SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TUNE VIKING SHIP

150th Anniversary of the Tune Viking Ship Finds
150 years have passed since the first Viking ship was excavated in Norway. Archaeologist Oluf Rygh excavated the Tune ship in only 14 days from the ship burial mound in Tune. Archaeologist Even Ballangrud Andersen describes the ship: “The ship is made from clinkered oak planks, a style that was common to the Nordics. Its mast was placed just behind midship and both stern posts were raised. A special chamber had been built for the man interred in the ship and all of his burial gifts and weaponry.”
By analysing the growth rings, the ship was dated to between 905 and 910 A. D. After the ship was excavated in 1867, it was placed on a barge and sent to Fredrikstad before continuing on to Christiania. After many years in poor storage, it was moved in 1930 to its permanent home at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. Later research has concluded that the ship most likely had twelve strakes and was a fast warship used to quickly transport people.
In terms of Norway’s maritime history, the Tune ship was the first indication that the stories passed orally through the years were true. Today the Viking ships stand as iconic witnesses to more than 1,000 years on the seven seas.

Norway 2017 inland mail sg?, scott?
http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... e&id=35767

Clipper ship RACER 1851

The era of the clipper ships was dominated by a sense of romance, competition, national pride and innovative technology. The sleek and graceful ships were a symbol of modernity in America and a fundamental part of the expanding global economy. Their design concentrated on speed instead of cargo capacity, which was a great benefit to shipping companies eager to transport goods quickly. Often ship owners or Captains would commission portraits to commemorate their vessels. The RACER was a 1700 ton ship built in 1851 by Currier & Townsend at Newburyport, Massachusetts under the superintendence of her experienced commander, Capt. R. W. Steele, formerly of the packet ship Andrew Foster, and previously of the U. S. Navy. She is 207 feet long, has 42-1/2 feet breadth of beam, 28 feet depth of hold, is 7 feet high between decks . It was the first and largest ship to be built specifically for the trade route between New York and Liverpool for the St George Line. The Racer is well known from her having made the fastest passage between New York and Liverpool. Her best day's run has been 394 miles. It was fitted out with passenger accommodation and cargo space in the hold for freight. She is provided also with large loading ports, one on each side in the upper, and two on a side in the lower between decks. The RACER involved in freight and passenger transport to Australia. The “Racer” sank in 1856, after going ashore on Arklow Bank. Fortunately, all five hundred passengers and crew members were rescued. The design stamp is made after painting of Dawson, Montague
Djibouti 2013;300f.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37454888?q&versionId=48848168. http://www.maritimeheritage.org/ships/C ... html#Racer. https://springfieldmuseums.org/collecti ... l-currier/

DIANA packet ship

The stamp of Belize shows us a brig and as given on the stamp the packet ship DIANA is depict.
Lloyds Registry was not so helpful there were around that time 2 or 3 pages in Lloyds with the ships name DIANA but nowhere by that name was given if it was a packet vessel.
If she is the DIANA which is depict is doubtful I could not find any image of the ship, but the Falmouth Post Office packet ships were mostly brig rigged, and the stamp shows us a ship of that time. It looks that she was chartered by the Post Office as a packet but when and till in service I could not find.

The book “The Falmouth Packets 1689-1851 by Tony Pawlyn mentioned her twice
In 1810 she parted her anchor cable during a severe storm over the West of England, and was nearly driven ashore.
22 September 1811 she sailed for Martinique.

In 1806 the DIANA was under command of Gibbons.
1813 Her captain is given as Parsons, 190 ton and owned by Capt. & Co, Whitehaven. Till 1818 was he the captain. Built in New York?.
1819 Her owner given as Symonds and under command of Captain Sleeman
1822 Same name, owner and captain.
1824 Lloyds Registry don’t mentioned her more.

Belize 1985 75c sg849, scott?
Source: Lloyds Registry 1813-1824.

