SANTANDER SAILING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS 2014

A stamp in the Sports series is being issued, dedicated to the Santander ISAF Sailing World Championships 2014.
The Sailing World Championships is the most important event organized by the International Sailing Federation. It takes place every four years, two before the Olympic Games, and is used to allot 75% of the places for countries taking part in the Games.
Santander is hosting the 4th World Sailing Championships over the first two weeks of September, when it will welcome about 1000 yachts and 1400 crew from more than 95 countries. The eleven Olympic categories will take part in the competition. Countries which qualify can participate in the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games in 2016.
The Royal Spanish Sailing Federation (RFEV) has set up several sites in the capital city of Cantabria, such as the marshland of the Santander Real Club Marítimo to moor the organization’s and keeled boats, the Star and the Elliots of the Women's Match Race, and the CEAR Príncipe Felipe (Specialist Centre for High Performance in Sailing), as well as other port areas nearby.
The first World Sailing Championships were held in Spain in 2003 in the Bay of Cadiz. Spanish philately marked this competition by issuing a commemorative stamp.
The second Championships were held in Cascais in Portugal in 2007, where 1350 sailors from 76 countries attended.
The third took place in Perth in Australia in 2011, with 1200 sailors from 79 countries.
Spain currently holds fourth place in the medals table in the World Sailing Championships, following the 2011 event, with three gold’s, one silver and two bronze.
The stamp recreates the blue waves of Cantabria, around yachts with sails billowing in the wind in front of the Magdalena Palace, an iconic building in Santander.
Spain 2014 Euro

Source: Spanish Post.

HAUNTED CANADA sailing vessel

Friday the 13th June 2014 Canada Post has issued five stamps that are sure to get the hairs raising on the back of your neck. The collection is the first in a multi-year series telling some of Canada’s most inexplicable and popular ghostly tales.
In every region across Canada, there are reports of apparitions, eerie sounds, phantom lights and spirits trapped between this world and the next.

Only one of this stamps which shows us a burning sailing vessel is interesting for the ship on stamp collectors.

The Northumberland Strait: The tale has been told by residents for at least 200 years of a vision of a burning ship on the waters between New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. On several occasions, onlookers have tried to rescue the ship but as soon as rescuers come close, the ship disappears into the mist.

Canada 2014 sg?, scott?

Source: Canada Post.
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VULTURE

By the stamp is given by Jersey post: Captain Peter Duval was a wanted man in the port of Bayonne, France. Around the year 1800, he commanded a small lugger named the VULTURE and engaged in harassing a large French brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. As the Captain drew up alongside the French opened fire but missed the smaller vessel which successfully scored cannon hits direct on to the brig’s hull.
Downloaded from the internet:
VULTURE was one of the most successful privateers in the Napoleonic Wars, which started badly for Jersey. Commanded by Capt Peter Duval, she brought in 16 prizes from the Bay of Biscay between 1795 and 1798.
Capt Duval was wanted man in the port of Bayonne, whose merchants had sufferred badly from his success. They set a trap, disguising a brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. Duval could not resist so seemingly easy a target and pulled alongside demanding their surrender. The French opened fire and missed.
What they had not taken account was the difference in height between the two ships. The VULTURE was a small lugger of 100 tons, four guns and 27 men, the brig's guns fired over her head but the VULTURE’s cannon all scored direct hits on the French ship's hull. They were forced to withdraw, having only managed to inflict slight damage on the VULTURE’s rigging.
Snipe
VULTURE was still successful in 1812 when, commanded by Captain Francis Le Feuvre and accompanied by another privateer, EARL ST VINCENT, she captured an American vessel, the SNIPE, which was attempting to run a blockade off the French coast at Bordeaux.
The SNIPE’s cargo was sold at public auction at L'Hotel de Deal in St Helier on 7 October. It consisted of:
• 212 cases of white sugar from Havanna
• 51 sacks of spices
• 10 barrels of Rocou
• 28 bales of cotton
• 151 sacks of cocoa
• 709 bales of coffee
• 248 half bales of Bourbon coffee
• 838 sacks of Java coffee
• 389 sacks of coffee
• 10 barrels of coffee
• 205 sacks of pepper
• 24 sacks of indigo
• 146 bear skins
After the sale the 216-tonne ship itself was auctioned. The new owners renamed it the MARS and it also became a privateer. Under Captain Noe Le Sueur she captured the SPEEDWELL, whose American crew were disgusted to discover they had been taken by a ship that not long before had been one of their own.

