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OTTAWA RIVER and steam tug

In 1992 Canada issued a strip of five stamps which shows us five famous waterways in Canada, only one stamp shows a vessel, a steam-tug which pulls a log raft on the Ottawa River, the tug till so far is not identified. The design is a little strange, it looks that the tug is under full steam and heading straight for the rocks, very near to the tug is a log raft, but I can’t see of the raft is connected to the tug.
The Ottawa River was the link between Montreal and the interior for early fur trading voyageurs and she is now a highway for Canadian commerce for over 300 years. It was also famous for the log-driving runs, supplying timber for colonists to build the new nation. Its strategic location, joining Ontario and Quebec, led to the decision to designate a town on its banks as the capital of the new Dominion.
Nowadays white-water rafting has replaced timber rafting on the river, and is an important contribution to Ottawa’s status as a world-class tourism destination.

Watercraft Philately 1993 page 38
Canada 1992 42c sg1494, scott1410.


For the 175th Anniversary of the death of Lord Nelson in 1981 Anguilla issued a set of stamps and one MS.
The 22p shows us Nelson’s Dockyard in Antigua, the stamp is designed by R Granger Barrett. On the stamp are two British warships depict which both has not been identified, it are three-mast ships.

Of Nelson’s Dockyard is given by Wikipedia:
Nelson's Dockyard is a cultural heritage site and marina in English Harbour, Antigua. It is part of Nelson's Dockyard National Park, which also contains Clarence House and Shirley Heights. Named after Admiral Horatio Nelson, who lived in the Dockyard from 1784 through 1787, Nelson's Dockyard is home to some of Antigua's sailing and yachting events such as Antigua Sailing Week and the Antigua Charter Yacht Meeting, as well as the 2015 and 2016 International Optimist North American Championships.
English Harbour quickly became a focal point for the establishment of a naval base in Antigua. Its position on the south side of the island meant it was well positioned to monitor the neighbouring French island of Guadeloupe. Additionally, the harbour is naturally well-suited to protect ships and cargo from hurricanes. In 1671 the first recorded ship to enter English Harbour was a yacht, the “Dover Castle.” It was chartered to the King by a Colonel Stroude for the use of the Governor of the Leeward Islands when he visited the islands under his jurisdiction and "chased ye pirates."
The first reference to the defence of English Harbour occurs in 1704 when Fort Berkeley was listed as one of the twenty forts established around the coast of Antigua. By 1707 naval ships used English Harbour as a station, but no facilities had yet been built for ship maintenance or repair. By 1723 English Harbour was in regular use by British naval ships and in September of that year the harbour gained a reputation as a safe natural harbour when a hurricane swept ashore 35 ships lying in other ports in Antigua, while the HMS HECTOR and HMS WINCHELSEA, both moored in English Harbour, suffered no damage. Soon British naval officers petitioned for the building of repair and maintenance facilities in English Harbour. In 1728 the first Dockyard, St. Helena, was built on the east side of the harbour and consisted of a capstan house for careening ships, a stone storehouse, and three wooden sheds for the storage of careening gear. There were no quarters for dockyard staff or visiting sailors and the seamen themselves conducted all work and repairs on the ships. Naval operations in English Harbour soon outgrew the small original dockyard and plans were made to develop the western side of the harbour with more facilities.
Construction of the modern Naval Dockyard began in the 1740s. Enslaved laborers from plantations in the vicinity were sent to work on the dockyard. By 1745 a line of wooden storehouses on the site of the present Copper & Lumber Store Hotel had been built and the reclamation of land to provide adequate wharves had been started. Building continued in the Dockyard between 1755 and 1765, when quarters were built for the Commander-in-Chief on the site of the Officers’ Quarters. Additional storerooms, a kitchen and a shelter for the Commander’s “chaise” were also erected. The first part of the present Saw Pit Shed was constructed, the reclamation of the wharves and their facing with wooden piles was continued, and a stone wall was built to enclose the Dockyard. Between 1773 and 1778 additional construction was undertaken. The boundary walls were extended to their present position; the Guard House, the Porter’s Lodge, the two Mast Houses, the Capstan House, and the first bay of the Canvas, Cordage, and Clothing Store were built; and the first Naval Hospital was built outside the Dockyard. Many of the buildings in the Dockyard today were constructed during a building programme undertaken between 1785 and 1794. The Engineer’s Offices and Pitch and Tar Store were built in 1788 and the Dockyard wall was extended to enclose the new building. The wharves were improved and the northern side of the Saw Pit Shed was built in the same year. In 1789 the Copper and Lumber Store was completed and by 1792 the west side of the Canvas, Cordage, and Clothing Store had been completed. The Blacksmith’s Shop also dates from this period. This building programme overlaps with Nelson’s tenure in the Dockyard from 1784 to 1787. The Sail Loft was built in 1797 adjacent to the Engineer’s Offices and Tar and Pitch Store. Around 1806 the Pay Master’s Office was built and in 1821 the Officers’ Quarters building was constructed to accommodate the growing numbers of officers who accompanied their ships to the yard. The Naval Officer’s and Clerk’s House was built in 1855 and is now home to the Dockyard Museum.
In 1889 the Royal Navy abandoned the Dockyard and it fell into decay. The Society of the Friends of English Harbour began restoration in 1951 and a decade later it was opened to the public. Among the original buildings are two hotels, a museum, craft and food shops, restaurants, and a large marina. Hiking trails radiate across the surrounding national park.
Anguilla 1981 22c sg449, scott?


