SCEPTRE K17 yacht

The SCEPTRE a 12-metre class yacht was built by Alexander Robertson and Sons Ltd., Sandbank on Holy Loch, Scotland for the Royal Yacht Squadron Syndicate at Cowes, U.K.
Designed by David Boyd.
1958 Launched as the SCEPTRE K17.
Displacement 30 tons, dim. 21.00 x 3.56 x 2.76m. (draught), length on waterline 14.15m.
Sail area 172 m².
She was built for the 1958 America Cup challenge.

The 1958 race of the America Cup was sailed off Newport RI from 20 till 26 September 1958 between the USA yacht COLUMBIA US 16 and the challenger the British yacht SCEPTRE.
The four races were all won by the COLUMBIA.

1959 Sold to Erik A Maxwell, Cowes, UK, not renamed.
1972 Sold to E.A. King, Cowes, not renamed.
1973 Sold to I.D. Mackay, Southampton, UK, not renamed.
1975 Transferred to the Estate of I.D. Mackay, Southampton, not renamed.
1976 Sold to J.D.A. Walker, Lytham St Annes, U.K. not renamed.
1986 Sold to the Sceptre Preservation Society (Tony Walker) at Preston Marina, U.K. not renamed.
2014 Still owned by the Society, and sails in British waters.
More info is given: http://www.sceptre1958.co.uk/

Antigua 1987 $1 sg1074, scott1002.
Barbuda 1987 $1 sg938, scott854.
Grenada of Grenadines 1992 $1 sg1582, scott1479. (Other yacht is the COLUMBIA US 16)
Source: Wikipedia. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05630.html

Greenville Victory

Greenville Victory (T-AK-237) was laid down under U.S. Maritime Commission contract by California Shipbuilding Corporation, Los Angeles, California; 21 March 1944; launched 28 May 1944; and delivered to the War Shipping Administration (WSA) 8 July 1944. During the remainder of the war, SS Greenville Victory served as a merchant ship under charter to Sea Shipping Company of New York City.
Following World War II, she transported cargo in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. She was transferred to the Army Transportation Service in the spring of 1948. Acquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, she was assigned to MSTS.
Manned by a civilian crew, Greenville Victory, from 1950 to 1953, operated in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean, carrying military cargo to French, English, and German ports; Guantanamo Bay; and the Panama Canal Zone.
Between 19 February and 9 May 1953, she sailed out of New York City to the Far East and back, loaded with ammunition for Korea. After completing a run to Europe and back, she again departed New York 9 July 1953 for the Far East. She reached Yokohama, Japan, 9 August and during the next 2 months operated in the Western Pacific Ocean, carrying ammunition to Formosa and to French forces fighting Communist Viet-Minh guerillas in French Indochina. Sailing from Yokohama 4 1953 October via San Francisco, California, she reached New York City 6 November 1953 to resume cargo runs to Europe.
During the next 2 years, Greenville Victory steamed primarily between New York City and West European ports. In June and July 1954 she sailed to the Western Mediterranean to replenish at-sea ships of the U.S. 6th Fleet. On 16 November 1955, she departed Newport, Rhode Island, for Antarctica and arrived at McMurdo Sound 16 January 1956 to provision ships of Task Force 43, as part of the Navy's Operation Deep Freeze. Departing Antarctica on 5 February 1956, and travelling via New Zealand, she arrived in New York on 28 March.
Between 1956 and 1964 Greenville Victory maintained a busy schedule transporting cargo to American bases scattered throughout the world. She replenished Task Force 43 on three more Antarctic deployments; and, from December to February 1956–57, 1957–38, and 1960–61, she operated in Antarctic waters. Cargo runs sent her to the Caribbean in 1958, 1960, and 1962 and to Thule, Greenland, during September and October 1958.
She also deployed with the 6th Fleet five times between June 1956 and March 1964. On two deployments in 1963 and 1964 she transited the Suez Canal, steaming to India and Pakistan.
Greenville Victory departed Norfolk, Virginia, 6 October 1964 to participate in the massive transatlantic trooplift exercise, "Steel Pike I." Departing Morehead City, North Carolina, 8 October, she closed the Spanish coast off Rota 19 October. For more than 2 weeks she discharged supplies and cargo in support of amphibious and shore operations. Departing Rota 7 November, she steamed via Morehead City to New York, arriving 20 November.
In response to American determination to protect South Vietnam from Communist forces, Greenville Victory departed New York 22 November 1964 for duty in the Western Pacific. Sailing via San Diego, California, she arrived Guam 24 December. During the next month she steamed to Okinawa, Korea, and Japan, carrying cargo. Arriving at Manila, Philippine Islands, on 26 January 1965, she sailed the 28th for Pearl Harbor and San Francisco, California. After reaching the U.S. West Coast on 25 February, she made a run out of San Francisco, California, to Seattle, Washington, then sailed for the U.S. Gulf Coast on 15 March, arriving New Orleans, Louisiana, on 28 March 1965.
During the next 5 months, Greenville Victory made cargo runs in the Atlantic out of Norfolk, Virginia, and New York. She departed New York 20 October 1965 after a voyage to Labrador and back. Steaming via Norfolk, Virginia, and Long Beach, California, she reached Yokohama, Japan, on 22 November 1965. Loaded with military cargo, she sailed for South Vietnam 30 November and arrived at Saigon 16 December. The following day she sailed via Vũng Tàu for the U.S. West Coast, arriving San Francisco 3 January 1966.
Greenville Victory replenished her holds with military supplies for anticommunist forces in Southeast Asia before returning to the Western Pacific. Sailing via Sasebo, Japan, she reached Bangkok, Thailand, on 13 February 1966. She sailed 22 February for South Vietnam and arrived Vũng Tàu the next day.
Having unloaded, she sailed 1 March 1966 for the U.S. West Coast to transport additional military material from the United States to Vietnam. She continued operations between the United States and the Western Pacific until transferred to the Atlantic at mid-year. In 1967 she was busy supplying NATO forces in Europe.
On 22 March 1976 Greenville Victory was transferred to the U.S. Maritime Administration who placed her in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, James River Group, at Lee Hall, Virginia. On 26 May 1983 she was sold for scrapping. She was struck from the Navy List on 16 January 1987.
Wikipedia
Faroe Islands 2014

