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SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

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RAMSEY HMS 1895

Built as a passenger ship under yard No 243 by Naval Construction & Armament Comp., Barrow-in-Furness, U.K. for the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway & London & North Western Railway Cos., Fleetwood.
9 May 1895 launched as the DUKE OF LANCASTER.
Tonnage 1,520 gross, dim. 94.5 x 11.3 x 4.9m.
Powered by two triple expansion 6-cyl. steam engines, 5,300 shp, twin screws, speed 19 knots.
Capacity for 1162 day passengers.
August 1995 in service, homeport Fleetwood.
TSS THE RAMSEY was a passenger steamer operated by the London and North Western Railway from 1895 to 1911 as the DUKE OF LANCASTER. The vessel was then acquired by an organisation referred to as the "Turkish Patriotic Committee". However the acquisition was not completed, and she was subsequently sold to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.
Construction
DUKE OF LANCASTER was launched on 9 May 1895 at the Barrow-in-Furness yard of the Naval Construction and Armament Company Ltd, who also constructed the engines and boilers. The vessel initially had a tonnage of 1,546 grt; length 310'2"; beam 37'1"; depth 16'4". DUKE OF LANCASTER had an operating speed of 19 knots.
Service life
DUKE OF LANCASTER entered service with the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company who operated her with the London & North Western Railway Company on the Fleetwood - Belfast service.
In March 1911, DUKE OF LANCASTER was sold to Abrihim & Edhen, Istanbul an organisation called the Turkish Patriotic Committee, who had the engines and boilers renovated at Cammell Laird.
However, the outbreak of the Italo-Turkish War in September 1911, prevented the purchasers from taking delivery, and the vessel was sold in 1912 to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.
Isle of Man Steam Packet Company
The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company took delivery of the vessel in July 1912, and immediately changed the vessel's name to THE RAMSEY. She had an uneventful career with the company as she established herself within the Steam Packet fleet.
RAMSEY 's service with the company was one of the shortest of any ship in its history, and concluded at the end of the 1914 season.
War Service & loss
The RAMSEY was the third of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company's ships to be called up for service in the Great War. On 28 October 1914 she was requisitioned and fitted out as an Armed Boarding Vessel by Cammell Larid's with two 12-pounder guns and a ship's company of 98, and renamed simply HMS RAMSEY.
Ramsey was based at Scapa Flow and her work consisted of night patrols. She was usually accompanying two destroyers. It was dangerous work, directed by radio from headquarters, carried out without navigation lights and with manned guns throughout. In the course of a few months RAMSEY intercepted and challenged many ships, sometimes putting a prize crew aboard and taking the suspect into port.
On her last patrol she had steamed for 12 hours when, after dawn on 8 August 1915, smoke was seen from over the horizon. RAMSEY gave chase and came upon a steamer flying the Russian flag. RAMSEY proceeded alongside the vessel, which had duly stopped. The suspect, which was the German auxiliary minelayer SMS METEOR then hoisted the German flag and fired at what amounted to point-blank range, killing the Commander and crew members on the bridge of RAMSEY.
At the same time the raider, fired a torpedo, shattering RAMSEY’s stern. Fifty five of the crew were killed; 43 were picked up by the METEOR after RAMSEY went down in five minutes. Her wreck position is given as lat:59°36'N. long:001°25'W.
The next day British Forces overwhelmed the METEOR, whose prisoners were transferred to neutral ships before she was scuttled.

Isle of Man 2015 75p sg?, scott?
Source: Register of Merchants Ships completed in 1896. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_The_Ramsey

TRADING SLOOP

On the Christmas stamp of Anguilla 1986 10c there is not a name given of the sloop depict, only that it is a “trading sloop”.

The book Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft gives on the sloops used in the West Indies.
The sloop of the Windward and Leeward Islands in the West Indies is widely used to carry freight, passengers and for fishing. Most are rigged with a gaff, jib-headed or gunter mainsail, and 1 -2 headsails; has an exceptionally long boom. Most roughly built with carvel planking, usually of pitch pine above the waterline, greenheart below; natural crook frames of cedar.
Counter or raked transom stern; curved or straight raked stern; bluff bow; full body amidships; strong sheer.
Larger boats decked, often with a trunk cabin in the after part. Northern boats that engage in fishing may have a wet well, but in the southern islands, the fish are dried in the rigging. Those with auxiliaries engines have a double sternpost, the rudder hung from the after post.
Crew of 3 plus a boy.
Reported lengths 7 – 30m; e.g. length 8.2m, beam 2,4m, depth 1,2m.

