SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

LUSITANIA

Centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA
The RMS LLUSITANIA was a British ocean liner famous for its luxurious accommodation and speed. It was, briefly, the world's largest passenger ship and holder of the Blue Riband, the unofficial trophy given to the passenger liner crossing the Atlantic Ocean in regular service with the highest speed record.

On 1 May, 1915, the LUSITANIA left New York and sailed for Liverpool. Since the outbreak of World War I, ocean voyages had become dangerous: German U-boats (submarines) hunted in British waters, continually looking for enemy vessels to sink. In fact, Germany had declared the seas around the United Kingdom a war zone and the German embassy in the United States had placed a newspaper advertisement warning people not to sail on the LUSITANIA. On 7 May, a German U-boat launched a torpedo at the LUSITANIA approximately 14 miles off the coast of Ireland, near the Old Head of Kinsale. The torpedo hit the starboard side of the LUSITANIA and, almost immediately, another explosion rocked the ship and the LUSITANIA sank within 18 minutes.

Although there had been enough lifeboats for all passengers, the severe listing of the ship while sinking prevented most of these from being launched properly. Of the 1,959 people on board, 1,198 died and 761 people were saved, many of them by boats launched from Kinsale, Queenstown (Cobh) and Cork. Nearly three days after the sinking of the LUSITANIA 150 of her victims were buried in mass graves in the Old Church cemetery, a mile north of Queenstown.

These two new stamps mark the centenary of the sinking of the RMS LUSITANIA. They feature specially commissioned paintings by Vincent Killowry and depict images of the ship. The 68c stamp portrays an image of the LUSITANIA just before the torpedo hit, steaming along in relatively calm waters in fine weather. However, the €1 stamp shows the ship listing to one side after the torpedo strike and explosion which led to her sinking within 18 minutes.

Ireland 2015 68c/1Euro and a MS sg?, scott? Details and history of the ship you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7736&p=16111&hilit=lusitania#p16111
http://www.irishstamps.ie/shop/p-1531-c ... stamp.aspx

L'Hirondelle (Robert Sercouf)

Robert Surcouf (12 December 1773 – 8 July 1827) was a French privateer and slave trader who operated in the Indian Ocean between 1789 and 1801, and again from 1807 to 1808, capturing over 40 prizes, while amassing a large fortune as a ship-owner, both from privateering and from commerce.
Surcouf started his career as a sailor and officer on the slave ships Aurore, Courrier d'Afrique and Navigateur. Having risen to Captain, and in spite of the prohibition of slave trading by the National Convention in 1793, he engaged in the business himself as a captain on Créole. He then captained the merchantman Émilie, on which he engaged in commerce raiding despite lacking a lettre de marque. He preyed on British shipping, famously capturing the East Indiaman Triton, before returning to Isle de France, where his prizes were confiscated. He then returned to France, where he obtained prize money from the government.
Returning to the Indian Ocean, Surcouf captained the privateers Clarisse and Confiance, raiding British, American and Portuguese merchantmen. He famously captured the East Indiaman Kent on 7 October 1800. Returning to France, he was awarded the Legion of Honour and settled as a ship-owner.
He briefly returned to the Indian Ocean in 1807 on the custom-built Revenant before returning to France. There, he armed privateers and merchantmen. His privateers led successful campaigns in the Indian Ocean and disastrous ones in the English Channel, except for Renard which achieved fame in her victory over HMS Alphea on 9 September 1812. After the Bourbon restoration, he organised fishing expeditions to Terre-Neuve and amassed a considerable fortune. He died in 1827 and is buried in a graveyard at Saint-Malo.

Mauritius Sg461 Wikipedia

Jean Laffite

Jean Laffite, thought to have been born in France, was more of a businessman than seafarer. Along with his brother, Laffite practiced pirating and privateering out of Barataria Bay, south of New Orleans. With over 10 vessels he and his crew raided among others, British, American, and Spanish vessels. Due to his frequent trips to various worldwide coastal ports, many in New Orleans traded with his band of pirates.
Laffite was renown for working his way out of trouble, when arrested by a certain governor, he failed to show up at the trial. The governor set a bounty for him at $750, in return, Laffite offered double that price for the capture of the governor.
British officials offered Laffite monetary rewards among others, in 1814, in return for his help in their attack on New Orleans. Laffite notified New Orleans officials, who paid no head to his warnings. A few weeks later a small Naval fleet attacked, before which Laffite and his crew slipped out of town. Later that same year, General Andrew Jackson accepted Laffites aid in combat with the British. In return for his help, he and his crew were pardoned for their maritime crimes, but lost their pirate privileges in Barataria Bay.
During an increase in naval activity, Laffite and his crew sailed towards Spanish occupied territory of Texas. He took over Galveston, from where he established his pirating activities. Being run out of Galveston, he left, but only after burning the entire settlement. With his brother, Laffite continued pirating around Central American ports until he died around 1821.

Grenada Sg369 Various web sites.

