight the fore and main-masts went over the side following shortly after by the mizzen.
Attempts to scuttle her failed and she eventually sank. Later was she salvaged and sold as a hulk in 1867. The cause of the fire is still a mystery.

Australia 2015 $1.10 sg?, scott?

Source: Wooden ships and Iron Man by Frederick W. Wallace. Log of Logs by Ian Nicholson. The Australian Run by Jack Loney and Peter Stone. Internet.

JOLLE ROSKILDE FJORD

I could not find much on the “Jolle Roskilde Fjord” the design is made after a photo taken in the 1920’s which shows the young Christan Nielsen with a wooden boat under sail and steering with an oar. By the photo is given that it is a “Lynaes jolle” which were used a lot in the Roskilde Fjord at that time.
Clinker built with dim. of about 3.04 x 1.31m, not a drawing was made and the boat was built after the builders measurements. “jolle” is the Scandinavian term for “dinghy”.
Mostly used for inshore and lake fishing. Rowed or skulled and can set a mast which carried a spritsail.

Denmark 1994 3k50 sg1074, scott1052.
Source: Various internet sites.

IRAQ patrol boat Swift class

For the Army Day the Post of Iraq has issued four stamps to honour the Iraqi forces, the 250 Dinar shows us a patrol boat of the Swiftships Model 35PB1208 E-1455.
12 Ships has been built for the Iraqi Navy, the first got the pennant No P-301, which one is depict I can’t tell. All are in service in 2015.
Dim. 35.06 x 7.25 x 2.59m. (draught).
Powered by three MTU 16V2000 Marine diesels, 900shp. Each, three shafts, speed 30 knots.
Range by a speed of 12 knots, 1,500 mile.
Armament 1 – MSI 30mm DS30M Mark 2 cannon, 1 – 50 cal/12.7 mm MG and 2 – 7.62 mm MGs.
Crew 25.
The Model 35PB1208 E-1455 patrol boat was ordered by the Iraqi Navy from Swiftships Shipbuilders in September 2009. The first was accepted into service in October 2010. Five others have since been delivered, the sixth in September 2011. The total order is for 12, with an option for a three more vessels.
Order History
In Dec 2008 the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency announced Iraq’s formal request to buy up to 20 Coastal Patrol Boats in the 30-35 meter range, and 3 Offshore Support Vessels in the 55-60 meter range.
In July 2009 the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) announced that Swiftships Shipbuilders would provide the Iraqi Navy with a patrol boat fleet of up to 15 Coastal Patrol Boats (CPBs).
In Sept 2009 Swiftships Shipbuilders received a $181 million contract for the detail design and construction of 9 patrol boats plus spare parts, and technical services.
In Sept 2010 the first boat, PB 301, is formally welcomed into the Iraqi Navy.
Design Features
The hull and superstructure are constructed of all-welded aluminium alloy. The hull includes 7 watertight bulkheads forming 8 watertight compartments.
Boats can be refuelled at sea using side by side procedures, and run on #2 diesel fuel.
Weather survivability includes Sea State 5 survival at the best heading, and full operational capability at Sea State 3, including 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) patrol speed and 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) sustained loitering speed for 12 hours.

Iraq 2015 250D sg?, scott?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiftships ... 208_E-1455

Windhuk 1906

The original entry for this vessel was incorrect (Thanks, Auke Palmhof). The write up was for the 1936 vessel which has probably not featured on a stamp.
If anyone would like to give a description of this vessel, it would be appreciated.

MASHHOUR cutter suction dredger

After the blunder with the first Egyptian issues for the Suez Canal, a new set of stamps were issued in 2014 all of Le2.
All three stamps shows ships but only the middle one I could identify as the “cutter suction dredger MASHHOUR” the other two are container vessels, of which the right one is one of the fleet of the Danish company Maersk which one is impossible to say, Maersk has a large fleet. The left one maybe one of the visitors of the site can identify her.
The cutter suction dredger was built by IHC Merwede at Kinderdijk, Netherlands for the Suez Canal Authority, Egypt.
Ordered October 1994, it was the 32nd craft built by IHC for the Suez Canal Authority since 1901.
04 January 1996 launched as the MASHHOUR.
Dimension: 140.30 x 22.40 x 7.20m., draught 4.95m.
Maximum dredging depth 35.00m.
Total installed power 22,795 kW.
Accommodation for 73 persons.
During the summer of 1996 she was transported to Egypt for undergoing trials on the job deepening and widening the Suez Canal.
22 October 1996 after the successful trials handed over to the new owners.