BAEK MA GANG (North Korea)

Built in 1979 by Nampo Shipyard, for Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. Nampo.
General Cargo, Dw:2740, Nt:1429, Dw:4309, Loa:100,26m. B:14m. Draft:6,40m. 1 diesel: hp.? 4x2 derricks, IMO.7944683.
20-03-2010 transferred to Paekmagang Shipping Co. Ltd. Pyongyang, renamed PAEK MA GANG.
2013 By Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. sold to Chinese breakers and arrived Shidao, Shandong on 16-04-2013.

(North Korea 2013, 15 Won, StG.?)
Internet + LR97/98

JACQUELINE- four-masted barque 1897.

A splendid four-masted steel barque, the Jacqueline a representative vessel of French build, launched in February 1897 from the yards of Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterranean at La Seyne for the wealthy firm of Paris shipowners A D Bordes and Sons and registered at Dun-kirk. Rigged with royal sails over double top and topgallant sails. Used in the South American nitrate trade.The vessel is from Marseilles and has done some fine sailing. She left on May 23,1897 sailed from Mareilles to Australia with a cargo of tiles, she had contrary weather to clearing Gibraltar June 10. After that crossed the equator July 1 in 32 38 W. Poor S E trades were met. On July 8 in 17° S , the new ship was hove to in a S S W gale for 30 hours, and it was nine days later when thev shaped east.Then commenced some excellent running. Captain Leonetti, having a new ship under himn was anxious to find what she was capable of doing with the result that tho ship is stated to have logged 15 knots per hour for four days.The prime meridian was crossed on July 24, and S S W to N W winds were carried right along to August 21 to Tasmania. Here she was becalmed and met with head winds,but it will be seen that the ship sailedI from Greenwich meridian to Tasmania in 28 days, or over 5 degrees per day right through or a 13 knot speed for the 28 days. After a most tedious time off Tasmania she picked up a sou'-wester on September 1. On that date at 8pm a sailor named Sahun fell overboard from the foreyard, A lifebuoy was thrown, and it was caught, and the man was rescued under circumstances given elsewhere. A fine run was made up the coast. The ship is an excptionally fine one being fitted up for saloon passengers in very handsome cabins which are aft, and are constructel of mahognnv, birdsoyo maple and violet ebony. The cargo-workmg appliances and the navigating deck gear are of tho most modern labour-saving kind. A running flying bridge from the poop to the foremast is built over all and the crew have most comfortable quarters in deck-houses. There are two engines - one for cargo working and tho other connected with the ballast tanks and with condensing apparatus. She is 322ft long, 45ft 7in beam and 25ft 4in deep and it is an ideal of the proportions of this most handsome vessel. 1906 sailed from Barry to Iquique in 72 days. 1907 towed against the Loup lighthouse in the Bristol Channel by two tugs which straddled the lighthouse. The Jacqueline damaged the bowsprit which was repaired at Falmouth. 1917 July 1 Left Iquique under Captain Y. Niolas with a cargo of nitrate for La Pallice. 1917 September 25 The British steamship Victoria warned the captain of the Jacqueline for submarines in position 46°25'N, 13°10'W. After the war it was established that she had been sunk by the German submarine U-101 in the Bay of Biscay the following morning. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale. .
Malawi 2013;250k.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14120744. http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships ... eline(1897).html.

BRIG-SCHOONER

The stamp inscription gives “brig-schooner” but she is rigged as a hermaphrodite brig, a term used in the late 18th centuries for a vessel that carried as many as 5 square sails on the foremast and a fore-and-aft mainsail with a gaff topsail. Numerous staysails between the masts and jibs to a long bowsprit. The type is now usually called a brigantine.

Somalia Republic 1998 300 SH SO sg?, scott?
Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
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Endurance (Shackleton)

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Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:26 pm

