SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

SUPERSPORT YACHT CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

THE AIRFOIL CONCEPT

Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?

Not any information.

SARIMANOK outrigger

In 1985 Bob Hobman built a. outrigger canoe the SARIMANOK made of a ghio tree and sails made entirely of vegetable elements, not a single nail was used. The outrigger was built mostly after plans of a Filipino “vinta” model.
Not any navigational instruments were on board, and the crew relied only on the stars to set course.
The name given to the outrigger was SARIMANOK she was named after a Sarimanok bird in Filipino Mindanao mythology, a reincarnation of a goddess who fell in love with a mortal man. Today it symbolized in the Filipino wealth and prestige.
From two books of which the quotations I got from Mr. Jung (with thanks) comes the following.

Madagascar - The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World by Peter Tyson pages 257-258.
I quote:
To find out, a Briton named Bob Hobman decided to build a replica of the king of boat the first Malagasy might have used and, in the manner of the Norwegian Thor Heyerdahl, try to sail it from Java to Madagascar, making no landfalls, using no modern navigation aids, and subsisting solely on foods the ancient Malagasy might have eaten. The 60-foot double outrigger canoe was built entirely of wood and bamboo, with palm-weave sails and rattan bindings instead of nails; it had no motor, radio or sextant. On June 3, 1985, the SARIMANOK, as the vessel was christened, set sail from Java. “They had an unending, horrible voyage,” Dewar told me. “There were problems with the boat. More or less continuous high seas, strong winds, and frequent storms. All the time they’re filming this damn thing, filming the boat falling to pieces and so forth.” After one stop on Cocos (Keeling) Island to let off a sick crew member (and bring on some tinned food), Hobman’s crew, against all odds, managed to go the distance to Madagascar in 49 days. But by then they had lost their ability to steer the craft, and they drifted past the northern tip of the island and into the Mozambique Channel. “On the boat they had this sealed, watertight container with a button,” Dewar told me. “If they pushed the button, it would turn on a radio beacon that would identify where they were and would send out a distress signal.” “Just like the original Malagasy might have had,” I said. “Exactly. Well, they finally gave up und pushed the button.” A French coast guard ship came out from the Comoros and towed them back to the island of Mayotte, where they promptly saddled with a hefty bill for the rescue. The crew then hired a local boat to tow the ailing craft to Madagascar, where, on September 5, the SARIMANOK finally came to rest on Nosy Be, on the beach by the Holiday Inn, “About a year later, a group of these people came back to try to raise money in Madagascar- which strikes one as a somewhat humorous effort- to refurbish the SARIMANOK and memorialize it,” Dewar said. “On of them gave a lecture in Diego Suarez while I was in town. He delivered it in English, with simultaneous translation, to a crowd of about 60, at least half of whom were under the age of 12. I think they left disappointed in terms of finding anyone to take care of the SARIMANOK.” But Jean-Aimé Rakotoarisoa, a leading Malagasy archeologist and a close friend of Dewar’s, had a different take on what the SARIMANOK voyagers had accomplished, Dewar told me. “They had done marvelous work, Jean-Aimé felt, solving problems that we archeologists had not been able to solve before. We now know that the first place settled in Madagascar was the Holiday Inn in Nosy Be, and we know that Americans must have settled the island first, because there we have proof: the built the Holiday Inn.”
Unquote.

Classic Ships of Islam: From Mesopotamia to the Indian Ocean von Dionysius Agius, page 103
I quote:
People of southeastern origin settled in Madagascar and the Comoro Islands in the second half of the first millennium CE; the language of Madagascar today is Malagasy of an Austronesian family with strong ties to Ma’anyan and the Borito languages of Borneo. How they reached Madagascar is interesting and something which has intrigued a number of scholars. One voyage, undertaken by Bob Hobman and his crew on 6 August 1985, proved that Neolithic navigators could have crossed over from Indonesia to Madagascar on an outrigger canoe, the SARIMANOK, a hollowed-out trunk of a huge ghio tree with sails woven from plant fibres. The voyage lasted 63 days.
Unquote.

The SARIMANOK is now in the Oceanographic Museum of Nosy Be, Malagasy.

Malagasy Republic 1987 60f, 150f sg 617/18
Cocos (Keeling) Islands 1987 36c sg160, scott?

BOM vessels

Gambia issued a set of stamps in 1991 for the 100th anniversary of the death of Vincent van Gogh 1853-1890.
One of this stamps shows use the “beach at Scheveningen during a calm day” painted in 1882 by van Gogh.
The three vessels on the painting on the beach are bom vessels for more info see. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11475&p=12256&hilit=panorama#p12256

Gambia 1991 1d.25 sg 1246, scott 1147.

