SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DOUALA PORT

The 1955 200f stamp and 1961 stamp Republique Federal shows us freighters in Douala port and In 1968 Cameroun issued five stamps for the “Five Year Development”, of which the 60F stamp shows us Douala port, with moored alongside a tug and some cargo vessels. On both stamps depicted vessels are not identified.

The town of Douala is situated in the estuary of the Wouri River, 50 km from the sea. It is an area of commercial activity since the 19th century when works were carried on there to permit trade between the coastal dwellers and traders from Hamburg and Bremen.
As per certain sources, the area was first developed by a German sailing company the “Woerman Line” in 1881. At that time it was only an anchorage and ships discharged on the river in barges. With the beginning of the First World War that saw an end to the German presence in Cameroun. Access to the port of Douala was made possible for ships with 4.0 metres draft. The infrastructure consists of a wharf of 60 metres, with warehouses, seven private jetties, ware-houses are connected by a road of 60 meters. Bonabéri at this time, will be served by a pier 100 meters long, with ware-houses. Well-equipped workshops and a floating dock of 900 tons. Annual traffic capacity is evaluated at 100 000 tonnes. After the Germans surrendered, the first objectives of the French who henceforth became the masters extended the railway and equipped the Port of Douala. Extension works stopped in 1922. They at the same time organized activities that cantered on specialized services of Ports and inland navigable ways under the colonial public works. That saw the beginning of the slow but sure setting up of institutions under French Administration.
At independence in 1960, this department became the Department of Ports for Navigable Ways under the Ministry of Transport.

Source: Douala Port website.
Cameroun 1953 200f sg262, scott C36, 1961 10/ sg?, scott? and 1968 60f sg494, scott?

DELTUVA

The Colombian Post issued in 2018 a miniature sheet with images from Barranquilla, of which one stamp shows us the Barranquilla port with a cargo vessel.

The cargo vessel is the DELTUVA the name is visible on the bow when you enlarge the stamp.
Built as a cargo vessel under yard No b570-1/1 by Stocznia Szczecinska Nowa Z O.O. New Szczecin Shipyard in Szczecin, Poland for Clipper Eagle Shipping Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas,
09 July 1994 launched as the CLIPPER EAGLE.
Tonnage 11,542 grt, 5,366 net, 16,906 dwt, dim. 149,44 x 23.00 x 12.10m., length bpp. 138.0m, draught 6.10m.
Powered by a one 4S50MC 4-cyl. diesel engine, manufactured bu H. Cegielski, 5,720 kW. One fixed pitch propeller. Speed 14 knots.
Four holds. Two cranes each 20.0 ton lifting capacity.
Capacity, grain 21,307m², bale 21,043m².
04 October 1994 completed. IMO No 8908832.

2007 Sold to Lithuanian Shipping Co. Klaipeda, Lithuania, renamed in DELTUVA.
2016 After the Lithuanian Shipping Co, got bankrupt during a public auction the DELTUVA was bought by Pirita Shipholding Co., Geneva, Switserland, renamed PIRITA under Antigua& Barbuda flag and registry.
15 June 2017 PIRITA arrived Chittagong, Bangladesh for scrapping.

Colombia 2018 $5.000 sg?, scott? and miniature sheet al $5.000 stamps.
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.nz and internet.

FAKHR EL BIHAR Royal yacht

For a meeting between King Farouk of Egypt and King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia in 1945 at Radhwa the Saudi Arabian Post issued four stamps. The stamps are not so clear, but the vessel on the left top is the Egyptian Royal yacht FAKHR EL BIHAR on which the meeting took place.

Built as a steel hulled yacht under yard No 268 by Ramage & Ferguson, Leith, Scotland for H.H. Prince Youssouf Kamal, Alexandria, Egypt.
09 September 1930 launched as the NAZ-PERWER.
Tonnage 708 grt, 251nrt, 1.051 tm, dim. 75.98 x 9.75 x 4.98m.
Powered by two 4S.C.SA 8-cyl. oil engines, manufactured by Friedrich Krupp A.G., Kiel, 384 nhp.
Schooner rigged.
December 1930 completed.

