CONSTELLATION US 20

Built as a 12-metre class yacht for the Constellation Syndicate, Oyster Bay NY. by Miniford Yacht Yard, City Island, NY. For The Constellation Syndicate (Walter Gubelmann) of the New York Yacht Club.
She was built of double planked mahogany over oak frames.
Designed by Olin J. Stephens.
1964 Launched as the CONSTELLATION US 20.
Displacement 29 tons, dim. 20.83 x 3.66 x 2.66m (draught), length on waterline 14.02m.
Sail area 170 m².
She defeated in the America Cup held from 15 till 21 September 1964 at Newport, Rhode Island and skippered by Eric Ridder the challenger of the Royal Thames Yacht Club the SOVEREIGN skippered by Paul Anderson 4 – 0.
1966 Sold to Pierre E Goemans at Monte Carlo, Monaco, not renamed.
1979 Sold to L’Asoc Francais pour “la Coupe de l’America” at Hyéres, France, not renamed and used as trial horse for a French syndicate.
January 1980 sold to Security Change Ltd. Hamble, U.K. not renamed and already February 1980 sold to the British Industry 1500 Syndicate at London not renamed.
Used by the British as a trial horse, things are getting then a little murky, some sources give she sank early 1980s off Turkey under tow, but the 12 metre class gives that she in 1994 still was owned by the British Industry 1500 Syndicate, but at the internet in 2014 I can’t find anything on her after 1980s.

Sierra Leone 1987 50 le sgMS1016, scott843
Solomon Islands 1986 18c sg570a, scott573c

Source: Internet. http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05429.html

MARIA VAN RIEBEECK SAS S97

Built in 1968-'70 by Dubigeon Normandie, Nantes, for the South African Navy (SAN).
Submarine of the 'Daphné' class, Displacement:860 tons surfaced, 1034 submerged, L:57,80m. (190') B:6,75m. (22,1') Draught:5,23m. (17,2') 2 SEMT/Pielstick engines:2450 hp. 2 x 80 cell batteries, 2 Jeumont/Schneider electric motors:2600 hp. 13,5 kn. surfaced, 16 kn. submerged, Armement:12 x 550 mm. torpedos, crew:6 officers and 45 ratings, 6 to 10 trainees.
Sisterships: EMILY HOBHOUSE and JOHANNA VAN DER MERWE.

In 1967, after nearly two years of negotiations, an order was placed with the French Government for three Daphné class submarines. The first of these submarines was the SAS MARIA VAN RIEBEECK. It was laid down at the Nantes shipyard of Dubigeon-Normandie on 14 March 1968, was launched on 18 March 1969 and completed on 22 June 1970.

On 20 August 1970, MARIA VAN RIEBEECK collided with the French submarine GALATÉE (also a member of the Daphné class) off Toulon. Both submarines were badly damaged, with GALATÉE being forced to run aground to avoid sinking.

In 1999 renamed in SAS SPEAR, 2003 scrapped.

(South Africa 1982, 8 c. StG.506)
JFS 73/74 + internet.

WEATHERLY US 17

Built as a 12-metre class yacht by Luders Marine Construction at Stamford, CT, USA for the Weatherly Syndicate, of the New York Yacht Club.
Designed by Philip L. Rhodes.
1958 launched as the WEATHERLY US 17
Displacement 26.5 tons, dim. 21.03 x 3.62 x 2.72m (draught) length on waterline 13.86m
Sail area 166 m².

WEATHERLY (US 17) was an unsuccessful defence candidate for the 1958 America's Cup and victorious defender in the 1962 America's Cup.
Design
WEATHERLY was a keel sloop designed to the 12-Metre Rule. She was designed by Philip L. Rhodes and built by Luders Marine Construction Company at Stamford, Connecticut for a syndicate of owners formed by Henry D. Mercer, with Cornelius S. Walsch and Arnold D. Frese. WEATHERLY was launched in 1958. She was built of steel frames with mahogany planking.
Career
Skippered by Arthur Knapp, WEATHERLY competed with COLUMBIA, EASTERN, GLEAM and VIM for the right to defend the America's cup but was outclassed in the 1958 selection trials. COLUMBIA went on to successfully defend the Cup in 1958.
Modified by Philip L. Rhodes at Luders yard in 1962, WEATHERLY was redesigned with a shorter bow and reduced wetted surface. Weight saved in the redesign was put into the keel.
The defender selection trials pitted WEATHERLY against COLUMBIA, EASTERNER and NEFERTITI. On 25 August 1962, the NYYC selected WEATHERLY to defend the Cup against Australian challenger GRETEL. Skippered by Emil "Bus" Mosbacher, Jr., in September 1962, WEATHERLY defended the Cup 4–1 against GRETEL.
After the races she was then used for pleasure cruising and charters.
1966 Sold to U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point NY, not renamed.
1971 Sold to Douglas E. Jones, Kings Point, NY, not renamed.
1975 Sold to Lynn Summers and Alan Buchanan, Seattle WA, not renamed.
1981 Sold to Seattle Council Boy Scouts of America, Seattle, WA, not renamed.
1986 Sold to Weatherly, Inc. (George Hill), Seattle, WA.
She is now normally berthed at dockside at the Newport Harbor Hotel and Marina and is available for chartering. She was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012.
2014 Managed by America Cup Charters in Newport RI
1958 and 1962 Specification Comparison.

