LIBERTY (US 40) yacht

The LIBERTY a 12-metre yacht was built for the America Cup Race at Newport, Rhode Island.
Built by Newport Offshore Ltd. at Newport for the Freedom Campaign ’83 SUNY at Fort Schuyler. The designer of the yacht was Johan Valentijn.
June 1983 launched as LIBERTY (US 40).
Displacement 28.5 ton, dim. 20.11 x 3.74 x 2.77m. (draught), length on waterline 13.71m.
Sail area 169.55 m².
Skipper Dennis Conner.

She was defender of the New York Yacht Club in 1983 the challenger was the Australian yacht AUSTRALIA II of the Royal Perth Yacht Club.
The race was sailed from 14 September till 26 September in which the LIBERTY won three races and the AUSTRALIA II won four races and was declared the winner of the cup, after 132 years the cup was lost by the USA.
1986 The LIBERTY was sold to the Sail America Foundation in San Diego, CA. USA.
1988 Sold to America Cup Organizing Committee, San Diego, not renamed.
1989 Sold to Japan, not renamed.
Her whereabouts are unknown but it is believed she sunk in Kobe , Japan in the early 1990’s.
Antigua 1987 $5 sgMS1076, scott
Barbuda 1987 $5 sgMS940. scott
Grenada of Grenadines 1992 $2 sg1583, scott
Belize 1987 75c sg986, scott (the stamp gives that the STAR AND STRIPES is showed but the sail No is US 40 which belongs to the LIBERTY.)

COALING AT CASTRIES

The stamp shows a steamship coal bunkering in Castries, St Lucia, the coal was loaded by mostly women who carried a basket full of coal on her head from the shore to tip it in the bunkers of the moored steamer. The steamer shown on the stamp is not identified.
In the second half of the 19th century Castries became an important bunkering port for coal, due to her deep and sheltered harbour, they could accommodate even the largest Royal Navy ships for bunkering.
Welsh coal was shipped to Castries, which was then supplied to ships which needed coal bunkers.
By the turn of the century Castries was the 14th most important coal bunkering port in the world.
During the 1930s oil got more important and the bunkering of coal declined around the world.
Saint Lucia 2002 65c sg?, scott?
Source: Internet various sites.

PINNACE

PINNACE was a fast maneuverable, relatively narrow square vessel of the late 17th century through the 18th century. Mostly used in the north of Europe and Portugal.
Used as a merchantman and whaler but also as a warship when needed. She resembled a jacht (yacht) and was often confused with it. The 17th century vessels had two decks, a forecastle and a half deck at the stern. Soft V shape bottom; angular bilges, tumble home to sides above the waterline. Ornamented beakhead and stern.
Armed with 18 guns.
Square rigged on fore- and mainmast, lateen and mizzen topsail on the mizzen mast. Larger ships had a spritsail and a sprit topsail (as seen on stamp) below the bowsprit.
Crew 60-70.
Dimensions: 35 – 45.7m long, 7.6 – 11.6 m wide. Tonnage from 150 to 800 ton.

Guinea 2002 4000F sgMS?, scott2071.

Source: Aak to Zumbra, a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

AMERICA II (US 46) yacht

The AMERICA II (US 46) was nominated as official team challenger and the only yacht which took part in the America’s Cup Louis Vuitton Challenge’s Race in Freemantle, Australia.
AMERICA II (US 46) was one of the three 12-metres yacht all named AMERICA II only the sail number was different, the others carried the No. US 42 and 44. Which yacht is depict on the stamp is difficult to say, not a sail number is visible, all were in Freemantle but the US 46 was the only yacht used in the Challenge Race, the other two yachts were used for training.
All three yachts were built as a 12-metre yacht by the Williams & Manchester Shipyard in Newport, Rhode Island for the America II Syndicate USMMA Foundation, representing the New York Yacht Club.
The US 46 was designed by Sparkman & Stephens, M.W. Langan.
Built in 1986.
Displacement 27.3 ton, dim. 19.72 x 3.35 x 2.62m, (draught), length on waterline 13.68m.
Sail area 140.64 m².
After completing she was shipped to Australia, the last of the AMERICA II yachts to arrive.
She sailed under skipper John Kolius in the Louis Vuitton Races, she did not reach the semi-finals.
After the America Cup the AMERICA II (US 46) was shipped back to the United States.
1989 Sold to Lennard A. Gulson at San Diego CA, USA. She was used in the movie “Wind” under the name FIDDLER.
1993 Sold to US 46 LLC (Alfred B. Van Liew), Newport, R.I. still named FIDDLER.
2005 Sold to Scott MacLeod in CT, USA, renamed again in AMERICA II.
2006 Sold to Manhattan Sailing Club, Manhattan, NY, USA not renamed. She was bought by members of that club to celebrate the club’s 20th anniversary, she was donated by the members in 2012 to the New York Harbor Sailing Foundation.
2014 Still owned by the Foundation and used for sailing with paying passengers in New York harbour.
Solomon Island 1987 $1 sg570a, scott570g.
Belize 1987 25c sg985, scott?
Source: http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05347.html Internet