Jersey 2014 46p sg?, scott?
http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/The_''Vulture''

Rhein (Barque) 1849

Rhein was built by von Somm at Hamburg Germany and delivered to Hapag (a company in Germany, Hamburg Amerikanische Paketfahtr Aktien Gesellschaft) on 09 March 1849.

She was Hamburg America Liner. She was one of the four ships with which Hapag started business in 1848. Her displacement is 360 gross tons, lenght 131,7', breadth 29', depth 17,4'. As built, she carried 220 passengers in two classes, crew; 16. In 1851, her passenger capacity increased to 240.

She made 22 voyages between Hamburg-New York-Hamburg and was sold on 25 March 1858 to Bernhardt Wencke, Hamburg, for trading to the Far East. In 1864 she was sold again in Singapore.

The stamp design is from a painting by her Commander, Capt. P. Popp. On the stamp she is flying the flag of the state of Hamburg. She capsized during her launch on 22 November 1848, was salvaged immediatelly, and delivered to Hapag 09 March 1849. She sailed on her Maiden Voyage from Hamburg to New York on 24 March 1849.

Paraguay 1977, S.G;?, Scott; 1764d.

Source: H.G.Hermann; Kludas, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, 1847-1906, Vol-I

Source: A. Kresse, Seechiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Vol-I

JERSEY PRIVATEERS and PIRATES

In the days when the easiest method of transportation goods in bulk was by water, unscrupulous members of seafaring communities saw its disruption as an ideal way of making money. Piracy was frowned on by authorities unless the ship happened to belong to an enemy power in which case a blind eye may have been turned. Despite this, piracy was a criminal offence unless it was sanctioned by the state and termed ‘privateering’.
In 1689, the practice of issuing ‘Letters of Marques’ became common, effectively a licence to thieve on the high seas and commissions were issued to vessels authorising their owners to attack and plunder the King’s enemies during war time. Any prize was sold and the profit was divided amongst the State, the ship owners and the crew.
Previously, the English Civil war period saw a blossoming of privateering activity in Jersey under Sir George Carteret who started with just one galley, built up his fleet of privateers to about a dozen by arming his prizes. Of course it was not only Jersey which issued Letters of Marques and by 1652, the Channel had been infested by freelance privateers, flying the flags of all nations and bringing the islands to a stranglehold.
Once legalised, Jersey ship owners were quick to take advantage of the situation with the numbers of vessels and captured prizes rising steadily during the French wars. The heyday of the Jersey privateering, however was the 18th century. In the first two years of the French War 1793-1802, 42 local boats and 900 Jerseymen were captured by the French, representing two thirds of the island’s shipping and 4% of the population. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, peace came to Europe and privateering fell into disuse until it was finally abolished in 1856 bringing with it the end of an era which had brought prosperity to the island.
Jersey 2014 46p/£1.20 and Souvenir Sheetlet £2.91 sg?. Scott?
Source: Jersey Stamp Bulletin Autumn 2014.

46p Shows the lugger VULTURE on the right and a French ship.
69p Shows CUMBERLAND in the background of the stamp.
56p Shows the CHARMING BETTY capturing the French bark ST CHARLES.
£1.20 Shows the CHARMING NANCY capturing the French Le HERON.

