SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

L'Hirondelle (Robert Sercouf)

Robert Surcouf (12 December 1773 – 8 July 1827) was a French privateer and slave trader who operated in the Indian Ocean between 1789 and 1801, and again from 1807 to 1808, capturing over 40 prizes, while amassing a large fortune as a ship-owner, both from privateering and from commerce.
Surcouf started his career as a sailor and officer on the slave ships Aurore, Courrier d'Afrique and Navigateur. Having risen to Captain, and in spite of the prohibition of slave trading by the National Convention in 1793, he engaged in the business himself as a captain on Créole. He then captained the merchantman Émilie, on which he engaged in commerce raiding despite lacking a lettre de marque. He preyed on British shipping, famously capturing the East Indiaman Triton, before returning to Isle de France, where his prizes were confiscated. He then returned to France, where he obtained prize money from the government.
Returning to the Indian Ocean, Surcouf captained the privateers Clarisse and Confiance, raiding British, American and Portuguese merchantmen. He famously captured the East Indiaman Kent on 7 October 1800. Returning to France, he was awarded the Legion of Honour and settled as a ship-owner.
He briefly returned to the Indian Ocean in 1807 on the custom-built Revenant before returning to France. There, he armed privateers and merchantmen. His privateers led successful campaigns in the Indian Ocean and disastrous ones in the English Channel, except for Renard which achieved fame in her victory over HMS Alphea on 9 September 1812. After the Bourbon restoration, he organised fishing expeditions to Terre-Neuve and amassed a considerable fortune. He died in 1827 and is buried in a graveyard at Saint-Malo.

Mauritius Sg461 Wikipedia

Jean Laffite

Jean Laffite, thought to have been born in France, was more of a businessman than seafarer. Along with his brother, Laffite practiced pirating and privateering out of Barataria Bay, south of New Orleans. With over 10 vessels he and his crew raided among others, British, American, and Spanish vessels. Due to his frequent trips to various worldwide coastal ports, many in New Orleans traded with his band of pirates.
Laffite was renown for working his way out of trouble, when arrested by a certain governor, he failed to show up at the trial. The governor set a bounty for him at $750, in return, Laffite offered double that price for the capture of the governor.
British officials offered Laffite monetary rewards among others, in 1814, in return for his help in their attack on New Orleans. Laffite notified New Orleans officials, who paid no head to his warnings. A few weeks later a small Naval fleet attacked, before which Laffite and his crew slipped out of town. Later that same year, General Andrew Jackson accepted Laffites aid in combat with the British. In return for his help, he and his crew were pardoned for their maritime crimes, but lost their pirate privileges in Barataria Bay.
During an increase in naval activity, Laffite and his crew sailed towards Spanish occupied territory of Texas. He took over Galveston, from where he established his pirating activities. Being run out of Galveston, he left, but only after burning the entire settlement. With his brother, Laffite continued pirating around Central American ports until he died around 1821.

Grenada Sg369 Various web sites.