CRUSADER / WHITE CRUSADER

The 12m yacht CRUSADER was built by Cougar Marine for the British America’s Cup Challenges PLC, representing the Royal Thames Yacht Club.
The yacht was designed by Ian Howlett.
February 1986 launched at Hamble, U.K as the CRUSADER (I), the yacht was christened by HRH Princess Diana.
Displacement 26 ton, dim. 1981 x 3.81 x 2.71m. (draught), length on waterline 13.77m.
Sail area 164.55m²
She was built for the contest of the 1987 America Cup in Fremantle, Australia.
1986 Renamed in WHITE CRUSADER after the sponsor of the yacht bought the whisky brand “White Horse”.
Under skipper Harald Cudmore the yacht made it to the sixth place.
1988 Was she chartered to V. Bandolowski in Lulea, Sweden and renamed HOLGER DANSKE.
1993 Sold to Richard Matthews in Ipswich, U.K. and renamed again CRUSADER.
Some time she was fitted out with an engine and had some accommodation.
2001 The engine and accommodation were removed and went back to full 12-Metre racing.
2014 Still owned by the Matthews and used for racing.
Solomon Islands 1986 $1 sg570a, scott574.
Belize 1987 $4 sg988, scott
Sources: Various internet sites.

IMPROVEMENT SUEZ CANAL

A new stamp was issued by the Egypt Post in 2014 for the improvement of the Suez Canal, but the design shows a lock in the Panama Canal.
The stamp was withdrawn after the mistake was detected, how many there have been issued is unknown.
The vessels depict on the stamp, the warship looks she is one of the Type 42 of the Royal Navy but which ship of the class is unknown. The other ships till so far not identified.

COURAGEOUS (US 26) yacht

Built as a 12 meter yacht by Minneford’s Yacht Yards, City Island, New York for the Courageous Syndicate, New York.
June 1974 launched as COURAGEOUS.
Displacement 25,4 ton, dim. 20.10 x 3.73 x 2.73m. (draught, length on waterline 13.60m.
Sail area 151 m²
Crew 11.

COURAGEOUS is a 12-metre class yacht. She was the third boat to win the America's Cup twice, in 1974 and 1977, after COLUMBIA in 1899 and 1901, and INTRPID in 1967 and 1970. All three of these boats won for the New York Yacht Club and thus the United States. COURAGEOUS was the first all-aluminium-hulled 12-metre class yacht.
COURAGEOUS successfully defended the America's Cup for the USA in 1974 with Ted Hood at the helm. After the 1974 cup, Hood built a new boat which he thought was faster than COURAGOUS and sold COURAGOUS to Ted Turner. Turner won the 1977 America's Cup defender trials in COURAGEOUS beating Hood in the process, and then went on to successfully defend the America's Cup later that year.
When preparing COURAGEOUS for the 1977 America's Cup, she was re-measured for compliance with the 12-metre class rule. It was discovered that she was lighter than the weight declared in her original racing certificate for the 1974 America's Cup. Less weight typically means a faster performance in lighter winds and a slower performance in stronger winds. If COURAGEOUS had been found to be underweight before the competition in 1974 then the designers would have had to make adjustments to sail area, the waterline length, or other attributes to make the design comply with the 12-metre rule. If COURAGEOUS was found to be underweight during the event she would have been disqualified. It is only conjecture what effect this oversight had on the result of the 1974 event.
1979 Renamed in COURAGEOUS II.
1984 Owned again by Courageous Syndicate Inc., Short Beach CT, USA., renamed COURAGES III.
1986 Renamed in COURAGEOUS IV.
1993 Renamed again in COURAGOUS and owned by Courageous Sailing Center in Charlestown MA, USA.
1996 Owned by US 26 Corporation, Wilmington, DE, USA not renamed.
Both COURAGEOUS and INTREPID are still sailing and racing today in Newport, Rhode Island. INTREPID is available for charter and COURAGEOUS is privately owned.
1997 Was she donated by Leonard Greene to the Museum of Yachting, Newport, Rhode Island.
2002 Restoration took place by Hinckley Yacht Services in Portsmouth, USA. Then owned by The Courageous Foundation Ltd., Newport, R.I.
2005 Designated by the State of Rhode Island as a State Yacht.
2014 Still owned by Courageous Foundation and regular used for races.

Solomon Islands 1986 18c sg570a, scott573h. $1 sg570a scott
Dominica 1987 $5 sgMS1056, scott1018.
Gambia 1987 1b sg701, scott673.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courageous_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05436.html Internet.
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

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Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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