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l'HERMIONE replica

Built as a wooden replica of the original ship, built by Asselin at Le Chantier de Arsenal at Rochefort France for Association Hermione-La Fayette, France.
1995 Ordered
06 July 2012 launched as the HERMIONE a replica of the 1779 built Concordia class frigate HERMIONE.
Displacement 1,166 tons, dim. 65 x 11.24 x 5.78m. (draught)
Sail auxiliary three masted full rigged, oak hulled wooden warship, sail area 2,200 m².
May 2013 she made her first sailing trial on the Charente River.
Armament: total of 32- (non-functional replica) guns, 26 -12 pdr, and 6 – 6 pdr. guns
Crew 80.
2015 Completed.
The HERMIONE is a Concorde class frigate, completed in Rochefort by the Asselin organisation in 2014. She is a reproduction of the 1779 HERMIONE, which achieved fame by ferrying General Lafayette to the United States in 1780 to allow him to re-join the American side in the American Revolutionary War.
This project was conceived by members of the Centre International de la Mer in 1992, and construction began in 1997, envisaging a launch in April 2015 (as compared to the original, which took less than a year to build).
The shipyard was in one of the two dry docks beside the Corderie Royale at Rochefort.
As far as possible, traditional construction methods were used although modern power tools were substituted for the period tools on some jobs. The site is open to the public, and admission fees help fund the project.
English plans of a sister ship, CONCORDE, were used. The cost was estimated to be $22 million. The original plans had been modified in several ways for reasons of strength and safety: planks had been bolted rather than pegged to avoid movement during the long period of construction. Similarly, the mast sections were fastened with glue rather than metal hoops to avoid water penetration. The cannons are lightweight and non-functional to save weight, and for safety reasons. Hemp rigging was used, and the sails made of linen.
An engine will be used for safety, and electric generators for lighting and basic amenities.
2015 voyage
In preparation for a transatlantic voyage in 2015, the frigate departed from Rochefort and started her sea-worthiness trials on 7 September 2014.
In April 2015, HERMIONE started her return voyage to the United States. HERMIONE’s itinerary is meant to reaffirm the relationship between the United States and France.

St Pierre et Miquelon 2015 1.38 Euro sgMS?, scott? ... ione_(2014)


A nice set of Portugal with local craft used for fishing, I am wondering by this craft where the crew is, the crafts are under full sail and have a nice bow-wave so she are underway without a crew.
Located on the south-western edge of Europe, Portugal was classified as a border country by geographer Orlando Ribeiro. Boats travelling from the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, which had been visiting the country since ancient times, strongly influenced Shipbuilding, leading Portuguese shipwrights to adopt two distinct techniques: Nordic clinker planking (overlapping planks and an end structure) and Mediterranean smooth planking (a front structure and juxtaposed planks).
The Douro River represents the cultural frontier that separated the two aforementioned styles, with Nordic-style boats prevailing in north-western rivers. To the south, and along the coast, Mediterranean-style boats dominated.
In addition to this cultural duality, barges and other boats boasting markedly Mediterranean features were commonly found in the Algarve, particularly in the coastal areas closest to neighbouring Andalusia, of which the most representative examples are the Calão and the Xávega. The latter has not been included in this stamp issue, as it is already featured in the “Portucale 77- Barcos da Costa Portuguesa” (Portucale 77 – Portuguese Coastal Boats) issue, launched in 1977. Both these boats bear traces from ancient Phoenician and Greek vessels, mostly evident in their bow decorations. Both boats feature a raised piece on the bow, horn- shaped in the Calão and in the shape of an elongated, stylised swan neck in the Xávega. Both boats feature barge-like hulls, without transoms. The Calão was propelled by oars or sails, whereas the Xávega was only propelled by oars. Although both were trawlers, the Calão also assisted larger ships engaged in deep sea fishing, namely tuna fishing, and transported fish to the shore.
The Canoa do Alto or Caçadeira, the Canoa da Picada and the Caíque were seagoing boats. The optimal performance afforded by their hulls inspired the building of recreational boats, widely used in regattas from the 19th century onwards, particularly by the Portuguese Royal House.
The Canoa da Picada carried salted sardines to the port of Lisbon; its leisure version, rigged differently, was known as coquette.
The Caíque, a fishing boat also used in port-to-port shipping, sailed on Moroccan waters and the Western Mediterranean. The “Bom Sucesso” (Good Fortune), a boat from Olhão, crossed the South Atlantic to take the news of the expulsion of Napoleon’s armies from Portugal to the Royal Family, exiled in Brazil.
The Galleon was introduced to the Algarve from Andalusia, to sail the high seas. This boat was soon replaced with a steam version and since then reconverted, to be used in the transport of salt. Its excellent performance on the high seas led a few sailing enthusiasts, namely from the Netherlands, to buy these boats and turn them into sports and pleasure craft.
The five boats depicted in this stamp issue portray Mediterranean traditions, not only regarding shipbuilding techniques but also in what concerns their origins.
Portugal Post web-site.