HORNET USS and PENGUIN HMS battle

On 23 March, 1815 USS HORNET captured HMS PENGUIN off Tristan da Cunha in the last action of the War of 1812.
The War of 1812 lasted two and a half years and was fought by the United States of America against the United Kingdom and its North American colonies and American Indians. War had been declared by the United States on 18 June, 1812 for several reasons, many connected to the Napoleonic wars; for example trade restrictions that affected America and the impressment of American merchant sailors into the Royal Navy which had expanded enormously during the Napoleonic Wars.
At the end of the war both sides signed the Treaty of Ghent 24 December, 1814 and both parties returned occupied land to its pre-war owner and resumed friendly trade relations. News of the Treaty didn't arrive in the United States for a further month when it was unanimously ratified by the U.S. Senate and proclaimed on the 18 February 1815. Master Commandant James Biddle aboard the HORNET was unaware of the imminent peace when he set sail from New York in January 1815.
HORNET had carried the final diplomatic messages from Britain and then returned to sea to become the first ship in the Navy to capture a British vessel. In 1813 she sank HMS PEACOCK and in 1814 she was part of a small squadron (comprising the frigate USS PRESIDENT, the sloops of war USS PEACOCK and HORNET and the Brig-rigged tender USS TOM BOWLINE prepared at New York to attack British shipping in the Indian Ocean. On 15 January 1815 USS PRESIDENT took advantage of a gale to break out of the harbour but was captured by the blockading British squadron. A week later the remaining three ships, unaware of the PRESIDENT's fate, took advantage of another storm and evading the blockaders made for a pre-arranged rendezvous with the PRESIDENT off Tristan da Cunha. During the voyage, HORNET lost touch with the other two vessels. USS PEACOCK and USS TOM BOWLINE reached the rendezvous first, on 18 March, but were then driven off by a gale.
HORNET, reached the island on 22 March and was about to drop anchor when an unfamiliar sail was spotted. The Cruiser-class brig-sloop HMS PENGUIN (Captain James Dickenson) was a new vessel carrying the same main battery as the HORNET, 18 carronades (broadside battery) and 2 long twelves (as bow chasers). She had been despatched from Cape Town to hunt down an American privateer, the YOUNG WASP, which had been attacking homeward-bound East Indiamen.
As soon as HORNET was sighted Dickenson prepared to engage and for some 15 minutes the two ships exchanged broadsides. As Dickenson turned to close with the HORNET he was mortally wounded. The two ships collided and PENGUIN’s bowsprit ran across HORNET 's deck between the main and mizzen masts, badly damaging the American rigging. Neither made any attempt to board the other and the gunnery duel continued. As the two vessels separated PENGUIN's foremast fell and unable to manoeuvre his ship Lieutenant McDonald, now in command of PENGUIN, surrendered.
Amazingly not a single British carronade shot had hit the hull of HORNET, whereas PENGUIN was too badly damaged to be repaired. The Americans removed her stores and hurriedly set her alight when more sails, which turned out to be the PEACOCK and TOM BOWLINE, were sighted.
The TOM BOWLINE took the British prisoners to St. Salvador, Brazil as HORNET and PEACOCK headed for the East Indies. On 27 April they sighted and headed for what they believed to be an East Indiaman before realising that their intended victim was in fact a British ship of the line, HMS CORNWALLIS. Recently completed at Bombay from teak the CORNWALLIS was fast and a chase that lasted two and a half days ensued. Eventually HORNET evaded capture by jettisoning pretty much everything on-board, including part of the forecastle. Without stores, guns, anchors or even the ships' bell, HORNET headed home.

Congressional Gold Medals awarded for two spectacular victories made HORNET one of the most decorated ships of the war.

Tristan da Cunha 2015 £1.10 and £2.50 sg?, scott? HORNET details and history you can find on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7144&p=7140&hilit=HORNET#p7140
PENGUIN details and history you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10424&p=10925&hilit=HORNET#p10925
http://www.tristandc.com/po/stamps201504.php

ROG

Slovenia issued an ms which depict the first cargo vessel owned by the shipping company Splosna Plovba at Koper, at that time Yugoslavia.
Built as a Victory-type cargo vessel under yard No 36 by Victoria Machinery Depot Ltd., Victoria BC, Canada for the British Government.
Laid down as the FORT BERENS, but before launching transferred to Park SS Co., Montreal (Canadian Transport Co. Vancouver) a Canadian Government Company.
Launched as the MISSION PARK.
Tonnage 7,164 grt, 4,295 net, 10,310 dwt, dim. 134.6 x 17.4 x 10.63, length bpp. 129.4m.
One triple expansion 3-cyl. steam engine, manufactured by Dominion Engineering Works Ltd., Montreal PQ. ?hp, speed 11 knots.
20 October 1944 completed.

1947 Sold to Montreal, Australia, New Zealand Line Ltd, Montreal, Canada and renamed OTTAWA VALLEY.
1950 Transferred to British flag and registry, with homeport London.
1954 Sold to Splosna Plovba, Koper, Yugoslavia and renamed ROG.
Under Yugoslavia flag did have a crew of 43, and used also as a training ship by the company for sailors and cadets.
She was the first Yugoslavian vessel which made a call at Tsingtao, China.
During a typhoon in the Pacific in February 1956, she lost a crew member and was damaged, made a call at Hakodate on Hokkaido Island , Japan for repairs.
1966 Sold to Wm Brandts (Leasing) Ltd., Hong Kong and renamed MILLS TRIDENT.
23 January 1969 arrived by Keun Hwa Iron & Steel Works, Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping.

Slovenia 2015 1.33 Euro sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Various internet sites.