1940 Sold to King Farouk of Egypt and renamed in FAKHR EL BIHAR.
24 January 1945 King Farouk visited King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia. The meeting between the two kings took place in Radhwa on board of the FAKHR EL BIHAR.
1949 Sold to the Egyptian Government and renamed El QUOSSEIR. Used by the Egyptian Naval Academy as training ship.
2018 In service same name and managed by the Egyptian Navy.

Source Log Book 3/70 and internet.
Saudi Arabia 1945 ½ to 10g scott 173/76

TE ARAWA waka

Hawaiki – a real island? Or a mythical place? Hawaiki is the traditional Māori place of origin. The first Māori are said to have sailed to New Zealand from Hawaiki

In Māori mythology, ARAWA was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled Aotearoa (New Zealand).
The Te ARAWA confederation of Māori iwi and hapu (tribes and sub-tribes) based in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty areas of New Zealand trace their ancestry from this waka
Construction of the canoe
Eventually, a large tree was felled and from this the waka which eventually came to be known as Te ARAWA was formed. The men who turned this log into a beautifully decorated canoe were Rata, Wahieroa, Ngaahue and Parata. "Hauhau-te-rangi" and "Tuutauru" (made from New Zealand greenstone brought back by Ngaahue) were the adzes they used for this time-consuming and intensive work. Upon completion, the waka was given the name Ngaa raakau kotahi puu a Atua Matua (also known as Ngaa raakau maatahi puu a Atua Matua).
The waka was eventually completed and berthed in Whenuakura Bay while Tama-te-kapua, in his capacity as rangatira (chief) of the canoe, set about trying to find a tohunga (priest) for the journey. Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife Kearoa were tricked by Tama-te-kapua to board the canoe to perform the necessary appeasement incantations to the gods prior to the canoe's departure. However, while they were on board, Tama-te-kapua signalled his men to quickly set sail, and before Ngātoro-i-rangi and his wife could respond they were far out to sea
Voyage to Aotearoa
One of the more dramatic stories pertaining to the voyage to Aotearoa occurred because Tama-te-kapua became desirous of Kearoa. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed the glint in Tama-te-kapua's eye and took precautions to protect his wife during the night while he was on deck navigating by the stars. This was done by tying one end of a cord to her hair and holding the other end in his hand. However, Tama-te-kapua untied the cord from Kearoa's hair and attached it to the bed instead. He then made love to her, following this pattern over a number of nights. One night however, he was nearly discovered in the act by Ngātoro-i-rangi, but just managed to escape. In his haste he forgot the cord. Ngātoro-i-rangi noticed this and therefore knew that Tama-te-kapua had been with Kearoa. He was furious and, in his desire to gain revenge, raised a huge whirlpool in the sea named Te korokoro-o-te-Parata ("The throat of Te Parata"). The waka was about to be lost with all on board but Ngātoro-i-rangi eventually took pity and caused the seas to become calm (Steedman, pp 99-100).
One incident that occurred during this drama was that all the kūmara (sweet potato) carried on the waka were lost overboard, save for a few that were in a small kete being clutched by Whakaotirang Immediately after the calming of the seas, a shark (known as an ARAWA) was seen in the water. Ngātoro-i-rangi immediately renamed the waka Te ARAWA, after this shark, which then accompanied the waka to Aotearoa, acting in the capacity of a kai-tiaki (guardian).
The ARAWA waka then continued on to Aotearoa without incident, finally sighting land at Whangaparaoa where feather headdresses were foolishly cast away due to greed and due to the beauty of the pohutukawa bloom. Upon landfall, an argument took place with members of the Tainui canoe over a beached whale and the ownership thereof. Tama-te-kapua again resorted to trickery and took possession of it despite rightful claim of the Tainui. . The canoe then travelled north up the coast to the Coromandel Peninsula, where Tama-te-kapua first sighted the mountain Moehau, a place he was later to make home. Heading south again, it finally came to rest at Maketu, where it was beached and stood until being burnt by Raumati of Taranaki some years later.
Some items of note that were brought to Aotearoa on the ARAWA, other than the precious kūmara saved by Whakaotirangi, was a tapu kōhatu (stone) left by Ngātoro-i-rangi on the island Te Poito o te Kupenga a Taramainuku just off the coast of Cape Colville. This stone held the mauri to protect the Te ARAWA peoples and their descendants from evil times (Stafford, 1967, p17). In addition, the waka brought over two gods, one called Itupaoa, which was represented by a roll of tapa, and another stone carving now possibly buried at Mokoia Island, Lake Rotorua.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARAWA_(canoe)
New Zealand 1906 ½d sg 370, scott ?

