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Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule.

HMS HERMES was a 20-gun class sixth-rate post ship built in Milford Dockyard in 1811. On 11 February 1812 Hermes captured the American brig Flora. Then on 26 April Hermes captured the American brig Tigress. Four days later, HERMES and BELLE POULE captured the American privateer schooner GIPSY (or Gipsey). She was on her way from New York City to Bordeaux with a cargo worth ₤50,000 when the British vessels captured her in the mid-Atlantic after a three-day chase. Gipsey surrendered twice to Hermes and twice got away again before Belle Poule caught her. Gipsey was of 300 tons (bm) and was armed with twelve 18-pounder carronades and an 18-pounder gun on a pivot mount.In September 1814, master Percy led her in an unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer. The Louisiana State Museum has a map of the battle. The attack took place on 15 September at about 4:30pm. Two of the four British vessels could not get close enough to fire. The fort was more strongly armed than expected, the British fire was ineffective, and a parallel ground attack failed. Furthermore, as she tried to withdraw, Hermes grounded under the guns of the fort. Percy evacuated her crew on boats from Sophie and then set fire to Hermes, which blew up after the fire reached her magazine at around 10pm. In all, Hermes had lost 17 killed in action, 5 mortally wounded and 19 wounded. (The medical journal of the Hermes has survived. ) She was destroyed in 1814 to prevent her falling into American hands after grounding during her unsuccessful attack on Fort Bowyer on Mobile Pointoutside Mobile, Alabama. On 18 January 1815, Percy faced a court martial on board Cydnus, off Cat Island (Mississippi). The court acquitted him of all blame, finding that the circumstances justified the attack and that all involved had behaved with great gallantry. HMS BELLE POULE was a Royal Navy fifth rate frigate, formerly Belle Poule, a Virginie-class frigate of the French Navy, which was built by the Crucy family's shipyard at Basse-Indre to a design by Jacques-Noël Sané. She was launched on 17 April 1802, and saw active service in the East, but in 1806 a British squadron under Sir John Borlase Warren captured her off La Palma in the Canary Islands. The Admiralty commissioned her into the Royal Navy as HMS Belle Poule. At the time of her capture Belle Poule was armed with forty 18-pounder guns, had a crew of 320 men, and was under the command of Captain Brouillac. Marengo and Belle Poule had lost 65 men killed and 80 wounded. The British on London and Amazon had 13 officers and men killed and 26 officers and men wounded. Belle Poule returned to Portsmouth on 17 May 1815. A week later she sailed for Cork. She was converted to a prison hulk in 1815. She was sold on 11 June 1816 for ₤2,700. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale: “Hermes, Gypsey Schooner and Belle Poule”.
Somali 2017;


The sixth issue from Maritime Malta series consists of 3 stamps featuring vessels dating back to the Order of Saint John.

For many years, warships, such as the galley, were used by the Mediterranean naval powers. In fact this type of ship served for many years as the backbone of the Navy of the Order of Saint John. The Galley was characterised by its long, slender and shallow hull. These vessels were usually painted red with a white waterline and while most vessels at the time had sails, however the primary method of propulsion was the human strength of prisoners.

The 26c stamp depicts a model of the common galley, also known as Sensile. This was armed with five bronze cannon on the bow and propelled by 26 oars on each side. Three to five people were needed for each oar and this vessel was also rigged with two lateen sails. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

The 42c Stamp depicts a model known as the Demi Galley or the Half Galley. This was introduced in 1742 and was a smaller version of the common galley. The development of this galley came at the time when availability of prisoners as oarsmen was scarce hence the smaller number of rowers needed. This galley was equipped with one large calibre bronze cannon on the bow. This model is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum and it is considered as the only surviving Demi Galley model known.

The 1 stamp shows a model of a brigantine. This was the ceremonial barge of the Portuguese Grand Master Antonio Manoel de Vilhena and was painted green with a white waterline. It was fitted with nine oars on each side and was not designed for long voyages, with storage space kept at a minimum. It is documented that Grand Master de Vilhena travelled to Gozo in this vessel. This model underwent extensive restoration in 1964 and it is on display at the Malta Maritime Museum.