1958 1962
LOA 21.03 m (69.0 ft) 29.39 m (96.4 ft)
LWL 13.86 m (45.5 ft)
Beam 3.62 m (11.9 ft)


Draft 2.72 m (8 ft 11 in)
Sail Area 166 m2 (1,790 sq ft) 165.6 m2 (1,783 sq ft)
Displacement 26.5 tons 25.65 tons
Ballast 16.35 tons 18.4 tons
Mast Height 25 m (82 ft)

Antigua 1992 $1 sg1704, scott1623.
Barbuda 1993 $1 sg1447, scott?
Grenada 1987 $5 sgMS1615, scott
Solomon Islands 1987 18c sg570a, scott570.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weatherly_(yacht) http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 70526.html Internet.

RAINBOW J4 yacht

RAINBOW a J-Class built yacht by Herreshoff Manufacturing Company, Bristol, Rhode Island, USA for the Harold Vanderbilt Syndicate of the New York Yacht Club.
The yacht was designed by William Starling Burgess.
15 May 1934 launched as the RAINBOW J4.
Tonnage 141 ton, dim. 38.61 x 6.40 x 4.45m (draught) length on waterline 25.11m.
Sail area 700.02 m².

She was built as and America Cup defender, but during the trials the YANKEE almost beat her.
The America Cup 1934 was sailed at Newport, Rhode Island, the defender was the RAINBOW of the New York Yacht Club against the challenger the British yacht ENDEAVOUR of the Royal Yacht Club.

The first race on 17 September 1934 was won by the ENDEAVOUR under skipper Sopwith, also the second race.
The third race was won by the RAINBOW under skipper Vanderbilt, also the fourth, fifth and sixth race, and the America Cup was won by the USA again.
After the America Cup the RAINBOW was laid up in a dry-dock where she was refitted.
1937 Sold to Chandler Hovey and contended for the defense of the 1937 cup but she lost against the RANGER.

1940 The RAINBOW was sold for scrap.
Solomon Islands 1987 18c sg570a, scott
Grenada 1987 $4 sg1614, scott

Source: Various internet sites.

Edmund B Alexander

In late 1940, as part of the National defence expansion undertaken in response to the Second World War, the thirty-five year old passenger liner America (formerly USS America (ID 3006) and USAT America) was reactivated for U.S. Army service. Renamed Edmund B. Alexander, she initially served as a barracks ship at St. John's, Newfoundland. After mid-1941 the ship was used as a transport in the Gulf of Mexico area and in May 1942 entered a Baltimore, Maryland, shipyard to begin a major modernization. This work, completed in April 1943, gave her new, oil-fired boilers, greater speed, and a much-changed appearance. Edmund B. Alexander spent the rest of the World War II era making transport runs between the United States, North Africa and Europe. She continued her work with the Army into the post-war era, primarily carrying military dependents. Placed in reserve in May 1949, USAT Edmund B. Alexander was sold for scrapping in January 1957.
http://www.history.navy.mil

CANADA (I) KC 1 yacht

CANADA (I) Built by Fred McConnel Marine Ltd. for the Secret Cove Yacht Club Challenge at Half Moon Bay, BC, Canada. The yacht was designed by Bruce Kirby.
1982 Launched as the CANADA (1) KC 1.
Displacement?, dim. 19.00 x 3.84 x 2.72m. (draught), length on waterline 13.78m.
Sail area 168 m².
There were two Canadian teams to challenge the America Cup 1987 , the Secret Cove Yacht Club and the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron. When both teams were unable to attract big sponsors, the two teams merged.
The CANADA (1) KC1 was heavily modified in 1985 including a winged keel and was thereafter renamed CANADA (II) KC 2
Displacement?, dim. 20.11 x 3.65 x 2.72m (draught), length on waterline 13.87m.
Sail area 166 m².
After extensive trailing between the TRUE NORTH and CANADA II the CANADA II was sent to Freemantle, Australia in 1987.
In the challenges races in the Louis Vuitton races at Freemantle in 1987, sailing under skipper Terry Neilson she was eliminated prior to the semi-finals.
1993 Sold to America’s Cup Yacht Racing in St Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, not renamed.
2014 Same name and owner and based at St Maarten, used for charter and match racing.

Solomon Islands 1987 $1 sg570a, scott573g. (Most probably the TRUE NORTH is depict on the stamp see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14088
Antigua 1987 30c sg1072, scott1000.
Barbuda 1987 30c sg936, scott852.

Source: http://www.12mrclass.com/yacht-search/d ... 05400.html Watercraft Philately. Internet.

MAIPÚ ms (Argentina)

Built in 1950-'51 by N.V. Koninklijke Maatschappij 'De Schelde', Vlissingen, #267, for Flota Argentina de Navigación de Ultramar (FANU)
Cargo/passenger ship, Gt:11,521, Nt:7935, Dw:7940, Loa:159,40m. (523') Lbpp:146,30m. (480') Br:19,50m. (64') D:14,17m. (46'6") Draught:7,90m. (25'11") 2-10 cyl. SD 60 Schelde/Sulzer engines:10,000 hp. (150 r.p.m.) twin screws 18 kn. crew:150, pass:788, 6 cargo holds, 1 derrick SWL:25 tons, 16-3 tons and 4 cranes SWL:3 tons.
Sistership ALBERO DODERO.
During dense fog at 04-11-1951 in collision with the American troopship GENERAL M.L. HERSEY in the Weser estuary, sunk, all passengers and crew (107) have been saved.

(Argentine 1951, 25 c. StG.829)
Book of the Koninklijke Maatschappij 'De Schelde' Shipbuilders, Engineering Works, Shiprepaires, Flushing + internet.
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

The full index of our ship stamp archive

UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

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Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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