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SG45
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SG75
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SG G34
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The Endurance, of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-16, was built in 1912 by Framnes Mek. Verks, at Sandefjord, and engined by Akers of Christiania. Her gross tonnage was 348 on dimensions 140ft. x 26.4ft. x 14.1ft., and she was the typical Norwegian whaler type of vessel, barquentine-rigged and launched 1912, as Polaris, a 3-masted barquentine with auxiliary steam for polar tourism and polar bear hunting!
Purchased by Shackleton and renamed Endurance. She was ready to sail under the direction of Sir Ernest Shackleton, C.V.O., on August 1, 1914. When the Naval mobilisation order was published on August 3, Shackleton, with the consent of the crew, offered the services of the ship and her crew to the Government. However, the Admiralty did not think the war would last longer than six months and Sir Ernest was told to go ahead with his Antarctic plans.
The Endurance carried a crew of 27 men in addition to the scientific staff. She sailed after Shackleton had been received by the King and assured of his Majesty's approval of the expedition. On this expedition a new coastline was discovered which Sir Ernest named Caird Coast in honour of Sir James Caird, who had subscribed £24,000 towards the cost of the expedition. Like the Deutschland, the Endurance was caught in pack ice, but the conditions were more severe than those experienced by the German ship. The British vessel was trapped on January 19, 1915, and crushed on October 27, 1915, finally sinking beneath the ice 25 days later.
The crew took to the ice, which drifted across the Weddell Sea. When it was obvious the pack ice was breaking up, they took to the ship's boats which had been saved when the Endurance went down and on April 16, reached Elephant Island.
What followed is an epic of the Antarctic—how Sir Ernest Shackleton left 22 men on Elephant Island, while he chose five men to accompany him in an open boat (the James Caird) to cross 800 miles of Antarctic seas to bring food and relief to the shipwrecked crew. Having successfully accomplished the almost impossible in a voyage of a fortnight, a mountain range of three ridges had to be crossed, one 5,000ft. high and covered in ice with dangerous precipices, before civilisation could be reached. It took them 36hrs. to overcome this obstacle. Eventually, Sir Ernest was able to effect the rescue of the Endurance's crew on Elephant Island, but it was not until several attempts had been made by the whaler, Southern Sky, the Uruguayan Government trawler Institute de Pesca, the British schooner Emma, and the Chilean Navy tender Yelcho, all led by Shackleton, that a way through the ice was found and the crew were picked up 41/2 months after their leader had left them. During the whole of that time Shackleton had thought of nothing but their relief.

Detail from BAT philatelic
Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton 1874-1922

Expeditions: British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-04 in Discovery. British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 in Endurance. Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition 1921-22 in Quest. Discoveries: Beardmore Glacier, South Magnetic Pole, Caird Coast.
Voyage: British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17.

Aus Ant SG45, Brit Ant SG75,249 Chile 1375 Fal Is Dep SG G34 Ross Dep SG36 South Georgia SG32.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:56 am

2015 South Georgia.JPG
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Built under yard 87 by Framnæs Mek. Verks., Sandefjord, Norway for a company formed by Lars Christensen from Norway and Adrien de Gerlach from Belgian.
17 December 1912 launched as the POLARIS.
Tonnage 348 gross, dim. 42.67 x 8.04 x 4.28m.
One auxiliary coal fired triple expansion steam engine, 350 hp, one shaft, speed 10.2 knots.
Rigged as a three-masted barkentine.
24 August 1913 completed.

