SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

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ECLIPSE HMS 1904

Built as a protected cruiser by the Portsmouth Dockyard for the Royal Navy.
11 December 1893 keel laid down.
19 July 1894 launched as HMS ECLIPSE she was the lead ship of her class.
Displacement: 5,690 ton, dim.106.7 x 16.3 x 6.25m. (draught)
Powered by two inverted triple expansion steam engines, 9,600 ihp, twin shafts, speed 18.5 knots.
Armament: 5 – 6 inch QF, 6 – 4.7 inch QF, 6 – 3 pdr. QF guns and 3 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 450.
23 March 1897 commissioned.

HMS ECLIPSE was an Eclipse-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the mid-1890s.
Design
Eclipse -class second-class protected cruisers were preceded by the shorter Astraea-class cruisers. ECLIPSE had a displacement of 5,600 long tons (5,700 t; 6,300 short tons) when at normal load. It had a total length of 373 ft (114 m), a beam of 53 ft 6 in (16.31 m), a metacentric height of around 3 m (9 ft 10 in), and a draught of 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m). It was powered by two inverted triple-expansion steam engines which used steam from eight cylindrical boilers. Using normal draught, the boilers were intended to provide the engines with enough steam to generate 8,000 indicated horsepower (6,000 kW) and to reach a speed of 18.5 knots (34.3 km/h; 21.3 mph); using forced draft, the equivalent figures were 9,600 indicated horsepower (7,200 kW) and a speed of 19.5 knots (36.1 km/h; 22.4 mph). Eclipse -class cruisers carried a maximum of 1,075 long tons (1,092 t) of coal and achieved maximum speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) in sea trials.[2]
It carried five 40-calibre 6-inch (152 mm) quick-firing (QF) guns in single mounts protected by gun shields. One gun was mounted on the forecastle, two on the quarterdeck and one pair was abreast the bridge. They fired 100-pound (45 kg) shells at a muzzle velocity of 2,205 ft/s (672 m/s). The secondary armament consisted of six 40-calibre 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns; three on each broadside. Their 45-pound (20.4 kg) shells were fired at a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s).[5] It was fitted with three 18-inch torpedo tubes, one submerged tube on each broadside and one above water in the stern.[6] Its ammunition supply consisted of 200 six-inch rounds per gun, 250 shells for each 4.7-inch gun, 300 rounds per gun for the 12-pounders and 500 for each three-pounder. ECLIPSE had ten torpedoes, presumably four for each broadside tube and two for the stern tube.
Service
HMS ECLIPSE was launched in 1894 and completed in 1897. In 1899 she served in the Indian Ocean under the command of Captain P. W. Bush, as flagship of the East Indies Squadron.
Refit at Chatham from 1900-1901.
She was commissioned at Chatham dockyard in late May 1901, with a crew of 450 officers and men under the command of Captain Stokes, to relieve HMS HERMIONE on the China Station.
1904-1905 In reserve at Devonport.
1905-1906 Cadet training ship based at Bermuda, attached to the North America and West Indies station in the 4th Cruiser Squadron.
1906-1907 In reserve Portsmouth.
1907-1912 Attached to the Royal Navy College at Osborne.
1912-1913 Joined the new formed Third Fleet Reserve at Portsmouth.
1913-1914 Assigned to Devonport.
Early 1914 escorted the new Australian submarines AE 1 and AE 2 part way to Singapore.
By the outbreak of the war she joined the 12th Cruiser Squadron in the Western Channel, capturing two German merchant ships on 10 August and 10 September 1914.
Then reduced to accommodation ship for submarine flotillas from 1915-1918.
Laid up in Devonport 1918-1919.
August 1921 sold to G Cohen for breaking up.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_ECLIPSE_(1894) British Cruisers of the Victorian Era by Norman Friedman.

CAESAR HMS 1898

Built as a battleship by the Portsmouth Navy Yard at Portsmouth for the Royal Navy.
25 March 1895 keel laid down.
02 September 1896 launched as the HMS CAESAR one of the Majestic class.
Displacement 14,890 ton light, 16,060 full load, dim. 128.3 x 22.9 x 8.2m. (draught). Length bpp. 118.9m.
Powered by two 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 12,000 hp. twin shafts, speed 17.5 knots maximum.
Armament: 4 -12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 16 – 12 pdr, 12 – 3 pdr. and 5 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 672.
13 January 1898 commissioned.

