SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

DISCOVERY OF KING GEORGES ISLANDS 1765

1765 Discovery of king Georges islands

Born on 8th November 1723 in Nottingham, John BYRON joined the English Navy at the age of 8.

In 1740, he took part in Commodore Anson’s expedition. His ship wrecked in the Magellan Strait and it was only after 13 months of incredible sufferings that the crew got rescued.

In 1763, after the Seven Year's War, the rivalry between
France and Great Britain took on an economic form and the
two governments decided to take hold of the Falkland Islands, as the former were the gateway to the Pacific. Louis Antoine de Bougainville and John Byron were appointed by their respective governments to carry out that mission.

In June 1764, John BYRON left England with two ships: the frigate DOLPHIN and the sloop TAMAR . He officially took possession of the Falkland Islands, where settlers of Bougainville had
already built a camp, without him knowing it.
He then followed the wakes of Magellan, Le Maire and Roggeveen.
This is how he sailed past the Polynesian atolls of NAPUKA and TEPOTO on 7th June 1765, without being able to land because of the heavy swell and of the many armed savages lined up along the beach.

On 11th June 1765, he landed on the atoll of TAKAROA, in order to get supplies of coconuts and scurvy grass that was indispensable for his ill seamen. His account of that day remains one of the few evidences of what life was like on the atolls before the arrival of the Europeans.
He then tried to land on the atoll of TAKAPOTO, where, 43 years earlier, Roggeveen’s ship AFRICAANSCHE GALEY had wrecked, but the islanders rebuffed all landing attempts.

He gave the name “King George Islands” to the group made of 4 atolls: Ahe – Manihi – Takapoto – Takaroa and to the uninhabited island of Tikei.
Then he continued on his way, narrowly missing the discovery of Tahiti, just like Le Maire and Roggeveen before him.
-
In May 1766, he was back in England, completing a round-the-world voyage in less than two years – a record.

In 1769, John BYRON was appointed Governor of Newfoundland.
He was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral of the Blue Squadron in 1778, and then Rear Admiral of the White Squadron in 1780.
He died on 10th April 1786, and rests in Twickenham, near the Chapel of St Mary’s Church.

HMS DOLPHIN: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7660
HMS TAMAR: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9096

French Polynesia 2015 190F sg?, scott?
http://www.tahitiphilatelie.com/details ... 015&id=285

NORMAN LE BROCQ

December 1996 British government approved the purchase of a Fishery Protection Vessel at a cost of £550.000.
Built by Souter Marine Ltd., Cowes for the British Government.
04 December 1997 at Cowes named as the NORMAN LE BROCQ, named after the Jersey politician Norman Le Brocq (1922-1996)
Tonnage 17.72 ton, dim. 15.1 x 6.0 x 1.31m. (draught).
Powered by two Scania diesel engines, 550 hp, cruising speed 22 knots.
Carried a 4.7m Searider RIB with a 75hp outboard motor.
20 December 1997 she arrived at Jersey. Based at La Collette.
07 February 1998 the vessel was officially named by Mrs. Le Brocq outside the Maritime Museum at Jersey.
She can be operated as fishery protection vessel, fisheries research or as a patrol vessel. When needed she can also be used as emergency vessel. At sea she is always available to assist in any serious maritime emergencies.
2009 Was she re-engined and re-fitted at Goodchilds in Great Yarmouth, Engeland.
03 June 2012 took part in in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Thames Pageant on the River Thames at London.
2015 In service same name and owners.

Jersey 2002 68p sg?, scott?
Source: Internet but mostly copied from http://channelislandsshipping.je/page35.html

LUSITANIA

Centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA
The RMS LLUSITANIA was a British ocean liner famous for its luxurious accommodation and speed. It was, briefly, the world's largest passenger ship and holder of the Blue Riband, the unofficial trophy given to the passenger liner crossing the Atlantic Ocean in regular service with the highest speed record.

On 1 May, 1915, the LUSITANIA left New York and sailed for Liverpool. Since the outbreak of World War I, ocean voyages had become dangerous: German U-boats (submarines) hunted in British waters, continually looking for enemy vessels to sink. In fact, Germany had declared the seas around the United Kingdom a war zone and the German embassy in the United States had placed a newspaper advertisement warning people not to sail on the LUSITANIA. On 7 May, a German U-boat launched a torpedo at the LUSITANIA approximately 14 miles off the coast of Ireland, near the Old Head of Kinsale. The torpedo hit the starboard side of the LUSITANIA and, almost immediately, another explosion rocked the ship and the LUSITANIA sank within 18 minutes.