HEART OF AMERICA US 51

HEART OF AMERICA was built as a 12-metre class yacht by Merrifield-Roberts Inc. boatyard, Bristol, Rhode Island for the Heart of America Challenge Syndicate Inc., Newport RI.
She was representing the Chicago Yacht Club, Chicago, Illinois.
Designed by Graham Gretsky, MacLane & Schlageter.
08 May 1986 launched in Newport R.I as the HEART OF AMERICA (US 51)
Displacement 25.9 ton, dim. 20.51 x 3.71 x 2.71m. (draught), length on waterline 13.99m.
Sail area 161.47 m².
The syndicate’s first challenge was to obtain a ruling from the New York Supreme Court that Lake Michigan on which Chicago laid was an arm of the sea, as required by the Deed of Gift for the Cup.
After completing she sailed for two weeks after completing, and then was taken by truck to Chicago, Illinois. At Chicago without unloaded from the truck was she christened on the truck, never touching the waters of Lake Michigan.
After the christening was she transported to San Francisco where she sailed on trials prior to being shipped to Freemantle, Australia, where she competed with skipper Harry C, “Buddy” Melges Jr.in the 1987 America Cup challenger eliminations, finishing eight.
The last time I find her was in the Los Angeles Time, where is given in the edition of 03 June 1990 she raced in San Diego Bay against two other America Cup yachts the AMERICA II and STARS & STRIPES “86 in which HEART OF AMERIC was the winner.
Since 1993 is she in Turkey.
2014 Can’t find a trace of her.

Solomon Islands 1986 $1 sg570a, scott570i

Source: Watercraft Philately 1988 page 69. Internet.

CONSTELLATION US 20

Built as a 12-metre class yacht for the Constellation Syndicate, Oyster Bay NY. by Miniford Yacht Yard, City Island, NY. For The Constellation Syndicate (Walter Gubelmann) of the New York Yacht Club.
She was built of double planked mahogany over oak frames.
Designed by Olin J. Stephens.
1964 Launched as the CONSTELLATION US 20.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 20.83 x 3.66 x 2.66m (draught), length on waterline 14.02m.
Sail area 170 m².
She defeated in the America Cup held from 15 till 21 September 1964 at Newport, Rhode Island and skippered by Eric Ridder the challenger of the Royal Thames Yacht Club the SOVEREIGN skippered by Paul Anderson 4 – 0.
1966 Sold to Pierre E Goemans at Monte Carlo, Monaco, not renamed.
1979 Sold to L’Asoc Francais pour “la Coupe de l’America” at Hyéres, France, not renamed and used as trial horse for a French syndicate.
January 1980 sold to Security Change Ltd. Hamble, U.K. not renamed and already February 1980 sold to the British Industry 1500 Syndicate at London not renamed.
Used by the British as a trial horse, things are getting then a little murky, some sources give she sank early 1980s off Turkey under tow, but the 12 metre class gives that she in 1994 still was owned by the British Industry 1500 Syndicate, but at the internet in 2014 I can’t find anything on her after 1980s.