HMS CAESAR was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Roman military and political leader Julius Caesar. The ship was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, starting with her keel laying in March 1895. She was launched in September 1896 and was commissioned into the fleet in January 1898. She was armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (300 mm) guns and a secondary battery of twelve 6-inch (150 mm) guns. The ship had a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph).
CAESAR served with the Mediterranean Fleet after a brief stint in the Channel Fleet. In 1905, she resumed service with a now re-organised Channel Fleet and was also part of the Atlantic Fleet for a time. In the service of the Home Fleet from 1907, she was placed in reserve in 1912. Following the outbreak of World War I, CAESAR returned to the Channel Fleet before being transferred to the North America and West Indies Station in 1915 after a brief spell as a guard ship at Gibraltar. From 1918 to 1919 she served as a depot ship, firstly in the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas and then the Black Sea, in support of naval operations against the Bolsheviks. In this latter role, she was the last of the pre-dreadnought battleships to see service outside the United Kingdom. Returning to England in 1920, she was decommissioned and sold for scrap in 1921.
CAESAR was 421 feet (128 m) long overall and had a beam of 75 ft (23 m) and a draft of 27 ft (8.2 m). She displaced up to 16,060 tonnes (15,810 long tons; 17,700 short tons) at full combat load. Her propulsion system consisted of two 3-cylinder triple expansion engines powered by eight coal-fired cylindrical boilers. By 1907–1908, she was re-boilered with oil-fired models. Her engines provided a top speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) at 10,000 indicated horsepower (7,500 kW). The Majestics were considered to have handled well, with an easy roll, although they suffered from high fuel consumption. She had a crew of 672 officers and enlisted men.
The ship was armed with four BL 12-inch Mk VIII guns in twin turrets, one forward and one aft. The turrets were placed on circular barbettes, unlike six of her sisters, which retained earlier pear-shaped barbettes.[1][2] CAESAR also carried twelve QF 6-inch /40 guns. They were mounted in casemates in two gun decks amidships. She also carried sixteen QF 12-pounder guns and twelve QF 2-pounder guns. She was also equipped with five 18-inch (450-mm) torpedo tubes, four of which were submerged in the ship's hull on the broadside, with the last in a deck-mounted launcher on the stern. CAESAR and the other ships of her class had 9 inches (229 mm) of Harvey armour, which allowed equal protection with less cost in weight compared to previous types of armour. This allowed CAESAR and her sisters to have a deeper and lighter belt than previous battleships without any loss in protection. The barbettes for the main battery were protected with 14 in (360 mm) of armour, and the conning tower had the same thickness of steel on the sides. The ship's armoured deck was 2.5 to 4.5 in (64 to 114 mm) thick.
Service history
HMS CAESAR was built at the Portsmouth Dockyard, with her keel laying taking place on 25 March 1895. She was launched on 2 September 1896, and completed in January 1898.[2] The ship was commissioned at Portsmouth on 13 January to serve in the Mediterranean Fleet. Before leaving for the Mediterranean, she was attached temporarily to the Channel Fleet to serve in home waters. In May 1898, CAESAR departed the United Kingdom for her Mediterranean service, undergoing a refit at Malta in 1900–01. Captain George Callaghan was appointed to command her on 21 December 1901, succeeding Captain John Ferris. She ended her Mediterranean service in October 1903, paying off at Portsmouth on 6 October 1903 to begin a refit. Her refit completed, CAESAR was commissioned at Portsmouth on 2 February 1904 to relieve her sister ship HMS MAJESTIC as flagship of the Channel Fleet. When the Channel Fleet became the Atlantic Fleet as a result of a reorganisation on 1 January 1905, CAESAR became flagship of the Atlantic Fleet. She was relieved of this duty in March 1905, becoming 2nd Flagship of the new Channel Fleet (which had been the Home Fleet prior to the reorganisation).
On 3 June 1905, CAESAR collided with and sank the barque AFGHANISTAN off Dungeness, suffering significant damage; her bridge wings were carried away and the boats, davits, and net booms on her port side were badly damaged. CAESAR was refitted at Devonport to repair the damage. CAESAR became Flagship, Rear Admiral, Home Fleet, in December 1905. She was relieved of this duty in February 1907 and transferred back to the Atlantic Fleet to become its temporary flagship. She served in this role until May 1907. On 27 May 1907, CAESAR was recommissioned for service in the Devonport Division of the new Home Fleet, which had been formed in January 1907. During this service she underwent a refit at Devonport in 1907–08. In May 1909, CAESAR transferred to the Nore, temporarily serving as the flagship of Vice Admiral, 3rd and 4th Divisions, Home Fleet. In April 1911 she transferred to Devonport to serve in the 3rd Division, Home Fleet. On 16 January 1911, CAESAR was rammed by the barque EXCELSIOR in fog at Sheerness, suffering no serious damage. In March 1912, CAESAR was placed in commissioned reserve with a nucleus crew as part of the 4th Division, Home Fleet.
At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, CAESAR was brought back into full commission and transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet; the squadron was charged with the defence of the English Channel. During this service she helped in transporting the Plymouth Marine Division from Plymouth to Ostend, Belgium, and covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In December 1914, CAESAR was detached from the 7th Battle Squadron and transferred to Gibraltar to serve as guard ship and gunnery training ship there. In July 1915, she transferred to the North America and West Indies Station, serving as guard ship and gunnery training ship at Bermuda and patrolling the Atlantic.
Her North America and West Indies Station service ended in September 1918, when CAESAR was transferred to relieve HMS ANDROMACHE (the old second-class cruiser and former minelayer HMS LATONA) as flagship of the Senior Naval Officer, British Adriatic Squadron, at Corfu, the last British pre-dreadnought to serve as a flagship. In September 1918, CAESAR went to Malta for refit as a depot ship, during which she was equipped with repair shops and with leisure facilities such as recreation rooms and reading rooms. This conversion completed, she took up duties in October 1918 at Mudros as depot ship for the British Aegean Squadron. In January 1919 she was transferred to Port Said, Egypt, for service as a depot ship there. In June 1919, CAESAR transited the Dardanelles and transferred to the Black Sea, where she served as a depot ship for British naval forces operating against the Bolsheviks during the Russian Revolution. In this service she became the last British pre-dreadnought to serve operationally overseas. CAESAR returned to the United Kingdom in March 1920, paid off at Devonport on 23 April 1920, and was placed on the disposal list. She was sold to...