MADONNA OF HYDRA on the stamp is given PANAGIA TIS YDRAS, after trying to find anything on this vessel with not much luck, at least I found a painting of the ship depict on the stamp but not much more as what is given below.
At that time around 1800 the isle of Hydra in Greece had many ship-owners and around 120 ships which were sailing in the Mediterranean and some were crossing the Atlantic to America. During the Greek War of Independence (1821-1832) many ships of Hydra were used as warships.
The stamp shows us a three-masted wooden cargo vessel, lateen rigged.
In 1804 three ships from Hydra sailed with a cargo of wine to Montevideo and returned with pelts.

Greece 1978 5d sg1444, scott?


A new set of stamps has been released on the subject of William Hodges, the artist who accompanied Captain Cook when he was first to land on the Island in 1775.
Entitled 'William Hodges: The Art of Discovery', the set of four stamps and a First Day Cover were released on September 30th.
William Hodges was born in London. In 1772 he was appointed draughtsman on Captain James Cook's second voyage and he is best known for the paintings and sketches of the places he visited during that journey, including Antarctica and Easter Island. The apparent purpose of the second voyage was to search for evidence of a mythical, but much speculated upon, southern continent.
The Admiralty brief to Hodges was “to make drawings and paintings of such places as they may touch at worth notice, in their intended voyage” and to “give a more perfect idea thereof that can be formed from written descriptions only”. While Hodges drew coastal views for navigation purposes, his main work was to gather material for landscape paintings. During the course of their three-year journey, the crews of Cook's RESOLUTION and its sister? ship ADVENTURE, were exposed to extreme weather conditions, environments and peoples. These ranged from the icy wastes of Antarctic waters to the first Pacific landfall in the dense rain forest of New Zealand's Dusky Sound, from the complex, hierarchical cultures of the cluster of Society Islands to the most geographically remote of all Polynesian societies, Easter Island.
Cook's expedition circumnavigated the globe at very high southern latitude, and on January 17th 1773 became the first to cross the Antarctic Circle. Cook discovered the South Sandwich Islands and was first to land on South Georgia. He mapped the islands and took possession of South Georgia for Britain.
The voyage required Hodges to respond to a staggering range of subjects, from the fantastical shapes of sea-worn ice to panoramic renderings of island cliffs and shores. He was asked to produce not only studies of the landscape, but portraits and botanical drawings. The artist proved remarkably flexible. Faced with exotic and unfamiliar landscapes, he was able to modify his conventional ways of working. These paintings were some of the first landscapes to use light and shadow for dramatic purposes. Hodges' use of light as a compositional element in its own right was a marked departure from the classical landscape tradition and contemporary art critics complained that his use of light and colour contrasts gave his paintings a rough and unfinished appearance.
On his return to London, Hodges was employed to supervise the production of engravings to illustrate the official account of the voyage. He also produced a series of epic paintings to commemorate the voyage.
The sketch of Cook's ship RESOLUTION in a stream of pack-ice that features on one of the 70p stamps is owned by 'The Captain Cook Memorial Museum'. The other 70p stamp features one of Hodges' epic paintings from the voyage, 'A View of the Monuments of Easter Island'. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7408&p=11098#p11098
The 95p stamp features Hodges' portrait of Captain Cook.
The etching on the £1.15 stamp is taken from an original print entitled “Possession Bay in the Island of South Georgia. Drawn from nature by W. Hodges. Engrav'd by S. Smith”, this engraving was included in the book “A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the World”, by James Cook.