Sierra Leone 1987 50 le sgMS1016, scott843
Solomon Islands 1986 18c sg570a, scott573c

Source: Internet. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05429.html

MARIA VAN RIEBEECK SAS S97

Built in 1968-'70 by Dubigeon Normandie, Nantes, for the South African Navy (SAN).
Submarine of the 'Daphné' class, Displacement:860 tons surfaced, 1034 submerged, L:57,80m. (190') B:6,75m. (22,1') Draught:5,23m. (17,2') 2 SEMT/Pielstick engines:2450 hp. 2 x 80 cell batteries, 2 Jeumont/Schneider electric motors:2600 hp. 13,5 kn. surfaced, 16 kn. submerged, Armement:12 x 550 mm. torpedos, crew:6 officers and 45 ratings, 6 to 10 trainees.
Sisterships: EMILY HOBHOUSE and JOHANNA VAN DER MERWE.

In 1967, after nearly two years of negotiations, an order was placed with the French Government for three Daphné class submarines. The first of these submarines was the SAS MARIA VAN RIEBEECK. It was laid down at the Nantes shipyard of Dubigeon-Normandie on 14 March 1968, was launched on 18 March 1969 and completed on 22 June 1970.

On 20 August 1970, MARIA VAN RIEBEECK collided with the French submarine GALATÉE (also a member of the Daphné class) off Toulon. Both submarines were badly damaged, with GALATÉE being forced to run aground to avoid sinking.

In 1999 renamed in SAS SPEAR, 2003 scrapped.

(South Africa 1982, 8 c. StG.506)
JFS 73/74 + internet.

WEATHERLY US 17

Built as a 12-metre class yacht by Luders Marine Construction at Stamford, CT, USA for the Weatherly Syndicate, of the New York Yacht Club.
Designed by Philip L. Rhodes.
1958 launched as the WEATHERLY US 17
Displacement 26.5 tons, dim. 21.03 x 3.62 x 2.72m (draught) length on waterline 13.86m
Sail area 166 m².

WEATHERLY (US 17) was an unsuccessful defence candidate for the 1958 America's Cup and victorious defender in the 1962 America's Cup.
Design
WEATHERLY was a keel sloop designed to the 12-Metre Rule. She was designed by Philip L. Rhodes and built by Luders Marine Construction Company at Stamford, Connecticut for a syndicate of owners formed by Henry D. Mercer, with Cornelius S. Walsch and Arnold D. Frese. WEATHERLY was launched in 1958. She was built of steel frames with mahogany planking.
Career
Skippered by Arthur Knapp, WEATHERLY competed with COLUMBIA, EASTERN, GLEAM and VIM for the right to defend the America's cup but was outclassed in the 1958 selection trials. COLUMBIA went on to successfully defend the Cup in 1958.
Modified by Philip L. Rhodes at Luders yard in 1962, WEATHERLY was redesigned with a shorter bow and reduced wetted surface. Weight saved in the redesign was put into the keel.
The defender selection trials pitted WEATHERLY against COLUMBIA, EASTERNER and NEFERTITI. On 25 August 1962, the NYYC selected WEATHERLY to defend the Cup against Australian challenger GRETEL. Skippered by Emil "Bus" Mosbacher, Jr., in September 1962, WEATHERLY defended the Cup 4–1 against GRETEL.
After the races she was then used for pleasure cruising and charters.
1966 Sold to U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point NY, not renamed.
1971 Sold to Douglas E. Jones, Kings Point, NY, not renamed.
1975 Sold to Lynn Summers and Alan Buchanan, Seattle WA, not renamed.
1981 Sold to Seattle Council Boy Scouts of America, Seattle, WA, not renamed.
1986 Sold to Weatherly, Inc. (George Hill), Seattle, WA.
She is now normally berthed at dockside at the Newport Harbor Hotel and Marina and is available for chartering. She was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012.
2014 Managed by America Cup Charters in Newport RI
1958 and 1962 Specification Comparison.