Source: Joseph Abela (Heritage Malta) ... sues%2fphi
Malta 2018 0.26/1.00 Euro sg?, scott? (The 1.00 Euro has the year 2019 printed on it)


Antigua & Barbuda issued in 1988 a set of stamps and a miniature sheet for the “Sailing week yacht regatta 1988”. All stamps and sheet shows sailing yachts of which I have not any information. Of the regatta Wikipedia has the following:

Antigua and Barbuda Sailing Week is a yacht regatta held at Nelson's Dockyard, St. Johns, Antigua. It is one of Antigua's most notable events. Founded in 1967, it is cited as one of the top regattas in the world and attracts an average 150-200 yachts, 1500 participants and 5000 spectators on average annually. In 2012 the regatta was held between 29 April and 4 May. In 2005, 24 countries were represented at the regatta. There are five main races held, including the English Harbour race, and at the end of the week the event finishes with the Lord Nelson's Ball.
Antigua & Barbuda 1988 30c/$5 sg 1190/93 and sgMS 1194, Scott 1112/16


Norfolk Island has not a deep water harbour, ships are required to anchor about a kilometre or so off shore. The cargo is then transferred from the hold of the ship to lighters. The 30 feet lighters, which are a local adaption of wooden whaling boats, are then towed by launch to the jetty.
Of the whalers used on Norfolk Island after which the lighters were built see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13176&p=14506&hilit=blessing+of+the+whalers#p14506

Loading jetties are located at Kingston and Cascade, but ships cannot get close to either of them. When a supply ship arrives, it is emptied by whaleboats towed by launches, five tonnes at a time. Which jetty is used depends on the prevailing weather on the day. The jetty on the leeward side of the island is often used. If the wind changes significantly during unloading/loading, the ship will move around to the other side. Visitors often gather to watch the activity when a supply ship arrives.

Much more is given on the following URL: ... nic-fleet/ ... olk_Island
Norfolk Island 1988 39 and 55c sg452/53, scott?. 1990 5c and10c sg483/84, scott?. 1993 45c sg 541, scott? 1996 $3.70 sg627, scott?, and 45c sg 629, scott? 2000 sgMS 731, scott? 2001 45c/$1.50 sg?, scott?


The Isle of Man issued two stamps in 1974 for the 1000th centenary of King Magnus Haraldson.

Under which name he was known has in the years many times spelled differently in the documents, but most probably it was King Magnus Haraldson, when born is also not known.
He was King of the Isle of Man and on the 8p stamp his fleet is seen. Twice in the year he sailed with this fleet of between 3600-4800 sails around the British Islands as admiral of the fleet to clear the waters around the islands from pirates especially the Danes and Normans. Also his coat of arms is depict on the stamp. Why are she rowing she are under sail, and why carry the shields outboard, so far I know the shields were only used during battle in this way, and clearly not a battle took place on this stamp.
The 4p stamp shows Magnus Haraldson in a stately barge with King Edgar of England on the River Dee in Wales. The skyline of the town in the background is of the town of Chester, a mistake has been made. The skyline of the town is from a drawing of the 14th century. Of the barge I have not any info, looks she is rowed by kings, all wearing a crown, King Edgar standing in the stern.
King Magnus Haraldson died in 977, but also other years have been given.

Source: Various internet sites.
Isle of Man 1974 4½p and 8p sg51/52, scott?


Felucca served as a cargo carrier, passenger vessel, man-of-war, corsair, and guardian of ports. Terra has been applied to a number of differ¬ent types of vessels during a long history that ended in the 19th century. Small types generally both rowed and sailed; large vessels only sailed, stepping 1-3 masts. Generally set lateen sails, although a sprit rig was common on some small open feluccas in the 17th century. Some As many as 20 banks of oars used and, on older types, outboard gangways supported standing rowers. Sharp ends, flat floors, shallow keel, flared sides. Most had a low beak. The later Spanish craft had a very tall stem extension. Most had an overhang¬ing poop deck, some had a cabin aft, and larger vessels were fully decked. On some, the helm could be placed at either end as needed. The corsair carried ca. 20 men. Reported lengths 9-19m, widths 1.8-3.7m, depths 0.7-1.12m.
Feluccas are the traditional sailboats of Egypts Nile . Egyptians and foreigners alike enjoy a relaxing felucca ride, as they are perfect for catching the breeze on a hot summer night, The felucca has remained, over the centuries, the primary transportation of the Nile . Its ancient form still graces the river as it has been done since the time of the Pharaohs. The felucca relies entirely on the breeze which builds during the day, and the Nile River's current. Egypt is blessed with a predominant southerly wind that pushes sailboats upriver, while allowing them to return on its current downstream.
Egipt 2014;le4. Dominica 1998; 90c; SG2459. Monaco 1979;1f50; SG1396. Uganda 1998;3000s;SG Ms1973b. (In margin of sheet).
Source: A Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra. ... rev=search