ALTAI and PEHR BRAHE

On 2 February 2016, the stamp series featuring Åland sailing ships continues with Allan Palmer's detailed paintings of the brig ALTAI and the barque PEHR BRAHE.

The six-year series started in 2015 with the issues featuring the schooner LEMLAND and the barquentine LEO. Captain and artist Allan Palmer made a comprehensive research to be able to illustrate the coming sailing ships ALTAI and PEHR BRAHE in a genuine entourage.

The brig ALTAI was built in 1859 on Vårdö for a jointly owned shipping firm with several part-owners. ALTAI chiefly transported timber on the North Sea, and she yielded good profits until taken out of use in 1876. On the stamp, ALTAI lies at anchor outside the port of Copenhagen, a common destination for taking onboard provision and buying gear.

The barque PEHR BRAHE was built in 1877 in Parainen for major shipowner Nikolai Sittkoff in Mariehamn. The barque is presumed to be the first actual deep sea ship from Åland and, sailing to Vladivostok and Nikolayevsk on the Pacific Coast in 1879, she became the first Åland ship to reach the Far East. Allan Palmer has depicted PEHR BRAHE on a long eastward voyage with a certain sail panel with studding sail described in the ship's logbook
I have, that the PEHR BRAHE was built in Haraldsholm, Pargas as a wooden 3 mast barque rigged sailing vessel.
Tonnage 560 ton, dim. 46.69 x 10.08 x 5.15m
A charter party of 13 November 1879 exist of a voyage between Nagasaki and Hong Kong..
1885 She made a voyage with hides from Montevideo to New York, https://law.resource.org/pub/us/case/re ... f.0642.pdf
1920 was she scrapped.
During her career did she have three commanders, Capt J. Isaksson, Petrell and G. Juselius.

Aland Islands 2016 0.10E and 10.00 Euro, sg?, scott?
Aland Post web-site. Lloyds Registry, Internet.

