SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

KILDANGAN HMS 1918

Built as a sloop under yard No 853 by Cochrane & Sons, Selby, U.K. for the Royal Navy.
15 March 1918 launched as the HMS KILDANGAN, she was one of the Kill-class.
Displacement 895 ton, dim. 55.5 x 9.1 x 3.20m. (draught)
Powered by one reciprocating steam engine, 1,400 hp, one shaft, speed 13 knots.
Armament 1 – 4 inch gun and 12 depth-charges.
Crew 57
September 1918 completed.
If she had any war service is doubtful.
Wikipedia gives the following on the class:
The Kil class were designed to counter the U-boat threat posed by the Imperial German Navy during the First World War. They were designed to be equipped with hydrophones and depth charges to detect and destroy enemy submarines before they posed a threat to allied convoys. The class began to be launched towards the end of 1917. So they could be constructed, an order for 85 anti-submarine trawlers was cancelled across six shipyards in order to free up enough berths for the building of the Kil class. Each ship took around six months to be constructed. Ships in the class were named after villages in Scotland and Ireland beginning with "Kil".
Similar to the 24-class sloop, the ships were built with a double ended design in order to confuse enemy submarine observers who were trying to work out which direction the ships were due to travel in. They had a single central funnel, and deckhouses both fore and aft were designed to be similar in order to enhance the effect. The class were painted in dazzle camouflage.
The class entered service after the main threat of the U-boats had passed, and therefore their effectiveness in anti-submarine warfare cannot be determined. Only 38 of the 85 ships ordered were completed by the time the Armistice with Germany was signed on 11 November 1918. The ships were put into reserve following the war, and were put up for sale by the Admiralty.
14 February 1920 sold to Robinson, Brown & Joplin (B.Burletson), Newcastle renamed in BEBSIDE and converted to a cargo vessel.
1922 Sold to Johann M.K. Blumenthal, Hamburg, Germany and renamed JOHANN.
1925 Sold to Pietro Schenone, Leghorn, Italy and renamed LABRONE.
1928 Sold to SA di Nav. L’Argonauta, Genoa. Italy and renamed ANITA. She was converte to a motor vessel, a new 4-cyl. oil engine was installed manufactured by Bolinder, Stockholm, 192 nhp.
1930 Sold to Banca Casareto, Genoa (most probably the mortgage holder), not renamed.
1939 Sold to Adolfo Calzi, Trieste, Italy not renamed.
1940 Sold to Soc. Italiana Ernesto Breda, Venice, Italy renamed in GIOVANNI MARIA.
10 January 1941 on a voyage from Derna for Tobruk was she running on a mine 12 mile off Tobruk and sunk.

Palau 2015 $1.20 sg?, scott?
Source: Wikipedia. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Lloyds Registry various years.

LEVIATHAN USS

Palau 2015 $1.20 sg?, scott?

See VATERLAND for her details and history. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9718

MOLTKE SMS

Built as a flush-decked corvette by the Kaiserliche Werft in Danzig for the Imperial German Navy.
1875 Laid down.
18 October 1877 launched as the SMS MOLTKE one of the Bismarck class, she was named after the Prussian Field Marshal Helmuth Karl Bernhard von Moltke.
Displacement 2,843 standard, 2,994 full load, dim. 82.0 x 13.7 x 6.3m. (draught)
Powered by a 3-cyl steam engine, 2,500 ihp, one shaft with a lifting screw, speed 12.5 knots.
Armament 16 – 15.0 cm guns.
Three mast ship rigged, total sail area 2,210 m².
Crew 404-469.
16 April 1878 commissioned.
After commissioned served as training vessel for cadets and midshipmen of the German Navy, and made numerous voyages abroad.
The German expedition under command of Carl Schrader sailed from Germany on 3 June 1882 on board a passenger ship to Montevideo. After arrival Montevideo she boarded the SMS MOLTKE under command of Captain Johannes Heinrich Pirner they sailed to South Georgia which they reached on 20 August 1882.
After a station was constructed in Moltke Harbour on the north coast of the island, the MOLTKE sailed away and left the expedition behind, which were picked up the next year on 6 September 1883 on board of the corvette SMS MARIE.
The MOLTKE was the first engine powered ship arriving in South Georgia.
On 28 October 1911, MOLTKE was renamed ACHERON. A new battlecruiser had been commissioned on 30 September 1911 to carry the distinguished name MOLTKE in the Imperial Navy. ACHERON was reclassified and converted to serve as hulk for U-boat crews at the Kiel naval base. The hulk ACHERON was broken up in 1920.