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Postby shipstamps » Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:32 pm

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Sloop built 1934. First Polish Transatlantic yacht L27’6”.B7’4”. Poland SG2305 (SB 3/75)
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Re: Dal

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:48 pm

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1926 — Lt. J. Swiechowski and Lt. A. Bohomolec, Poland; Poland.
The name DAL means distance.
She is a gaff-rigged sloop carrying one headsail, and was built in Poland in 1926. The first Polish transatlantic racing yacht, she sailed from Gdynia in 1933 with Lt. J. Swiechowski of the Polish Merchant Marine and Lt. A. Bohomolec of the Polish Cavalry in her crew, bound for the Century of Progress Exhibition in Chicago. After many months, through hurricanes and adverse weather, she reached Bermuda, then worked her way up the Atlantic Coast and finally reached Chicago in 1934. She attracted much attention as she lay in the Jackson Park Lagoon. The crew returned to Poland as heroes. The yacht remained in the United States. In 1941, DAL was moved to the Museum of Science and Industry where she was displayed in an exhibit on wind power in commerce and transportation. In 1968, the exhibit was closed, and plans were in hand to dispose of DAL. When Ireneusz Gieblewicz, the son of a Baltic fisherman and recent emigrant, heard that DAL was being offered for disposition, he appealed to the Illinois Division of the Polish American Congress for help, which was readily provided. Plans were then presented to museum officials for the restoration of DAL and its return to Poland. Due to technical difficulties, the Polish Museum of America could not accept the boat and it was eventually handed over to Gieblewicz and moved to his garage in the Chicago suburbs. With the help of a few friends, and with his own money, Gieblewicz spent many months restoring DAL for its return journey to Poland. However, his financial resources were becoming exhausted. Learning of his difficulties, television journalist Tom Korzeniowski, a grand nephew of Joseph Conrad, appealed for support to the Polish National Alliance. The Alliance agreed, and with its support, DAL departed Chicago on May 3, 1980, with Gieblewicz as her skipper, bound for the Polish Maritime Museum in Gdansk, via all the ports visited an the original 1933 voyage. DAL damaged her stern and rudder when she scraped bottom on the Buffalo run. She sailed to New York City, only to be dry-docked at the Minneford Marina in City Island. Questions about her seaworthiness led to the decision to load her aboard the freighter BRONISLAW LACHOWICZ for the trip back to Poland. She arrived in the Baltic Sea Aug. 13, 1980, but was not allowed into Gdansk because of a strike there. She was laid up in a small fishing village, and was finally permitted to enter Gdansk on Sept. 16, 1980.

Sources: Polonus Philatelic Society; WP 35:27.

She lost her mast in a cyclone. She was a "star" of the Chicago World's Fair as well as a cause of disputes between consecutive owners. Laminated with plastic many years ago, she has been waiting for conservation which would restore her original design from the 1930s.

At present, Complex Jacht, a company comprised of specialists who have renovated, among others, a sailing yacht GENERAL ZARUSKI, is conducting works on a legendary yacht "DAL". The repair of "DAL" is the first large-scale conservation undertaking since 1980 when the yacht was brought to Poland. Her renovation is being conducted under the project of construction of the Shipwreck Conservation Centre in Tczew.