Anguilla 1986 10c sg734, scott?

BIG BILLFISH TOURNAMENT

The Big Billfish Tournament, which attracts the sports-fishing elite from the United States, Canada and Europe, is held annually in the Turks & Caicos Islands in the West Indies. The term "billfish" includes any of the large species with a prominent bill, such as sailfish, swordfish and various marlins (white, blue and black).
To hail the 1988 Billfish Tournament, the Turks & Caicos issued four new stamps and a souvenir sheet.
The 8-cent depicts a giant swordfish jumping into the air after being hooked by an angler from the deck of a fishing boat, a 28-foot Aquasport 270 Express Fisherman.
The 10-cent shows the captain of the boat, the swordfish and the angler having their picture taken.
The 70-cent illustrates the fishing boat leaving port for the big fish area.
The $1 pictures a large blue marlin underwater.
The $2 MS depict in the margin also a sport fishing boat.

The 8c stamp depict an Aquasport 270 Express Fisherman. The type was built by Aquasport in Sarasota, Florida, USA.
Dimensions: 8.71 x 3.05 x 0.76m. (draught)
Weight 2,721 kg.
Powered by two inboard gasoline engines of 220 hp, speed 20 knots, maximum 28 knots.
Sleeping accommodation for three persons.

Turks & Caicos Islands 1988 8c/$1 sg930/33, scott753/5. MSsg?, scott756.
Source: Internet.

CUMBERLAND QUEEN schooner 1919

I found in it Suralco Magazine 2014 page 55 that the first shipment of bauxite from Moengo, Surinam to the United States of America was loaded on board the schooner CUMBERLAND QUEEN in 1922. The 730c stamps shows a four-mast schooner and I believe she is depict.
By the article was given a photo which looks she is the vessel depict on the stamp.
The CUMBERLAND QUEEN a four-mast wooden schooner was built by Robinson & Pugsley in Diligent River N.B., Canada, could not find an owner.
Tonnage 634 tons, dim. 179.0 x 38.0 x 13.2ft.
1919 Completed.
The first time I found her in Lloyds Registry was in 1930/31.
There is given her name as EMERETT ex CUMBERLAND QUEEN and she was then owned by M.Dacosta Roberts, with homeport Baltimore, USA. Tonnage given as 659 ton.
L.R. 1931/32 gives that she is damaged in port, and then she is not more mentioned in L.R.
So most probably too expensive too repair, and scrapped.

Suriname 1996 750c sg1704, scott1070.
Source: various internet sites and Lloyds Registry.

IBN KHALDOON ?? 1976

Mr. Niewenhuijzen did say the cargo/training vessel IBN KHALDOON completed in 1978, is not the ship depict on the stamp issued by Iraq in 1981, and he gives, the stamp shows a vessel with a stulcken mast while the IBN KHALDOON has a bi-pod mast.
I agree that she is not the vessel, by searching around on the internet I found another IBN KHALDOON, (Stanley Gibbons gives that she is IBN KHALDOON, but I can’t find if this is true. Navicula gives that she is a K-class vessel.) Comparing the stamp and photos of that ships class on the internet, I agree with Navicula she is a K-class vessel.
Which vessel is depict is doubtful the name on the stamp when you enlarge the stamp is not readable, but one of the ships of that class of 52 ships is the IBN KHALDOON completed in 1976.
That class was built in the U.K and South Korea. The details of the ships are almost all the same.
The IBN KHALDOON was built as a cargo vessel under yard No 2320 by Hyundai at Ulsan, South Korea for the United Arab Shipping Co, S.A.G. Kuwait.
05 March 1976 laid down.
06 August 1976 launched as the IBN KHALDOON.
Tonnage 15,446 grt, 23,618 dwt, dim. 175.32 x 23.98 x 10.40 (draught), length bpp. 168.10m
One 6-cyl. B&W 6K74EF diesel engine, 15,000 hp, one shaft, speed 16 knots.
The class was more a conventional cargo ship but it was possible to carry 434 TEU’s containers.
December 1976 completed. Under Kuwait flag and registry.

