SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

PINERO

Built as a passenger ship by Neafie & Levy, Philadelphia for the Wilmington Steamboat Co., Wilmington, USA.
Launched as the CITY OF TRENTON.
Tonnage 458 tons, dim. 51 x (47.4 bpp) x 9.8 x 2.25m.(draught)
Powered by a steam engine,?hp, speed?
1901 Completed.
She was not long in the service of the Wilmington Steamboat Co., in August 1901 her boiler exploded, killing at least nine and scores of passengers were seriously injured, some passengers were missing. When the explosion happened she was underway with her daily trip from Philadelphia to Trenton.
After the explosion the CITY OF TRENTON got on fire and grounded in the marshes opposite Torresdale, with her hold filled with water.
She was anyhow salvaged and repaired her next owner in 1902 was the Long Island Railroad Co., New York and she was renamed SAGAMORE.
Her engine was replaced by two 6-cyl 4SA oil engines, manufactured by New London S & E.B. Co., New London, Conn.
1916 Sold to Barclay Johnson, Philadelphia and renamed PRINCETON.
1927 Sold to the Isle of Pines SS Co, Nueva Gerona, Cuba for 150,000 Pesos and renamed PINERO. At that time she had 25 passengers’ cabins with double berths.
Used in the service between Batabanó and Nueva Gerona, Isle of Pines, at that time a new prison was built there, and most of the material and men for building the prison was transported by the PINERO.
She was the first ship in use in Cuba fitted out with an oil engine.
When the prison was ready she transported criminals and political prisoners to and from the prison.
On 15 May 1955 after Castro landed with the GRANMA at 09.00 a.m. she sailed from Nueva Gerona with on board the political prisoners who got amnesty from the Castro Government to Havana, where the comrades were met by Fidel Castro.
The prison was then used by Fidel Castro Government for his political prisoners and criminals, and the PINERO transported again this prisoners to the Presidio Modelo prison.
When she was taken out of service I don’t known, but she is no in a dry berth at Nueva Gerona as a national monument.
1987 Lloyds Registry deleted her in 1987.

Cuba 2015 75p sg?, scott?
Source: Internet. Lloyds Registry http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Los Angeles Herald 29 August 1901.

MARIGOLD and CHRISTOPHER

MARIGOLD or MARYGOLD a wooden barque rigged vessel built in Aldeburgh, Suffolk and transferred to Plymouth in 1576.
Tonnage 30 tons burthen, armed with 16 guns.
Crew ca. 29 men.
She took part in Francis Drake expedition of five ships, which left 13 December 1577 Plymouth, at that time the MARIGOLD was under command of Captain John Thomas.
It was given that the fleet of five ships were heading for the River Nile on a trading voyage, when reaching the Morocco port Mogador it was revealed that the ships were heading for the Pacific via the Strait of Magellan.
The fleet sailed via the Cabo Verde Islands to southern Brazil were a landfall was made on 05 April 1578. During the crossing some Spanish ships were taken under which the SANTA MARIA, which was renamed in MARY, she had a Portuguese pilot Nuño da Silva on board who knew the waters of the Pacific. Then the fleet headed south along the South American coast to Puerto San Julián, Patagonia where the fleet arrived on 15 June 1578, Drake decide to overwinter there.
Three small ships the SWAN, CHRISTOPHER and MARY were abandoned there and the crew divided over the other three ships.
17 August sails were set and the three vessels headed south for the Strait of Magellan, which she entered three days later. 6 September she had passed the Strait of Magellan. Then the small fleet ran out of luck when she were running in a heavy storm which the ships scattered, the MARIGOLD was lost in the storm with all hands.
(An old story gives that Captain Thomas of the MARIGOLD used the storm to get rid of Drake and deserted the fleet, if this is true is unknown but of the MARIGOLD noting was heard again.)

CHRISTOPHER a wooden pinnace of 15 tons burthen, with 1 gun under command of Captain Tom Moone was abandoned in Puerto San Juliá.

British Virgin Island 1997 40c sg979, scott876d.
Source: Various internet sites. The complete Encyclopedia of sailing ships by Batchelor & Chant.