AZALEA HMS 2015

Built as a sloop under yard No 531 by Barclay, Curle & Co, Whiteinch, Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
? Laid down.
10 September 1915 launched as the HMS AZALEA (T32) one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 ihp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77.
October 1915 completed.

Of her wartime career I can’t find anything, only that in July 1917 her bow was almost blown off by a mine, and she was repaired in Malta
? Decommissoned.
01 February 1923 she was sold to J. Hornby & Sons for scrap and she was broken up the same year.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ANEMONE HMS 1915

Built as a sloop under yard No 988 by Swan, Hunter & W. Richardson, Low Walker for the Royal Navy.
January 1915 ordered.
25 January 1915 laid down.
13 May 1915 (other source 30 June 1915) launched as HMS ANEMONE (M-27), she was one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 hp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77
07 July 1915 commissioned.

The class was first built as minesweepers, with reinforced bows to improve survivability if struck by a mine.
She were refitted in 1917 to carry depth charges and re-deployed as convoy escorts.
From 15 February 1916 she joined the Smyrna patrol to blockade the Turkish coast from Cape Kaba to Latitude 38 30E included Smyrna (now called Izmir).
Her base was at Port Iere on the Greek island of Mytelene, very near to the Turkish coast.
17/18 February 1916 took part in the operations at Khios.
? Decommissioned.
06 September 1922 sold to Marple & Gillott and she was broken up at Saltash, U.K.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ALBION HMS 1901

Built as a battleship by Thames Ironwork & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Blackwall, London for the Royal Navy.
03 December 1896 keel laid down.
21 June 1898 launched as the HMS ALBION, one of the Canopus class.
Displacement 12,950 ton light, 14,320 ton full load. Dim. 132 x 23 x 7.9m (draught)
Length bpp. 18.8m.
Powered by two vertical triple expansion steam engine, 15,400 ihp., twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament:2 – 12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 10 – 12 pdr QF, 6 – 3 pdr, guns and 4 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 750.
25 June 1901 commissioned.