MERCATOR. Gerardus 1512-1594

Gerardus Mercator  is best known for his work in cartography, in particular theworld map of 1569 based on a new projection which represented sailing courses of constant bearing as straight lines. He was the first to use the term " atlas " for a collection of maps.Before Mercator's time, world maps were basically useless to navigators plotting voyages of discovery and trade. The maps may have shown landmasses correctly, but generally they did not show proportional distance and direction so navigators could not plot a compass course. In his map, Mercator drew straight, equidistant longitude lines, perpendicular to latitude lines, forming a grid which could be used to accurately determine sea routes. Mercator created and published numerous other maps, many of which were posthumously published by his son as Atlas' or Cosmographic Meditations on the Structure of the World . This marked the first use of the world atlas in connection with a book of maps. Mercator also introduced the use of italics to the text of maps.                                                                                                                                                                      Mercator was born Gerhard Kremer on March 5, 1512, in Rupelmonde, Flanders, and changed his name when he became a student at the University of Louvain in1530. Though Mercator studied philosophy and theology, he also developed an interest in astronomy, mathematics, geography, art and engraving. He studied the first two subjects under Gemmy Phrysius, a cartographer and mathematician.While Mercator lived in Louvain, from 1530 until 1552, Mercator made scientific instruments and worked as a surveyor, while makings his first maps and globes. His earliest globe was finished about 1536, and he published his first map in 1537. Its subject was Palestine. In 1844, Mercator was imprisoned for several months in Louvain for heresy, though he was set free due to lack of evidence. In 1552, Mercator moved to Duisberg in what is now Germany, where he was employed by the Duke of Cleves. Mercator did his most significant work under Cleves's patronage in Duisberg.  In 1569, Mercator designed his Great World Map to facilitate sea travel, inspired by his contact with sea captains and navigators. His grid based of equidistant meridians (longitude lines) and parallels (latitude lines) drawn perpendicularly is known as a graticule. Mercator's graticule allowed constant compass bearing to be plotted as a straight line. While Mercator's map was useful for navigators because it preserved constant compass directions, it had drawbacks. Landmasses were not depicted in their true area and proportions, except at the equator. The further from the equator the landmass is, the bigger it looks on Mercator's map. Hence, Greenland looks much larger than the continent of South America, though it is really half its size. The North and South Poles cannot be projected at all. But the relationships between these landmasses are correctly depicted. Mercator's innovation did not become widespread until 1599, when Edward Wright published corrective tables for navigator's use.                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mercator also designed, engraved, and published many maps of Europe and its different parts. In 1554, for example, he published an accurate, detailed map of Europe. Eventually, 107 of these maps appeared in the atlas published by his son in 1595. Mercator also built globes on commission, including a one made of crystal and wood for the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V. Mercator died in Duisberg on December 2, 1594.

Guinea 2012; 40000fg,5000fg,15000fg,20000fg;SG?
Belgium 2012;3f;SG?
Source:

http://www.madehow.com/inventorbios/54/ ... cator.html

By Anatoly

T-91 (Patrol Boat) 1970

This coastal patrol craft is one of three patrol boats built by Royal Thai Naval Dockyard, Bangkok. Commissioned in 1971.

Displacement; 87,5 tons standart, 104,3' x 17,5'. Draft; 5,5', 2 diesels, 1600 bhp, two screws, speed; 25 knots, Armament; 1 x 40 mm and 1 x 20 mm guns. Range; 700 miles at 21 knots, complement; 21.

Thailand 1979, S.G.?, Scott; 898.

Source: Janes Figthing Ships
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GENERAL SHERMAN

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby shipstamps » Fri Mar 27, 2009 3:55 pm


Click image to view full size
Built as an iron passenger-cargo vessel under yard 111 by the yard of Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for M. Langlands & Son, Glasgow and managed by the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet.
20 June 1861 launched under the name PRINCESS ROYAL.
Tonnage 494 gross, 828 ton burden, dim. 196.9 x 27.3 x 16ft.
Powered by a 2-cyl steam engine, two boilers, one screw, speed 11 knots.
Schooner rigged
1860 Delivered to owners.

Ostensibly she was built for the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet, but her appearance was more like a blockade-runner for the Confederacy than an Irish Channel steamer.
1862 Taken over by Fraser, Trendholm & Company, Charleston S.C. and she crossed the North Atlantic loaded with two badly needed marine engines and boilers for some ram-ships, under construction in Charleston. Other cargo on board was 600 barrels of gunpowder, 6 - 70-pound Whitworth cannons, 930 steel-headed Whitworth shells, 35 tons of projectile steel, a machine for molding and some provision, the total value of the cargo was £78.808.


Sailed from London and via Newfoundland, arrived mid January 1863 at Bermuda, she was heavily loaded with a draught of 11 feet, with this draught was she slow, and not very suitable to be used as a blockade runner.
Early in the morning of 29 January 1863 she approached the entrance of Charleston, where she was sighted by the schooner G.W. BLUNT that opened fire and warned the other vessels of squadron.
The steamer USS UNADILLA forced the PRINCESS ROYAL aground, but when boarding parties reached the vessel, most of the crew and passengers had left the ship. Only some British sailors stayed behind on board.

