SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

INCONSTANT HMS 1915

Built as a light cruiser under yard No 514 by William Beardmore & Co., Dalmuir for the Royal Navy.
03 April 1913 keel laid down.
06 July 1914 launched as the HMS INCONSTANT one of the Arethusa class.
Displacement 3,568 ton, dim. 132.9 x 11.9 x 4.75m. (draught), length bpp. 125.0m.
Powered by four Parsons steam turbines, 40,000 shp, four shafts, speed 28.5 knots.
Armament: 2 – 6 inch, 6 – 4 inch QF, 1 – 3pdr. AA gun, 4 – 21 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 270.
January 1915 commissioned.

HMS INCONSTANT was one of eight Arethusa-class light cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the 1910s. She fought in the First World War, participating in the Battle of Jutland. Following the war, she was scrapped.
Design and description
The Arethusa-class cruisers were intended to lead destroyer flotillas and defend the fleet against attacks by enemy destroyers. The ships were 436 feet (132.9 m) long overall, with a beam of 39 feet (11.9 m) and a deep draught of 15 feet 7 inches (4.75 m). Displacement was 3,512 long tons (3,568 t). INCONSTANT was powered by four Parsons steam turbines, each driving one propeller shaft, which produced a total of 40,000 indicated horsepower (30,000 kW). The turbines used steam generated by eight Yarrow boilers which gave her a speed of about 28.5 knots (52.8 km/h; 32.8 mph). She carried 840 long tons (853 t) tons of fuel oil that gave a range of 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph).
The main armament of the Arethusa-class ships was two BL 6-inch (152 mm) Mk XII guns that were mounted on the centreline fore and aft of the superstructure and six QF 4-inch Mk V guns in waist mountings. They were also fitted with a single QF 3-pounder (47 mm (1.9 in)) anti-aircraft gun and four 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes in two twin mounts.
Construction and service
The ship was launched on 6 July 1914 at William Beardmore and Company shipyard. On being commissioned, she was assigned to the 1st Light Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet at Rosyth. Took part in the search for the SMS METEOR. On 31 May to 1 June 1916 INCONSTANT took part in the Battle of Jutland. She survived the battle. September 1917 fitted out as a minelayer and laid 370 mines in 5 voyages. Early 1919 send to the Baltic as a SNO (what is that?) ship and returning to the U.K. April 1919. The she joined the Light Cruiser Squadron in Harwich.
October 1919 paid off and then attached to the 1st Submarine Flotilla until February 1922, including short spells as Atlantic Fleet Flagship.
16 February 1922 paid off at Chatham, and was sold for scrapping on 9 June 1922 to Cashmore, of Newport.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Inconstant_(1914) Conway’s All the World’s Fighting ships 1906-1921.

25 YEARS OF DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS - ISRAEL-GREECE

The stamp shows us an imagination I believe of the designer of the stamp, from a cruise vessel and a container vessel. Thessaloniki port is depict on the left of the stamp, Haifa port on the right.

Israel–Greece Joint Issue - 25 Years of Diplomatic Relations
This year, 2015, marks the 25th anniversary of full diplomatic relations between Israel and Greece. Both are modern democratic states, Mediterranean neighbors, with common values representing the proud independence of two ancient nations. The two countries have forged a multidimensional partnership with wide-ranging cooperation in all fields reflecting our peoples' shared history, close cultural ties and common interests. This historic commemorative stamp symbolizes the close friendship between Israel and Greece as they strive to build a better future, working together to promote the progress and prosperity of our nations and our region.
Irit Ben Abba
Israeli Ambassador to Greece
The Jews of Thessaloniki stood facing the sea, while other Jewish communities throughout the Diaspora and in Eretz Israel lived with their backs to it.
Yitzhak Ben Zvi, one of the forefathers of the Zionist movement and later President of Israel, visited Thessaloniki in 1914 and was amazed by the Jewish command of the port: "On the eve of the Sabbath, even before sunset, all transport halts at the port. At once, all the Jewish sailors fill the port with their rowboats, dinghies and ships, all sailing to shore... Sabbath!"
Due to the deep economic ties between Thessaloniki and the sea, which reflected the Jewish power on the docks and beyond, the "pearl of the Aegean" became known as "Jerusalem of the Balkans", in other words – like a city in Israel whose Jewish residents were linked to nature and to physical labor.
The "Jewish muscle" exhibited on the docks of Thessaloniki led the Zionist leadership to include the Thessalonikians in the conquest of the sea in Eretz Israel. Between 1933 and1935 hundreds of Jewish dockworkers from Thessaloniki immigrated to Eretz Israel and helped to realize the national vision of Hebrew labor with their own hands in the key sea ports of Haifa and Jaffa. The routine daily work on the docks was both tedious and dangerous. During the Arab strike that broke out in 1936, Arab workers failed in their attempts to lock the gates of the Haifa and Jaffa ports. Haifa Port remained open thanks to the Thessalonikian dockworkers who continued to come to work despite the atmosphere of terror, and in Tel Aviv the Thessalonikians built the first Hebrew port, as an alternative to the striking Jaffa port. These heroic actions destroyed the Arab blockade of the transfer of goods, passengers and immigrants through the ports of Eretz Israel and garnered the Thessalonikians a place in the national pantheon for their key role in the realization of the Zionist vision during the period of the Jewish Yishuv as it moved toward statehood.
Dr. Shai Srougo
Researcher of Jewish Communities of the Mediterranean Region
Lecturer, Department of Jewish History, Haifa University
Description of the stamp
The stamp features Haifa Port as represented by a typical freighter and cranes, with the Baha'i Gardens on the slopes of Mt. Carmel in the background; and the Port of Thessaloniki as represented by a typical cruise ship and cranes, with the ancient white tower on the beach in the background.
The stamp tab features the 25 Years of Diplomatic Relations between Israel and Greece logo, designed by graphic artist and illustrator Kelly Matathia Covo.