Source: South Georgia Post.
South Georgia 2010 70/1.15 sg?, scott?


The stamp of Guatemala depict the banana loading pier in Puerto Barrios, which during a hurricane now partly is demolished. On both sides of the pier is berthed a Great White Fleet ship, of which the nearest is given that she is the CHIRIQUI, the other vessel is not identified.
Built as a passenger-cargo-reefer vessel for the liner service of the United Mail SS Co. (White Great Fleet) by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry-dock Co, Newport News under yard 346.
14 November 1931 launched as the CHIRIQUI, christened by Mrs. J. Harris Robinson, she was named after the Panamanian province Chiriqui. Five sisters.
Tonnage 6,932 gross, 3,184 net, 4,425 dwt, dim. 136.17 x 18.28 x 11.59m., length bpp. 126.49m.
Powered by two General Electric steam turbines connected to electro motors, 11,000 shp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Accommodation for 100 passengers.
Cargo capacity 270,000 cubic feet and could carry 50,000 stems of bananas.
18 March 1932 delivered to owners, and managed by United Fruit Company.

Her maiden voyage was from New York on 24 March to San Francisco where she arrived on 14th April. She was then put in the Pacific coastal service from San Francisco to west coast of Central America.
1935 Put in the service from New York to the Carib and east coast of Central America.
04 June bareboat chartered by the US Government, and renamed USS TARAZED AF-13.
US Navy service
The US Navy bareboat chartered her through the Maritime Commission on 4 June 1941. Brewer's Drydock Co. of Staten Island, New York converted her for Navy use and she was commissioned on 14 June 1941, commanded by Cmdr J.M. Connally.
Neutrality period operations
TARAZED loaded supplies sailed to North Carolina to supply ships of the Neutrality Patrol. After returning to New York, she left late in August for a voyage to Iceland to resupply US and Royal Navy ships.
World War II North Atlantic operations
When the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into World War II, TARAZED was at Halifax, Nova Scotia preparing to join another convoy to Iceland. Upon completion of the voyage she went to Baltimore, Maryland, for an extensive overhaul before making resupply runs to Newfoundland, Iceland and Bermuda.
In July 1942 TARAZED reached Boston, Massachusetts, from Nova Scotia and loaded a cargo for Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Panama. On 21 September she returned to Baltimore with a cargo of sugar. She continued supply runs from Baltimore or Norfolk, Virginia, to the Caribbean until mid-1943.
Supporting the invasion of North Africa
On 8 June 1943 TARAZED joined Task Force 65 at Norfolk — headed for North Africa — and arrived at Mers el Kebir, Algeria, on 22 June. She partially unloaded there and, on the 30th, took the rest of her cargo to Oran.
On 4 July, TARAZED left for the US in convoy GUS-9. She reached Norfolk, VA on 23 July, was replenished, and left for Bermuda. After supplying Bermuda and Cuba she returned to the US, reaching Bayonne, New Jersey, on 13 August.
Eight days later TARAZED left for North Africa, reaching Mers el Kebir on 2 September. After calling at Bizerte and Algiers, she returned to the US in convoy GUS-15 and arrived at Norfolk on 4 October. Late that month, she joined convoy UGS-22 to take materiel to Oran, Bizerte and Palermo. Then, with the exception of a voyage to the Mediterranean in April, she took provisions to the Caribbean in the first five months of 1944.
Supporting the invasion of southern France
In June, TARAZED delivered provisions to ships in the ports of Plymouth, Swansea and Portland Harbour in Britain and at Belfast in Northern Ireland. She steamed from Norfolk on 24 August and arrived at Oran on 4 September to supply ships supporting the invasion of southern France. She continued logistics runs to the Mediterranean into April 1945 and turned to supplying bases and ports in the Caribbean until 14 December 1945 when she was ordered to report to the 8th Naval District for disposal.
Military honors and awards
TARAZED received one battle star for World War II.
Post-war decommissioning
TARAZED was decommissioned on 4 January 1946, was returned to United Fruit through the War Shipping Administration at New Orleans, Louisiana, the same day and was struck from the Navy list on 21 January 1946. She was renamed again in CHIRIQUI.
Post-war service
United Fruit restored the ship's pre-war name CHIRIQUI to her.
1958 United Fruit sold her to Union-Partenreederei T/S (Scipio & Co.) of Bremen, Germany, which also acquired her United Fruit sister ship JAMAICA. Union-Partenreederei changed CHIRIQUI’s name to BLEXEN. The new owner cut her down to a freighter by Todd New Orleans Shipyard.
Used in the banana trade from Central America to Europe.
28 November 1969 sold to Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping, work of scrapping commenced in 1971.

