SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

AZALEA HMS 2015

Built as a sloop under yard No 531 by Barclay, Curle & Co, Whiteinch, Glasgow for the Royal Navy.
? Laid down.
10 September 1915 launched as the HMS AZALEA (T32) one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 ihp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77.
October 1915 completed.

Of her wartime career I can’t find anything, only that in July 1917 her bow was almost blown off by a mine, and she was repaired in Malta
? Decommissoned.
01 February 1923 she was sold to J. Hornby & Sons for scrap and she was broken up the same year.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ANEMONE HMS 1915

Built as a sloop under yard No 988 by Swan, Hunter & W. Richardson, Low Walker for the Royal Navy.
January 1915 ordered.
25 January 1915 laid down.
13 May 1915 (other source 30 June 1915) launched as HMS ANEMONE (M-27), she was one of the Acacia class.
Displacement 1,134 ton light, 1,269 ton full load, , dim. 76.2 x 10.1 x 3.7m. (draught), length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered by one 4-cyl. triple expansion steam engine, maximum 1,800 hp, one shaft, speed 16.5 knots.
Range by a speed of 15 knots, 2,000 mile.
Bunker capacity 250 ton coal maximum.
Armament 2 – 12 pdr, 2 – 3 pdr AA guns.
Crew 77
07 July 1915 commissioned.

The class was first built as minesweepers, with reinforced bows to improve survivability if struck by a mine.
She were refitted in 1917 to carry depth charges and re-deployed as convoy escorts.
From 15 February 1916 she joined the Smyrna patrol to blockade the Turkish coast from Cape Kaba to Latitude 38 30E included Smyrna (now called Izmir).
Her base was at Port Iere on the Greek island of Mytelene, very near to the Turkish coast.
17/18 February 1916 took part in the operations at Khios.
? Decommissioned.
06 September 1922 sold to Marple & Gillott and she was broken up at Saltash, U.K.

Guyana 2015 $80 sg?, scott?
Source: Various internet sites.

ALBION HMS 1901

Built as a battleship by Thames Ironwork & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Blackwall, London for the Royal Navy.
03 December 1896 keel laid down.
21 June 1898 launched as the HMS ALBION, one of the Canopus class.
Displacement 12,950 ton light, 14,320 ton full load. Dim. 132 x 23 x 7.9m (draught)
Length bpp. 18.8m.
Powered by two vertical triple expansion steam engine, 15,400 ihp., twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament:2 – 12 inch, 12 – 6 inch QF, 10 – 12 pdr QF, 6 – 3 pdr, guns and 4 – 18 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 750.
25 June 1901 commissioned.