At that time she was the largest and most powerful cutter suction dredger of its kind in the world, and was designed to dredge very abrasive sand and gravel compacted sand, sticky clay and rocks in the widening and deepening of the Suez Canal.
2015 In service same name and owners.
More information is given on: MIGHTY MASHHOUR, a) MUNCHING MILLIONS

Egypt 2014 le2 sg?, scott?
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Endurance (Shackleton)

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Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:26 pm

Endurance.jpg
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SG45.jpg
SG45
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SG75
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FID G34.jpg
SG G34
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SG36.jpg
SG36
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SG32.jpg
SG32
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Endurance.jpg
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SG1375
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The Endurance, of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-16, was built in 1912 by Framnes Mek. Verks, at Sandefjord, and engined by Akers of Christiania. Her gross tonnage was 348 on dimensions 140ft. x 26.4ft. x 14.1ft., and she was the typical Norwegian whaler type of vessel, barquentine-rigged and launched 1912, as Polaris, a 3-masted barquentine with auxiliary steam for polar tourism and polar bear hunting!
Purchased by Shackleton and renamed Endurance. She was ready to sail under the direction of Sir Ernest Shackleton, C.V.O., on August 1, 1914. When the Naval mobilisation order was published on August 3, Shackleton, with the consent of the crew, offered the services of the ship and her crew to the Government. However, the Admiralty did not think the war would last longer than six months and Sir Ernest was told to go ahead with his Antarctic plans.
The Endurance carried a crew of 27 men in addition to the scientific staff. She sailed after Shackleton had been received by the King and assured of his Majesty's approval of the expedition. On this expedition a new coastline was discovered which Sir Ernest named Caird Coast in honour of Sir James Caird, who had subscribed £24,000 towards the cost of the expedition. Like the Deutschland, the Endurance was caught in pack ice, but the conditions were more severe than those experienced by the German ship. The British vessel was trapped on January 19, 1915, and crushed on October 27, 1915, finally sinking beneath the ice 25 days later.
The crew took to the ice, which drifted across the Weddell Sea. When it was obvious the pack ice was breaking up, they took to the ship's boats which had been saved when the Endurance went down and on April 16, reached Elephant Island.
What followed is an epic of the Antarctic—how Sir Ernest Shackleton left 22 men on Elephant Island, while he chose five men to accompany him in an open boat (the James Caird) to cross 800 miles of Antarctic seas to bring food and relief to the shipwrecked crew. Having successfully accomplished the almost impossible in a voyage of a fortnight, a mountain range of three ridges had to be crossed, one 5,000ft. high and covered in ice with dangerous precipices, before civilisation could be reached. It took them 36hrs. to overcome this obstacle. Eventually, Sir Ernest was able to effect the rescue of the Endurance's crew on Elephant Island, but it was not until several attempts had been made by the whaler, Southern Sky, the Uruguayan Government trawler Institute de Pesca, the British schooner Emma, and the Chilean Navy tender Yelcho, all led by Shackleton, that a way through the ice was found and the crew were picked up 41/2 months after their leader had left them. During the whole of that time Shackleton had thought of nothing but their relief.

Detail from BAT philatelic
Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton 1874-1922

Expeditions: British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-04 in Discovery. British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 in Endurance. Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition 1921-22 in Quest. Discoveries: Beardmore Glacier, South Magnetic Pole, Caird Coast.
Voyage: British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17.