Great ambitions of a small yacht
In a way, the history of "DAL" defined and marked the lives of her two owners. Andrzej Bohomolec, a Polish cavalryman, dreamt about crossing the Atlantic on a small vessel. Over a decade later, Ireneusz Gieblewicz wanted to bring "DAL" to Poland. When Bohomolec was leaving Gdynia for Chicago in summer of 1933, the possibility of crossing the Atlantic on board "DAL" for many seemed quite doubtful. After all, the yacht was an 8.5 metre sloop with a 2.15 metre beam, 1.3 metre draft, around 4.5 tonne displacement and 45 square meter sail area. Andrzej Bohomolec was accompanied by Jan Witkowski and Jerzy Świechowski, instructors from a maritime yachting centre in Gdynia.

Success in Chicago
The crossing was going according to the plan until the second half o August when "DAL" was hit by a cyclone. A broken mast caused suspension of the voyage – the yacht reached the Bermudas and, upon completion of repair and ballasting works, continued her crossing on 3rd June, 1934. The goal was to present "DAL" at the Chicago World's Fair which turned out to be her great success – this small but courageous vessel was admired for completion of such a difficult voyage. In commemoration of the Atlantic crossing conducted by "DAL", it has been decided to exhibit the yacht (which was purchased from donations of the Polish diaspora in USA) on permanent basis in the post-exhibition area in Chicago.

Destruction of the symbol
For the next few years, the yacht was moored in the exhibition area, followed by a mooring in front of the Museum of Science and Industry and a transfer to the interior part of the museum. The years which followed were marked by a gradual diminishment in the role of "DAL" as a small courageous vessel. Step by step, her history and symbolic value were being forgotten in the United States. In the late 1960s, the yacht started to be an unnecessary burden which simply occupied space in the museum area. In 1967, "DAL" was subject to eviction and was transferred back to the Polish Museum in Chicago.

Repair of "DAL"
It was then decided that the yacht will go back to Poland the same way it arrived in the United States 35 years before. Ireneusz Gieblewicz, a new owner of the yacht and a yachting enthusiast, was a driving spirit of this undertaking. Before the Atlantic crossing, Gieblewicz decided to reinforce the hull by lamination. In the 1970s, polyester glass laminate was a highly popular material due to its durability, high resistance to weather conditions and light weight which made it a perfect reinforcement for a wooden hull of "DAL". Application of laminate on wood was also a much easier operation than a time-consuming and expensive conservation of the damaged hull. In addition to lamination of the hull, masts and rigging were replaced with new ones.

Yacht-related disputes
Andrzej Bohomolec was not enthusiastic about the idea of laminating the yacht and therefore, sued the new owner of "DAL". The lawsuit between her current and previous owners delayed repair works and consequently, return of the yacht to Poland. Due to the ongoing proceedings, launching preparations took seven years. Upon completion of initial trials on Lake Michigan and participation in Chicago boat show, "DAL" headed to New York. It soon became clear that lamination of the hull was not sufficient in terms of reinforcement which would guarantee an independent and safe voyage across the Atlantic. "DAL" was in poor technical condition: lack of proper conservation throughout the years as well as poor maintenance made her independent crossing to Poland impossible.

Return to Poland
"DAL" was then decided to be shipped to Europe on board BRONISLAW LACHOWICZ– first to Bremerhaven and then, on her own keel, to Gdynia through Sweden, Szczecin and Świnoujście. "DAL" reached Poland in August 1980, the period marked by important events in the history of the Polish nation. Strikes and the Gdańsk Agreement attracted all media attention and therefore, return of the yacht, which was a symbol of Polish maritime history and incredible courage of her owners, after 47 years from the United States was left unnoticed.

"DAL" in the Museum
After the Gdańsk Agreement was reached, Ireneusz Gieblewicz contacted Przemysław Smolarek, PhD, who at that time held the position of the Museum Director – "DAL" was agreed to be moored at the Polish Maritime Museum after an official welcoming ceremony in Gdynia. The yacht had been exhibited by the Crane for four years before she was placed in a boathouse of the Academic Yacht Club in Górki Zachodnie (district of Gdańsk) in winter of 1985. Towards the end of 1995, the yacht was transferred to the museum warehouses in Tczew.

In summer of 2014, under the "Shipwreck Conservation Centre combined with Studio Warehouse in Tczew" construction project, the yacht was transported to Puck. "DAL" is planned to return to Tczew as one of the main exhibition items of the newly built department of the National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk upon completion of the repair works which will restore her original design from the 1930s.
Poland 1974 1z50 sg 2305, scott2039.
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