SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SANTA ROSA lake steamer 1903

The vessel depict on this stamp is given by Watercraft Philately as the SANTA ROSA on Lake Llanquihue, Chile.

In the year 1902 a group of people from Puerto Varas, Chile formed a partnership with the purpose of building a steamship to be used for service on Lake Llanquihue. The company was founded on 11 September 1902, which traded under the corporate name of "Sociedad Klenner, Niklitscheck and Company"; its initial capital was $ 50,000 and it consisted of 65 members. The new steamship, which was given the name of "SANTA ROSA was built by the firm Behrens, at Valdivia, and being the first steamship which was built entirely of iron on the lake. Its dimensions were 28 meters in length with a capacity of 80 tons; Fitted out with two masts, yards and sails which on her first voyages were used to increase her speed, later the sails were removed, because they were constantly exposed to the sparks coming from the funnel of the boilers that were fed with firewood, her capacity was 80 passengers The SANTA ROSA when completed was moved unrigged from Valdivia to Puerto Montt by sea. The transport overland from this city to the lake was not easy, because the road was narrow and in many parts with steep slopes that only with good oxen it was possible to overcome the transport problems.
It took several days for the transport over the road to reach finally her destination, in Puerto Chico, where she was rerigged and fitted out.
On 13 December1903, the SANTA ROSA was able to make her maiden voyage between Puerto Varas and Puerto Octay. It was a very scenic trip using steam engines and sails. In the middle of the journey, the ship suffered engine failure of a vital part of the machine, and was towed to port for repair.
The SANTA ROSA had several owners in a few years. The company was modified; some partners withdrew and others joined. The new company, which revolved with the name "José Matzner and others", was constituted in the month of November 1910. It keeps this name for three years.
January 1914 the company was acquired by Mr. Cristino Haase. The two wharves and warehouses that the company owned in Puerto Varas and Puerto Octay were also transferred with the steamship.
In 1915, Mr. Haase sold the SANTA ROSA to Mr. Augusto Minte and the value of the transaction amounted to $ 40,000, including some spare parts such as the propeller and others.
In September of the year 1918 it was acquired by Mr. Carlos Heim, after which the SANTA ROSA sailed without interruption until 1938 the year in which she underwent repairs and general modernizations. The machines were removed for a complete overhaul. The SANTA ROSA was lengthened to 36 meters. It was also modernized with accommodations for 150 passengers and adapted mainly for the service of tourists in comfortable and luxurious cabins. Also it was fitted out for the transport of all sorts of cargo in large holds.
Among his illustrious passengers, the Argentine Cardinal, Monsignor José L. Coppelo, is remembered. This representative of the Holy See, in his capacity as "papal delegate", on Sunday 02 November 1941, embarked in Ensenada to Puerto Varas accompanied by a select delegation.
From Buenos Aires, via San Carlos de Bariloche, he went to Santiago, to participate in the Eucharistic Congress of that year.
The "Santa Rosa" sailed until 1945, when she was sold; it was intended to unrig her and move it to Puerto Montt to put it in service between Puerto Montt and Puerto Aysen.
Out of service she remained half unrigged in Puerto Varas until a strong storm threw her on the beach where her last remains were abandoned.

Source: http://www.laensenada.cl/page15.html
Chile 1938 1.80p sg 275, scott206.

Sailing ships in the painting of Christoph Blossom

In 2010 Somalia issued a small sheet dedicated to the marine paintings of the artist Christopher Blossom.
Christopher Blossom
When a child has a father and grandfather who are both well known illustrators, it is likely the offspring will also become an artist. And when a boy starts to sail at the age of six, it is also likely that the artist might choose the sea and sailing ships as his subject. Such was the case for Christopher Blossom, who, by the time he left the Parsons School of Design and Robert Bourke’s Design Studio, could visualize a finished boat from only its plans—and draw the craft from any angle. Before Blossom was twenty, he had sailed under square rig aboard the brigantine Young America. Known for his complex, detailed compositions of ships at sea, Blossom combines his appreciation for the beauty and the menace of the sea with his love of maritime history and ship construction. Before Blossom paints a vessel, he is likely to study the ship’s blueprint to learn about it hull design, length, tonnage and deck layout. Blossom’s historically accurate ships and harbors are combined with color, light and composition to capture the mood of a voyage and convey the essence of the seafaring experience. At the age of twenty, he won a Gold Medal at the Society of Illustrators Scholarship Exhibition. His dual vocation of experiencing the sea and then painting both nautical history and some of the greatest modern places to sail, was truly launched. Blossom became both a charter member and an artist of the American Society of Marine Artists, serving as its president from 1983 to 1986. His awards include a Gold Medal from the National Academy of Western Art for his painting of ships in Monterey. Saluted as an undisputed master, Blossom has exhibited his art at the Gilcrease Museum, the Colorado Museum of History, the prestigious Prix de West Invitational and the Artists of America show. Blossom continues to achieve artistic honors including the Robert Lougheed Memorial Award at the 2001 Prix de West. Almost the only time he isn’t painting is when he is sailing, visiting ports of call in Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, the Bahamas, California and Washington state. Blossom, who recently spent a year sailing around the Caribbean with his wife and two sons says of his love, "It’s not a hobby, it’s a way of life. When I look at the ocean, I get the same feeling pilots must get when they look to the sky." On the sheetlet shows the pictures:
1."Morning Star", Hudon´s Bay, 1864- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12594.
2. Among the rolling brakers.
3. "Allerton" on the East river- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16277.
4. "Benjamin Sewall" arriving in San Francisco Bay- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12580.
5. Boston Navy Yard- viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16276.
6. "Arthur James" heading out-viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16282.
7. Before the gale.
8. "Cutting in" in the Arctic.
Somalia 2010;(2500x8)Ms
http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist

GOREY HARBOUR on Jersey

The stamp shows us Gorey Harbour on Jersey with in the background Mont Orgueil Castle, in the foreground a wooden hulled fishing boat under sail and two rowing boats around 1795.
They is one of a set of stamps issued by Jersey, all are designed after paintings made by Sarah Louisa Kolpac http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/ ... sa_Kilpack

Jersey 1989 13p sg 512, scott ?

SANTIAGO carrack or nao (1570)

In 1971 Portugal issued three stamps for the IV Centenary of the Martyr Missionaries of Brasil all three stamps have the same design, with in the top the SANTIAGO a carrack (also given as a nao) from around 1570, who transported the missionaries to Brasil. The group of missionaries was headed by Inacio de Azevedo, and Wikipedia has the following on this missionary, and the voyage to Brasil.

Blessed Inácio de Azevedo (1527–1570) was a Portuguese Jesuit missionary.

His life
His full name was Inácio de Azevedo de Ataíde e Abreu Malafaia and he was born in Porto from a wealthy family, being the eldest son of Dom Manuel de Azevedo and Dona Francisca de Abreu. One of his brothers, Dom Jerónimo de Azevedo, was Viceroy of Portuguese India from 1612 to 1617.
He was educated at the Portuguese court of King John III and at the age of 18 he became administrator of his family's estate. However, after attending the sermons and speeches of Jesuit priest Francisco Estrada he decided to renounce all his possessions, including the feudal honra of Barbosa, in the northern Portuguese province of Entre Douro e Minho
In 1548 he made an irrevocable choice of a religious life and entered the Society of Jesus where he was finally ordained in 1553. In 1565 Saint Francis Borgia charged him with full powers for the inspection of the Jesuit missions in the Portuguese colony of Brazil, a task that took him nearly 3 years to accomplish. He arrived in Bahia in August, 1566 and he proceeded to visit all the Jesuit missions in Brazil. He nominated Father Manuel da Nóbrega Provincial for Brazil and with Nóbrega and Blessed José de Anchieta he visited the missions in the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro whose foundations were then being laid. He thus spent two years of his life in Brazil.
In October 1568 he was back in Lisbon and in May 1569 he proceeded to Rome to report to Pope Pius V and Saint Francis Borgia. In his final report, Inácio de Azevedo asked for more people to be sent to the missions and Saint Francis Borgia thus ordered him to recruit new elements for the Jesuits in Brazil. Then, after several months of intense preparations that included meetings with King Sebastian of Portugal, Azevedo and his companions finally left Portugal for Brazil on the merchant vessel SANTIAGO on 5 June 1570, while another group of more than 20 companions boarded the military fleet of the newly appointed Governor General of Brazil.
During the trip to Brazil, on July 15, 1570 while sailing near the Canary Islands, the Santiago was attacked and captured by a fleet led by French Huguenot corsair Jacques de Sores off Fuencaliente Lighthouse. Following the capture, Azevedo and his 39 companions were massacred.

The Forty Martyrs of Brazil were blessed by Pope Pius IX on 11 May 1854. In 1999 40 concrete crosses at the place of martyrdom, about 200 ft off the Fuencaliente lighthouse were placed on the seabed by the government of the island La Palma. This place is situated in a depth of about 20 meters and is today a popular diving destination. Adjacent to the old tower, another monument for the Forty Martyrs of Brazil has been erected in the October 2014. This monument is a stone cross, with a plate on which the names of the martyrs are engraved.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In%C3%A1cio_de_Azevedo
Portugal 1971 1e, 3.30e and 4.80e sg?, scott 1116/18.