Aus Ant SG45, Brit Ant SG75,249 Chile 1375 Fal Is Dep SG G34 Ross Dep SG36 South Georgia SG32.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:56 am

2015 South Georgia.JPG
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Built under yard 87 by Framnæs Mek. Verks., Sandefjord, Norway for a company formed by Lars Christensen from Norway and Adrien de Gerlach from Belgian.
17 December 1912 launched as the POLARIS.
Tonnage 348 gross, dim. 42.67 x 8.04 x 4.28m.
One auxiliary coal fired triple expansion steam engine, 350 hp, one shaft, speed 10.2 knots.
Rigged as a three-masted barkentine.
24 August 1913 completed.

She was designed for the new formed company as a polar safari ship with paying guests, but when delivered the new formed company could not made the last payment, and the POLARIS was laid up waiting for a new buyer.
When Shackleton also short by cash was looking for a polar expedition vessel, and he did not have to pay for the POLARIS straight away but after some time, bought her for 225.000NKroner.
She was renamed in ENDURANCE.
The ENDURANCE was the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. She was launched in 1912 from Sandefjord in Norway and was crushed by ice, causing her to sink, three years later in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.
Designed by Ole Aanderud Larsen, the ENDURANCE was built at the Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway and fully completed 24 August 1913. She was built under the supervision of master wood shipbuilder Christian Jacobsen, who was renowned for insisting that all men employed under him not just be skilled shipwrights, but also be experienced in seafaring aboard whaling or sealing ships. Every detail of her construction had been scrupulously planned to ensure maximum durability, for example every joint and every fitting cross-braced each other for maximum strength
She was launched on December 17, 1912 and was initially christened the POLARIS (eponymous with Polaris, the North Star). She was 144 feet (44 m) long, with a 25 feet (7.6 m) beam and weighed 350 short tons (320 t). Though her black hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while her sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. Her bow, where she would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that is natural shape followed the curve of her design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).
Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, ENDURANCE had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of driving her at speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
By the time she was launched on December 17, 1912, POLARIS was perhaps the strongest wooden ship ever built, with the possible exception of the FRAM, the vessel used by Fridtjof Nansen and later by Roald Amundsen. However, there was one major difference between the ships. The FRAM was bowl-bottomed, which meant that if the ice closed in against her she would be squeezed up and out and not be subject to the pressure of the ice compressing around her. But since the POLARIS was designed to operate in relatively loose pack ice she was not constructed so as to rise out of pressure to any great extent.
She was built for Adrien de Gerlache and Lars Christensen. They intended to use her for polar cruises for tourists to hunt polar bears. Financial problems leading to de Gerlache pulling out of their partnership meant that Christensen was happy to sell the boat to Ernest Shackleton for GB£11,600 (approx US$67,000), less than cost. He is reported to have said he was happy to take the loss in order to further the plans of an explorer of Shackleton's stature 'After Shackleton's purchasing her, she was rechristened ENDURANCE after the Shackleton family motto "Fortitudine vincimus" (By endurance we conquer).
Shackleton sailed with ENDURANCE from Plymouth, England on August 6, 1914 and set course for Buenos Aires, Argentina. This was ENDURANCE's first major cruising since her completion and amounted to a shakedown cruise. The trip across the Atlantic took more than two months. Built for the ice, her hull was considered by many of its crew too rounded for the open ocean.
On October 26, 1914 ENDURANCE sailed from Buenos Aires to her last port of call, the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia off the southern tip of South America, where she arrived on November 5. She departed from Grytviken for her final voyage on December 5, 1914 towards the southern regions of the Weddell Sea.
Two days after leaving from South Georgia, ENDURANCE encountered polar pack ice and progress slowed down. For weeks Endurance twisted and squirmed her way through the pack. She kept moving but averaged less than 30 miles (48 km) per day. By January 15, Endurance was within 200 miles (320 km) of its destination, Vahsel Bay. However by the following day heavy pack ice was sighted in the morning and in the afternoon a blowing gale developed. Under these conditions it was soon evident progress could not be made, and ENDURANCE took shelter under the lee of a large grounded berg. During the next two days ENDURANCE dogged back and forth under the sheltering protection of the berg.