1958 1962
LOA 21.03 m (69.0 ft) 29.39 m (96.4 ft)
LWL 13.86 m (45.5 ft)
Beam 3.62 m (11.9 ft)


Draft 2.72 m (8 ft 11 in)
Sail Area 166 m2 (1,790 sq ft) 165.6 m2 (1,783 sq ft)
Displacement 26.5 tons 25.65 tons
Ballast 16.35 tons 18.4 tons
Mast Height 25 m (82 ft)

Antigua 1992 $1 sg1704, scott1623.
Barbuda 1993 $1 sg1447, scott?
Grenada 1987 $5 sgMS1615, scott
Solomon Islands 1987 18c sg570a, scott570.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weatherly_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 70526.html Internet.

RAINBOW J4 yacht

RAINBOW a J-Class built yacht by Herreshoff Manufacturing Company, Bristol, Rhode Island, USA for the Harold Vanderbilt Syndicate of the New York Yacht Club.
The yacht was designed by William Starling Burgess.
15 May 1934 launched as the RAINBOW J4.
Tonnage 141 ton, dim. 38.61 x 6.40 x 4.45m (draught) length on waterline 25.11m.
Sail area 700.02 m².

She was built as and America Cup defender, but during the trials the YANKEE almost beat her.
The America Cup 1934 was sailed at Newport, Rhode Island, the defender was the RAINBOW of the New York Yacht Club against the challenger the British yacht ENDEAVOUR of the Royal Yacht Club.

The first race on 17 September 1934 was won by the ENDEAVOUR under skipper Sopwith, also the second race.
The third race was won by the RAINBOW under skipper Vanderbilt, also the fourth, fifth and sixth race, and the America Cup was won by the USA again.
After the America Cup the RAINBOW was laid up in a dry-dock where she was refitted.
1937 Sold to Chandler Hovey and contended for the defense of the 1937 cup but she lost against the RANGER.

1940 The RAINBOW was sold for scrap.
Solomon Islands 1987 18c sg570a, scott
Grenada 1987 $4 sg1614, scott

Source: Various internet sites.
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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

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Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby shipstamps » Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:57 pm


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Launched 24th February 1925 by Swan Hunter and sailed on her maiden voyage from London to West Indies.
13th August 1936 the two Osborne brothers, who had earlier absconded from Britain with the fishing vessel GIRL PAT, were placed in custody by the master of Inanda and transferred to the authorities in London.
21st June 1940 she sailed on the final voyage of Harrison passenger service to West Indies.
27th Aug 1940. On return requisitioned by Admiralty as an Ocean Boarding Vessel. In September she was struck by bombs from German aircraft whilst fitting out in Royal Albert Dock, London.
She was refloated and taken over by UK government and rebuilt as a cargo vessel.
11th Feb 1942 registered under the ownership of the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE EXPLORER.
8yh July 1942 torpedoed by German submarine U575 on passage from Demerara to Barbados. Hit by a second torpedo and then the Uboat shelled her until she sank.
Only 3 of the 71 crew were reported missing.
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Re: Inanda (T&J Harrison)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 pm

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Built in 1925 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Charente Steamship Co Ltd. (operated by T & J Harrison Ltd.)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:5985, Nt:3746, Dw:6900, L:124,05m. (407’) B:15,90m. (52’2”) D:8,66m. (28’5”) draught:7,80m. (25’7¼”) Wallsend Slipway Co. Ltd. quadruple expansion steam engine:606 nhp. 13 kn. passengers:100, crew:130.