She was designed for the new formed company as a polar safari ship with paying guests, but when delivered the new formed company could not made the last payment, and the POLARIS was laid up waiting for a new buyer.
When Shackleton also short by cash was looking for a polar expedition vessel, and he did not have to pay for the POLARIS straight away but after some time, bought her for 225.000NKroner.
She was renamed in ENDURANCE.
The ENDURANCE was the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. She was launched in 1912 from Sandefjord in Norway and was crushed by ice, causing her to sink, three years later in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.
Designed by Ole Aanderud Larsen, the ENDURANCE was built at the Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway and fully completed 24 August 1913. She was built under the supervision of master wood shipbuilder Christian Jacobsen, who was renowned for insisting that all men employed under him not just be skilled shipwrights, but also be experienced in seafaring aboard whaling or sealing ships. Every detail of her construction had been scrupulously planned to ensure maximum durability, for example every joint and every fitting cross-braced each other for maximum strength
She was launched on December 17, 1912 and was initially christened the POLARIS (eponymous with Polaris, the North Star). She was 144 feet (44 m) long, with a 25 feet (7.6 m) beam and weighed 350 short tons (320 t). Though her black hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while her sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. Her bow, where she would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that is natural shape followed the curve of her design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).
Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, ENDURANCE had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of driving her at speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
By the time she was launched on December 17, 1912, POLARIS was perhaps the strongest wooden ship ever built, with the possible exception of the FRAM, the vessel used by Fridtjof Nansen and later by Roald Amundsen. However, there was one major difference between the ships. The FRAM was bowl-bottomed, which meant that if the ice closed in against her she would be squeezed up and out and not be subject to the pressure of the ice compressing around her. But since the POLARIS was designed to operate in relatively loose pack ice she was not constructed so as to rise out of pressure to any great extent.
She was built for Adrien de Gerlache and Lars Christensen. They intended to use her for polar cruises for tourists to hunt polar bears. Financial problems leading to de Gerlache pulling out of their partnership meant that Christensen was happy to sell the boat to Ernest Shackleton for GB£11,600 (approx US$67,000), less than cost. He is reported to have said he was happy to take the loss in order to further the plans of an explorer of Shackleton's stature 'After Shackleton's purchasing her, she was rechristened ENDURANCE after the Shackleton family motto "Fortitudine vincimus" (By endurance we conquer).
Shackleton sailed with ENDURANCE from Plymouth, England on August 6, 1914 and set course for Buenos Aires, Argentina. This was ENDURANCE's first major cruising since her completion and amounted to a shakedown cruise. The trip across the Atlantic took more than two months. Built for the ice, her hull was considered by many of its crew too rounded for the open ocean.
On October 26, 1914 ENDURANCE sailed from Buenos Aires to her last port of call, the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia off the southern tip of South America, where she arrived on November 5. She departed from Grytviken for her final voyage on December 5, 1914 towards the southern regions of the Weddell Sea.
Two days after leaving from South Georgia, ENDURANCE encountered polar pack ice and progress slowed down. For weeks Endurance twisted and squirmed her way through the pack. She kept moving but averaged less than 30 miles (48 km) per day. By January 15, Endurance was within 200 miles (320 km) of its destination, Vahsel Bay. However by the following day heavy pack ice was sighted in the morning and in the afternoon a blowing gale developed. Under these conditions it was soon evident progress could not be made, and ENDURANCE took shelter under the lee of a large grounded berg. During the next two days ENDURANCE dogged back and forth under the sheltering protection of the berg.
On January 18 the gale began to moderate and thus ENDURANCE, one day short of her destination, set the topsail with the engine at slow. The pack had blown away. Progress was made slowly until hours later ENDURANCE encountered the pack once more. It was decided to move forward and work through the pack, and at 5pm ENDURANCE entered it. However it was noticed that this ice was different from what had been encountered before. The ship was soon engulfed by thick but soft ice floes. The ship floated in a soupy sea of mushy brash ice. The ship was beset. The gale now increased its intensity and kept blowing for another six days from a northerly direction towards land. By January 24, the wind had completely compressed the ice in the whole Weddell Sea against the land. The ice had packed snugly around ENDURANCE. All that could be done was to wait for a southerly gale that would start pushing, decompressing and opening the ice in the other direction. Instead the days passed and the pack remained unchanged.
ENDURANCE drifted for months while remaining beset in the ice in the Weddell Sea and drifted with it. The ice kept compressing it until ENDURANCE could not endure the pressure and was crushed on October 27, 1915. On the morning of November 21, 1915, the ENDURANCE bow began to sink under the ice. Like RMS TITANIC, the Endurance went vertical, her stern rising into the air, then disappearing beneath the ice. The ENDURANCE is considered the last ship of her kind.
It is said that Shackleton placed advertisements in London newspapers that read:
"MEN WANTED: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success. Sir Ernest Shackleton."
The crew of the Endurance in its final voyage was made up of the 28 men Blackborrow was originally refused a post aboard the vessel due to his young age and inexperience and decided to stow away, helped to sneak aboard by William Blakewell, a friend of his, and Walter How. By the time he was found, the expedition was far enough out that Shackleton had no choice but to make him a steward. Blackborrow eventually proved his worth, earning the Bronze Polar Medal, and the honour of becoming the first human being ever to set foot on Elephant Island. His name is also the matter of some debate—it is sometimes spelled Percy, or Blackboro, or in other ways.
Alfred Lansing wrote a book titled Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage about the ordeal that Shackleton and his men endured aboard the ship. It became a bestseller when first published in 1959. Subsequent reprints have made it a recurrent bestseller; the last time being in the late 1990s.
Two Antarctic patrol ships of the British Royal Navy have been named ENDURANCE in honour of Shackleton's ship. The first HMS ENDURANCE (originally named ANITA DAN) was launched in May 1956 and awarded Pennant number A171 sometime later. She acted as an ice patrol and hydrographic survey ship until 1986. Today's modern HMS ENDURANCE, nicknamed The Red Plum, is a class 1A1 ice-breaker bought from Norway in 1992 where she had been known as MV POLAR CIRCLE. She is based at Portsmouth but makes annual forays to Antarctica where she can penetrate through 0.9 metres (2 ft 11 in) of ice at a speed of 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph). She has a complement of 126 marine personnel and carries two Westland Lynx helicopters.
In 1998 wreckage found at Stinker Point on the south western side of Elephant Island was incorrectly identified as flotsam from the ship. It in fact belonged to the 1877 wreck of the Connecticut sealing ship CHARLES SHEARER In 2001 wreck hunter David Mearns unsuccessfully planned an expedition to find the wreck of the Endurance By 2003 two rival groups were making plans for an expedition to find the wreck, however no expedition was actually mounted. In 2010 Mearns announced a new plan to search for the wreck. The plan is sponsored by the National Geographic Society but is subject to finding sponsorship for the balance of the U.S. $10 million estimated cost.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)"