FRENCH WARSHIP 1720

Dominica issued in 1989 four stamps and a miniature sheet for the Exposition Philatélique Mondale in Paris from 7 to 17 July,
The $1.00 stamp also in the ms shows us a French two decker warship from 1720 of which I have not any details or her career.

Dominica 1989 $1,00 and MS, sg 1228 and sgMS?, scott?

«Arthur James»-fishing schooner

Fishing schooner «Arthur James» had been built in 1905. She had seen sixteen seasons and four collisions, the most recent in 1916 off Castle Island, where she sank in fifty feet of water after being run down by steamer. Every spring around March, the seiners of the mackerel fleet would fit out and prepare to head south to meet the schools of mackerel off the Carolina capes. Then, through the summer, the fleet would pursue the schools north along the coast, finding them by autumn off Nova Scotia. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “This is a view of the schooner "Arthur James" leaving Gloucester just after the turn of the century. She is heading out of the harbor at sunrise with a blustery northwest wind. Behind her is the fort section of town. Around her, at anchor and throughout the harbor, the fleet prepares to get under way. With a full load of salt and one seine boat on deck and another towing astern, the "Arthur James" is bound south.”
Somalia 2010;2500. Source: http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/details/default. asp?p=87&a=10&t. https://books. google. ru/ books?id=s2mBTh6mC.
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Dal

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Dal

Postby shipstamps » Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:32 pm


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Sloop built 1934. First Polish Transatlantic yacht L27’6”.B7’4”. Poland SG2305 (SB 3/75)
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Re: Dal

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:48 pm

Dal-001.jpg
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1926 — Lt. J. Swiechowski and Lt. A. Bohomolec, Poland; Poland.
The name DAL means distance.
She is a gaff-rigged sloop carrying one headsail, and was built in Poland in 1926. The first Polish transatlantic racing yacht, she sailed from Gdynia in 1933 with Lt. J. Swiechowski of the Polish Merchant Marine and Lt. A. Bohomolec of the Polish Cavalry in her crew, bound for the Century of Progress Exhibition in Chicago. After many months, through hurricanes and adverse weather, she reached Bermuda, then worked her way up the Atlantic Coast and finally reached Chicago in 1934. She attracted much attention as she lay in the Jackson Park Lagoon. The crew returned to Poland as heroes. The yacht remained in the United States. In 1941, DAL was moved to the Museum of Science and Industry where she was displayed in an exhibit on wind power in commerce and transportation. In 1968, the exhibit was closed, and plans were in hand to dispose of DAL. When Ireneusz Gieblewicz, the son of a Baltic fisherman and recent emigrant, heard that DAL was being offered for disposition, he appealed to the Illinois Division of the Polish American Congress for help, which was readily provided. Plans were then presented to museum officials for the restoration of DAL and its return to Poland. Due to technical difficulties, the Polish Museum of America could not accept the boat and it was eventually handed over to Gieblewicz and moved to his garage in the Chicago suburbs. With the help of a few friends, and with his own money, Gieblewicz spent many months restoring DAL for its return journey to Poland. However, his financial resources were becoming exhausted. Learning of his difficulties, television journalist Tom Korzeniowski, a grand nephew of Joseph Conrad, appealed for support to the Polish National Alliance. The Alliance agreed, and with its support, DAL departed Chicago on May 3, 1980, with Gieblewicz as her skipper, bound for the Polish Maritime Museum in Gdansk, via all the ports visited an the original 1933 voyage. DAL damaged her stern and rudder when she scraped bottom on the Buffalo run. She sailed to New York City, only to be dry-docked at the Minneford Marina in City Island. Questions about her seaworthiness led to the decision to load her aboard the freighter BRONISLAW LACHOWICZ for the trip back to Poland. She arrived in the Baltic Sea Aug. 13, 1980, but was not allowed into Gdansk because of a strike there. She was laid up in a small fishing village, and was finally permitted to enter Gdansk on Sept. 16, 1980.

Sources: Polonus Philatelic Society; WP 35:27.


She lost her mast in a cyclone. She was a "star" of the Chicago World's Fair as well as a cause of disputes between consecutive owners. Laminated with plastic many years ago, she has been waiting for conservation which would restore her original design from the 1930s.

At present, Complex Jacht, a company comprised of specialists who have renovated, among others, a sailing yacht GENERAL ZARUSKI, is conducting works on a legendary yacht "DAL". The repair of "DAL" is the first large-scale conservation undertaking since 1980 when the yacht was brought to Poland. Her renovation is being conducted under the project of construction of the Shipwreck Conservation Centre in Tczew.

