AZZURRA (I-4) yacht 1981

The Grenada Grenadines stamp shows the yacht AZZURRA with the year 1981, not a sail no visible, four yachts with the name AZZURRA have been built in Italy between 1982 and 1986 the first was completed in 1982 as the AZZURRA (I 4). She took part in America Cup Races in 1983, likely she is depict.
AZZURRA (I 4) was built as a 12-metre class yacht by Off. Meccaniche Ing. Mario Cobau at Pesaro, Italy for the Consorzio Sfida Italiana America’s Cup 1983 (Gianni Agnelli &Karim Aga Khan.) Representing Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo, Italy.
Designed by Studio Andrea Valicelli.
19 July 1982 launched as the AZZURRA (I 4)
Displacement 25.650 tons, dim. 19.98 x 3.81 x 2.72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.
Sail area 166.65 m².
The AZZURRA (I 4) competed in the 1983 Louis Vuitton Cup races in Newport RI, she reached the semi-finals, finished third in the semi-finals.
Used then as trial horse for the Italian yachts for the America Cup Races in 1986/87
In 1987 was she not more sailing.
2014 On display at the Centro Sportivo of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo.
More info is given on: http://www.sy-pacificwave.com/Pages/Pac ... igree.aspx

Grenada Grenadines 1987 70c sg861, scott864.
Source: Internet and http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05384.html

AUSTRALIA KA 5 yacht 1977

AUSTRALIA KA 5 was built Steve E.Ward Co., Cove Harbor, Western Australia for the America Cup Challenge ’77 Ltd. (Alan Bond), Yanchep Western Australia.
Designed by Ben Lexcen & Johan Valentijn.
February 1977 launched as the AUSTRALIA KA 5.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 19.81 x 3.71 x 2.74m. (draught), length on waterline 13.71 m.
Sail area: 160 m².

AUSTRALIA (KA-5) is an Australian 12-metre-class America's Cup racing yacht that twice challenged unsuccessfully for the America's Cup in 1977 and 1980. Designed by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn for Alan Bond, Australia failed to win a single race against the 1977 defender, COURAGEOUS (US-26), but managed to win one race against the 1980 defender, FREEDOM (US-30). Australia resides in Sydney, Australia, and is currently located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.
Design and Construction
AUSTRALIA was designed during 1976 by Ben Lexcen in association with the Dutch designer Johan Valentijn. Both men spent seven months experimenting with 1/9th scale models in the University of Delft test tank in the Netherlands.
AUSTRALIA is a conventional design and has been described as a "Courageous-style boat".It has v-shaped mid-ship sections, a low freeboard, large bustle and a low aft run finishing in a wide U-shaped transom. Its fore overhang is very narrow and round shaped in its lowest part. The cockpits are shallow, keel is thin and the ballast is placed very low. The elliptical mast is made in extruded aluminum. AUSTRALIA was approximately 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb) lighter than COURAGEOUS and it was hoped that by lowering the freeboard and taking a penalty on length, AUSTRALIA would prove faster than the US boat.
AUSTRALIA was built by Steve Ward in Perth and launched in February 1977. AUSTRALIA then sailed in sea trials against Alan Bond's 1974 challenger, SOUTHERN CROSS (KA-4), off Yanchep in Western Australia. The older boat remained a trial horse for AUSTRALIA during the 1977 America's Cup series
1977 America's Cup challenge
For the 1977 America's Cup, AUSTRALIA went to Newport and raced against the 1970 Australian challenger, GRETEL II (KA-3), the Swedish entrant, SVERIGE (S-3), and the French challenger, FRANCE (F-1), led by Baron Bich. Eventually, AUSTRALIA won the right to challenge for the Cup by defeating SVERGE 4–0.
However AUSTRALIA lost to the US defender, CCOURAGEOUS, 4–0. Ben Lexcen, who initially stayed in Australia during the challenge, went to Newport an was disappointed to find that AUSTRALIA had a poor-quality mast from SOUTHERN CROSS and that AUSTRALIA's sails were flat, heavy and of poor quality. AUSTRALIA was never really competitive and COURAGEOUS won the series easily.
1980 America's Cup challenge
Initially, Alan Bond suggested dropping AUSTRALIA and designing a new boat for the 1980 series. Ben Lexcen, however, was convinced that AUSTRALIA's hull – with a few modifications – was a good design and that its performance would improve with a new rig and sails. The hull had its keel made sharper at the bottom, and the bustle was lowered slightly and made larger to help improve the steering.
AUSTRALIA’s competitors for challenging the Americans were: SVERIGE, back for a second time; FRANCE III (F-3), a new yacht for Baron Bich, and the British challenger LIONHEART (K-18). LIONHEART was a fast boat, partly because it was fitted with a ‘bendy' mast which hooked aft several feet at its tip giving it 10 per cent extra unmeasured sail area on its main sail. In light winds, that gave the British boat a strong advantage.
Seeing the British boat's speed, the AUSTRALIA camp decided to copy the mast. The ‘bendy' rig added to AUSTRALIA’s speed and it became a very competitive boat defeating the US defender FREEDOM (US-30) in the second race of the series. However, the late adoption of the ‘bendy' mast meant that AUSTRALIA’s crew were experimenting with the newly cut sails and lacked the necessary confidence in them to win. In any case, the ‘bendy' mast was only effective in light winds. In the final two races, the wind blew hard enough to cancel out whatever advantage it gave AUSTRALIA and FREEDOM won the series convincingly 4–1.
After 1980
Following the 1980 challenge, AUSTRALIA was sold to the British "Victory" syndicate headed by Peter de Savary. Renamed ‘'TEMERAIRE, the boat became a trial-horse for VICTORY 82 (K-21) and VICTORY 83 (K-22) for the 1983 America's Cup that was ultimately won by AUSTRALIA II (KA-6)
In 1985, Australia returned to Sydney after being bought by Syd Fisher in 1985 to be the trail horse for Fisher's "East Australia America's Cup Defence" syndicate defender, STEAK AND KIDNEY (KA-14). Australia was eventually refitted as a charter boat in 2004 and was acquired by the Australia 12m Historic Trust in 2011
Today, Australia is located at the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club (SASC) in Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour.