“galeão”: One of a team of boats working out of the Tagus Estuary, employing the large ring net. The rest of the team includes the motorized mother ship also called galeão, several buques and 1 – 2 small boats to serve the mother ship. The sailing galeão transport the net and aids in setting and hauling it.
Carvel-planked; sharp ends; curved stem with shredded wool on the stemhead to reduce chaffing of the sail; curved sternpost; keel.
Decked, 5 hatches. Outboard rudder with tiller. Mainly rowed; 7 rowing benches along each side; 2 men on each of the 6 oars forward of the mast, and 2 on the 8 oars abaft the mast. Oars held to tholepins by strops.
Quadrilateral lateen type sail with a short luff used when going to and from the fishing grounds. Forward raking mast secured by single shrouds.
Crew of 40 man and 4 boys.
Length 15.7m, beam 4m, depth 1.0m, 13.65 rt.

Portugal 2015 MS 1.80 Euro sg?, scott? (in margin of sheet on right side of stamp.)
Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“canoa do alto”: Engaged in offshore fishing in the area from the Tagus River to the south coast.
Straight stem, curved forefoot; shredded wool on stemhead reduces sail chafing; wide raked wine-glass transom. Drag to the straight keel; bilge keels; high sides, strong sheer; 2 wales. Some full decked; more often only a foredeck; enclosed bench aft. Outboard rudder with tiller. Set a lateen sail or quadrilateral lateen-type sail with a short luff. Forward raking mast stepped on keelson. Some also employed a sprit-rigged, aft raking mizzenmast sheeted to an outrigger (as seen on stamp)
Rowed in calms and when shooting the net. Crew 11-13 plus 1-2 boys.
Reported lengths 6.58 – 8.5m; e.g. length 7.7m, beam 3m, depth 1.0m.

Portugal 2015 0.45 Euro sg?, scott? MS 1.80 Euro sg?, scott? (in margin of sheet.)
Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“canoa da picada”; Developed by Portugal in the late 19th century as a fast seaworthy vessel to carry the catch from fishing boats to the Lisbon market. Also fished and in modified form has been a pleasure craft; reported also as a cargo carrier from south coast ports. Typical features include a long rounded counter stern above a sharply raked sternpost, maximum beam abaft amidships, and a gaff mizzen stepped on the counter and sheeted to an outrigger. Plump stem, deep drag to the keel, round bottom with slack bilges. Shredded wool on the stemhead prevents chafing of the sail.
Decked. 3 hatchways. Inboard rudder; tiller. May tow a small tender called an “aiola’. Sets a large quadrilateral lateen type sail with a short luff as a mainsail to a forward-raking or vertical mast; yard, carried generally to starboard, extends beyond the bow; tack to steamhead. Might also set a foresail and a mizzen staysail. Rowed in calms, oars stropped to tholepins.
Crew of 15 – 18 when serving as a market boat.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 18m. e.g. length 18m, beam 5.5m, depth 1.5m.