On January 18 the gale began to moderate and thus ENDURANCE, one day short of her destination, set the topsail with the engine at slow. The pack had blown away. Progress was made slowly until hours later ENDURANCE encountered the pack once more. It was decided to move forward and work through the pack, and at 5pm ENDURANCE entered it. However it was noticed that this ice was different from what had been encountered before. The ship was soon engulfed by thick but soft ice floes. The ship floated in a soupy sea of mushy brash ice. The ship was beset. The gale now increased its intensity and kept blowing for another six days from a northerly direction towards land. By January 24, the wind had completely compressed the ice in the whole Weddell Sea against the land. The ice had packed snugly around ENDURANCE. All that could be done was to wait for a southerly gale that would start pushing, decompressing and opening the ice in the other direction. Instead the days passed and the pack remained unchanged.
ENDURANCE drifted for months while remaining beset in the ice in the Weddell Sea and drifted with it. The ice kept compressing it until ENDURANCE could not endure the pressure and was crushed on October 27, 1915. On the morning of November 21, 1915, the ENDURANCE bow began to sink under the ice. Like RMS TITANIC, the Endurance went vertical, her stern rising into the air, then disappearing beneath the ice. The ENDURANCE is considered the last ship of her kind.
It is said that Shackleton placed advertisements in London newspapers that read:
"MEN WANTED: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success. Sir Ernest Shackleton."
The crew of the Endurance in its final voyage was made up of the 28 men Blackborrow was originally refused a post aboard the vessel due to his young age and inexperience and decided to stow away, helped to sneak aboard by William Blakewell, a friend of his, and Walter How. By the time he was found, the expedition was far enough out that Shackleton had no choice but to make him a steward. Blackborrow eventually proved his worth, earning the Bronze Polar Medal, and the honour of becoming the first human being ever to set foot on Elephant Island. His name is also the matter of some debate—it is sometimes spelled Percy, or Blackboro, or in other ways.
Alfred Lansing wrote a book titled Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage about the ordeal that Shackleton and his men endured aboard the ship. It became a bestseller when first published in 1959. Subsequent reprints have made it a recurrent bestseller; the last time being in the late 1990s.
Two Antarctic patrol ships of the British Royal Navy have been named ENDURANCE in honour of Shackleton's ship. The first HMS ENDURANCE (originally named ANITA DAN) was launched in May 1956 and awarded Pennant number A171 sometime later. She acted as an ice patrol and hydrographic survey ship until 1986. Today's modern HMS ENDURANCE, nicknamed The Red Plum, is a class 1A1 ice-breaker bought from Norway in 1992 where she had been known as MV POLAR CIRCLE. She is based at Portsmouth but makes annual forays to Antarctica where she can penetrate through 0.9 metres (2 ft 11 in) of ice at a speed of 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph). She has a complement of 126 marine personnel and carries two Westland Lynx helicopters.
In 1998 wreckage found at Stinker Point on the south western side of Elephant Island was incorrectly identified as flotsam from the ship. It in fact belonged to the 1877 wreck of the Connecticut sealing ship CHARLES SHEARER In 2001 wreck hunter David Mearns unsuccessfully planned an expedition to find the wreck of the Endurance By 2003 two rival groups were making plans for an expedition to find the wreck, however no expedition was actually mounted. In 2010 Mearns announced a new plan to search for the wreck. The plan is sponsored by the National Geographic Society but is subject to finding sponsorship for the balance of the U.S. $10 million estimated cost.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)"

The 10p stamp features Ernest Shackleton and his Imperial Transantarctic Expedition ship ENDURANCE. The Weddell Sea party of the expedition visited South Georgia in November 1914 to take on coal and other stores and refit the ship before sailing for Antarctica. While in Buenos Aires, Shackleton was warned that it might be a bad year for ice in the Weddell Sea so he delayed his departure from South Georgia for a month. This gave time for scientific work to be carried out. Unfortunately most of the records and specimens were lost when ENDURANCE was crushed by the ice and sank. Shackleton is buried in the cemetery at Grytviken.

Source: South Georgia Post.

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2015 10p sg?, scott?
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