HMS ALBION was a British Canopus-class predreadnought battleship. Commissioned into the Royal Navy in 1901, she served on the China Station until 1905. She was then employed as part of the Channel Fleet until 1907, at which time she began service with the Atlantic Fleet. Following the outbreak of World War I, she saw action in operations against German Southwest Africa in 1914 and also served in the Dardanelles campaign against the Turks, supporting the landings at Gallipoli. She remained in the Mediterranean until 1916, and then returned to the United Kingdom for service as a guard ship for the remainder of the war. She was scrapped in 1920.
Technical Description
HMS ALBION was laid down by Thames Iron Works at Leamouth, London on 3 December 1896. Tragedy struck when she was launched on 21 June 1898; after the Duchess of York christened her, a wave created by ALBION's entry into the water caused a stage from which 200 people were watching to collapse into a side creek, and 34 people, mostly women and children, drowned. This was probably one of the first ever ship launchings to be filmed. ALBION's completion then was delayed by late delivery of her machinery. She finally began trials late in 1900, during which she was further delayed by machinery and gun defects, and she was not finally completed until June 1901.
ALBION was designed for service in the Far East, and to be able to transit the Suez Canal. She was designed to be smaller (by about 2,000 tons), lighter, and faster than her predecessors, the Majestic-class battleships, although she was slightly longer at 430 feet (131 meters). In order to save weight, she carried less armour than the Majestics, although the change from Harvey armour in the Majestics to Krupp armour in ALBION meant that the loss in protection was not as great as it might have been, Krupp armour having greater protective value at a given weight than its Harvey equivalent. Still, her armour was light enough to make her almost a second-class battleship.
Part of her armour scheme included the use of a special 1-inch (2.54 mm) armoured deck over the belt to defend against plunging fire by howitzers that France reportedly planned to install on its ships, although this report proved to be false.[
ALBION had four 12-inch (305-mm) 35-calibre guns mounted in twin turrets fore and aft, mounted in circular barbettes that allowed all-around loading, although at a fixed elevation. She also mounted twelve 6-inch (152-mm) 40-calibre guns (sponson mounting allowing some of them to fire fore and aft) in addition to smaller guns, and four 18-inch (457-mm) submerged torpedo tubes.
The Canopus-class ships were the first British battleships with water-tube boilers, which generated more power at less expense in weight compared with the cylindrical boilers used in previous ships. The new boilers led to the adoption of fore-and-aft funnels, rather than the side-by-side funnel arrangement used in may previous British battleships. The Canopus-class ships proved to be good steamers, consuming 10 tons of coal per hour at full speed, with a high speed for battleships of their time, a full two knots faster than the Majestics.[
Pre-World War I
HMS ALBION was commissioned on 25 June 1901 at Chatham Dockyard, by Captain W. W. Hewett and a complement of 779 officers and men, to relieve battleship BARFLEUR on the China Station. She arrived at Hong Kong on 11 September 1901, and relieved BARFLEUR as second flagship of the China Station, based in that city. Captain Martyn Jerram was appointed in command in March 1902. During her time on the station, she underwent refits at Hong Kong in 1902 and 1905.
In 1905, the United Kingdom and Japan ratified a treaty of alliance, reducing the requirement for a large British presence on the China Station, and the Royal Navy recalled all its battleships from the station. At Singapore, ALBION rendezvoused with her sister ships OCEAN and VENGEANCE and battleship CENTURION , and on 20 June 1905 the four battleships departed to steam in company to Plymouth, where they arrived on 2 August 1905.
ALBION then became part of the Channel Fleet. She soon suffered a mishap, colliding with battleship DUNCAN at Lerwick on 26 September 1905, but suffered no damage. ALBION transferred to the commissioned Reserve on 3 April 1906, and underwent an engine and boiler refit at Chatham. On 25 February 1907, ALBION paid off at Portsmouth.
On 26 February 1907, ALBION recommissioned at Portsmouth for temporary service with the Portsmouth Division of the Home Fleet. She returned to full commission on 26 March 1907 to begin service in the Atlantic Fleet. During this service, she underwent a refit at Gibraltar in 1908 and at Malta in 1909. She was with the fleet that visited London from 17 July to 24 July 1909 to be entertained by the citizens of the city, and on 31 July 1909 was present at the fleet review of the Home and Atlantic Fleets at Cowes by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.
ALBION ended her Atlantic Fleet service by paying off on 25 August 1909. She then began service at the Nore as parent ship of the 4th Division, Home Fleet. She became a unit of the 3rd Fleet at the Nore in May 1912 and underwent a refit at Chatham that year. She was stationed at Pembroke Dock in 1913.
World War I
When World War I broke out in August 1914, ALBION was assigned to the 8th Battle Squadron, Channel Fleet. On 15 August 1914, she became second flagship of the new 7th Battle Squadron. On 21 August 1914, she was sent to the Saint Vincent-Finisterre Station to provide battleship support to cruiser squadrons operating in the Atlantic in case German Navy heavy ships broke out into the open Atlantic. On 3 September 1914, she transferred her flag, becoming a private ship, and moved to the Cape Verde-Canary Islands station to relieve her sister ship CANOPUS there.
ALBION was transferred to the Cape of Good Hope Station in South Africa in October 1914, where she took up duty as a guard ship at Walvis Bay through November 1914. In December 1914 and January 1915, she participated in Allied operations against German Southwest Africa.
Dardanelles campaign
ALBION transferred to the Mediterranean in January 1915 to participate in the Dardanelles campaign. She took part in the bombardment of the Ottoman Turkish forts guarding the outer entrance to the Dardanelles on 18 February 1915 and 19 February 1915. ALBION, MAJESTIC and TRIUMP became the first Allied battleships to enter the Turkish Straits during the Dardanelles campaign on 26 February 1915 when they made the initial attack on the inner forts. ALBION then supported the first Allied landings in late February 1915 and early March 1915.
In action against Ottoman forts on 1 March 1915, ALBION took repeated hits but sustained no serious damage. She participated in the main attack on the forts on 18 March 1915, and supported the main landings at V Beach at Cape Helles on 25 April 1915. On 28 April 1915 she suffered significant damage from Ottoman shore batteries during an attack on Krithia, forcing her to retire to Mudros for repairs. Back in action on 2 May 1915, she again suffered damage necessitating repairs at Mudros.
On the night of 22–23 May 1915, ALBION beached on a sandbank off Gaba Tepe and came under heavy fire from Ottoman...