Portugal 2015 0.80 Euro. Sg?, scott?
Source Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“calão”; A fishing boat used on the coast of the Algarve and also used to transport the fish too markets. Length between 7.5 – 12m.
Not much sheer, with a round bow which was open, oval stern and an outside rudder with tiller.
At least three rowing benches for the 6 rowers, three on each side.
One mast which carried a triangle sail.
Characterized by a painted eye (oculi) on the bow.
Crew 10 – 12 men.

Portugal 2015 0.72 Euro, sg?, scott?
Source: Internet.


The left top stamp shows Étienne Brûlé with a canoe.
The explorers of New France introduced Europeans to the Canadians Indians, outlined the geography of Central Canada and found the way west. Born in France about 1592, Étienne Brûlé (c1592 – 1633) arrived at Quebec in 1608. In 1610 Samuel de Champlain sent him to live with the Huron and to learn their language. The adventurous Brûlé was more than an interpreter, though. He became the first European to shoot the Lachine rapids and to set eyes on Lakes Huron, Ontario, Superior and Erie. Artist Frederick Hagan of Newmarket, Ontario, created the images for these stamps. The paintings project the power of strong colour to evoke the moods of changing seasons and landscape. Forest, lake, river and hilltops combine with elements of cartography and the heraldry of flags to suggest the activities and experiences of the early explorers of Central Canada. J.F. Britton of Oakville, Ontario, prepared the typography for the stamp designs. Most probably the canoe used as seen on the stamp was a “north canoe” also named “canot de maitre”.

The top right stamps shows Radisson and Des Groseilliers with in the middle of the stamp a voyage canoe.

In the 1640's, Radisson and Des Groseilliers arrived in New France. Both were seasoned coureurs de bois when in August 1659 they set out together for the "pays d'en haut" (hinterland). Geographic information gained from their conversations with the Lake Superior Indians led to the creation of the Hudson's Bay Company. Artist Frederick Hagan of Newmarket, Ontario, created the images for these stamps.

The lower stamp left shows also a voyage canoe.

In 1672 the Governor of New France commissioned Joliet, fur trader, organist and former candidate for the priesthood, to lead an expedition to the Mississippi River. He and Father Marquette, a Jesuit fluent in six Indian languages, discovered the Mississippi in 1673 and determined that it flowed south, not west.

The lower right stamp depict not a watercraft.

The explorers of New France introduced Europeans to the Canadians Indians, outlined the geography of Central Canada and found the way west. Champlain wanted to convert the Indians to Christianity, so in 1615 he brought Recollet missionaries to New France. Jesuits and Sulpicians, followed later. These were the best educated and most idealistic explorers yet to reach Canada. Their detailed reports were a goldmine of information for both contemporaries and historians.

Canada 1987 34c sg1232/35, scott?

Canadian Post press release 1987.


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby shipstamps » Fri Mar 27, 2009 3:55 pm

Click image to view full size
Built as an iron passenger-cargo vessel under yard 111 by the yard of Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for M. Langlands & Son, Glasgow and managed by the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet.
20 June 1861 launched under the name PRINCESS ROYAL.
Tonnage 494 gross, 828 ton burden, dim. 196.9 x 27.3 x 16ft.
Powered by a 2-cyl steam engine, two boilers, one screw, speed 11 knots.
Schooner rigged
1860 Delivered to owners.

Ostensibly she was built for the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet, but her appearance was more like a blockade-runner for the Confederacy than an Irish Channel steamer.
1862 Taken over by Fraser, Trendholm & Company, Charleston S.C. and she crossed the North Atlantic loaded with two badly needed marine engines and boilers for some ram-ships, under construction in Charleston. Other cargo on board was 600 barrels of gunpowder, 6 - 70-pound Whitworth cannons, 930 steel-headed Whitworth shells, 35 tons of projectile steel, a machine for molding and some provision, the total value of the cargo was £78.808.

Sailed from London and via Newfoundland, arrived mid January 1863 at Bermuda, she was heavily loaded with a draught of 11 feet, with this draught was she slow, and not very suitable to be used as a blockade runner.
Early in the morning of 29 January 1863 she approached the entrance of Charleston, where she was sighted by the schooner G.W. BLUNT that opened fire and warned the other vessels of squadron.
The steamer USS UNADILLA forced the PRINCESS ROYAL aground, but when boarding parties reached the vessel, most of the crew and passengers had left the ship. Only some British sailors stayed behind on board.