Dominica 1987 $3 sg1055, scott1017. (The yacht in the background carries a sail No but hard to read can she be the SVERIGE (S3)?)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05360.html

COLUMBIA US 16 yacht 1958

COLUMBIA a 12-metre class yacht built by Nevins, City Island for New York Yacht Club (Sears-Cunningham Syndicate), New York.
She was built for the America’s Cup 1958 races and designed by Olin Stephens.
1958 Launched as the COLUMBIA US 16.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 20.19 x 3.61 x 2.80m. (draught), length on waterline 14.30m.
Sail area 169.55 m².

In the defender series the COLUMBIA competed against three other USA yachts during the summer of 1958 and she was the winner.
The COLUMBIA under skipper Briggs Cunningham she was the defender of the cup against the British yacht SCEPTRE.
The 1958 America Cup Race was sailed off Newport, Rhode Island from 20 September till 26 September. The COLUMBUS won all 4 races, and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
She took also part in the defender trials for the 1962, 1964 and 1967 America’s Cup competitions.
1960 Sold to Paul Shields, New York.
1964 Sold to Thomas Douglas, Newport Beach Ca.
1975 Sold to Swedish Syndicate for the America Cup, Goteborg, Sweden, she kept her name COLUMBIA.
First half of 1976 sold to Handelsbolaget Modern Boating, Goteborg.
Second half of 1976 sold to Pelle Petterson, Lars Wiglund, Stellan Westerdahl, Goteborg.
1978 Sold to Xaver Rouget-Luchaire (Societe des Regates Rochelaises, La Rochelle, France, not renamed.
1985 Sold to Bernard Pollet, Cannes, France.
1997 Sold to Paul Gardener and Bill Collins, Newport, RI, USA.
2000 Sold to Alain Hanover & Daniel Hanover, Newport RI.
2014 Restored to her old glory she is now for charter and races at Newport RI, same name and owners.

Grenada 1987 10c sg1611, scott1479.
Grenadines of Grenada 1992 $1 sg1582, scott1479
Solomon Island 1986 30c sg570a, scott?

Source: Wikipedia. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05327.html

Krill trawler transhipping to a reefer

The new 'Fisheries' stamp issue was released on 01 May 2008. The issue is the first in a series entitled “The Waters of South Georgia” and comprises four stamps and a First Day Cover.

The waters around South Georgia teem with marine life, thanks to the rich mixing of cold and warm currents at the polar front. Krill, the basic building block of the Southern Ocean’s biology, gathers in large swarms and is fed upon by larger fish, penguins and marine mammals. The deep waters around the Island are home to strange species, which only in the last few decades have become a target for fishermen.

Conserving the rich diversity and abundant fish stocks is the first objective of the Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. Protecting the seas is expensive, with Patrol Vessel costs running over £2m per annum, and research costs nearing £1m. To fund this work, the Government allows carefully controlled and responsible fishing vessels to operate annually under licence. The fees from the sale of these licences provide the majority of the territory’s revenue.