Canoe of Bilibili.New Guinea.

The best canoe seen by explorers were at Bilibili of Madang Province which is the center of a flourishing pottery industry, the canoes being largely employed in this trade: The canoes are from 20 to 30 feet long; each end of the hull is produced into a long point flattened above, to which Ovulum shells are fastened. Many canoes have two washstrakes on each side which are frequently painted with representations of fishes, turtles, and birds. Canoe have the breakwater as having fastened to it in front a carved forwardly protecting spur to which tassels are attached. The two booms are curved and each is connected to the rather weak float (about 14 feet long) by two pairs of undercrossed sticks. Amidships on the booms is a platform on which is erected a kind of cabin resembling a large cage in which merchandise (pottery), provisions, and weapons, are stored; a potsherd with glowing charcoal in a layer of sand is carried on the platform. The roof forms a second platform and has lateral railings. There is a two mast. Each mast carries a small quadrangular mat sail, they diverge fore and aft from two-storied platform. The end of the mast is often adorned with a roughly carved wooden bird or a ruddled Nautilus shell. The Bilibili natives are not great sailors. They may go as far as Karkar ( Dampier lsland) a distance of 40 miles, and never go out of sight of land, nor do they put to sea in rough weather but on the whole the sea here is calm. The Bilibili canoes of a smaller build are exactly like those at Bongu. Тhe anchor as a piece of tree trunk, the partially cut-off branches of which form hooks; it is weighted with one large or several small stones which are bound on with rattan, and a strong rattan serves at a cable, this use how a sinker for a fishtrap. There are three sizes of paddles for men, women, and children, besides the steering paddle which are large and rough. The grips of the paddles have the grip carved and often pierced, or as in some steering paddles, with a human head but there is no crutch.
Papua New Guinea 2009;K3.70;SG?
Sources:A. Haddon, John. Hornell: Canoes of Oceania.1937.Volume II. http://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania/Oceania.html