HMS ALBION was a British Canopus-class predreadnought battleship. Commissioned into the Royal Navy in 1901, she served on the China Station until 1905. She was then employed as part of the Channel Fleet until 1907, at which time she began service with the Atlantic Fleet. Following the outbreak of World War I, she saw action in operations against German Southwest Africa in 1914 and also served in the Dardanelles campaign against the Turks, supporting the landings at Gallipoli. She remained in the Mediterranean until 1916, and then returned to the United Kingdom for service as a guard ship for the remainder of the war. She was scrapped in 1920.
Technical Description
HMS ALBION was laid down by Thames Iron Works at Leamouth, London on 3 December 1896. Tragedy struck when she was launched on 21 June 1898; after the Duchess of York christened her, a wave created by ALBION's entry into the water caused a stage from which 200 people were watching to collapse into a side creek, and 34 people, mostly women and children, drowned. This was probably one of the first ever ship launchings to be filmed. ALBION's completion then was delayed by late delivery of her machinery. She finally began trials late in 1900, during which she was further delayed by machinery and gun defects, and she was not finally completed until June 1901.
ALBION was designed for service in the Far East, and to be able to transit the Suez Canal. She was designed to be smaller (by about 2,000 tons), lighter, and faster than her predecessors, the Majestic-class battleships, although she was slightly longer at 430 feet (131 meters). In order to save weight, she carried less armour than the Majestics, although the change from Harvey armour in the Majestics to Krupp armour in ALBION meant that the loss in protection was not as great as it might have been, Krupp armour having greater protective value at a given weight than its Harvey equivalent. Still, her armour was light enough to make her almost a second-class battleship.
Part of her armour scheme included the use of a special 1-inch (2.54 mm) armoured deck over the belt to defend against plunging fire by howitzers that France reportedly planned to install on its ships, although this report proved to be false.[
ALBION had four 12-inch (305-mm) 35-calibre guns mounted in twin turrets fore and aft, mounted in circular barbettes that allowed all-around loading, although at a fixed elevation. She also mounted twelve 6-inch (152-mm) 40-calibre guns (sponson mounting allowing some of them to fire fore and aft) in addition to smaller guns, and four 18-inch (457-mm) submerged torpedo tubes.
The Canopus-class ships were the first British battleships with water-tube boilers, which generated more power at less expense in weight compared with the cylindrical boilers used in previous ships. The new boilers led to the adoption of fore-and-aft funnels, rather than the side-by-side funnel arrangement used in may previous British battleships. The Canopus-class ships proved to be good steamers, consuming 10 tons of coal per hour at full speed, with a high speed for battleships of their time, a full two knots faster than the Majestics.[
Pre-World War I
HMS ALBION was commissioned on 25 June 1901 at Chatham Dockyard, by Captain W. W. Hewett and a complement of 779 officers and men, to relieve battleship BARFLEUR on the China Station. She arrived at Hong Kong on 11 September 1901, and relieved BARFLEUR as second flagship of the China Station, based in that city. Captain Martyn Jerram was appointed in command in March 1902. During her time on the station, she underwent refits at Hong Kong in 1902 and 1905.
In 1905, the United Kingdom and Japan ratified a treaty of alliance, reducing the requirement for a large British presence on the China Station, and the Royal Navy recalled all its battleships from the station. At Singapore, ALBION rendezvoused with her sister ships OCEAN and VENGEANCE and battleship CENTURION , and on 20 June 1905 the four battleships departed to steam in company to Plymouth, where they arrived on 2 August 1905.
ALBION then became part of the Channel Fleet. She soon suffered a mishap, colliding with battleship DUNCAN at Lerwick on 26 September 1905, but suffered no damage. ALBION transferred to the commissioned Reserve on 3 April 1906, and underwent an engine and boiler refit at Chatham. On 25 February 1907, ALBION paid off at Portsmouth.
On 26 February 1907, ALBION recommissioned at Portsmouth for temporary service with the Portsmouth Division of the Home Fleet. She returned to full commission on 26 March 1907 to begin service in the Atlantic Fleet. During this service, she underwent a refit at Gibraltar in 1908 and at Malta in 1909. She was with the fleet that visited London from 17 July to 24 July 1909 to be entertained by the citizens of the city, and on 31 July 1909 was present at the fleet review of the Home and Atlantic Fleets at Cowes by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.
ALBION ended her Atlantic Fleet service by paying off on 25 August 1909. She then began service at the Nore as parent ship of the 4th Division, Home Fleet. She became a unit of the 3rd Fleet at the Nore in May 1912 and underwent a refit at Chatham that year. She was stationed at Pembroke Dock in 1913.
World War I
When World War I broke out in August 1914, ALBION was assigned to the 8th Battle Squadron, Channel Fleet. On 15 August 1914, she became second flagship of the new 7th Battle Squadron. On 21 August 1914, she was sent to the Saint Vincent-Finisterre Station to provide battleship support to cruiser squadrons operating in the Atlantic in case German Navy heavy ships broke out into the open Atlantic. On 3 September 1914, she transferred her flag, becoming a private ship, and moved to the Cape Verde-Canary Islands station to relieve her sister ship CANOPUS there.
ALBION was transferred to the Cape of Good Hope Station in South Africa in October 1914, where she took up duty as a guard ship at Walvis Bay through November 1914. In December 1914 and January 1915, she participated in Allied operations against German Southwest Africa.
Dardanelles campaign
ALBION transferred to the Mediterranean in January 1915 to participate in the Dardanelles campaign. She took part in the bombardment of the Ottoman Turkish forts guarding the outer entrance to the Dardanelles on 18 February 1915 and 19 February 1915. ALBION, MAJESTIC and TRIUMP became the first Allied battleships to enter the Turkish Straits during the Dardanelles campaign on 26 February 1915 when they made the initial attack on the inner forts. ALBION then supported the first Allied landings in late February 1915 and early March 1915.
In action against Ottoman forts on 1 March 1915, ALBION took repeated hits but sustained no serious damage. She participated in the main attack on the forts on 18 March 1915, and supported the main landings at V Beach at Cape Helles on 25 April 1915. On 28 April 1915 she suffered significant damage from Ottoman shore batteries during an attack on Krithia, forcing her to retire to Mudros for repairs. Back in action on 2 May 1915, she again suffered damage necessitating repairs at Mudros.
On the night of 22–23 May 1915, ALBION beached on a sandbank off Gaba Tepe and came under heavy fire from Ottoman...
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Endurance (Shackleton)