Israel 2016 4s10 sg?, scott?
http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... e&id=25333

HSL 142

A new stamp issue commemorating the 75th anniversary of the RAF Search and Rescue Force is released by Jersey Post on 6 February 2016. The six stamps and Souvenir Sheet feature dramatic search and rescue scenes created by illustrator, Sharif Tarabay.
“In 1940, during The Battle of Britain, the British found that they were unprepared for a battle over the sea,” explains Chris Elligott, Philatelic Production Coordinator at Jersey Post. “It was clear that a better equipped and dedicated service was needed to recover airmen who had ditched or parachuted into the water and return them to their squadrons. As a result, the Air Ministry formed the Directorate of Air Sea Rescue to coordinate rescue efforts.”
The Air Sea Rescue Service was officially founded in February 1941 and adopted the motto, ‘The sea shall not have them.’ The six stamps in this issue depict specialised search and rescue vessels: a Lockheed Hudson aircraft responding to a distress flare, an air sea rescue high speed launch, a Supermarine Walrus seaplane rescuing two pilots in a dinghy, a Westland Whirlwind helicopter carrying out a winch rescue from a sinking boat, a Westland Wessex helicopter flying above a stormy sea and a Westland Sea King helicopter about to carry out a cliff rescue.
“Over the years, RAF Search and Rescue has provided a vital service, both in a military context and for civilians who have found themselves in emergency situations,” continues Mr Elligott. “We’re very happy to be able to commemorate such a significant anniversary with this set of stamps.”
http://www.jerseystamps.com/en/News/Detail/65
The set of stamps and the MS depict rescue from sea and coast, only one stamp the 57p I have more detail on, she depict the HSL 142.
Built under yard No 1631 as a High Speed Launch (HSL) by the Power Boat Company at Hythe, Southampton.
Ordered by the South African Air Force but taken over by RAF during building.
Displacement 21.5 ton, dim. 19.20 x 5.33 x 1.14m.
Hull mahogany.
Powered by 3 Napier Sea Lion diesel engines, each 500 bhp, speed 36 knots.
Armament: 2 - 0.303mm Vickers MG, 2 – 0.303mm Lewis MG.
Crew 9
1940 Completed as the HSL 142.
On completion and after trials, she was taken on charge by the RAF at Calshot on 15th November 1940 and within a month allocated to serve with No. 22 ASR unit from Grimsby in December the same year. Two months later in February 1941 she was transferred to operate with several of her sisters with No. 27 ASRU from Dover. The HSLs were kept very busy and some suffered damage.
HSL 142 was back at Calshot for repairs in August 1941 before being re-allocated for further service with 71 ASRU which was based at Gibraltar.
She was received at Gibraltar in November 1941 and joined sister HSL 181 in the area. HSL 142 saw out most of the war at Gibraltar but was returned to 43 Group for more repairs on the 31st May 1944, and then taken to 85 Maintenance Unit at Felixstowe in August the same year.
HSL 142 was officially written off charge by the RAF on the 17th April 1945, and kept in reserve until she was offered for disposal through the Admiralty Small Craft Sales on the 25th November 1946 at Felixstowe.