1987 Sold to Goddard Shipping Co., Cyprus and renamed ZEBRA.
1989 Sold to Trade Fir Shipping Inc., Cyprus, renamed TRADE FIR.
1994 Sold to Temple Services Ltd., St Vincent and renamed KRISTEN STAR.
20 December 2000 arrived Chittagong for demolition.
2015 The ships of this class has all been scrapped or deleted from Lloyds Registry

Iraq 1981 50f/120f sg1507/08 scott1032/33.
Source: Marine News. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Internet.

FREMANTLE HMAS (203)

Built as a patrol boat under yard No 422 by Brooke Marine, Lowestoft South, England for the Australian Navy.
October 1977 laid down.
16 February 1979 launched as the HMAS FREMANTLE (203) the lead ship of her class.
Displacement 220 tons standard, 245 tons full load, dim. 41.9 x 7.70 x 1.75m. (draught)
Powered by 2 MTU series 538 diesel engines, 3,200 shp, twin shafts, speed 30 knots.
Range by a speed of 5 knots, 5,000 mile.
Armament 1 – 40/60mm Bofors gun, 2 – 12.7mm MG, 1 81mm mortar who was later removed..
Crew 22
17 March 1980 commissioned, homeport Coonawarra.
HMAS FREMANTLE (FCPB 203), named for the city of Fremantle, Western Australia, was the lead ship of the Fremantle class patrol boats, entering service in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in 1980 and decommissioning in 2006. Fremantle was the only ship of the class not constructed in Australia, and it is claimed that her delivery voyage was the longest ever made by a patrol boat.
Main article: Fremantle class patrol boat
Starting in the late 1960s, planning began for a new class of patrol boat to replace the Attack class, with designs calling for improved seakeeping capability, and updated weapons and equipment. In 1976, Brooke Marine of the United Kingdom won the contract to produce the lead ship.
The FREMANTLE had a full load displacement of 220 tonnes (220 long tons; 240 short tons), were 137.6 feet (41.9 m) long overall, had a beam of 24.25 feet (7.39 m), and a maximum draught of 5.75 feet (1.75 m). Main propulsion machinery consisted of two MTU series 538 diesel engines, which supplied 3,200 shaft horsepower (2,400 kW) to the two propeller shafts. Exhaust was not expelled through a funnel, like most ships, but through vents below the waterline. The patrol boat could reach a maximum speed of 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph), and had a maximum range of 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph). The ship's company consisted of 22 personnel. Each patrol boat was armed with a single 40 mm Bofors gun as main armament, supplemented by two .50 cal Browning machineguns and an 81-mm mortar, although the mortar was removed from all ships sometime in the late 1990s. The main weapon was originally to be two 30-mm guns on a twin-mount, but the reconditioned Bofors were selected to keep costs down; provision was made to install an updated weapon later in the class' service life, but this did not eventuate.
Construction
Construction of FREMANTLE began in October 1977, and she was launched on 16 February 1979. During sea trials, FREMANTLE was revealed to be 20 tons over the contract's proscribed weight, leading to unpopularity in the media. However, the design proved its worth when it was diverted from trial to successfully rescue a British sailor thrown from a fishing trawler. Because of the sea trials, FREMANTLE was not commissioned until 17 March 1980.
Delivery of previous Brooke Marine patrol boats to the client nations was normally done by loading the craft on a heavy lift ship. It was instead decided in 1979 to sail FREMANTLE to Australia; the RAN wanted to learn as much about the capabilities of the new design as quickly as possible, and the loss of an Omani Navy patrol vessel from a heavy lift ship during a storm was a cause of concern. On 7 June 1980, FREMANTLE left Lowestoft, England on the delivery voyage to Australia. The voyage took 82 days, 48 spent at sea. During this voyage, FREMANTLE travelled through the Mediterranean Sea, Suez Canal, Red Sea, along the coast of India, through Maritime Southeast Asia, then down the east coast of Australia to Sydney.[ During this voyage, FREMANTLE was tested to limits; encountering windstoms reaching Force 6, a sandstorm in the Red Sea, high-temperature and -humidity conditions, and a monsoon. By the time FREMANTLE arrived in Australia on 27 August 1980, she had already sailed 14,509 nautical miles (26,871 km). This is claimed to be the longest voyage undertaken by a single patrol boat.
Operational history
During her career, FREMANTLE was primarily involved in operations against illegal fishing and illegal immigration, and supporting Australian Coastwatch and the Australian Customs Service.
Decommissioning and fate
On 11 August 2006, HMAS FREMANTLE was decommissioned at HMAS Coonawarra, Darwin. FREMANTLE was the eighth ship of her class to be decommissioned. FREMANTLE was in service for 26 years, and travelled a distance of 535,705 nautical miles (992,126 km; 616,478 mi) from commissioning. The patrol boat was broken up for scrap in Darwin during 2006 and 2007, at a cost of $450,000 to the Australian government.