The 10p stamp features Ernest Shackleton and his Imperial Transantarctic Expedition ship ENDURANCE. The Weddell Sea party of the expedition visited South Georgia in November 1914 to take on coal and other stores and refit the ship before sailing for Antarctica. While in Buenos Aires, Shackleton was warned that it might be a bad year for ice in the Weddell Sea so he delayed his departure from South Georgia for a month. This gave time for scientific work to be carried out. Unfortunately most of the records and specimens were lost when ENDURANCE was crushed by the ice and sank. Shackleton is buried in the cemetery at Grytviken.

Source: South Georgia Post.

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2015 10p sg?, scott?
Maldives 2015 20M and 60M sg?, scott?
Solomon Islands 2015 $40 sgMS?, scott?
Sierra Leone 2015 6000L sgMS?, scott? sgMS?, scott?
Guina 2015 10.000f sgMS?, scott?
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby ptvisnes » Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:11 pm

More issues with "Endurance" (1912)

British Antarctic Territory
1994. 76p+4p. Mi 234. SG 249. Sc B4
2000. 35p. Mi 298. SG 312. Sc 285
2000. 40p. Mi 299. SG 313. Sc XXX
2005. 42p. Mi 397. SG 400. Sc 350
2005. 55p. Mi 410. SG 409. Sc 363
2005. £1. Mi 411. SG 410. Sc 364
2008. 4v. Mi Bl 15. SG MS 473. Sc 399d
2013. 6v. Mi (640-45) Bl 25. SG xxx. Sc 470 a-f
2013. 75p. Mi 645. SG xxx. Sc 470f
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 471
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 472
Falkland Islands
2000. 17p. Mi 776. SG 867. Sc 758
2000. 45p. Mi 777. SG 868. Sc 759
Ireland
2004. 48c/48c. Mi 1569/70. SG 1637/38. Sc xxx
2004. 65c/65c. Mi 1573/74 Bl 15. In margin
Great Britain
2003. 42p. Mi 2107. SG 2363. Sc 2121
South Georgia & SSI
2009. 55p. Mi 473. SG 472. Sc 385
2011. £1.15. Mi 549. SG 549. Sc 442b
2014. 12v.
Ross Dependency
2015. 80c. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc xxx
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sun May 22, 2016 6:54 pm

endurance 1.jpg
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endurance in ijs.jpg
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endurance ierland.png
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British Antarctic Territory 2014, 2x 65 p. StG.?
Ireland 2004, 2x 48 c. StG.1637/38
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