PENDOLARE CONCEPT BOAT

Of the “pendolare concept boat” I can only find that it is a Granata Design from Palmetto Bluff, USA and a photo of the design, but not any detail on the design so most probably the design was not a seller and it stayed on the design board.

Gambia 2000 8d sg?, scott?

FERRY SEA COASTER CONCEPT

When you look carefully to this stamp you can see that the name ROCKET II is painted mid-ships on the hull, the stamp gives that a “ferry sea coaster concept” is shown. The stamp shows I believe a ship drawing of the design, but actually the ship is the ISLAND ROCKET II.

She was built in 1997 for the Island Express Boat Lines, Sandosky, OH by the Air Ride Craft Inc. Miami.
Delivered as the ISLAND ROCKET II.
Tonnage 32 grt, 25 nrt, dim. 64.70 x 19.20 x 6.5ft.
Powered by?

On the "home-grown" design front, the new Surface Effect Ship (SES) catamaran ferry ISLAND ROCKET II will begin service this summer on Lake Erie for owner Island Express Boat Lines, Ltd., Sandusky, Ohio.
"We were looking for something with a little more speed and a little more passenger comfort," Island Express general manager Brad Castle told Marine Log, "and this certainly fit the bill."
At full load, Castle says the 149-passenger ISLAND ROCKET II should reach cruising speeds in the "mid-40 knot range" and still be comfortable for passengers. It will combine with Island Express Boat Lines' other ferry, the ISLAND ROCKET I, to offer regular service from Sandusky to Kelleys Island to Put-in-Bay.
Based on the Seacoaster design from inventor Don Burg, president of Air Ride Craft, Inc., Miami, the 72 ft ISLAND ROCKET II integrates the best features of an SES and a catamaran. Like other SESs, the Seacoaster rides on a pressurized air cushion created under the vessel, which carries some 75 to 90% of its weight, greatly reducing the wetted area hull friction. This means that an SES normally needs much less propulsive power--about half--of that required for similar size monohulls or catamarans at speeds of 25 knots and up. For operators, this translates into fuel and power savings, a smooth ride in rough seas, and better wake characteristics at high speeds.
While SES craft are nothing new, the Seacoaster design has attracted some interest among other operators. One of those is Dan Yates, owner of the PORTLAND SPIRIT, as well as two other dinner boats in Portland, Ore. Yates has been exploring the possibility of creating a network of water taxis and fast ferries that would connect downtown Portland with Vancouver, Wash., via the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. The concept would involve possibly five ferries in the 100 passenger range.
"The designs are out there," says Yates, "but I don't want to be an innovator in technology. Rather, I want to use technology in an innovative way." But because of political and operational hurdles, he believes the effort could take two more years to come to fruition. "There's a strong light rail contingent," says Yates, "and there's also a lot of debris in the river. My dinner boats get their props banged every so often by 125 ft trees floating down the river," says Yates. ML

http://m.marinelog.com/DOCS/hisp.html

2005 The last I can find on the net that she was in a service in Florida and for sale. At that time still owned by the same owner, under USA Flag and registry IMO Number D1058181.

https://cgmix.uscg.mil/PSIX/PSIXSearch.aspx
Gambia 2000 D8 sg?, scott?
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GENERAL SHERMAN

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GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby shipstamps » Fri Mar 27, 2009 3:55 pm


Click image to view full size
Built as an iron passenger-cargo vessel under yard 111 by the yard of Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for M. Langlands & Son, Glasgow and managed by the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet.
20 June 1861 launched under the name PRINCESS ROYAL.
Tonnage 494 gross, 828 ton burden, dim. 196.9 x 27.3 x 16ft.
Powered by a 2-cyl steam engine, two boilers, one screw, speed 11 knots.
Schooner rigged
1860 Delivered to owners.

Ostensibly she was built for the Glasgow & Liverpool Steam Packet, but her appearance was more like a blockade-runner for the Confederacy than an Irish Channel steamer.
1862 Taken over by Fraser, Trendholm & Company, Charleston S.C. and she crossed the North Atlantic loaded with two badly needed marine engines and boilers for some ram-ships, under construction in Charleston. Other cargo on board was 600 barrels of gunpowder, 6 - 70-pound Whitworth cannons, 930 steel-headed Whitworth shells, 35 tons of projectile steel, a machine for molding and some provision, the total value of the cargo was £78.808.