References: Wikipedia. Going Bananas by Mark H. Goldberg. Lloyds Registry. Internet.
This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
Guatemala 1935 3c sg299, scott?


Built at a shipyard in Wiscasset, Maine.
The Salem Gazette of 8 September 1812 has the following
To be sold at Wiscasset a vessel of about 300 tons, pierced for 18 guns exclusive of bridle and stern ports.
Built after the model of the fast sailing ship VOLANTE and by the same master-workman.
28 September she arrived at Boston and she attracted the attention of a group of Salem men interested in privateering, and soon after the brig appeared they made a thorough inspection of her, whereafter she bought the vessel and she was named GRAND TURK (III), The ship had about 30 shareholders.
Tonnage 309 ton (bm), dim. 102 x 28 x 12.4ft.
Rigged as a brig.

16 February 1813 after she was fitted out at Salem as a privateer, she set sail for her first cruise.

When the War of 1812 broke out the GRAND TURK was refitted as a privateer, carrying eighteen guns and a complement of one hundred and fifty men.
At first she had as her commander Holten J. Breed, but toward the close of the war she was commanded by Nathan Green. Her first venture was made early
in 1813, when she ran down to the coast of Brazil, cruised some time in the West Indies, and late in May put into Portland, Maine. In this time the
GRAND TURK captured three large vessels carrying heavy armaments and a schooner, all of which were ordered to France.

In her second cruise, which was begun in July, 1813, the GRAND TURK made directly for European waters. On her voyage across the Atlantic she cap-
tured the schooner REBECCA,from Halifax bound for Bermuda, laden with live stock and provisions, which was sent into Portsmouth. Reaching the other side of the ocean, the GRAND TURK cruised for twenty days in the chops of the English Channel without meeting a British war craft of any descrip- tion. She came across many of their merchantmen, however, and took, in rapid succession, the schooner AGNES, laden with fish, which was sent into a French port; the ship WILLIAM, of ten guns, having a valuable cargo of drygoods, crates, wine, etc., from Cork for Buenos Ayres, which was sent into Salem; the brig INDIAN LASS,from Liverpool for St. Michael, with drygoods, which also was sent into Salem with thirty prisoners; the brig CATHARINE, from Lisbon for London; and the schooner BRITANNIA, for the West
Indies, which was sent into Portland. The CATHARINE shortly afterward was recaptured by the English brig of war BACCHUS, but before the prize could
gain port the GRAND TURK again loomed up on her horizon and seized her for the second time. To make sure that she would not again fall into the hands
of the enemy, the Americans, after taking out the most valuable portion of the cargo, burned her.
Continuing her cruise in English waters, the GRAND TURK added to her list of valuable prizes the sloop CAROLINE,from London for St. Michael, laden
with drygoods. The cargo was transferred to the privateer, but the sloop being of little value, and the prisoners in the privateer becoming so numerous as to be dangerous, the CAROLINE was released and ordered to the nearest port with the prisoners. Soon afterward the privateer captured the merchantman COSSACK, laden with wine. This vessel was recaptured by the 74-gun ship of the line BULWARK, but, like the CATHARINE, was again captured by the Americans; this time by the privateer SURPRISE, of Baltimore, and was sent into Salem. After burning or sinking the schooner PINK; the brig BROTHERS, from St. John's for Liverpool, with lumber aboard; the brig ROBERT STEWART, also with lumber; the schooner COMMERCE, laden with fish; and releasing the brig BELGRADE, from Malta for Falmouth after taking
some guns out of her the GRAND TURK returned to Salem in November, 1813, having made a cruise of one hundred and three days, and with only forty-
four men of her original complement of one hundred and fifty left. One of her prizes had a cargo invoiced at thirty thousand pounds sterling.