Although there had been enough lifeboats for all passengers, the severe listing of the ship while sinking prevented most of these from being launched properly. Of the 1,959 people on board, 1,198 died and 761 people were saved, many of them by boats launched from Kinsale, Queenstown (Cobh) and Cork. Nearly three days after the sinking of the LUSITANIA 150 of her victims were buried in mass graves in the Old Church cemetery, a mile north of Queenstown.

These two new stamps mark the centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA. They feature specially commissioned paintings by Vincent Killowry and depict images of the ship. The 68c stamp portrays an image of the LUSITANIA just before the torpedo hit, steaming along in relatively calm waters in fine weather. However, the €1 stamp shows the ship listing to one side after the torpedo strike and explosion which led to her sinking within 18 minutes.

Ireland 2015 68c/1Euro and a MS sg?, scott? Details and history of the ship you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7736&p=16111&hilit=lusitania#p16111
http://www.irishstamps.ie/shop/p-1531-c ... stamp.aspx

L'Hirondelle (Robert Sercouf)

Robert Surcouf (12 December 1773 – 8 July 1827) was a French privateer and slave trader who operated in the Indian Ocean between 1789 and 1801, and again from 1807 to 1808, capturing over 40 prizes, while amassing a large fortune as a ship-owner, both from privateering and from commerce.
Surcouf started his career as a sailor and officer on the slave ships Aurore, Courrier d'Afrique and Navigateur. Having risen to Captain, and in spite of the prohibition of slave trading by the National Convention in 1793, he engaged in the business himself as a captain on Créole. He then captained the merchantman Émilie, on which he engaged in commerce raiding despite lacking a lettre de marque. He preyed on British shipping, famously capturing the East Indiaman Triton, before returning to Isle de France, where his prizes were confiscated. He then returned to France, where he obtained prize money from the government.
Returning to the Indian Ocean, Surcouf captained the privateers Clarisse and Confiance, raiding British, American and Portuguese merchantmen. He famously captured the East Indiaman Kent on 7 October 1800. Returning to France, he was awarded the Legion of Honour and settled as a ship-owner.
He briefly returned to the Indian Ocean in 1807 on the custom-built Revenant before returning to France. There, he armed privateers and merchantmen. His privateers led successful campaigns in the Indian Ocean and disastrous ones in the English Channel, except for Renard which achieved fame in her victory over HMS Alphea on 9 September 1812. After the Bourbon restoration, he organised fishing expeditions to Terre-Neuve and amassed a considerable fortune. He died in 1827 and is buried in a graveyard at Saint-Malo.

Mauritius Sg461 Wikipedia

Jean Laffite

Jean Laffite, thought to have been born in France, was more of a businessman than seafarer. Along with his brother, Laffite practiced pirating and privateering out of Barataria Bay, south of New Orleans. With over 10 vessels he and his crew raided among others, British, American, and Spanish vessels. Due to his frequent trips to various worldwide coastal ports, many in New Orleans traded with his band of pirates.
Laffite was renown for working his way out of trouble, when arrested by a certain governor, he failed to show up at the trial. The governor set a bounty for him at $750, in return, Laffite offered double that price for the capture of the governor.
British officials offered Laffite monetary rewards among others, in 1814, in return for his help in their attack on New Orleans. Laffite notified New Orleans officials, who paid no head to his warnings. A few weeks later a small Naval fleet attacked, before which Laffite and his crew slipped out of town. Later that same year, General Andrew Jackson accepted Laffites aid in combat with the British. In return for his help, he and his crew were pardoned for their maritime crimes, but lost their pirate privileges in Barataria Bay.
During an increase in naval activity, Laffite and his crew sailed towards Spanish occupied territory of Texas. He took over Galveston, from where he established his pirating activities. Being run out of Galveston, he left, but only after burning the entire settlement. With his brother, Laffite continued pirating around Central American ports until he died around 1821.

Grenada Sg369 Various web sites.