INAUGURATION OF THE PORT OF LOME

For the inauguration of the port of Lome and the 8th anniversary of Independence the Togo Post issued a set of stamps.

The 20f stamp shows us the inauguration of the port with in the background a tug and cargo vessels, which are not identified.
Lomé is the main port for the trade of goods. It was established by the Germans in the early 1900s. From the wooden wharf to the current modern facilities, this port has been the centre of major changes. Today (2018) , it is one of the deepest–water ports in the whole West African region, handling over 80% of the international trade of Togo. Lomé is also an important transit point for landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.
The Port of Lomé lies in the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic coast), in the extreme southwestern corner of the country. Its modernization started in the 1960s. The deepwater harbor was completed/inaugurated in 1968. It was initially planned for a 400,000-ton annual traffic, but currently handles a traffic estimated over 6 millions tons.
The increased capacity of the Port of Lomé has facilitated the shipping of phosphates and other major export products, such as cocoa, coffee, copra, cotton, and palm products. It has also positioned Lomé as one of the main port for the international trade of neighboring landlocked countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso.

Source: http://dlca.logcluster.org/display/publ ... CB9087590E
Togo 1968 30f sg 590 scott?

LANDING OF THE MAORI IN NEW ZEALAND AROUND 1350.

Landing of Maori in New Zealand around 1350, in the background of the stamp you see a double hulled waka prow.

Maori history was transmitted orally from generation to generation in pre-European times. A continuing examination of the traditions, archaeological, linguistic and cultural evidence, has discredited the 'great fleet theory' of the Maori arrival in New Zealand. The consensus among scholars now is that the Polynesians originally moved into the Pacific from the west, spread eastwards, and that the Maori came most recently from the eastern Pacific (that is from Tahiti or the Marquesas). They began to arrive here in small groups, starting more than 1000 years ago, probably via islands to the north-east. The scene depicted on the stamp is an original conception by the artist of the arrival of one of the canoes The Maoris have been pictured as arriving in a state of physical exhaustion, the inevitable consequence, despite their magnificent seafaring skills, of weeks spent in open canoes.

The first Maori arrived in the canoe ARAWA or TAINUI.

New Zealand 1940 ½d sg613, scott?
Source: New Zealand Post.
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Endurance (Shackleton)

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Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:26 pm

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The Endurance, of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-16, was built in 1912 by Framnes Mek. Verks, at Sandefjord, and engined by Akers of Christiania. Her gross tonnage was 348 on dimensions 140ft. x 26.4ft. x 14.1ft., and she was the typical Norwegian whaler type of vessel, barquentine-rigged and launched 1912, as Polaris, a 3-masted barquentine with auxiliary steam for polar tourism and polar bear hunting!
Purchased by Shackleton and renamed Endurance. She was ready to sail under the direction of Sir Ernest Shackleton, C.V.O., on August 1, 1914. When the Naval mobilisation order was published on August 3, Shackleton, with the consent of the crew, offered the services of the ship and her crew to the Government. However, the Admiralty did not think the war would last longer than six months and Sir Ernest was told to go ahead with his Antarctic plans.
The Endurance carried a crew of 27 men in addition to the scientific staff. She sailed after Shackleton had been received by the King and assured of his Majesty's approval of the expedition. On this expedition a new coastline was discovered which Sir Ernest named Caird Coast in honour of Sir James Caird, who had subscribed £24,000 towards the cost of the expedition. Like the Deutschland, the Endurance was caught in pack ice, but the conditions were more severe than those experienced by the German ship. The British vessel was trapped on January 19, 1915, and crushed on October 27, 1915, finally sinking beneath the ice 25 days later.
The crew took to the ice, which drifted across the Weddell Sea. When it was obvious the pack ice was breaking up, they took to the ship's boats which had been saved when the Endurance went down and on April 16, reached Elephant Island.
What followed is an epic of the Antarctic—how Sir Ernest Shackleton left 22 men on Elephant Island, while he chose five men to accompany him in an open boat (the James Caird) to cross 800 miles of Antarctic seas to bring food and relief to the shipwrecked crew. Having successfully accomplished the almost impossible in a voyage of a fortnight, a mountain range of three ridges had to be crossed, one 5,000ft. high and covered in ice with dangerous precipices, before civilisation could be reached. It took them 36hrs. to overcome this obstacle. Eventually, Sir Ernest was able to effect the rescue of the Endurance's crew on Elephant Island, but it was not until several attempts had been made by the whaler, Southern Sky, the Uruguayan Government trawler Institute de Pesca, the British schooner Emma, and the Chilean Navy tender Yelcho, all led by Shackleton, that a way through the ice was found and the crew were picked up 41/2 months after their leader had left them. During the whole of that time Shackleton had thought of nothing but their relief.