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Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:26 pm

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SG45
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SG75
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SG G34
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The Endurance, of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-16, was built in 1912 by Framnes Mek. Verks, at Sandefjord, and engined by Akers of Christiania. Her gross tonnage was 348 on dimensions 140ft. x 26.4ft. x 14.1ft., and she was the typical Norwegian whaler type of vessel, barquentine-rigged and launched 1912, as Polaris, a 3-masted barquentine with auxiliary steam for polar tourism and polar bear hunting!
Purchased by Shackleton and renamed Endurance. She was ready to sail under the direction of Sir Ernest Shackleton, C.V.O., on August 1, 1914. When the Naval mobilisation order was published on August 3, Shackleton, with the consent of the crew, offered the services of the ship and her crew to the Government. However, the Admiralty did not think the war would last longer than six months and Sir Ernest was told to go ahead with his Antarctic plans.
The Endurance carried a crew of 27 men in addition to the scientific staff. She sailed after Shackleton had been received by the King and assured of his Majesty's approval of the expedition. On this expedition a new coastline was discovered which Sir Ernest named Caird Coast in honour of Sir James Caird, who had subscribed £24,000 towards the cost of the expedition. Like the Deutschland, the Endurance was caught in pack ice, but the conditions were more severe than those experienced by the German ship. The British vessel was trapped on January 19, 1915, and crushed on October 27, 1915, finally sinking beneath the ice 25 days later.
The crew took to the ice, which drifted across the Weddell Sea. When it was obvious the pack ice was breaking up, they took to the ship's boats which had been saved when the Endurance went down and on April 16, reached Elephant Island.
What followed is an epic of the Antarctic—how Sir Ernest Shackleton left 22 men on Elephant Island, while he chose five men to accompany him in an open boat (the James Caird) to cross 800 miles of Antarctic seas to bring food and relief to the shipwrecked crew. Having successfully accomplished the almost impossible in a voyage of a fortnight, a mountain range of three ridges had to be crossed, one 5,000ft. high and covered in ice with dangerous precipices, before civilisation could be reached. It took them 36hrs. to overcome this obstacle. Eventually, Sir Ernest was able to effect the rescue of the Endurance's crew on Elephant Island, but it was not until several attempts had been made by the whaler, Southern Sky, the Uruguayan Government trawler Institute de Pesca, the British schooner Emma, and the Chilean Navy tender Yelcho, all led by Shackleton, that a way through the ice was found and the crew were picked up 41/2 months after their leader had left them. During the whole of that time Shackleton had thought of nothing but their relief.

Detail from BAT philatelic
Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton 1874-1922

Expeditions: British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-04 in Discovery. British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 in Endurance. Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition 1921-22 in Quest. Discoveries: Beardmore Glacier, South Magnetic Pole, Caird Coast.
Voyage: British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17.

Aus Ant SG45, Brit Ant SG75,249 Chile 1375 Fal Is Dep SG G34 Ross Dep SG36 South Georgia SG32.
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:56 am

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Built under yard 87 by Framnæs Mek. Verks., Sandefjord, Norway for a company formed by Lars Christensen from Norway and Adrien de Gerlach from Belgian.
17 December 1912 launched as the POLARIS.
Tonnage 348 gross, dim. 42.67 x 8.04 x 4.28m.
One auxiliary coal fired triple expansion steam engine, 350 hp, one shaft, speed 10.2 knots.
Rigged as a three-masted barkentine.
24 August 1913 completed.