Sailed from London and via Newfoundland, arrived mid January 1863 at Bermuda, she was heavily loaded with a draught of 11 feet, with this draught was she slow, and not very suitable to be used as a blockade runner.
Early in the morning of 29 January 1863 she approached the entrance of Charleston, where she was sighted by the schooner G.W. BLUNT that opened fire and warned the other vessels of squadron.
The steamer USS UNADILLA forced the PRINCESS ROYAL aground, but when boarding parties reached the vessel, most of the crew and passengers had left the ship. Only some British sailors stayed behind on board.

After Union warships towed her free, she was brought north, still with the British sailors on board who were hired by the federal commander, he was short of sailors.
The prize court at Philadelphia sold her and her cargo for $342.000.

18 March 1863 sold to the U.S. Navy Department for $112.000, and she was armed with 2 – 30 pound Parrot rifles, 1 - 11 inch Dahlgren gun and four 24-pound howitzers.
29 May 1863 commissioned under command of Melancthon B. Woolsey as USS PRINCESS ROYAL.
Crew 150.

Assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
28 June 1863 had a sharp engagement with some Confederate forces at Donaldsonville, LA, in which USS KINEO and WINONA also participated, driving the enemy forces off.
10 August 1863 she captured the British schooner FLYING SCUD loaded with cotton near Matamoros off the Rio Oranda, Tex.
The rest of 1863 and 1864 used in the blockading service, and she captured several small brigs and schooners.
07 December 1864 together with USS CHOCURA she captured the schooner ALABAMA, which was underway from Havana.
07 February 1865 off Galveston Tex. She and the USS BIENVILLE took several small schooners.

In the summer of 1865 she was ordered to head north and she arrived at 21 July at Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned.

17 August 1865 during a public auction sold to Samuel C.Cook for $54.175, and he renamed her in GENERAL SHERMAN.
Thereafter he sent the vessel to China, which at that time was in chaos because of the Taiping upraising.
The Chinese Government hired some foreign mercenaries of which some defected to the Taiping rebels.
A group of these defectors under command of the American Henry A. Burgevine boarded the GENERAL SHERMAN and on board of her he sailed to Formosa (Taiwan), but the Royal Navy captured her during the voyage. In the encounter Burgevine was killed.

Then her ownership became murky, most probably she was bought by the British firm Meadows & Co in Tientsin (Tianjin), and was she bought or chartered by a American merchant W.B. Preston, who sent the ship to Korea.
She was loaded with merchandise and on 09 August 1866 she sailed from Tientsin, under command of Capt. Page with a crew of 28 and the missionary/interpreter, Robert Thomas, the owner Preston was also on board, after a call at Chefoo (Yantai) for fresh water she sailed to Korea, arriving off the mouth of the Daedong River on 18 August.

05 September 1866 was she attacked near Pyongyang, and the complete crew was killed, the vessel was set on fire. For the attack and killing of the crew see http://www.kimsoft.com/2000Sherman.htm
The GENERAL SHERMAN did not sink she was grounded, but she was not lost, as some sources give; when the river levels rose she was refloated and moved to Seoul.
She was repaired and for some time was she the first engine powered warship of the Korean Navy. Under pressure of China she was handed back to her former American owner Samuel C. Cook in 1867.
Early 1868 bought by William F.Weld Co. Boston, Mass., who was building up his Merchants of Boston SS Co.
After a recondition and alternation she was put in the service from Boston to New Orleans service with accommodation for some passengers.
Her last voyage was, when she left on 04 January 1874 New York with on board a crew of 42 men and 4 passengers and general cargo consigned to New Orleans.
During the voyage the weather worsened and on 07 January at 02.00am. she sprung a leak, and the pumps could not manage the water level pouring in.

Her crew were rescued by the schooner SPRAY and FLORENCE and salvaged some cargo and the baggage of the passengers who disembarked at Wilmington N.C.
10 January the steam tug BRANDT steamed out from Wilmington and found the GENERAL SHERMAN still afloat, she managed to put a hawser on the ship and started towing.
Near Tub’s Inlet, twenty-seven miles from Cape Fear the GENERAL SHERMAN sank.

Korea North 2006 140ch sg?, scott?

Source: Clyde built ships. Lifeline of the Confederacy by Stephen R. Wise. http://www.kimsoft.com/2000/shermanr.htm Some other web-sites, a Google search give plenty on the ship.
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Re: GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby markhuggins » Sun Jan 23, 2011 10:28 pm

Had no idea of the history of this ship. I did several scuba dives on it in the late 1980's.
Picked up several lead shot, a rifle slug, several buttons and a belt buckle.
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Re: GENERAL SHERMAN

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Mar 30, 2017 10:28 pm

2016 General Sherman.jpg
Click image to view full size
North Korea 2016 sgMS?, scott?
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