HORNET USS and PENGUIN HMS battle

On 23 March, 1815 USS HORNET captured HMS PENGUIN off Tristan da Cunha in the last action of the War of 1812.
The War of 1812 lasted two and a half years and was fought by the United States of America against the United Kingdom and its North American colonies and American Indians. War had been declared by the United States on 18 June, 1812 for several reasons, many connected to the Napoleonic wars; for example trade restrictions that affected America and the impressment of American merchant sailors into the Royal Navy which had expanded enormously during the Napoleonic Wars.
At the end of the war both sides signed the Treaty of Ghent 24 December, 1814 and both parties returned occupied land to its pre-war owner and resumed friendly trade relations. News of the Treaty didn't arrive in the United States for a further month when it was unanimously ratified by the U.S. Senate and proclaimed on the 18 February 1815. Master Commandant James Biddle aboard the HORNET was unaware of the imminent peace when he set sail from New York in January 1815.
HORNET had carried the final diplomatic messages from Britain and then returned to sea to become the first ship in the Navy to capture a British vessel. In 1813 she sank HMS PEACOCK and in 1814 she was part of a small squadron (comprising the frigate USS PRESIDENT, the sloops of war USS PEACOCK and HORNET and the Brig-rigged tender USS TOM BOWLINE prepared at New York to attack British shipping in the Indian Ocean. On 15 January 1815 USS PRESIDENT took advantage of a gale to break out of the harbour but was captured by the blockading British squadron. A week later the remaining three ships, unaware of the PRESIDENT's fate, took advantage of another storm and evading the blockaders made for a pre-arranged rendezvous with the PRESIDENT off Tristan da Cunha. During the voyage, HORNET lost touch with the other two vessels. USS PEACOCK and USS TOM BOWLINE reached the rendezvous first, on 18 March, but were then driven off by a gale.
HORNET, reached the island on 22 March and was about to drop anchor when an unfamiliar sail was spotted. The Cruiser-class brig-sloop HMS PENGUIN (Captain James Dickenson) was a new vessel carrying the same main battery as the HORNET, 18 carronades (broadside battery) and 2 long twelves (as bow chasers). She had been despatched from Cape Town to hunt down an American privateer, the YOUNG WASP, which had been attacking homeward-bound East Indiamen.
As soon as HORNET was sighted Dickenson prepared to engage and for some 15 minutes the two ships exchanged broadsides. As Dickenson turned to close with the HORNET he was mortally wounded. The two ships collided and PENGUIN’s bowsprit ran across HORNET 's deck between the main and mizzen masts, badly damaging the American rigging. Neither made any attempt to board the other and the gunnery duel continued. As the two vessels separated PENGUIN's foremast fell and unable to manoeuvre his ship Lieutenant McDonald, now in command of PENGUIN, surrendered.
Amazingly not a single British carronade shot had hit the hull of HORNET, whereas PENGUIN was too badly damaged to be repaired. The Americans removed her stores and hurriedly set her alight when more sails, which turned out to be the PEACOCK and TOM BOWLINE, were sighted.
The TOM BOWLINE took the British prisoners to St. Salvador, Brazil as HORNET and PEACOCK headed for the East Indies. On 27 April they sighted and headed for what they believed to be an East Indiaman before realising that their intended victim was in fact a British ship of the line, HMS CORNWALLIS. Recently completed at Bombay from teak the CORNWALLIS was fast and a chase that lasted two and a half days ensued. Eventually HORNET evaded capture by jettisoning pretty much everything on-board, including part of the forecastle. Without stores, guns, anchors or even the ships' bell, HORNET headed home.

Congressional Gold Medals awarded for two spectacular victories made HORNET one of the most decorated ships of the war.

Tristan da Cunha 2015 £1.10 and £2.50 sg?, scott? HORNET details and history you can find on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7144&p=7140&hilit=HORNET#p7140
PENGUIN details and history you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10424&p=10925&hilit=HORNET#p10925
http://www.tristandc.com/po/stamps201504.php
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

BREADALBANE

The full index of our ship stamp archive

BREADALBANE

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun May 17, 2009 9:17 pm

tmp178.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in 1843 as a wooden three masted ship, on the yard of Henderick & Rowan, Glasgow for account of McNeil & Co., Glasgow.
Tonnage 428 tons, dim. 107.7 x 24.4 x 18.2ft.
Bark rigged.
Delivered July 1843.