Solomon Islands 2014 in margin of MS. Sg?, scott? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_Fremantle_(FCPB_203)
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Endurance (Shackleton)

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Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:26 pm

Endurance.jpg
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SG45.jpg
SG45
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SG75
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FID G34.jpg
SG G34
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SG36
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SG32.jpg
SG32
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Endurance.jpg
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SG1375
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The Endurance, of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-16, was built in 1912 by Framnes Mek. Verks, at Sandefjord, and engined by Akers of Christiania. Her gross tonnage was 348 on dimensions 140ft. x 26.4ft. x 14.1ft., and she was the typical Norwegian whaler type of vessel, barquentine-rigged and launched 1912, as Polaris, a 3-masted barquentine with auxiliary steam for polar tourism and polar bear hunting!
Purchased by Shackleton and renamed Endurance. She was ready to sail under the direction of Sir Ernest Shackleton, C.V.O., on August 1, 1914. When the Naval mobilisation order was published on August 3, Shackleton, with the consent of the crew, offered the services of the ship and her crew to the Government. However, the Admiralty did not think the war would last longer than six months and Sir Ernest was told to go ahead with his Antarctic plans.
The Endurance carried a crew of 27 men in addition to the scientific staff. She sailed after Shackleton had been received by the King and assured of his Majesty's approval of the expedition. On this expedition a new coastline was discovered which Sir Ernest named Caird Coast in honour of Sir James Caird, who had subscribed £24,000 towards the cost of the expedition. Like the Deutschland, the Endurance was caught in pack ice, but the conditions were more severe than those experienced by the German ship. The British vessel was trapped on January 19, 1915, and crushed on October 27, 1915, finally sinking beneath the ice 25 days later.
The crew took to the ice, which drifted across the Weddell Sea. When it was obvious the pack ice was breaking up, they took to the ship's boats which had been saved when the Endurance went down and on April 16, reached Elephant Island.
What followed is an epic of the Antarctic—how Sir Ernest Shackleton left 22 men on Elephant Island, while he chose five men to accompany him in an open boat (the James Caird) to cross 800 miles of Antarctic seas to bring food and relief to the shipwrecked crew. Having successfully accomplished the almost impossible in a voyage of a fortnight, a mountain range of three ridges had to be crossed, one 5,000ft. high and covered in ice with dangerous precipices, before civilisation could be reached. It took them 36hrs. to overcome this obstacle. Eventually, Sir Ernest was able to effect the rescue of the Endurance's crew on Elephant Island, but it was not until several attempts had been made by the whaler, Southern Sky, the Uruguayan Government trawler Institute de Pesca, the British schooner Emma, and the Chilean Navy tender Yelcho, all led by Shackleton, that a way through the ice was found and the crew were picked up 41/2 months after their leader had left them. During the whole of that time Shackleton had thought of nothing but their relief.

Detail from BAT philatelic
Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton 1874-1922

Expeditions: British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-04 in Discovery. British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 in Endurance. Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition 1921-22 in Quest. Discoveries: Beardmore Glacier, South Magnetic Pole, Caird Coast.
Voyage: British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17.