Vaga of Suau Island

The canoe[Vaga] of this part of New Guinea [east of South Cape] is usually about twenty-five feet in length, and carries seven or eight people. It is made of the trunk of a tree, hollowed out like a long trough, roundly pointed at each end, a foot and a half in extreme width, with the sides bulging out below and falling in at top, leaving only eight inches between the gunwales which are strengthened by a pole running along from end to end. The end which are alike are carved in imitation of the head of a turtle or snake, but more elaborately. The outrigger consist of a float as long as the canoe, from wich it is 4 feet distant. Each of the numerous booms is attached to the float by means of two pairs of undercrossed sticks. In the Waga there are from five to nine booms, three or seven of which support the platform, the two end ones being quite free. There is no washstrake, but there appears to be a pole on each gunwale on which the booms rest. The inner ends of booms rest in notches in both gunwales, and are secured there. The booms support a not great platform made of strong rattan laths . The canoes seen by explorers were provided with only a small temporary sail made by interlacing the leaflets of a coconut palm leaf and stuck up on pole when going with the wind free. The Vaga is commonly used, in moderate weather, for short passages and for going out a few miles at sea to fish. In fine weather with light wind they are often used for expeditions of from 10 to 20 miles along the coast. They hug the shore all the way so that if bad weather sets in the voyagers can haul the vaga up on the beach of some quiet bay. The explorer Abel remarks: "If a dead fair wind favours the voyagers, it is only the matter of a few minutes to paddle the craft in shore cut an impromptu mast from the thick bush along the coast, scale the cocoa nut palm tree and haсk off two long leaves, plait these together for a sail, re embark and up stick and away down the coast at the rate of three knots an hour." The Vaga is propelled by means of paddles and is made out of a solid log. The paddles are like those of the Louisiades Archipelage with spear-shaped blades and slender handles, but are larger measuring six feet in length and of neater construction, the end of the handle being carved into some fanciful device." The bailer is scoop-shaped, made of wood, with an inwardly projecting handle.
Papua New Guinea 2009;K3.70;SG?
Sources:A. Haddon, John. Hornell: Canoes of Oceania.1937.Volume II. http://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania/Oceania.html

ZAANDAM cruise vessel 2000

Built as a cruise vessel under yard No 6036 by Fincantieri Breda, Marghera, Italy for the Holland America Line, Nassau Bahamas.
26 June 1998 laid down.
29 April 1999 floated out under the name ZAANDAM.
Tonnage 60,906 grt, 31,224 net, 6,150 dwt, dim. 237.0 x 32.25 x 7.80m. (draught), length bpp.202.8m.
Powered by five 12-cyl. Sulzer-Fincantiere diesels, each 8,640 kW. driven two electric motors, twin shafts, two controllable pitch propellers, speed 22 knots.
Accommodation for 1,432 passengers and 615 crew.
06 April 2000 completed,
08 April 2000 delivered to owners. Building cost US$300 million.
04 May 2000 christened by the actresses Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen in Fort Lauderdale.
06 May 2000 maiden cruise voyage from Fort Lauderdale to the Caribbean.
MS ZAANDAM is a cruise ship owned and operated by Holland America Line, named for the city of Zaandam, Netherlands near Amsterdam. She was built by Italy’s Fincantieri in Venice, and delivered in 2000. ZAANDAM is part of the 'R-Class' and a sister ship to MS VOLENDAM , MS ROTTERDAM and MS AMSTERDAM . MS ZAANDAM has a musical theme and is decorated with artifacts and memorabilia from different musical genres. Items such as a Baroque-style Dutch pipe organ and guitars signed by the Rolling Stones, Carlos Santana and Queen can be seen.
One of the aft stairways also has a saxophone signed by former United States President Bill Clinton.
Several earlier vessels in the company also bear the name ZAANDAM: A single-funnel steam ship known as SS ZAANDAM (1882–1897) and MS ZAANDAM (1938–1942). The latter was torpedoed by German submarine U-174 and sank.
Current Cruises
ZAANDAM sails out of Alaska during the summer and during the winter sails Mexico and Hawaii. In December and January, the ZAANDAM cruises the Antarctic and South America.
2016 In service, still owned by HAL Antillen NV, IMO No 9156527. Beneficial owner Carnival Group. Under Dutch flag with homeport Rotterdam.

Uruguay 2015 20p sg?, scott?
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_ZAANDAM Internet
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BREADALBANE

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BREADALBANE

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun May 17, 2009 9:17 pm

tmp178.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in 1843 as a wooden three masted ship, on the yard of Henderick & Rowan, Glasgow for account of McNeil & Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage 428 tons, dim. 107.7 x 24.4 x 18.2ft.
Bark rigged.
Delivered July 1843.

Built for the trade between the U.K and India.
26 March 1853, chartered by the British Government for three years as transport vessel.
22 May 1853 she sailed from London, under command of Capt. John McKenzie, for Baffin Bay in search for the lost Sir John Franklin expedition. Her ice master was George Sabiston, I can remember that even in the 1960s ships of the company I was sailing for used ice masters when they were loading in Greenland ports, the ice master or pilot is mostly a experienced captain who knows the waters and ice situation well in that area. On that voyage she had a crew of 20 (21other source) men including the master and ice master.