Built for the trade between the U.K and India.
26 March 1853, chartered by the British Government for three years as transport vessel.
22 May 1853 she sailed from London, under command of Capt. John McKenzie, for Baffin Bay in search for the lost Sir John Franklin expedition. Her ice master was George Sabiston, I can remember that even in the 1960s ships of the company I was sailing for used ice masters when they were loading in Greenland ports, the ice master or pilot is mostly a experienced captain who knows the waters and ice situation well in that area. On that voyage she had a crew of 20 (21other source) men including the master and ice master.


07 Oct. 1853 it was reported that she was lost, when her companion ship the PHOENIX arrived at Thurso, North Scotland. It was reported that on 21 August 1853 she was crushed by shifting ice and sank in 15 minutes off Beechey Island. The crew was saved by the PHOENIX.
19 October 1853 the rescued crew arrived at London.

The following is an excerpt from the August 21, 1853 journal entry by William H. Fawckner, Royal Navy Officer on the BREADALBANE.

About ten minutes past four a.m., the ice passing the ship awoke me, and the door of my cabin from the pressure opened: I immediately hurriedly put on my clothes, and on getting up found some hands on the ice, endeavoring to save the boats, but they were instantly crushed to pieces; they little thought, when using their efforts to save the boats, that the BREADALBANE was in so perilous a situation. I went foreward to hail the PHOENIX, for men to save the boats, and whilst doing so, the ropes by which we were secured parted, and a heavy nip took the ship making every timber in her creak, and the ship tremble all over. I looked in the main hold, and saw the beams given away; I hailed those on the ice and told them of our critical situation, they not for one moment suspecting it. I then rushed to my cabin, hauled out my portmanteau on the deck, and roared like a bull to those in their beds to jump out and save their lives. The starling effects on them might be more easily imagined than described. On reaching the deck those on the ice called out to me to jump over the side, that the ship was going over…

Everyone then abandoned the ship, with what few clothes they saved – some with only what they had on… The ship now began to sink fast, and from the time her bowsprit touched the ice, until her mastheads were out of sight, did not occupy above one minute and a half. It was a very sad and unceremonious way of being turned out of our ship. For the first time the first nip took her, until her disappearance, did not occupy more that fifteen minutes.
I, as well all the spectators of the last of BREADALBANE, was astonished at the rapid manner in which she went down… I can not easily imagine why the two missing Arctic ships (EREBUS and TERROR) have never been heard of, and it is but too probable in my mind, they were lost not many miles from my old vessel, and that all hands met with a watery grave.

On 13 August 1980 the hull of the BREADALBANE was rediscovered by a team of scientists in a position 74 41 N and 91 50W.

On the stamp, only her steering wheel is depict.

Canada 1987 36c sg1239, scott?


Information I got from the World Ship Society:
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 4214
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: BREADALBANE

Postby john sefton » Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:16 am

Extract from an article by J B Maclnnis National Geographic July 1983.
Far below the surface of the hostile sea, tomorrows technology unlocks the secrets of a long‑dead vessel.
She is BREADALBANE, a British Bark launched in 1843 and lost a decade later in the ice of Canadas Northwest Passage while aiding in the search for survivors of the ill‑fated Franklin Expedition. She is the nothernmost shipwreck ever discovered on the seafloor.
During his six long years of research and exploration for BREADALBANE Dr Maclnnis got his real first view of the vessel on 13 August 1980 in a ghostly side scan sonar image.
Entombed beneath six feet of surface ice and 340 feet of arctic water, the ship appeared far beyond human reach or ability to explore. Yet only 3 years later, in early May, a diver touched down on BREADALBANE'S deck in a revolutionary submersible destined to extend mans reach under the sea. Dubbed WASP for its resemblance to that insect, it is also referred to as “a submarine you wear''. The 'wheel of misfortune' that guided BREADALBANE in her final moments before storm driven ice punctured her hull and sent her to the bottom off Beechy Island in Canadas high Arctic was beautifully preserved by near‑freezing temperatures and an absence of pollution or marine borers, was promptly flown to the world famous Parks Canada conservation facility in Ottawa.
By some miracle all the 21 crewmen aboard managed to scramble to safety on the surrounding ice and joined an accompanying ship.

Stamp issue: Canada 1987.. SG1239. shows BREADALBANE' S wheel
john sefton
 
Posts: 1650
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:59 pm


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Bing [Bot], D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen, Google Adsense [Bot], HarryMaxuell, Yahoo [Bot] and 8 guests

Sponsored Links