Great ambitions of a small yacht
In a way, the history of "DAL" defined and marked the lives of her two owners. Andrzej Bohomolec, a Polish cavalryman, dreamt about crossing the Atlantic on a small vessel. Over a decade later, Ireneusz Gieblewicz wanted to bring "DAL" to Poland. When Bohomolec was leaving Gdynia for Chicago in summer of 1933, the possibility of crossing the Atlantic on board "DAL" for many seemed quite doubtful. After all, the yacht was an 8.5 metre sloop with a 2.15 metre beam, 1.3 metre draft, around 4.5 tonne displacement and 45 square meter sail area. Andrzej Bohomolec was accompanied by Jan Witkowski and Jerzy Świechowski, instructors from a maritime yachting centre in Gdynia.

Success in Chicago
The crossing was going according to the plan until the second half o August when "DAL" was hit by a cyclone. A broken mast caused suspension of the voyage – the yacht reached the Bermudas and, upon completion of repair and ballasting works, continued her crossing on 3rd June, 1934. The goal was to present "DAL" at the Chicago World's Fair which turned out to be her great success – this small but courageous vessel was admired for completion of such a difficult voyage. In commemoration of the Atlantic crossing conducted by "DAL", it has been decided to exhibit the yacht (which was purchased from donations of the Polish diaspora in USA) on permanent basis in the post-exhibition area in Chicago.

Destruction of the symbol
For the next few years, the yacht was moored in the exhibition area, followed by a mooring in front of the Museum of Science and Industry and a transfer to the interior part of the museum. The years which followed were marked by a gradual diminishment in the role of "DAL" as a small courageous vessel. Step by step, her history and symbolic value were being forgotten in the United States. In the late 1960s, the yacht started to be an unnecessary burden which simply occupied space in the museum area. In 1967, "DAL" was subject to eviction and was transferred back to the Polish Museum in Chicago.

Repair of "DAL"
It was then decided that the yacht will go back to Poland the same way it arrived in the United States 35 years before. Ireneusz Gieblewicz, a new owner of the yacht and a yachting enthusiast, was a driving spirit of this undertaking. Before the Atlantic crossing, Gieblewicz decided to reinforce the hull by lamination. In the 1970s, polyester glass laminate was a highly popular material due to its durability, high resistance to weather conditions and light weight which made it a perfect reinforcement for a wooden hull of "DAL". Application of laminate on wood was also a much easier operation than a time-consuming and expensive conservation of the damaged hull. In addition to lamination of the hull, masts and rigging were replaced with new ones.

Yacht-related disputes
Andrzej Bohomolec was not enthusiastic about the idea of laminating the yacht and therefore, sued the new owner of "DAL". The lawsuit between her current and previous owners delayed repair works and consequently, return of the yacht to Poland. Due to the ongoing proceedings, launching preparations took seven years. Upon completion of initial trials on Lake Michigan and participation in Chicago boat show, "DAL" headed to New York. It soon became clear that lamination of the hull was not sufficient in terms of reinforcement which would guarantee an independent and safe voyage across the Atlantic. "DAL" was in poor technical condition: lack of proper conservation throughout the years as well as poor maintenance made her independent crossing to Poland impossible.

Return to Poland
"DAL" was then decided to be shipped to Europe on board BRONISLAW LACHOWICZ– first to Bremerhaven and then, on her own keel, to Gdynia through Sweden, Szczecin and Świnoujście. "DAL" reached Poland in August 1980, the period marked by important events in the history of the Polish nation. Strikes and the Gdańsk Agreement attracted all media attention and therefore, return of the yacht, which was a symbol of Polish maritime history and incredible courage of her owners, after 47 years from the United States was left unnoticed.

"DAL" in the Museum
After the Gdańsk Agreement was reached, Ireneusz Gieblewicz contacted Przemysław Smolarek, PhD, who at that time held the position of the Museum Director – "DAL" was agreed to be moored at the Polish Maritime Museum after an official welcoming ceremony in Gdynia. The yacht had been exhibited by the Crane for four years before she was placed in a boathouse of the Academic Yacht Club in Górki Zachodnie (district of Gdańsk) in winter of 1985. Towards the end of 1995, the yacht was transferred to the museum warehouses in Tczew.

In summer of 2014, under the "Shipwreck Conservation Centre combined with Studio Warehouse in Tczew" construction project, the yacht was transported to Puck. "DAL" is planned to return to Tczew as one of the main exhibition items of the newly built department of the National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk upon completion of the repair works which will restore her original design from the 1930s.

http://www.en.nmm.pl/news/new-life-of-the-yacht-DAL
Poland 1974 1z50 sg 2305, scott2039.
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