07 Oct. 1853 it was reported that she was lost, when her companion ship the PHOENIX arrived at Thurso, North Scotland. It was reported that on 21 August 1853 she was crushed by shifting ice and sank in 15 minutes off Beechey Island. The crew was saved by the PHOENIX.
19 October 1853 the rescued crew arrived at London.

The following is an excerpt from the August 21, 1853 journal entry by William H. Fawckner, Royal Navy Officer on the BREADALBANE.

About ten minutes past four a.m., the ice passing the ship awoke me, and the door of my cabin from the pressure opened: I immediately hurriedly put on my clothes, and on getting up found some hands on the ice, endeavoring to save the boats, but they were instantly crushed to pieces; they little thought, when using their efforts to save the boats, that the BREADALBANE was in so perilous a situation. I went foreward to hail the PHOENIX, for men to save the boats, and whilst doing so, the ropes by which we were secured parted, and a heavy nip took the ship making every timber in her creak, and the ship tremble all over. I looked in the main hold, and saw the beams given away; I hailed those on the ice and told them of our critical situation, they not for one moment suspecting it. I then rushed to my cabin, hauled out my portmanteau on the deck, and roared like a bull to those in their beds to jump out and save their lives. The starling effects on them might be more easily imagined than described. On reaching the deck those on the ice called out to me to jump over the side, that the ship was going over…

Everyone then abandoned the ship, with what few clothes they saved – some with only what they had on… The ship now began to sink fast, and from the time her bowsprit touched the ice, until her mastheads were out of sight, did not occupy above one minute and a half. It was a very sad and unceremonious way of being turned out of our ship. For the first time the first nip took her, until her disappearance, did not occupy more that fifteen minutes.
I, as well all the spectators of the last of BREADALBANE, was astonished at the rapid manner in which she went down… I can not easily imagine why the two missing Arctic ships (EREBUS and TERROR) have never been heard of, and it is but too probable in my mind, they were lost not many miles from my old vessel, and that all hands met with a watery grave.

On 13 August 1980 the hull of the BREADALBANE was rediscovered by a team of scientists in a position 74 41 N and 91 50W.

On the stamp, only her steering wheel is depict.

Canada 1987 36c sg1239, scott?


Information I got from the World Ship Society:
aukepalmhof
 
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Re: BREADALBANE

Postby john sefton » Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:16 am

Extract from an article by J B Maclnnis National Geographic July 1983.
Far below the surface of the hostile sea, tomorrows technology unlocks the secrets of a long‑dead vessel.
She is BREADALBANE, a British Bark launched in 1843 and lost a decade later in the ice of Canadas Northwest Passage while aiding in the search for survivors of the ill‑fated Franklin Expedition. She is the nothernmost shipwreck ever discovered on the seafloor.
During his six long years of research and exploration for BREADALBANE Dr Maclnnis got his real first view of the vessel on 13 August 1980 in a ghostly side scan sonar image.
Entombed beneath six feet of surface ice and 340 feet of arctic water, the ship appeared far beyond human reach or ability to explore. Yet only 3 years later, in early May, a diver touched down on BREADALBANE'S deck in a revolutionary submersible destined to extend mans reach under the sea. Dubbed WASP for its resemblance to that insect, it is also referred to as “a submarine you wear''. The 'wheel of misfortune' that guided BREADALBANE in her final moments before storm driven ice punctured her hull and sent her to the bottom off Beechy Island in Canadas high Arctic was beautifully preserved by near‑freezing temperatures and an absence of pollution or marine borers, was promptly flown to the world famous Parks Canada conservation facility in Ottawa.
By some miracle all the 21 crewmen aboard managed to scramble to safety on the surrounding ice and joined an accompanying ship.

Stamp issue: Canada 1987.. SG1239. shows BREADALBANE' S wheel
john sefton
 
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