After Union warships towed her free, she was brought north, still with the British sailors on board who were hired by the federal commander, he was short of sailors.
The prize court at Philadelphia sold her and her cargo for $342.000.

18 March 1863 sold to the U.S. Navy Department for $112.000, and she was armed with 2 – 30 pound Parrot rifles, 1 - 11 inch Dahlgren gun and four 24-pound howitzers.
29 May 1863 commissioned under command of Melancthon B. Woolsey as USS PRINCESS ROYAL.
Crew 150.

Assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
28 June 1863 had a sharp engagement with some Confederate forces at Donaldsonville, LA, in which USS KINEO and WINONA also participated, driving the enemy forces off.
10 August 1863 she captured the British schooner FLYING SCUD loaded with cotton near Matamoros off the Rio Oranda, Tex.
The rest of 1863 and 1864 used in the blockading service, and she captured several small brigs and schooners.
07 December 1864 together with USS CHOCURA she captured the schooner ALABAMA, which was underway from Havana.
07 February 1865 off Galveston Tex. She and the USS BIENVILLE took several small schooners.

In the summer of 1865 she was ordered to head north and she arrived at 21 July at Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned.

17 August 1865 during a public auction sold to Samuel C.Cook for $54.175, and he renamed her in GENERAL SHERMAN.
Thereafter he sent the vessel to China, which at that time was in chaos because of the Taiping upraising.
The Chinese Government hired some foreign mercenaries of which some defected to the Taiping rebels.
A group of these defectors under command of the American Henry A. Burgevine boarded the GENERAL SHERMAN and on board of her he sailed to Formosa (Taiwan), but the Royal Navy captured her during the voyage. In the encounter Burgevine was killed.

Then her ownership became murky, most probably she was bought by the British firm Meadows & Co in Tientsin (Tianjin), and was she bought or chartered by a American merchant W.B. Preston, who sent the ship to Korea.
She was loaded with merchandise and on 09 August 1866 she sailed from Tientsin, under command of Capt. Page with a crew of 28 and the missionary/interpreter, Robert Thomas, the owner Preston was also on board, after a call at Chefoo (Yantai) for fresh water she sailed to Korea, arriving off the mouth of the Daedong River on 18 August.

05 September 1866 was she attacked near Pyongyang, and the complete crew was killed, the vessel was set on fire. For the attack and killing of the crew see http://www.kimsoft.com/2000Sherman.htm
The GENERAL SHERMAN did not sink she was grounded, but she was not lost, as some sources give; when the river levels rose she was refloated and moved to Seoul.
She was repaired and for some time was she the first engine powered warship of the Korean Navy. Under pressure of China she was handed back to her former American owner Samuel C. Cook in 1867.
Early 1868 bought by William F.Weld Co. Boston, Mass., who was building up his Merchants of Boston SS Co.
After a recondition and alternation she was put in the service from Boston to New Orleans service with accommodation for some passengers.
Her last voyage was, when she left on 04 January 1874 New York with on board a crew of 42 men and 4 passengers and general cargo consigned to New Orleans.
During the voyage the weather worsened and on 07 January at 02.00am. she sprung a leak, and the pumps could not manage the water level pouring in.

Her crew were rescued by the schooner SPRAY and FLORENCE and salvaged some cargo and the baggage of the passengers who disembarked at Wilmington N.C.
10 January the steam tug BRANDT steamed out from Wilmington and found the GENERAL SHERMAN still afloat, she managed to put a hawser on the ship and started towing.
Near Tub’s Inlet, twenty-seven miles from Cape Fear the GENERAL SHERMAN sank.

Korea North 2006 140ch sg?, scott?

Source: Clyde built ships. Lifeline of the Confederacy by Stephen R. Wise. http://www.kimsoft.com/2000/shermanr.htm Some other web-sites, a Google search give plenty on the ship.
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Re: GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby markhuggins » Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:28 pm

Had no idea of the history of this ship. I did several scuba dives on it in the late 1980's.
Picked up several lead shot, a rifle slug, several buttons and a belt buckle.
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