Inanda was launched on 24 February 1925 and was completed in May. She was built for the Charente Steamship Co Ltd and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was Liverpool. She was allocated the United Kingdom Official Number 137410 and Code Letters KSNF. On 3 February 1932, Inanda was on a voyage from London to the West Indies when she suffered a broken propellor. She put into Swansea, Glamorgan for repairs.Following the changes to Code Letters in 1934, Inanda was allocated GLMB.
Inanda was a member of Covnoy OA 7, which departed from Southend, Essex on 19 September 1939 and dispersed at sea on 22 September. She was bound for Antigua, where she arrived on 3 October. She departed that day and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving later that day. On 4 October, Inanda sailed for Grenada arriving on 6 October and departing that day for Trinidad, where she arrived the next day. On 9 October, she sailed for Demarara, British Guiana, arriving the next day and departing on 14 October for Trinidad, where she arrived on 15 October. Departing on 20 October, Saint Vincent and Grenada were visited before Inanda arrived at Saint Lucia, from where she sailed on 25 October for Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She arrived on 2 November, sailing on 8 November as a member of Convoy HXF 8, which arrived at Dover, Kent, United Kingdom on 21 November. Inanda was carrying general cargo, rum and sugar. She then sailed to Southend to join Convoy FN 46, which departed on 1 December and arrived at Methil, Fife the next day. She left the convoy at Middlesbrough, Yorkshire on 2 December.
Inanda sailed from Middlesbrough on 11 December to join Convoy FS 53, which had sailed from Methil that day and arrived at Southend on 12 December. She then joined Convoy OA 53, which sailed on 14 December and dispersed at sea on 16 December. She was carrying a cargo of sulphite as well as a number of passengers and her captain was the convoy's Vice Commodore. Inanda was bound for Demerara, which was reached on 9 January 1940 via Barbados and Trinidad. She departed on 13 January for Montserrat, from where she sailed on 15 January for Trinidad. She departed on 16 January for Galveston, Texas, United States, arriving on 22 January and sailing on 3 February for Halifax, where she arrived on 13 February. Inanda was a member of Convoy HX 20, which departed on 16 February and arrived at Liverpool on 4 March. She was carrying general cargo.
Inanda departed from Liverpool on 29 March as a member of Convoy OB 119, which dispersed at sea on 1 April. She was performing the rôle of a convoy rescue ship and sailed to London after the convoy had dispersed. She then sailed to Southend, from where she departed on 8 April as a member of Convoy OA 125G, which formed Convoy OG 25 on 10 April. Inanda was carrying general cargo bound for Antigua, arriving on 24 April and sailing that day for Saint Kitts, where she arrived on 24 April. She sailed the next day for Saint Lucia, from where she departed on 26 April for Grenada, arriving on 29 April. She spent the next few weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at Bermuda on 20 May. Carrying general cargo, Inanda was a member of Convoy BHX 64, which departed on 7 August and joined with convoy HX 64 on 12 August. Convoy HX 64 departed from Halifax on 8 August and arrived at Liverpool on 23 August. Inanda was bound for London, which was reached by leaving the convoy and sailing to the Methil Roads, where she arrived on 24 August. She then joined Convoy FS 262, which departed on 25 August and arrived at Southend on 27 August.
Inanda was then hired by the Royal Navy for use as an ocean boarding vessel. On 7 September, she was berthed at London Docks when she was sunk in an air raid.
She was salvaged and rebuilt as a cargo ship, Inanda was renamed Empire Explorer, she was passed to the MoWT and placed under the management of T & J Harrison Ltd. Her port of registry was changed to London although she retained the Code Letters GLMB.
Empire Explorer was a member of Convoy FN 632, which departed from Southend on 15 February 1942 and arrived at Methil two days later. She left the convoy at the Tyne on 16 February, to load general cargo. She sailed four days later to join Convoy FN 636, which had departed from Southend on 19 February and arrived at Methil on 21 February. She then joined Convoy EN 50, which departed the next day and arrived at Oban, Argyllshire on 23 February. She left the convoy at Loch Ewe and sailed to Saint Kitts, arriving on 17 March. Empire Explorer spent the next five weeks sailing around the West Indies, arriving at the Cape Verde Islands on 20 April and sailing two days later for Halifax, where she arrived on 30 April. She joined Convoy HX 188, which departed on 3 May and arrived at Liverpool on 15 May. She was carrying general cargo, sugar and 38 bags of mail. She left the convoy at the Clyde, arriving on 15 May.
Empire Explorer sailed on 1 June to join Convoy OS 30, which departed from Liverpool that day and arrived at Freetown, Sierra Leone on 19 June. She was in ballast and armed with a 4-inch or 4.7-inch gun, eight machine guns and a number of kites. She was stated to be bound for George, South Africa. She arrived at Demerara on 21 June, sailing nine days later for Trinidad, where she arrived on 1 July. Empire Explorer sailed from Trinidad on 8 July, carrying 200 bags of mail, 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) of pitch and 4,000 long tons (4,100 t) of sugar and bound for Barbados. At 02:47 German time on 9 July, Empire Explorer was torpedoed, shelled and sunk at
11°40′N 60°55’W. by the U-575, which was in the command of Günther Heydemann. Of her 70 crew and 8 DEMS gunners, three crew were killed. The survivors were rescued by HMS MTB 337 and landed at Tobago.
(Barbados 1994, 70 c. StG.1033; St. Kitts 1990, 40 c. StG.316)
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