Aus Ant SG45, Brit Ant SG75,249 Chile 1375 Fal Is Dep SG G34 Ross Dep SG36 South Georgia SG32.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:56 am

2015 South Georgia.JPG
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Built under yard 87 by Framnæs Mek. Verks., Sandefjord, Norway for a company formed by Lars Christensen from Norway and Adrien de Gerlach from Belgian.
17 December 1912 launched as the POLARIS.
Tonnage 348 gross, dim. 42.67 x 8.04 x 4.28m.
One auxiliary coal fired triple expansion steam engine, 350 hp, one shaft, speed 10.2 knots.
Rigged as a three-masted barkentine.
24 August 1913 completed.

She was designed for the new formed company as a polar safari ship with paying guests, but when delivered the new formed company could not made the last payment, and the POLARIS was laid up waiting for a new buyer.
When Shackleton also short by cash was looking for a polar expedition vessel, and he did not have to pay for the POLARIS straight away but after some time, bought her for 225.000NKroner.
She was renamed in ENDURANCE.
The ENDURANCE was the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. She was launched in 1912 from Sandefjord in Norway and was crushed by ice, causing her to sink, three years later in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.
Designed by Ole Aanderud Larsen, the ENDURANCE was built at the Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway and fully completed 24 August 1913. She was built under the supervision of master wood shipbuilder Christian Jacobsen, who was renowned for insisting that all men employed under him not just be skilled shipwrights, but also be experienced in seafaring aboard whaling or sealing ships. Every detail of her construction had been scrupulously planned to ensure maximum durability, for example every joint and every fitting cross-braced each other for maximum strength
She was launched on December 17, 1912 and was initially christened the POLARIS (eponymous with Polaris, the North Star). She was 144 feet (44 m) long, with a 25 feet (7.6 m) beam and weighed 350 short tons (320 t). Though her black hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while her sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. Her bow, where she would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that is natural shape followed the curve of her design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).
Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, ENDURANCE had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of driving her at speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
By the time she was launched on December 17, 1912, POLARIS was perhaps the strongest wooden ship ever built, with the possible exception of the FRAM, the vessel used by Fridtjof Nansen and later by Roald Amundsen. However, there was one major difference between the ships. The FRAM was bowl-bottomed, which meant that if the ice closed in against her she would be squeezed up and out and not be subject to the pressure of the ice compressing around her. But since the POLARIS was designed to operate in relatively loose pack ice she was not constructed so as to rise out of pressure to any great extent.
She was built for Adrien de Gerlache and Lars Christensen. They intended to use her for polar cruises for tourists to hunt polar bears. Financial problems leading to de Gerlache pulling out of their partnership meant that Christensen was happy to sell the boat to Ernest Shackleton for GB£11,600 (approx US$67,000), less than cost. He is reported to have said he was happy to take the loss in order to further the plans of an explorer of Shackleton's stature 'After Shackleton's purchasing her, she was rechristened ENDURANCE after the Shackleton family motto "Fortitudine vincimus" (By endurance we conquer).
Shackleton sailed with ENDURANCE from Plymouth, England on August 6, 1914 and set course for Buenos Aires, Argentina. This was ENDURANCE's first major cruising since her completion and amounted to a shakedown cruise. The trip across the Atlantic took more than two months. Built for the ice, her hull was considered by many of its crew too rounded for the open ocean.
On October 26, 1914 ENDURANCE sailed from Buenos Aires to her last port of call, the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia off the southern tip of South America, where she arrived on November 5. She departed from Grytviken for her final voyage on December 5, 1914 towards the southern regions of the Weddell Sea.
Two days after leaving from South Georgia, ENDURANCE encountered polar pack ice and progress slowed down. For weeks Endurance twisted and squirmed her way through the pack. She kept moving but averaged less than 30 miles (48 km) per day. By January 15, Endurance was within 200 miles (320 km) of its destination, Vahsel Bay. However by the following day heavy pack ice was sighted in the morning and in the afternoon a blowing gale developed. Under these conditions it was soon evident progress could not be made, and ENDURANCE took shelter under the lee of a large grounded berg. During the next two days ENDURANCE dogged back and forth under the sheltering protection of the berg.