WILHELM KAISEN lifeboat

The German Maritime Search and Rescue Service (German: Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger - DGzRS) is responsible for Search and Rescue in German territorial waters in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, including the Exclusive Economic Zone.
The DGzRS operates 61 vessels on 54 stations in the North Sea and Baltic. 20 of which are seagoing cruisers between 20 m and 46 m of length and 41 vessels are classified as inshore lifeboats.
A feature of the cruisers is that all but the 20-m class carry a fully equipped small lifeboat on deck which can quickly be released through a gate in the aft for conducting operations in shallow waters. This principle was developed by DGzRS in the 1950s. The 20-m class uses a rigid-hulled inflatable boat instead.
More than 80,000 people has already been rescued from dangerous situations since its creation in 1865 the DGzRS. They operate thanks to donations. Visit their website. You never know when YOU might need them to be ready.
http://collectorzpedia.blogspot.co.nz/2 ... PEDIA.html

The stamp depict the WILHELM KAISEN.
Built as a lifeboat under yard No 6430 by Schweers at Bardenfleth (on the Weser River) for the Deutschen Gesellschaft zur Retting Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS).(German Society for Sea Rescue.)
06 April 1987 christened in Bardenfleth as the WILHELM KAISEN (KRS11) named after a long serving mayor of the town Bremen. She was one of the 44-m class.
Displacement 185 ton, dim. 44.2 x 8.05 x 2.8m. (draught)
Powered by three diesel-engines 6,380 hp, three shafts, speed maximum 30 knots.
Crew 6.
She was also fitted out with a daughter boat built under yard No 6431 by the same yard which received the name HELEN (KRT11) she was named after the first name of the wife of the mayor.
Displacement 5.8 ton, dim. 8.5 x 2.7 x 0.9m (draught).
Powered by one diesel engine 240 hp. one shaft, speed 13 knots.

After completion based at the South harbour in Helgoland.
2000 Modernised and updated with the most modern nautical equipment, her crew quarters refitted and the hospital ward changed in a multipurpose room. The last can be used as additional accommodation or a meeting room.
Her stern section was widened mainly below the waterline to give her a better stability in the high seas from behind.
When a new lifeboat on 08 July 2003 took over the station in Helgoland, WILHELM KAISEN was relocated to Sassnitz on the island of Rügen in the Baltic.
18 May 2012 out of service.
22 October 2012 sold to Worldwide Procurement Serv Fze, Dubai, United Arab Emirates and renamed SHERRIE ANNE.
Registered under the Togo flag and used as security vessel against piracy off the East African coast.
She was refitted by Tamsen Maritim in Rostock, Germany as a security vessel, and sailed from Rostock on 21 December 2012.
2015 Her last position was in Dubai, IMO No 7700166, same name and owners, managed by Tier One Holdings Ltd., Dubai.

Source: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Kaisen_(Schiff)
Germany 2015 0.62 Euro sg?. Scott?

ASSISTANCE ? HMS 1650

The 30p stamp of St Helena gives the inscription “1673 English Recapture” and shows a British warship on the road most probably Captain Richard Munden‘s ship the HMS ASISSTANCE when he recaptured the island in 1673.
He was a commodore of a small British squadron with an East India convoy on her way to India. Nearing St Helena he was warned that the Dutch had took possession of the island, and he attacked the island with his squadron and recaptured it again on 4 May 1673 for the British crown.
The ASSISTANCE was built by Henry Johnson at Deptford for the Royal Navy.
December 1649 ordered.
1650 Launched as the ASSISTANCE.
When buil: Tonnage 513 ton (bm), dim. 121 x 30.10 x 15.5ft, length of keel 101.6ft.
Armament 40 guns.
Crew 180.
1650 Commissioned under command of Captain John Bourne.
Most of her history is given on the web-site below. Her voyage to St Helena is not mentioned at all there.
07 January 1673 command was taken by Captain Richard Munden.
Under his command was she at the recapture of St Helena from the Dutch in May 1673.
1674 Was she back again in England.
http://www.st-george-squadron.com/sgs/w ... Assistance
Altogether she was four times rebuilt, in 1687, 1699, 1713 and 1725.
The ASSISTANCE was sunk as a breakwater in 1745 at Sheerness.

St Helena 2002 30p sg?, scott? (On the painting she is the vessel in the foreground.)
Sources: Internet and British Warships in the Age of Sail by Rif Winfield.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

Inanda (T&J Harrison)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm


Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size
Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

inanda.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
Internet.
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
Posts: 489
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:46 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen, Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 16 guests

Sponsored Links