South Georgia 2015 £1.25 sg?, scott?

Source: Wikipedia and internet.

JOLLIET & MARQUETTE EXPEDITION 1673

1673, Marquette joined the expedition of Louis Jolliet, a French-Canadian explorer. They departed from St. Ignace on May 17, with two canoes and five voyageurs of French-Indian ancestry (Métis). They followed Lake Michigan to Green Bay and up the Fox River, nearly to its headwaters. From there, they were told to portage their canoes a distance of slightly less than two miles through marsh and oak plains to the Wisconsin River. Many years later, at that point the town of Portage, Wisconsin was built, named for the ancient path between the two rivers. From the portage, they ventured forth, and on June 17, they entered the Mississippi near present-day Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.
The Joliet-Marquette expedition traveled to within 435 miles (700 km) of the Gulf of Mexico but turned back at the mouth of the Arkansas River. By this point they had encountered several natives carrying European trinkets, and they feared an encounter with explorers or colonists from Spain. They followed the Mississippi back to the mouth of the Illinois River, which they learned from local natives provided a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. They reached Lake Michigan near the site of modern-day Chicago, by way of the Chicago Portage. In September Marquette stopped at the mission of St. Francis Xavier, located in present-day Green Bay, Wisconsin, while Jolliet returned to Quebec to relate the news of their discoveries.
Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. As welcomed guests of the Illinois Confederation, the explorers were feasted enroute and fed ceremonial foods such as sagamite.
In the spring of 1675, Marquette traveled westward and celebrated a public mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery which he had contracted during the Mississippi expedition sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died at age 37 near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.
Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. As welcomed guests of the Illinois Confederation, the explorers were feasted enroute and fed ceremonial foods such as sagamite.
In the spring of 1675, Marquette traveled westward and celebrated a public mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery which he had contracted during the Mississippi expedition sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died at age 37 near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.

Canada 1987 34c sg1232, scott1128.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Marquette

Adjame (River Mail and Passenger Steamer) 1912

Owned by Compagnie des Chargeurs Réunis, Grand Bassam (East of Abidjan); Her displacement about 250 tons, unloaded displacement 130 tons, dwt 120; her dimensions; 38.00m x 6.70m x 1,97m, 1.30m (draught); double exp. Two- cylinder engine, diameter of H.P. cylinder 0.406m, low pressure cylinder 0.838m, Evaporating machine: Cylindrical boiler with light-back, Diameter 3,073 m, Length 2,990 m, Grid surface 3.62 sq m, Heating surface 90.00 sq m, Boiler pressure 8.5 k, 359 hp, speed on trials 8.35 knot, volume of the coal bunkers 42 m3; cargo hold volume 205 cubic m; 20 passengers in cabins.

This small mail and passenger steamer was used by Compagnie des Chargeurs Réunis at Grand Bassam (East of Abidjan). The first time she is mentioned in any sources was in 1912.

She was most probably used in the trade on the Ébrié Lagoon which separated Côte d’Ivoire for most of its length, from the Atlantic Ocean by a narrow coastal strip. The 100-kilometre lagoon is linked to the sea by the Vridi Canal, while the Comoë River flows into it. The lagoon averages four km. in width, and five meters in depth. Abidjan and towns such as Grand Bassam, Bingerville, Jacqueville and Tiagba lie on the lagoon.


Ivory Coast 1985, S.G.?, Scott: 738.


Source: Beauge and Cognan-Histoire Maritime des Chargeurs.

Osman Gabriel (Lifeboat) 1973

She was a Rother class lifeboat and designed by R.A.Oakley. She was taken into the service of the Royal National Lifeboat Instution at Port Erin (Manx port) on 04 Aug 1973 and named for her donor, Major Osman Gabriel. She was built at a cost of £60,000.