On her third cruise which started on 17 February 1814 she sighted 01 May 1814 the British mail-packet HINCHINBROOKE see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13246#!lightbox[gallery]/3/

This privateer made one more short run to sea with fairly good success, but it was on her last cruise, when under the command of Captain Nathan Green, that she made her greatest reputation.

Half an hour after noon on Sunday, January 1, 1815, Captain Green stowed his anchors away and cleared his deck preparatory for sailing from Salem,
and at 2 p. M. he passed Baker's Island. Nothing more than an occasional glimpse of a British frigate or a ship of the line, to which the GRAND TURK
promptly showed a clean pair of heels, served to break the monotony of the cruise until 3.30 P. M., February 17th, when the privateer was in the vicinity of Pernambuco. At that time a small sail was sighted, which proved to be a catamaran, and for the purpose of gaining information as to the proposed movements of British merchant ships Captain Green boarded her. It happened that the craft had just left the port, and her master informed the
Americans that there were eight English vessels in the harbor, some of them ready to sail. This was the news Captain Green had been longing for, and he determined to hover off the port until some of the ships sailed. At six o'clock that evening he had approached sufficiently near Pernambuco to distinguish the shipping. Two days later, or at 5.30 P. M., Sunday, February 19th, his patience was rewarded by a sail appearing to the north.
Gradually drawing up on her during the night, he,at nine o'clock on the following morning, boarded the brig JOVEN FRANCISCO,sailing under Spanish colors from Pernambuco to London, but laden with a cargo of tea, coffee, sugar, and cinnamon consigned to British merchants. From her invoices and some letters found aboard, Captain Green was satisfied that the Spanish flag had been used merely as a cover, and that the craft and her cargo were in truth English property. Accordingly he seized her as a prize and placed Nathaniel Archer and some of his men aboard, with orders to make for the United States.

Scarcely had the last speck of the JOVEN FRANCISCO faded from the horizon when the people in the privateer were cheered by the sight of another sail, this one to the south, standing northward. Observing that she was coming directly upon the privateer, Captain Green allowed her to approach, and at 6.30 p. M., February 21st, he boarded her. She was found to be the British ship ACTIVE JANE, of Liverpool, from Rio Janeiro bound for Maranham. She had on board seven bags of specie, containing fourteen thousand milled rees, which were valued at about seventeen thousand five hundred dollars. A prize crew was placed aboard, with orders to keep near the GRAND TURK during the night. At daylight on the following morning Captain Green made a more thorough search of his prize, but finding nothing else of much value, he transferred the specie to his vessel and scuttled the merchantman.

From this time until March 10th the GRAND TURK cruised in this vicinity, occasioning much damage to the enemy's commerce. She stayed so long, how-
ever, that the English had time to collect several war ships, which were promptly sent out to capture the bold privateersman. Captain Green was fully alive to the growing danger of his position, and when at daylight, Friday, March 10th, the man at the masthead reported a sail in the eastern quarter, he promptly called all hands and sent them to quarters. Thinking that the stranger might be a merchantman, Captain Green cautiously ran down to her, but soon afterward he discovered another sail, this one being on the weather bow. This did not deter the GRAND TURK from continuing her approach to the first stranger, and she was fast drawing near to her,
when, at 6.30 A. M., she passed very...

Inanda (T&J Harrison)

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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm

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Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
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Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

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Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
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