Detail from BAT philatelic
Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton 1874-1922

Expeditions: British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-04 in Discovery. British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 in Endurance. Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition 1921-22 in Quest. Discoveries: Beardmore Glacier, South Magnetic Pole, Caird Coast.
Voyage: British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17.

Aus Ant SG45, Brit Ant SG75,249 Chile 1375 Fal Is Dep SG G34 Ross Dep SG36 South Georgia SG32.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:56 am

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Built under yard 87 by Framnæs Mek. Verks., Sandefjord, Norway for a company formed by Lars Christensen from Norway and Adrien de Gerlach from Belgian.
17 December 1912 launched as the POLARIS.
Tonnage 348 gross, dim. 42.67 x 8.04 x 4.28m.
One auxiliary coal fired triple expansion steam engine, 350 hp, one shaft, speed 10.2 knots.
Rigged as a three-masted barkentine.
24 August 1913 completed.

She was designed for the new formed company as a polar safari ship with paying guests, but when delivered the new formed company could not made the last payment, and the POLARIS was laid up waiting for a new buyer.
When Shackleton also short by cash was looking for a polar expedition vessel, and he did not have to pay for the POLARIS straight away but after some time, bought her for 225.000NKroner.
She was renamed in ENDURANCE.
The ENDURANCE was the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. She was launched in 1912 from Sandefjord in Norway and was crushed by ice, causing her to sink, three years later in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.
Designed by Ole Aanderud Larsen, the ENDURANCE was built at the Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway and fully completed 24 August 1913. She was built under the supervision of master wood shipbuilder Christian Jacobsen, who was renowned for insisting that all men employed under him not just be skilled shipwrights, but also be experienced in seafaring aboard whaling or sealing ships. Every detail of her construction had been scrupulously planned to ensure maximum durability, for example every joint and every fitting cross-braced each other for maximum strength
She was launched on December 17, 1912 and was initially christened the POLARIS (eponymous with Polaris, the North Star). She was 144 feet (44 m) long, with a 25 feet (7.6 m) beam and weighed 350 short tons (320 t). Though her black hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while her sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. Her bow, where she would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that is natural shape followed the curve of her design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).
Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, ENDURANCE had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of driving her at speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
By the time she was launched on December 17, 1912, POLARIS was perhaps the strongest wooden ship ever built, with the possible exception of the FRAM, the vessel used by Fridtjof Nansen and later by Roald Amundsen. However, there was one major difference between the ships. The FRAM was bowl-bottomed, which meant that if the ice closed in against her she would be squeezed up and out and not be subject to the pressure of the ice compressing around her. But since the POLARIS was designed to operate in relatively loose pack ice she was not constructed so as to rise out of pressure to any great extent.
She was built for Adrien de Gerlache and Lars Christensen. They intended to use her for polar cruises for tourists to hunt polar bears. Financial problems leading to de Gerlache pulling out of their partnership meant that Christensen was happy to sell the boat to Ernest Shackleton for GB£11,600 (approx US$67,000), less than cost. He is reported to have said he was happy to take the loss in order to further the plans of an explorer of Shackleton's stature 'After Shackleton's purchasing her, she was rechristened ENDURANCE after the Shackleton family motto "Fortitudine vincimus" (By endurance we conquer).
Shackleton sailed with ENDURANCE from Plymouth, England on August 6, 1914 and set course for Buenos Aires, Argentina. This was ENDURANCE's first major cruising since her completion and amounted to a shakedown cruise. The trip across the Atlantic took more than two months. Built for the ice, her hull was considered by many of its crew too rounded for the open ocean.
On October 26, 1914 ENDURANCE sailed from Buenos Aires to her last port of call, the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia off the southern tip of South America, where she arrived on November 5. She departed from Grytviken for her final voyage on December 5, 1914 towards the southern regions of the Weddell Sea.