On January 18 the gale began to moderate and thus ENDURANCE, one day short of her destination, set the topsail with the engine at slow. The pack had blown away. Progress was made slowly until hours later ENDURANCE encountered the pack once more. It was decided to move forward and work through the pack, and at 5pm ENDURANCE entered it. However it was noticed that this ice was different from what had been encountered before. The ship was soon engulfed by thick but soft ice floes. The ship floated in a soupy sea of mushy brash ice. The ship was beset. The gale now increased its intensity and kept blowing for another six days from a northerly direction towards land. By January 24, the wind had completely compressed the ice in the whole Weddell Sea against the land. The ice had packed snugly around ENDURANCE. All that could be done was to wait for a southerly gale that would start pushing, decompressing and opening the ice in the other direction. Instead the days passed and the pack remained unchanged.
ENDURANCE drifted for months while remaining beset in the ice in the Weddell Sea and drifted with it. The ice kept compressing it until ENDURANCE could not endure the pressure and was crushed on October 27, 1915. On the morning of November 21, 1915, the ENDURANCE bow began to sink under the ice. Like RMS TITANIC, the Endurance went vertical, her stern rising into the air, then disappearing beneath the ice. The ENDURANCE is considered the last ship of her kind.
It is said that Shackleton placed advertisements in London newspapers that read:
"MEN WANTED: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success. Sir Ernest Shackleton."
The crew of the Endurance in its final voyage was made up of the 28 men Blackborrow was originally refused a post aboard the vessel due to his young age and inexperience and decided to stow away, helped to sneak aboard by William Blakewell, a friend of his, and Walter How. By the time he was found, the expedition was far enough out that Shackleton had no choice but to make him a steward. Blackborrow eventually proved his worth, earning the Bronze Polar Medal, and the honour of becoming the first human being ever to set foot on Elephant Island. His name is also the matter of some debate—it is sometimes spelled Percy, or Blackboro, or in other ways.
Alfred Lansing wrote a book titled Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage about the ordeal that Shackleton and his men endured aboard the ship. It became a bestseller when first published in 1959. Subsequent reprints have made it a recurrent bestseller; the last time being in the late 1990s.
Two Antarctic patrol ships of the British Royal Navy have been named ENDURANCE in honour of Shackleton's ship. The first HMS ENDURANCE (originally named ANITA DAN) was launched in May 1956 and awarded Pennant number A171 sometime later. She acted as an ice patrol and hydrographic survey ship until 1986. Today's modern HMS ENDURANCE, nicknamed The Red Plum, is a class 1A1 ice-breaker bought from Norway in 1992 where she had been known as MV POLAR CIRCLE. She is based at Portsmouth but makes annual forays to Antarctica where she can penetrate through 0.9 metres (2 ft 11 in) of ice at a speed of 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph). She has a complement of 126 marine personnel and carries two Westland Lynx helicopters.
In 1998 wreckage found at Stinker Point on the south western side of Elephant Island was incorrectly identified as flotsam from the ship. It in fact belonged to the 1877 wreck of the Connecticut sealing ship CHARLES SHEARER In 2001 wreck hunter David Mearns unsuccessfully planned an expedition to find the wreck of the Endurance By 2003 two rival groups were making plans for an expedition to find the wreck, however no expedition was actually mounted. In 2010 Mearns announced a new plan to search for the wreck. The plan is sponsored by the National Geographic Society but is subject to finding sponsorship for the balance of the U.S. $10 million estimated cost.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)"

The 10p stamp features Ernest Shackleton and his Imperial Transantarctic Expedition ship ENDURANCE. The Weddell Sea party of the expedition visited South Georgia in November 1914 to take on coal and other stores and refit the ship before sailing for Antarctica. While in Buenos Aires, Shackleton was warned that it might be a bad year for ice in the Weddell Sea so he delayed his departure from South Georgia for a month. This gave time for scientific work to be carried out. Unfortunately most of the records and specimens were lost when ENDURANCE was crushed by the ice and sank. Shackleton is buried in the cemetery at Grytviken.

Source: South Georgia Post.

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2015 10p sg?, scott?
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