Quotas for fishing are set annually by the international body the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and take into account the size of the stock and also any other species of wildlife which depend on the fish for food to make sure that the ecosystem is not unbalanced by commercial fishing.
Source: South Georgia & and South Sandwich Islands post

The four ships have been identified as.
50p ARGOS FROYANES.
60p ROBERT M LEE.
85p The krill trawler and reefer both not identified at anchor in Cumberland Bay, South Georgia.
£1.05 Research vessel PHAROS SG

RANGER J5 yacht 1937

Built as a steel hulled J-class yacht by the Bath Iron Works, Bath for Harold S. Vanderbilt, built as a defender of the 1937 America Cup.
Designed by William Starling Burgess & Olin J. Stephens.
11 May 1937 launched as the RANGER J5. Christened by Mrs. Vanderbilt.
Displacement 166 tons, dim. 41.20 x 6.40 x 4.57m. (draught), length on waterline 26.52m.
Sail area 701.05m².

In the Preliminary Tests she won almost every race against other USA yachts and she was chosen to defend the America Cup Races at Rhode Island in 1937.
She won under skipper Harold S. Vanderbilt all four races from 31 July till 5 August against the British yacht ENDEAVOUR II and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
The rest of the summer of 1937 was she used for races and was very successful.
21 May 1941 the RANGER was sold for scrap for US$ 12,000 to the L & Z Corporation of Fall River, Mass.

Grenadines of Grenada 1992 75c sg1581, scott1478.
Solomon Islands 18c sg570a, scott
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 18&lang=en

ENDEAVOUR (II) yacht 1936

Built as a steel hulled J-class yacht by Camper & Nicholson, Gosport, Hampshire for Thomas Octave Murdoch Sopwith a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron, as a challenger for the 1937 America Cup.
Designer: Charles E. Nicholson.
February 1936 laid down.
08 June 1936 launched as the ENDEAVOUR (II) K6.
Displacement 162.6 ton, dim. 41.39 x 6.55 x 4.08m. (draught aft), length on waterline 26.36m.
Sail area 700.77m².

In 1937 she crossed the North Atlantic and arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in the end of May.
She was in 1937 the challenger of the America Cup against the USA yacht RANGER off Newport, Rhode Island.
31 July 1937 the first race the ENDEAVOUR (II) under skipper T.O.M.Sopwith is beaten by the RANGER, and also the second, third and fourth race.
After the America Cup she sailed back to the U.K. under captain George Williams who died during the passage on an ulcer.
In 1938 was she laid up at the builder’s yard in Gosport.
1947 Sold to Charles Kerridge Ltd. for scrap.
1968 At least her hulk was scrapped in Southampton, U.K.

Grenada & Grenadines 1992 75c sg 1581, scott1478. (She is the black hulled yacht in the background of the stamp.)
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 14&lang=en

ATALANTA yacht 1881

ATALANTA built as a wooden hulled centreboard sloop at the Flint & Holton lumber yard, Belleville, Ontario, Canada by and for Captain Alexander Cuthbert, as a challenger for the America Cup. Cuthbert was a member of the Bay of Quinte Yacht Club, Canada,
Designed also by Captain Cuthbert.
Early spring 1881 keel laid down.
17 September 1881 launched as the ATALANTA, named after a daughter of a mythical Greek King, she had promised to marry any man who could sprint faster than herself but to put to dead all those who tried and failed.
Gross register tons 46.65, displacement 44.7 tons, dim. 21.34 x 5.79 x 5.03m. (draught), length on waterline 19.50m.
Sail area 289.67m².

She was late in the season almost completed and to be at time in New York she was forced to pass via the inland route to New York, entering the Erie Canal at Oswego.
30 October 1881 arrived at New York harbour.
The first race under skipper Alexander Cuthbert against the defender the MISCHIEF on 08 November was cancelled due to light winds and fog.
09 November the first race over a distance of 32.6 mile off New York was won by the MISCHIEF and also the second race on 10 November was won by the MISCHIEF and the cup stayed in the hands of the New York Yacht Club.
1882 The ATALANTA sailed on Lake Ontario.
1883 Took part in the Fisher Cup at Chicago, she was leading but broke her spinnaker boom and lost against the yacht CORA, at that time the ATALANTA was owned by the Gifford Syndicate of Cobury, Canada.
After repairs were made she raced again in a private match on the same course, and in this race she beat the CORA by 16 minutes.
The ATALANTA kept the Fisher Cup until 1886.
1896 She got on fire and was partly burned. Sold and taken to Chicago for repairs, she was rebuilt with higher topsides and flush deck.
1900 Was she seen in New Orleans, where after she disappears, fate unknown.
More info is given on:
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 57&lang=en

Grenadines of Grenada 1992 15c sg1578, scott1475. (she is the yacht in the background of the stamp.)

Source The Story of the America Cup 1851-2003 by Ranulf Rayner. http://navalmarinearchive.com/research/atalanta.html
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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm


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Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
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Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

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Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
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