Two days after leaving from South Georgia, ENDURANCE encountered polar pack ice and progress slowed down. For weeks Endurance twisted and squirmed her way through the pack. She kept moving but averaged less than 30 miles (48 km) per day. By January 15, Endurance was within 200 miles (320 km) of its destination, Vahsel Bay. However by the following day heavy pack ice was sighted in the morning and in the afternoon a blowing gale developed. Under these conditions it was soon evident progress could not be made, and ENDURANCE took shelter under the lee of a large grounded berg. During the next two days ENDURANCE dogged back and forth under the sheltering protection of the berg.
On January 18 the gale began to moderate and thus ENDURANCE, one day short of her destination, set the topsail with the engine at slow. The pack had blown away. Progress was made slowly until hours later ENDURANCE encountered the pack once more. It was decided to move forward and work through the pack, and at 5pm ENDURANCE entered it. However it was noticed that this ice was different from what had been encountered before. The ship was soon engulfed by thick but soft ice floes. The ship floated in a soupy sea of mushy brash ice. The ship was beset. The gale now increased its intensity and kept blowing for another six days from a northerly direction towards land. By January 24, the wind had completely compressed the ice in the whole Weddell Sea against the land. The ice had packed snugly around ENDURANCE. All that could be done was to wait for a southerly gale that would start pushing, decompressing and opening the ice in the other direction. Instead the days passed and the pack remained unchanged.
ENDURANCE drifted for months while remaining beset in the ice in the Weddell Sea and drifted with it. The ice kept compressing it until ENDURANCE could not endure the pressure and was crushed on October 27, 1915. On the morning of November 21, 1915, the ENDURANCE bow began to sink under the ice. Like RMS TITANIC, the Endurance went vertical, her stern rising into the air, then disappearing beneath the ice. The ENDURANCE is considered the last ship of her kind.
It is said that Shackleton placed advertisements in London newspapers that read:
"MEN WANTED: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success. Sir Ernest Shackleton."
The crew of the Endurance in its final voyage was made up of the 28 men Blackborrow was originally refused a post aboard the vessel due to his young age and inexperience and decided to stow away, helped to sneak aboard by William Blakewell, a friend of his, and Walter How. By the time he was found, the expedition was far enough out that Shackleton had no choice but to make him a steward. Blackborrow eventually proved his worth, earning the Bronze Polar Medal, and the honour of becoming the first human being ever to set foot on Elephant Island. His name is also the matter of some debate—it is sometimes spelled Percy, or Blackboro, or in other ways.
Alfred Lansing wrote a book titled Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage about the ordeal that Shackleton and his men endured aboard the ship. It became a bestseller when first published in 1959. Subsequent reprints have made it a recurrent bestseller; the last time being in the late 1990s.
Two Antarctic patrol ships of the British Royal Navy have been named ENDURANCE in honour of Shackleton's ship. The first HMS ENDURANCE (originally named ANITA DAN) was launched in May 1956 and awarded Pennant number A171 sometime later. She acted as an ice patrol and hydrographic survey ship until 1986. Today's modern HMS ENDURANCE, nicknamed The Red Plum, is a class 1A1 ice-breaker bought from Norway in 1992 where she had been known as MV POLAR CIRCLE. She is based at Portsmouth but makes annual forays to Antarctica where she can penetrate through 0.9 metres (2 ft 11 in) of ice at a speed of 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph). She has a complement of 126 marine personnel and carries two Westland Lynx helicopters.
In 1998 wreckage found at Stinker Point on the south western side of Elephant Island was incorrectly identified as flotsam from the ship. It in fact belonged to the 1877 wreck of the Connecticut sealing ship CHARLES SHEARER In 2001 wreck hunter David Mearns unsuccessfully planned an expedition to find the wreck of the Endurance By 2003 two rival groups were making plans for an expedition to find the wreck, however no expedition was actually mounted. In 2010 Mearns announced a new plan to search for the wreck. The plan is sponsored by the National Geographic Society but is subject to finding sponsorship for the balance of the U.S. $10 million estimated cost.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)"

The 10p stamp features Ernest Shackleton and his Imperial Transantarctic Expedition ship ENDURANCE. The Weddell Sea party of the expedition visited South Georgia in November 1914 to take on coal and other stores and refit the ship before sailing for Antarctica. While in Buenos Aires, Shackleton was warned that it might be a bad year for ice in the Weddell Sea so he delayed his departure from South Georgia for a month. This gave time for scientific work to be carried out. Unfortunately most of the records and specimens were lost when ENDURANCE was crushed by the ice and sank. Shackleton is buried in the cemetery at Grytviken.