Her dimensions are length: 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m), beam: 11 ft 6 in (3.51 m), draught: 3 ft 6 in (1.07 m). Propulsion is 2 x 52 hp Ford Thornycroft 250 diesel engines at 8 knots, with an operating radius of 180 miles. Her displacement is 13 tons and her wooden hull has an aluminum alloy superstructure, she is equipped with self-righting boats, and radar and carries a crew of seven.

Most emergency calls came from the coastguard and when this happens two maroons were released,each producing a double explosion.The crew then swiftly assemble at the lifeboat station. On average it took seven or eight seconds to actually launch the boat. The station door was raised by a winch driven by hydraulic power and then the boat travelled down a slipway which was notable for being the steepest in the institution. The boat hited the water at a speed of approximately 20 m.p.h.

The Rother-class lifeboat was a self-righting lifeboat operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution around the coast of the United Kingdom and Ireland between 1972 and 1995. They were based on the 37 ft Oakley-class lifeboat.

See Topic: “J G Graves of Sheffield Lifeboat” for Oakley Class Lifeboat.

The Rother-class was the final displacement hull lifeboat produced by the RNLI. As a result of the decision to have fast lifeboats at all all-weather stations they had a shorter than usual career and none of the 14 built reached 20 years service. The 1982 built RNLB James Cable (ON 1068) was the last displacement hull boat in RNLI service when withdrawn from Aldeburgh in December 1993.

The Rother-class was a development of the 37 ft Oakley boat, like its predecessor primarily intended for carriage launching, although 6 of the 14 went to slipway stations. A major change was the abandonment of the Oakley's complicated water ballast self-righting system. The Rother achieved its self-righting ability from its extended watertight superstructure and all had an enclosed wheelhouse with the radar mounted on the roof. Twin 52 hp Ford Thorneycroft 250 four cylinder diesels gave a maximum speed of 8 knots (9.2 mph) and at this speed the range was around 180 nautical miles. The boats built for Walmer and Aldeburgh had strengthed hulls for beach launching over skids.

She was sold in March 1993 and replaced by Lifeboat Herbert and Edith (Atlantic 21-class).

See Topic: “Herbert and Edith”

Isle of Man 1974, S.G.?, Scott: 39.

Isle of Man 1991, S.G.?, Scott: 464.

Source: Wikipedia and various web sites.
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

GENERAL SHERMAN

The full index of our ship stamp archive

GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby shipstamps » Fri Mar 27, 2009 3:55 pm


Click image to view full size
Built as an iron passenger-cargo vessel under yard 111 by the yard of Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for M. Langlands & Son, Glasgow and managed by the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet.
20 June 1861 launched under the name PRINCESS ROYAL.
Tonnage 494 gross, 828 ton burden, dim. 196.9 x 27.3 x 16ft.
Powered by a 2-cyl steam engine, two boilers, one screw, speed 11 knots.
Schooner rigged
1860 Delivered to owners.

Ostensibly she was built for the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet, but her appearance was more like a blockade-runner for the Confederacy than an Irish Channel steamer.
1862 Taken over by Fraser, Trendholm & Company, Charleston S.C. and she crossed the North Atlantic loaded with two badly needed marine engines and boilers for some ram-ships, under construction in Charleston. Other cargo on board was 600 barrels of gunpowder, 6 - 70-pound Whitworth cannons, 930 steel-headed Whitworth shells, 35 tons of projectile steel, a machine for molding and some provision, the total value of the cargo was £78.808.


Sailed from London and via Newfoundland, arrived mid January 1863 at Bermuda, she was heavily loaded with a draught of 11 feet, with this draught was she slow, and not very suitable to be used as a blockade runner.
Early in the morning of 29 January 1863 she approached the entrance of Charleston, where she was sighted by the schooner G.W. BLUNT that opened fire and warned the other vessels of squadron.
The steamer USS UNADILLA forced the PRINCESS ROYAL aground, but when boarding parties reached the vessel, most of the crew and passengers had left the ship. Only some British sailors stayed behind on board.