She was designed for the new formed company as a polar safari ship with paying guests, but when delivered the new formed company could not made the last payment, and the POLARIS was laid up waiting for a new buyer.
When Shackleton also short by cash was looking for a polar expedition vessel, and he did not have to pay for the POLARIS straight away but after some time, bought her for 225.000NKroner.
She was renamed in ENDURANCE.
The ENDURANCE was the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. She was launched in 1912 from Sandefjord in Norway and was crushed by ice, causing her to sink, three years later in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.
Designed by Ole Aanderud Larsen, the ENDURANCE was built at the Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway and fully completed 24 August 1913. She was built under the supervision of master wood shipbuilder Christian Jacobsen, who was renowned for insisting that all men employed under him not just be skilled shipwrights, but also be experienced in seafaring aboard whaling or sealing ships. Every detail of her construction had been scrupulously planned to ensure maximum durability, for example every joint and every fitting cross-braced each other for maximum strength
She was launched on December 17, 1912 and was initially christened the POLARIS (eponymous with Polaris, the North Star). She was 144 feet (44 m) long, with a 25 feet (7.6 m) beam and weighed 350 short tons (320 t). Though her black hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while her sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. Her bow, where she would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that is natural shape followed the curve of her design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).
Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, ENDURANCE had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of driving her at speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
By the time she was launched on December 17, 1912, POLARIS was perhaps the strongest wooden ship ever built, with the possible exception of the FRAM, the vessel used by Fridtjof Nansen and later by Roald Amundsen. However, there was one major difference between the ships. The FRAM was bowl-bottomed, which meant that if the ice closed in against her she would be squeezed up and out and not be subject to the pressure of the ice compressing around her. But since the POLARIS was designed to operate in relatively loose pack ice she was not constructed so as to rise out of pressure to any great extent.
She was built for Adrien de Gerlache and Lars Christensen. They intended to use her for polar cruises for tourists to hunt polar bears. Financial problems leading to de Gerlache pulling out of their partnership meant that Christensen was happy to sell the boat to Ernest Shackleton for GB£11,600 (approx US$67,000), less than cost. He is reported to have said he was happy to take the loss in order to further the plans of an explorer of Shackleton's stature 'After Shackleton's purchasing her, she was rechristened ENDURANCE after the Shackleton family motto "Fortitudine vincimus" (By endurance we conquer).
Shackleton sailed with ENDURANCE from Plymouth, England on August 6, 1914 and set course for Buenos Aires, Argentina. This was ENDURANCE's first major cruising since her completion and amounted to a shakedown cruise. The trip across the Atlantic took more than two months. Built for the ice, her hull was considered by many of its crew too rounded for the open ocean.
On October 26, 1914 ENDURANCE sailed from Buenos Aires to her last port of call, the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia off the southern tip of South America, where she arrived on November 5. She departed from Grytviken for her final voyage on December 5, 1914 towards the southern regions of the Weddell Sea.
Two days after leaving from South Georgia, ENDURANCE encountered polar pack ice and progress slowed down. For weeks Endurance twisted and squirmed her way through the pack. She kept moving but averaged less than 30 miles (48 km) per day. By January 15, Endurance was within 200 miles (320 km) of its destination, Vahsel Bay. However by the following day heavy pack ice was sighted in the morning and in the afternoon a blowing gale developed. Under these conditions it was soon evident progress could not be made, and ENDURANCE took shelter under the lee of a large grounded berg. During the next two days ENDURANCE dogged back and forth under the sheltering protection of the berg.
On January 18 the gale began to moderate and thus ENDURANCE, one day short of her destination, set the topsail with the engine at slow. The pack had blown away. Progress was made slowly until hours later ENDURANCE encountered the pack once more. It was decided to move forward and work through the pack, and at 5pm ENDURANCE entered it. However it was noticed that this ice was different from what had been encountered before. The ship was soon engulfed by thick but soft ice floes. The ship floated in a soupy sea of mushy brash ice. The ship was beset. The gale now increased its intensity and kept blowing for another six days from a northerly direction towards land. By January 24, the wind had completely compressed the ice in the whole Weddell Sea against the land. The ice had packed snugly around ENDURANCE. All that could be done was to wait for a southerly gale that would start pushing, decompressing and opening the ice in the other direction. Instead the days passed and the pack remained unchanged.
ENDURANCE drifted for months while remaining beset in the ice in the Weddell Sea and drifted with it. The ice kept compressing it until ENDURANCE could not endure the pressure and was crushed on October 27, 1915. On the morning of November 21, 1915, the ENDURANCE bow began to sink under the ice. Like RMS TITANIC, the Endurance went vertical, her stern rising into the air, then disappearing beneath the ice. The ENDURANCE is considered the last ship of her kind.
It is said that Shackleton placed advertisements in London newspapers that read:
"MEN WANTED: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success. Sir Ernest Shackleton."
The crew of the Endurance in its final voyage was made up of the 28 men Blackborrow was originally refused a post aboard the vessel due to his young age and inexperience and decided to stow away, helped to sneak aboard by William Blakewell, a friend of his, and Walter How. By the time he was found, the expedition was far enough out that Shackleton had no choice but to make him a steward. Blackborrow eventually proved his worth, earning the Bronze Polar Medal, and the honour of becoming the first human being ever to set foot on Elephant Island. His name is also the matter of some debate—it is sometimes spelled Percy, or Blackboro, or in other ways.
Alfred Lansing wrote a book titled Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage about the ordeal that Shackleton and his men endured aboard the ship. It became a bestseller when first published in 1959. Subsequent reprints have made it a recurrent bestseller; the last time being in the late 1990s.
Two Antarctic patrol ships of the British Royal Navy have been named ENDURANCE in honour of Shackleton's ship. The first HMS ENDURANCE (originally named ANITA DAN) was launched in May 1956 and awarded Pennant number A171 sometime later. She acted as an ice patrol and hydrographic survey ship until 1986. Today's modern HMS ENDURANCE, nicknamed The Red Plum, is a class 1A1 ice-breaker bought from Norway in 1992 where she had been known as MV POLAR CIRCLE. She is based at Portsmouth but makes annual forays to Antarctica where she can penetrate through 0.9 metres (2 ft 11 in) of ice at a speed of 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph). She has a complement of 126 marine personnel and carries two Westland Lynx helicopters.
In 1998 wreckage found at Stinker Point on the south western side of Elephant Island was incorrectly identified as flotsam from the ship. It in fact belonged to the 1877 wreck of the Connecticut sealing ship CHARLES SHEARER In 2001 wreck hunter David Mearns unsuccessfully planned an expedition to find the wreck of the Endurance By 2003 two rival groups were making plans for an expedition to find the wreck, however no expedition was actually mounted. In 2010 Mearns announced a new plan to search for the wreck. The plan is sponsored by the National Geographic Society but is subject to finding sponsorship for the balance of the U.S. $10 million estimated cost.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)"