Source: South Georgia Post.

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2015 10p sg?, scott?
Maldives 2015 20M and 60M sg?, scott?
Solomon Islands 2015 $40 sgMS?, scott?
Sierra Leone 2015 6000L sgMS?, scott? sgMS?, scott?
Guina 2015 10.000f sgMS?, scott?
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby ptvisnes » Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:11 pm

More issues with "Endurance" (1912)

British Antarctic Territory
1994. 76p+4p. Mi 234. SG 249. Sc B4
2000. 35p. Mi 298. SG 312. Sc 285
2000. 40p. Mi 299. SG 313. Sc XXX
2005. 42p. Mi 397. SG 400. Sc 350
2005. 55p. Mi 410. SG 409. Sc 363
2005. £1. Mi 411. SG 410. Sc 364
2008. 4v. Mi Bl 15. SG MS 473. Sc 399d
2013. 6v. Mi (640-45) Bl 25. SG xxx. Sc 470 a-f
2013. 75p. Mi 645. SG xxx. Sc 470f
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 471
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 472
Falkland Islands
2000. 17p. Mi 776. SG 867. Sc 758
2000. 45p. Mi 777. SG 868. Sc 759
Ireland
2004. 48c/48c. Mi 1569/70. SG 1637/38. Sc xxx
2004. 65c/65c. Mi 1573/74 Bl 15. In margin
Great Britain
2003. 42p. Mi 2107. SG 2363. Sc 2121
South Georgia & SSI
2009. 55p. Mi 473. SG 472. Sc 385
2011. £1.15. Mi 549. SG 549. Sc 442b
2014. 12v.
Ross Dependency
2015. 80c. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc xxx
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Sun May 22, 2016 6:54 pm

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British Antarctic Territory 2014, 2x 65 p. StG.?
Ireland 2004, 2x 48 c. StG.1637/38
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:46 am

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Maldive Islands 2017 60MVR sgMS?, scott?
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby Anatol » Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:03 pm

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Thad 2017;2300f;800f;800f;800f;800f;Sg?
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Mar 01, 2018 8:04 pm

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Australia Antarctic Territory issued 3 stamps and a miniature sheet in 2017 for the “AAT Cultural Heritage” of which the $1 stamp shows in the left of the stamp a sailing vessel which Watercraft Philately gives the ENDURANCE is depict, which is correct, a photo is used for the design I believe of the ENDURANCE in the ice.

Exploring the rich cultural history of the AAT
Human engagement with Antarctica is relatively short, but it has given rise to a rich cultural legacy. Australia’s direct encounters with this inhospitable southern continent stretch back to the late 19th century, with physicist Louis Bernacchi being the first Australian to step foot on the continent, in 1898–99, three years after the first recorded landing. But our connection with Antarctica pre-dates this, through whaling and sealing in subantarctic waters from the early 19th century and with Hobart used as a port of call for supplies by early European and American expedition parties.
The history of Australia’s Antarctic association exists in materials ranging over documents, photographs, recordings, artefacts, monuments, built heritage and more. The AAT Cultural Heritage stamp issue, which will be released on 19 September 2017, presents cultural artefacts that relate to three key eras within Antarctica’s rich history. The stamp designs are by Lynda Warner.