After Union warships towed her free, she was brought north, still with the British sailors on board who were hired by the federal commander, he was short of sailors.
The prize court at Philadelphia sold her and her cargo for $342.000.

18 March 1863 sold to the U.S. Navy Department for $112.000, and she was armed with 2 – 30 pound Parrot rifles, 1 - 11 inch Dahlgren gun and four 24-pound howitzers.
29 May 1863 commissioned under command of Melancthon B. Woolsey as USS PRINCESS ROYAL.
Crew 150.

Assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
28 June 1863 had a sharp engagement with some Confederate forces at Donaldsonville, LA, in which USS KINEO and WINONA also participated, driving the enemy forces off.
10 August 1863 she captured the British schooner FLYING SCUD loaded with cotton near Matamoros off the Rio Oranda, Tex.
The rest of 1863 and 1864 used in the blockading service, and she captured several small brigs and schooners.
07 December 1864 together with USS CHOCURA she captured the schooner ALABAMA, which was underway from Havana.
07 February 1865 off Galveston Tex. She and the USS BIENVILLE took several small schooners.

In the summer of 1865 she was ordered to head north and she arrived at 21 July at Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned.

17 August 1865 during a public auction sold to Samuel C.Cook for $54.175, and he renamed her in GENERAL SHERMAN.
Thereafter he sent the vessel to China, which at that time was in chaos because of the Taiping upraising.
The Chinese Government hired some foreign mercenaries of which some defected to the Taiping rebels.
A group of these defectors under command of the American Henry A. Burgevine boarded the GENERAL SHERMAN and on board of her he sailed to Formosa (Taiwan), but the Royal Navy captured her during the voyage. In the encounter Burgevine was killed.

Then her ownership became murky, most probably she was bought by the British firm Meadows & Co in Tientsin (Tianjin), and was she bought or chartered by a American merchant W.B. Preston, who sent the ship to Korea.
She was loaded with merchandise and on 09 August 1866 she sailed from Tientsin, under command of Capt. Page with a crew of 28 and the missionary/interpreter, Robert Thomas, the owner Preston was also on board, after a call at Chefoo (Yantai) for fresh water she sailed to Korea, arriving off the mouth of the Daedong River on 18 August.

05 September 1866 was she attacked near Pyongyang, and the complete crew was killed, the vessel was set on fire. For the attack and killing of the crew see
The GENERAL SHERMAN did not sink she was grounded, but she was not lost, as some sources give; when the river levels rose she was refloated and moved to Seoul.
She was repaired and for some time was she the first engine powered warship of the Korean Navy. Under pressure of China she was handed back to her former American owner Samuel C. Cook in 1867.
Early 1868 bought by William F.Weld Co. Boston, Mass., who was building up his Merchants of Boston SS Co.
After a recondition and alternation she was put in the service from Boston to New Orleans service with accommodation for some passengers.
Her last voyage was, when she left on 04 January 1874 New York with on board a crew of 42 men and 4 passengers and general cargo consigned to New Orleans.
During the voyage the weather worsened and on 07 January at 02.00am. she sprung a leak, and the pumps could not manage the water level pouring in.

Her crew were rescued by the schooner SPRAY and FLORENCE and salvaged some cargo and the baggage of the passengers who disembarked at Wilmington N.C.
10 January the steam tug BRANDT steamed out from Wilmington and found the GENERAL SHERMAN still afloat, she managed to put a hawser on the ship and started towing.
Near Tub’s Inlet, twenty-seven miles from Cape Fear the GENERAL SHERMAN sank.

Korea North 2006 140ch sg?, scott?

Source: Clyde built ships. Lifeline of the Confederacy by Stephen R. Wise. Some other web-sites, a Google search give plenty on the ship.
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Postby markhuggins » Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:28 pm

Had no idea of the history of this ship. I did several scuba dives on it in the late 1980's.
Picked up several lead shot, a rifle slug, several buttons and a belt buckle.
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Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:01 pm

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