Her post-war career is very sketchy, but she ended up as a houseboat on the River Thames. The current owner took up the offer of bringing the HSL to the Marchwood facility in order that the safe site and the local expertise could be used for continued restoration of the craft. HSL 142 arrived in April 2000 and is currently owned by Mick Dent. He needs assistance to ensure the project is completed, however of late, unfortunately very little progress has been made.

2004 Was she broken up at Marchwood, only her transom survived and is now in the Merston Aircraft Museum Hal.

Jersey 2016 57p sg?, scott? MSsg ?, scott?

Source: http://www.tangmere-museum.org.uk/artef ... launch-142
http://www.bmpt.org.uk/other_boats_hist ... /index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_Two_63_ft_HSL

GIBRALTAR HMS 1894

Built as a cruiser under yard No 420 by Robert Napier & Sons, Govan East, Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
02 December 1889 keel laid down.
27 April 1892 launched as HMS GIBRALTAR, one of the Edgar class.
Displacement: 7,700 ton, dim. 118.1 x 18 x 7.3m. (draught).
Powered by two triple expansion steam engines, 12,000 hp, twin shafts, speed 19.5 knots.
Bunker capacity 1,250 ton coal (maximum).
Range by a speed of 10 knots, 10,000 mile.
Armament: 2 – 9.2 inch, 10 – 6 inch QF, 12 – 6 pdr, guns and 4 – 14 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 544.
01 November 1894 commissioned.

HMS GIBRALTAR, was an Edgar-class cruiser launched in 1892 for service in the Royal Navy. She was built and engineered by Messrs Napier of Glasgow. Of 7,700 loaded displacement, she was coal-fired with four double-ended cylindrical boilers driving two shafts. She could make 20 knots (37 km/h) with forced draught and 18 knots (33 km/h) with natural draught. She was a very good sea boat and an exceptional steamer.
During her early career she served mainly on foreign stations. In late 1899 she had a complete refit at Portsmouth dockyard. In March 1901 she was commissioned by Captain Arthur Limpus, with a complement of 544 officers and men, to take the place as flagship of Rear-Admiral Arthur Moore, who had been appointed Commander-in-Chief on the Cape Station. She arrived in Durban in early September 1901.
Despite her obsolescence, she saw service in the First World War, first with the 10th Cruiser Squadron on Northern Patrol and from 1915 as a depot ship for this group, based in the Shetland Islands. Two of her 6-in QF Mk I guns were dismounted from the cruiser and moved to Swarbacks Head on Vementry, a headland that overlooks the entrance to Swarbacks Minn between the islands of Vementry and Muckle Roe for shore based defence. The two guns still exist on this site and can be visited.
Future First Sea Lord John H. D. Cunningham served aboard her as a midshipman. Captain Ronald Arthur Hopwood, R.N. was in command 1913–1914, leaving at the start of the First World War.
GIBRALTAR was sold in August 1923 to John Cashmore Ltd for breaking up at Newport.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Gibraltar_(1892)

FOYLE HMT 1918

This stamp depict the HMT FOYLE but while she is depict on the stamp, I believe the intention was to depict the destroyer FOYLE who was in service in the Royal Navy during World War I. The HMT FOYLE was at that time not sailing under that name but carried the name JOHN EDMUND and she was just completed before the end of World War I.

Built as a navy minesweeper trawler under yard No 224 by Goole Shipbuilding & repairing Co. Ltd, Goole, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
1918 Launched as the HMT JOHN EDMUND she was one of the Mersey class.
Tonnage 328 gross, 131 net, dim. 45.1 x 7.2m., length bpp. 42.2m.
Powered by one triple expansion steam engine, manufactured by Campbell Gas Engine Co. Ltd. Halifax, 69 nhp., one shaft, speed 11 knots.
Armament 1 – 12pdr gun.
Crew ?
22 October 1918 completed.
1919 Registered in London.
1920 Renamed in HMT FOYLE (T48).
1921 Bought or leased by the new formed South African Navy and renamed HMSAS SONNEBLOM (sunflower). She was one of the first South African navy vessels.
When the “Great Depression” hit also South Africa, there was not any money for the navy and the Government was forced to hand back the ship to the U.K. government in 1934, where she was again renamed in FOYLE.
1938-1945 Can’t find anything on her WW II war history.
After the war sold by the Royal Navy to Thomas H. Scales & Son Ltd., Granton and refitted in a fishing trawler, renamed CRAMOND ISLAND GN 18.
1949 Sold to Oddson & Co. Ltd, Hull, renamed BRIMNES H 558.
09 January 1949 towed into Stromness, Orkney by the Islandic trawler RODULL, with five feet of water in the engine room.
January 1950 was she owned by Alexander Robertson Milne, Aberdeen.
06 April 1950 renamed HETTY MILNE A 648.
October 1954 sold for scrap, arrived 16 October1954 by the scrapyard of Jacques Bakker & Zn., Bruges, Belgium.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz and various internet sites.