Exploration era $1
Spanning the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the exploration era is often known as the heroic period. Several countries undertook voyages to Antarctica during this time, powered by the determination and extreme resilience of expedition members. Australians made significant contributions during this era, through scientific observations and recordings and through charting new territory. Australia had an interest in and presence on Robert Scott’s Discovery expedition (1901–04), and similarly on Ernest Shackleton’s Nimrod expedition (BAE; 1907–09), during which Australians attained the south magnetic pole in the longest man-hauling sled journey ever made.
Douglas Mawson’s Australasian Antarctic Expedition (1911–14) charted coastline and investigated the ocean between Australia and Antarctica, and explored Macquarie Island; and Ernest Shackleton’s ill-fated British Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–17), which included an Australian contingent, epitomised the strength of the human spirit and ingenuity. While the story of the latter expedition is known through the well-documented travails of Shackleton’s main party, the story of the Ross Sea party is lesser known. This party travelled on the AURORA to McMurdo Sound, from where they would lay supplies for the main party. Unknown to them, the ENDURANCE became trapped in pack-ice and was eventually destroyed. The men of this party laid supplies by sledge over 169 days, during which three of them perished. The AURORA, meanwhile, had broken its mooring during the winter of 1915 and been carried north by the ice, stranding the stores party. The survivors were eventually rescued by Shackleton and John King Davis in 1917.

The aneroid barometer featured in the stamp design was given to Australian physicist Alistair Keith Jack, a member of the Ross Sea Party, by Ernest Shackleton. The barometer was made by the London-based company Cary. The barometer – held in the Museums Victoria collection and photographed by Michelle McFarlane – represents not only polar exploration during this period, but also the value of scientific observations, specifically meteorological research of the little-known continent.

Interwar era $1
Douglas Mawson’s contribution to Antarctic exploration and science spanned the exploration and interwar eras. A preeminent figure of Australian polar history, he led BANZARE (British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expeditions) voyages in 1929–31. Many crucial scientific observations in multiple disciplines were made during these scientific expeditions, with great numbers of natural history specimens collected and much coastline mapped. While every expedition had a political dimension, the BANZARE voyages, financed by the three governments and Melbourne-based businessman MacPherson Robertson, were perhaps more explicit in this respect, resulting in territorial proclamations for Britain. The extensive mapping and the proclamations were significant for Australia’s eventual claim of 42 per cent of the Antarctic continent.

The stamp design features the proclamation over King George V Land that Australian polar explorer and scientist Douglas Mawson signed on behalf of the British sovereign on 5 January 1931. It was hand-written in copperplate by physicist and surveyor Alexander Kennedy and signed by Mawson, who read it aloud to his men at Cape Denison. They then buried it at the site in a canister fashioned from empty food cans. It was retrieved from beneath the cairn by the Australian Antarctic Expedition in 1977 and is now held in the collection of the National Museum of Australia.
The proclamation is important to Australia because it forms the basis of Britain’s transferal of territory to Australia under the Australian Antarctic Territory Acceptance Act 1933. The document is also significant for its connection with eminent Australian Douglas Mawson.

Postwar era $2
Following World War II, scientific interest in Antarctica was renewed, facilitated by Mawson’s lobbying of government. ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition) was formed in 1947 to undertake Australian Antarctic research, with a program coordinated by physicist Dr Phillip Law, who was appointed director of the Antarctic Division in 1949.
A stronger research presence was established through the construction of stations, first at the subantarctic Macquarie and Heard Islands, in 1947 and 1948 respectively. Until Australia secured the KISTA DAN, ANARE was unable to really expand its research program onto continental Antarctica. The ice-strengthened vessel enabled the establishment of Mawson station, the first permanent continental base, was built in 1954; Davis was established in 1957, coinciding with International Geophysical Year activities; and Wilkes was taken over from the USA in 1959 (eventually replaced by Casey). These bases and the development of more sophisticated science, communication and transport technologies allowed for the expansion of polar research in this postwar period.
The tracked Weasel M29 vehicle was introduced to Antarctica postwar, the all-terrain vehicle having been used extensively by the US army during World War II. It was a primary Antarctic traverse vehicle for ANARE until the mid-1960s.

The restored Weasel shown in the stamp design, in a photograph by Jonathan Wherrett, was used on ANARE’s 1962–63 Wilkes–Vostok traverse, an historic journey of 3,000 kilometres to the Russian station in the Antarctic interior. The traverse was undertaken by a party of six, led by RB Thompson, with a scientific program that included seismology, glaciology, geomagnetism and meteorology. Leaving the coast base of Wilkes on 17 September 1962, the party travelled with two Weasels, two D4 Caterpillar tractors and nine sleds, with the Weasels achieving two miles to the gallon. The party arrived at Vostok on 18 November and returned to Wilkes on 14 January 1963. The restored vehicle is in the collection of the Australian Antarctic Division.

The content was produced at the time of the stamp issue release date and will not be updated.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

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