The 10p stamp features Ernest Shackleton and his Imperial Transantarctic Expedition ship ENDURANCE. The Weddell Sea party of the expedition visited South Georgia in November 1914 to take on coal and other stores and refit the ship before sailing for Antarctica. While in Buenos Aires, Shackleton was warned that it might be a bad year for ice in the Weddell Sea so he delayed his departure from South Georgia for a month. This gave time for scientific work to be carried out. Unfortunately most of the records and specimens were lost when ENDURANCE was crushed by the ice and sank. Shackleton is buried in the cemetery at Grytviken.

Source: South Georgia Post.

South Georgia & Sandwich Islands 2015 10p sg?, scott?
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Solomon Islands 2015 $40 sgMS?, scott?
Sierra Leone 2015 6000L sgMS?, scott? sgMS?, scott?
Guina 2015 10.000f sgMS?, scott?
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Re: Endurance (Shackleton)

Postby ptvisnes » Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:11 pm

More issues with "Endurance" (1912)

British Antarctic Territory
1994. 76p+4p. Mi 234. SG 249. Sc B4
2000. 35p. Mi 298. SG 312. Sc 285
2000. 40p. Mi 299. SG 313. Sc XXX
2005. 42p. Mi 397. SG 400. Sc 350
2005. 55p. Mi 410. SG 409. Sc 363
2005. £1. Mi 411. SG 410. Sc 364
2008. 4v. Mi Bl 15. SG MS 473. Sc 399d
2013. 6v. Mi (640-45) Bl 25. SG xxx. Sc 470 a-f
2013. 75p. Mi 645. SG xxx. Sc 470f
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 471
2014. 65p. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc 472
Falkland Islands
2000. 17p. Mi 776. SG 867. Sc 758
2000. 45p. Mi 777. SG 868. Sc 759
Ireland
2004. 48c/48c. Mi 1569/70. SG 1637/38. Sc xxx
2004. 65c/65c. Mi 1573/74 Bl 15. In margin
Great Britain
2003. 42p. Mi 2107. SG 2363. Sc 2121
South Georgia & SSI
2009. 55p. Mi 473. SG 472. Sc 385
2011. £1.15. Mi 549. SG 549. Sc 442b
2014. 12v.
Ross Dependency
2015. 80c. Mi xxx. SG xxx. Sc xxx
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