ECLIPSE HMS 1904

Built as a protected cruiser by the Portsmouth Dockyard for the Royal Navy.
11 December 1893 keel laid down.
19 July 1894 launched as HMS ECLIPSE she was the lead ship of her class.
Displacement: 5,690 ton, dim.106.7 x 16.3 x 6.25m. (draught)
Powered by two inverted triple expansion steam engines, 9,600 ihp, twin shafts, speed 18.5 knots.
Armament: 5 – 6 inch QF, 6 – 4.7 inch QF, 6 – 3 pdr. QF guns and 3 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 450.
23 March 1897 commissioned.

HMS ECLIPSE was an Eclipse-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the mid-1890s.
Design
Eclipse -class second-class protected cruisers were preceded by the shorter Astraea-class cruisers. ECLIPSE had a displacement of 5,600 long tons (5,700 t; 6,300 short tons) when at normal load. It had a total length of 373 ft (114 m), a beam of 53 ft 6 in (16.31 m), a metacentric height of around 3 m (9 ft 10 in), and a draught of 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m). It was powered by two inverted triple-expansion steam engines which used steam from eight cylindrical boilers. Using normal draught, the boilers were intended to provide the engines with enough steam to generate 8,000 indicated horsepower (6,000 kW) and to reach a speed of 18.5 knots (34.3 km/h; 21.3 mph); using forced draft, the equivalent figures were 9,600 indicated horsepower (7,200 kW) and a speed of 19.5 knots (36.1 km/h; 22.4 mph). Eclipse -class cruisers carried a maximum of 1,075 long tons (1,092 t) of coal and achieved maximum speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) in sea trials.[2]
It carried five 40-calibre 6-inch (152 mm) quick-firing (QF) guns in single mounts protected by gun shields. One gun was mounted on the forecastle, two on the quarterdeck and one pair was abreast the bridge. They fired 100-pound (45 kg) shells at a muzzle velocity of 2,205 ft/s (672 m/s). The secondary armament consisted of six 40-calibre 4.7-inch (120 mm) guns; three on each broadside. Their 45-pound (20.4 kg) shells were fired at a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s).[5] It was fitted with three 18-inch torpedo tubes, one submerged tube on each broadside and one above water in the stern.[6] Its ammunition supply consisted of 200 six-inch rounds per gun, 250 shells for each 4.7-inch gun, 300 rounds per gun for the 12-pounders and 500 for each three-pounder. ECLIPSE had ten torpedoes, presumably four for each broadside tube and two for the stern tube.
Service
HMS ECLIPSE was launched in 1894 and completed in 1897. In 1899 she served in the Indian Ocean under the command of Captain P. W. Bush, as flagship of the East Indies Squadron.
Refit at Chatham from 1900-1901.
She was commissioned at Chatham dockyard in late May 1901, with a crew of 450 officers and men under the command of Captain Stokes, to relieve HMS HERMIONE on the China Station.
1904-1905 In reserve at Devonport.
1905-1906 Cadet training ship based at Bermuda, attached to the North America and West Indies station in the 4th Cruiser Squadron.
1906-1907 In reserve Portsmouth.
1907-1912 Attached to the Royal Navy College at Osborne.
1912-1913 Joined the new formed Third Fleet Reserve at Portsmouth.
1913-1914 Assigned to Devonport.
Early 1914 escorted the new Australian submarines AE 1 and AE 2 part way to Singapore.
By the outbreak of the war she joined the 12th Cruiser Squadron in the Western Channel, capturing two German merchant ships on 10 August and 10 September 1914.
Then reduced to accommodation ship for submarine flotillas from 1915-1918.
Laid up in Devonport 1918-1919.
August 1921 sold to G Cohen for breaking up.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_ECLIPSE_(1894) British Cruisers of the Victorian Era by Norman Friedman.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

Inanda (T&J Harrison)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm


Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size
Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

inanda.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
Internet.
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
Posts: 533
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:46 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 29 guests

Sponsored Links
cron