VIIC type U-BOAT

Type VIIC
Displacement 769 ton surfaced, 871 ton submerged, dim. 67.10 x 6.20 x 4.74m (draught) length bpp 50.50m, height 9.60m.
Speed 17.7 knots surface, 7.06 knots submerged. Range 8,500 mile by a speed of 10 knots on surface and 80 mile by a speed of 4 knots, submerged.
Armament 1 – 88/45 deck-gun with 220 rounds. 4 bow and 1 stern torpedo tubes, 14 torpedoes.
Crew 44 – 52 men.
Maximum depth circa 220 meter.
The Type VIIC was the workhorse of the German U-boat force, with 568 commissioned from 1940 to 1945. The first VIIC boat commissioned was the U-69 in 1940. The Type VIIC was an effective fighting machine and was seen almost everywhere U-boats operated, although its range of only 6,500 nautical miles was not as great as that of the larger Type IX (11,000 nautical miles), severely limiting the time it could spend in the far reaches of the western and southern Atlantic without refueling from a tender or U-boat tanker. The VIIC came into service toward the end of the "First Happy Time" near the beginning of the war and was still the most numerous type in service when Allied anti-submarine efforts finally defeated the U-boat campaign in late 1943 and 1944.
Type VIIC differed from the VIIB only in the addition of an active sonar and a few minor mechanical improvements, making it 2 feet longer and 8 tons heavier. Speed and range were essentially the same. Many of these boats were fitted with snorkels in 1944 and 1945.
They had the same torpedo tube arrangement as their predecessors, except for U-72, U-78, U-80, U-554, and U-555, which had only two bow tubes, and for U-203, U-331, U-351, U-401, U-431, and U-651, which had no stern tube.
On the surface the boats (except for U-88, U-90 and U-132 to U-136 which used MAN M6V40/46s) were propelled by two supercharged Germaniawerft, 6 cylinder, 4-stroke M6V 40/46 diesels totaling 2,800 to 3,200 PS (2,800 to 3,200 shp; 2,100 to 2,400 kW) at 470 to 490 rpm.
For submerged propulsion, several different electric motors were used. Early models used the VIIB configuration of two AEG GU 460/8-276 electric motors, totaling 750 PS (740 shp; 550 kW) with a max rpm of 296, while newer boats used two BBC GG UB 720/8, two GL (Garbe, Lahmeyer & Co.) RP 137/c electric motors or two Siemens-Schuckert-Werke (SSW) GU 343/38-8 electric motors with the same power output as the AEG motors.
Perhaps the most famous VIIC boat was U-96, featured in the movie Das Boot.

Maldives 2015 22Rf sg?, scott? (The stamp is designed after the Revell model kit RV5093.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Ty ... #Type_VIIC U-boat net.

GLOBAL CHALLENGE ISLE OF MAN

In 2000 the Isle of Man issued 6 stamps with a value of 22p to 65p for the BT Global Challenge 2000/1, in which the yacht ISLE OF MAN took part, the yacht is visible on the FDC, but on the stamps only the sails with logo is visible.
The 22p stamp shows also a cruise vessel which is identified as the VISTAFJORD viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8616&p=17043&hilit=vistafjord#p17043
I am wondering what has happened with the ISLE OF MAN after the race, I can’t find a trace of here.
BT Global Challenge 2000/1
On 10 September, a new fleet of 72 ft (22 m) steel cutters made their debut in this race. The winner, Conrad Humphreys and crew on LG FLATRON, won four of the six legs.
QUADSTONE collided heavily in a port and starboard incident with SAVE THE CHILDREN in Wellington, NZ, and QUADSTONE retired from this leg. Skipper Alex Philips later resigned. Both boats had to be extensively repaired in New Zealand.
For the first time the race was scored on points, with equal points for each leg, though combined elapsed times are shown here for comparison.
Overall place Yacht name Skipper Points Combined
elapsed time
1 LG Flatron Conrad Humphreys 95 171d 13h 33m 49s
2 Compaq Will Oxley 86 173d 14h 59m 43s
3 BP Mark Denton 78 175d 09h 54m 33s
4 Logica Jeremy Troughton 71 175d 20h 46m 04s
5 TeamSpirit Andy Dare, John Read 68 176d 22h 34m 43s
6= Spirit of Hong Kong Stephen Wilkins 62 178d 21h 34m 43s
6= Quadstone Alex Phillips, Richard Chenery 64* 179d 11h 58m 14s
8 Norwich Union Neil Murray 60 180d 07h 58m 14s
9= Isle of Man Lin Parker 56 180d 21h 41m 18s
9= Save the Children Nick Fenton 56* 176d
10 Olympic Manley Hopkinson 37* 183d
* These teams did not finish all legs, a requirement for a position in the overall standings, but their positions are shown without displacing any other team
Kate Middleton, who married HRH Prince William to become the Duchess of Cambridge, worked as corporate crew during the buildup of the 2000/1 race.
Challenge 72 Specifications
Hull type Monohull
Builder Ten of the twelve yachts were built by Devonport, UK, the other two by Kim's Yacht Company in China.
Displacement (half load) 40 tonnes
Draught full load 10 ft (3.05m)
Ballast 12.5 tonnes
Designer Rob Humphreys
Length overall 72 ft (22 m)
Length waterline 61 ft (19 m)
Air draught 95 ft (29 m)
Hull 50A mild steel
Deck Stainless steel
Sail area (windward) 2,825 sq ft (262.5 m2)
Sail area (downwind) 4,020 sq ft (373 m2)
Water capacity 390 gal (1,775 lt)
Fuel capacity 475 gal (2,150 lt)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Ch ... e_2000.2F1

ANOREP 1 submersible

On this two MS of Niger issued in 2015 you can find COUSTEAU ship CALYPSO and the submersible ANOREP 1 built in 1966 and which now stands outside the Oceanographic Museum in Monte Carlo, Monaco. Have not any details on her.

Centenary of the creation of the Peruvian submarine fleet

See corrections as given by Mr Peter Crichton below.