After Union warships towed her free, she was brought north, still with the British sailors on board who were hired by the federal commander, he was short of sailors.
The prize court at Philadelphia sold her and her cargo for $342.000.

18 March 1863 sold to the U.S. Navy Department for $112.000, and she was armed with 2 – 30 pound Parrot rifles, 1 - 11 inch Dahlgren gun and four 24-pound howitzers.
29 May 1863 commissioned under command of Melancthon B. Woolsey as USS PRINCESS ROYAL.
Crew 150.

Assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
28 June 1863 had a sharp engagement with some Confederate forces at Donaldsonville, LA, in which USS KINEO and WINONA also participated, driving the enemy forces off.
10 August 1863 she captured the British schooner FLYING SCUD loaded with cotton near Matamoros off the Rio Oranda, Tex.
The rest of 1863 and 1864 used in the blockading service, and she captured several small brigs and schooners.
07 December 1864 together with USS CHOCURA she captured the schooner ALABAMA, which was underway from Havana.
07 February 1865 off Galveston Tex. She and the USS BIENVILLE took several small schooners.

In the summer of 1865 she was ordered to head north and she arrived at 21 July at Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned.

17 August 1865 during a public auction sold to Samuel C.Cook for $54.175, and he renamed her in GENERAL SHERMAN.
Thereafter he sent the vessel to China, which at that time was in chaos because of the Taiping upraising.
The Chinese Government hired some foreign mercenaries of which some defected to the Taiping rebels.
A group of these defectors under command of the American Henry A. Burgevine boarded the GENERAL SHERMAN and on board of her he sailed to Formosa (Taiwan), but the Royal Navy captured her during the voyage. In the encounter Burgevine was killed.

Then her ownership became murky, most probably she was bought by the British firm Meadows & Co in Tientsin (Tianjin), and was she bought or chartered by a American merchant W.B. Preston, who sent the ship to Korea.
She was loaded with merchandise and on 09 August 1866 she sailed from Tientsin, under command of Capt. Page with a crew of 28 and the missionary/interpreter, Robert Thomas, the owner Preston was also on board, after a call at Chefoo (Yantai) for fresh water she sailed to Korea, arriving off the mouth of the Daedong River on 18 August.

05 September 1866 was she attacked near Pyongyang, and the complete crew was killed, the vessel was set on fire. For the attack and killing of the crew see http://www.kimsoft.com/2000Sherman.htm
The GENERAL SHERMAN did not sink she was grounded, but she was not lost, as some sources give; when the river levels rose she was refloated and moved to Seoul.
She was repaired and for some time was she the first engine powered warship of the Korean Navy. Under pressure of China she was handed back to her former American owner Samuel C. Cook in 1867.
Early 1868 bought by William F.Weld Co. Boston, Mass., who was building up his Merchants of Boston SS Co.
After a recondition and alternation she was put in the service from Boston to New Orleans service with accommodation for some passengers.
Her last voyage was, when she left on 04 January 1874 New York with on board a crew of 42 men and 4 passengers and general cargo consigned to New Orleans.
During the voyage the weather worsened and on 07 January at 02.00am. she sprung a leak, and the pumps could not manage the water level pouring in.

Her crew were rescued by the schooner SPRAY and FLORENCE and salvaged some cargo and the baggage of the passengers who disembarked at Wilmington N.C.
10 January the steam tug BRANDT steamed out from Wilmington and found the GENERAL SHERMAN still afloat, she managed to put a hawser on the ship and started towing.
Near Tub’s Inlet, twenty-seven miles from Cape Fear the GENERAL SHERMAN sank.

Korea North 2006 140ch sg?, scott?

Source: Clyde built ships. Lifeline of the Confederacy by Stephen R. Wise. http://www.kimsoft.com/2000/shermanr.htm Some other web-sites, a Google search give plenty on the ship.
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Re: GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby markhuggins » Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:28 pm

Had no idea of the history of this ship. I did several scuba dives on it in the late 1980's.
Picked up several lead shot, a rifle slug, several buttons and a belt buckle.
markhuggins
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:01 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: aukepalmhof, Baidu [Spider], D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen, Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 27 guests

Sponsored Links