Peru issued two stamps in 2011 for the 100th anniversary of the submarine forces of Peru.
The two stamps depicting 7 submarines (at that time Peru had only 6 submarines in service, (one has to be a decommissioned submarine.), So far I know the submarines have not be named. I will give the details of the six Peru submarines at that time in service.
All were built by the Howaldtswerke Deutsche Werft AG, Kiel, Germany.
Two types were built the ISLAY and ARICA of type 209/1100 and ANGAMOS, ANTOFAGASTA, PISAGUA and CHIPANA of type 209/1200.
ISLAY: built under yard No 53 as a coastal patrol submarine. Type 209/1100.
15 March 1971 laid down.
11 October 1973 launched as the ISLAY (SS-35).
Displacement 1,105 ton surfaced, 1,230 ton submerged, dim. 54.4 x 6.2 x 5.9m. (draught)
Powered by 4 MTU type 12v493 AZ80 GA3H dieselengines, 1 Siemenselectric motor, 4,600 hp, one shaft, speed 11 knots surfaced, 21 knots submerged.
Mission endurance 50 days.
Range by a speed of 4 knots, 11,300 mil surfaced. Submerged range by a speed of 20 knots, 20 mile
Armament 8 – 21 inch torpedo tubes, 14 SST-4 torpedoes.
Maximum depth 500 metre.
Crew 36.
29 August 1974 commissioned. All submarines have as homeport San Lorenzo, Peru.

ARICA: built under yard No 54. Type 209/1100
01 October 1973 laid down
05 April 1974 launched as the ARICA (SS-36)
Same details of the ISLAY.
21January 1975 commissioned.

ANGAMOS: built under yard No 131 type 209/1200
12 August 1976 ordered.
15 July 1977 laid down.
31 August 1979 launched as the ANGAMOS (SS-31).
Displacement surface 1,180 ton, submerged 1,290 ton, dim. 55.9 x 6.2 x 5.5m. (draught)
Powered diesel electric by 4 MTU type 12V493 AZ80 GA31l diesel engines, 4,600 hp, one Siemens electric motor, one shaft, speed 11 knots surfaced, 21 knots submerged.
Range by a speed of 4 knots, 11,300 mile.
Armament 8 – 21 inch torpedo tubes, 14 SST-4 torpedoes.
Crew 33.
19 December 1980 commissioned.

ANTOFAGASTA built under yard No 132 as a type 209/1200.
03 October 1977 laid down.
19 December 1979 launched as the ANTOFAGASTA (SS-32)
20 February 1981 commissioned.
Details the same as ANGAMOS.

PISAGUA built under yard No 133 as a type 209/1200.
15 August 1978 laid down.
19 October 1980 launched as the PISAGUA (SS-33).
12 July 1983 commissioned.
Same details as ANGAMOS.

CHIPANA built under yard No 134 as a type 209/1200.
01 November 1978 laid down.
19 May 1981 launched as the CHIPANA (SS-34).
20 September 1982 commissioned.
Same details as ANGAMOS.

Peru 2011 7$20c sg?, scott?
Wikipedia. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... -specs.htm

From Mr. Peter Crichton I received the following update on the stamps.
He gives two pennant numbers are easily readable on the left hand stamp.
Pennant No 42 (the boat at sea in foreground) is the ABATO, see her history and career.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7845&p=7841&hilit=abtao#p7841
Outermost of the moored boats with pennant No 43 is ANGAMOS completed in 1957 as ATUN.
Built as a patrol submarine under yard No 145 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Connecticut, USA for the Peruvian Navy. The design is based on that of the US Mackerel class. All this boats belong to the Abtao class.
27 October 1956 laid down.
05 February 1957 launched as the ATUN.
Displacement 825 ton surfaced, 1,400 ton submerged, dim. 74.1 x 6.7 x 4.3m. (draught)
Powered by two General Motors Corporation 278A diesels, 2,400 shp., and electric motors delivering power to two shafts, speed 16 knots surfaced, 15 knots submerged.
Armament 6 – 21 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 85.
01 July 1957 commissioned
1960 renamed in ANGAMOS (S-43).
Stricken 1990.

The innermost boat is either DOS DE MAYO (S-41) or IQUIQUE (S-44).
DOS DE MAYO built under yard No 140 by Electric Boat Co., Groton.
12 May 1952 laid down.
06 February 1954 launched as the LOBO.
Same details as the ATUN. Except that she had also a 1 – 5 inch deck-gun aft the conning tower..
14 June 1954 commissioned.
1957 Renamed in DOS DE MAYO (S-41).
Stricken 1999.

IQUIQUE built under yard No 146 by Electric Boat Co., Groton.
27 October 1955 laid down.
05 February 1957 launched as the MERLIN.
Same details as the ATUN.
01 October 1957 commissioned.
1960 renamed in IQUIQUE (S-44).
Stricken 1993.
The other three boats are a mixture of photos of the 209 class.

Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. The World’s Navies edited by Chris Chant.
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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm


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Click image to view full size
Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
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Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

inanda.jpg
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Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
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