HORNET USS and PENGUIN HMS battle

On 23 March, 1815 USS HORNET captured HMS PENGUIN off Tristan da Cunha in the last action of the War of 1812.
The War of 1812 lasted two and a half years and was fought by the United States of America against the United Kingdom and its North American colonies and American Indians. War had been declared by the United States on 18 June, 1812 for several reasons, many connected to the Napoleonic wars; for example trade restrictions that affected America and the impressment of American merchant sailors into the Royal Navy which had expanded enormously during the Napoleonic Wars.
At the end of the war both sides signed the Treaty of Ghent 24 December, 1814 and both parties returned occupied land to its pre-war owner and resumed friendly trade relations. News of the Treaty didn't arrive in the United States for a further month when it was unanimously ratified by the U.S. Senate and proclaimed on the 18 February 1815. Master Commandant James Biddle aboard the HORNET was unaware of the imminent peace when he set sail from New York in January 1815.
HORNET had carried the final diplomatic messages from Britain and then returned to sea to become the first ship in the Navy to capture a British vessel. In 1813 she sank HMS PEACOCK and in 1814 she was part of a small squadron (comprising the frigate USS PRESIDENT, the sloops of war USS PEACOCK and HORNET and the Brig-rigged tender USS TOM BOWLINE prepared at New York to attack British shipping in the Indian Ocean. On 15 January 1815 USS PRESIDENT took advantage of a gale to break out of the harbour but was captured by the blockading British squadron. A week later the remaining three ships, unaware of the PRESIDENT's fate, took advantage of another storm and evading the blockaders made for a pre-arranged rendezvous with the PRESIDENT off Tristan da Cunha. During the voyage, HORNET lost touch with the other two vessels. USS PEACOCK and USS TOM BOWLINE reached the rendezvous first, on 18 March, but were then driven off by a gale.
HORNET, reached the island on 22 March and was about to drop anchor when an unfamiliar sail was spotted. The Cruiser-class brig-sloop HMS PENGUIN (Captain James Dickenson) was a new vessel carrying the same main battery as the HORNET, 18 carronades (broadside battery) and 2 long twelves (as bow chasers). She had been despatched from Cape Town to hunt down an American privateer, the YOUNG WASP, which had been attacking homeward-bound East Indiamen.
As soon as HORNET was sighted Dickenson prepared to engage and for some 15 minutes the two ships exchanged broadsides. As Dickenson turned to close with the HORNET he was mortally wounded. The two ships collided and PENGUIN’s bowsprit ran across HORNET 's deck between the main and mizzen masts, badly damaging the American rigging. Neither made any attempt to board the other and the gunnery duel continued. As the two vessels separated PENGUIN's foremast fell and unable to manoeuvre his ship Lieutenant McDonald, now in command of PENGUIN, surrendered.
Amazingly not a single British carronade shot had hit the hull of HORNET, whereas PENGUIN was too badly damaged to be repaired. The Americans removed her stores and hurriedly set her alight when more sails, which turned out to be the PEACOCK and TOM BOWLINE, were sighted.
The TOM BOWLINE took the British prisoners to St. Salvador, Brazil as HORNET and PEACOCK headed for the East Indies. On 27 April they sighted and headed for what they believed to be an East Indiaman before realising that their intended victim was in fact a British ship of the line, HMS CORNWALLIS. Recently completed at Bombay from teak the CORNWALLIS was fast and a chase that lasted two and a half days ensued. Eventually HORNET evaded capture by jettisoning pretty much everything on-board, including part of the forecastle. Without stores, guns, anchors or even the ships' bell, HORNET headed home.

Congressional Gold Medals awarded for two spectacular victories made HORNET one of the most decorated ships of the war.

Tristan da Cunha 2015 £1.10 and £2.50 sg?, scott? HORNET details and history you can find on viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7144&p=7140&hilit=HORNET#p7140
PENGUIN details and history you can find on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10424&p=10925&hilit=HORNET#p10925
http://www.tristandc.com/po/stamps201504.php

ROG

Slovenia issued an ms which depict the first cargo vessel owned by the shipping company Splosna Plovba at Koper, at that time Yugoslavia.
Built as a Victory-type cargo vessel under yard No 36 by Victoria Machinery Depot Ltd., Victoria BC, Canada for the British Government.
Laid down as the FORT BERENS, but before launching transferred to Park SS Co., Montreal (Canadian Transport Co. Vancouver) a Canadian Government Company.
Launched as the MISSION PARK.
Tonnage 7,164 grt, 4,295 net, 10,310 dwt, dim. 134.6 x 17.4 x 10.63, length bpp. 129.4m.
One triple expansion 3-cyl. steam engine, manufactured by Dominion Engineering Works Ltd., Montreal PQ. ?hp, speed 11 knots.
20 October 1944 completed.

1947 Sold to Montreal, Australia, New Zealand Line Ltd, Montreal, Canada and renamed OTTAWA VALLEY.
1950 Transferred to British flag and registry, with homeport London.
1954 Sold to Splosna Plovba, Koper, Yugoslavia and renamed ROG.
Under Yugoslavia flag did have a crew of 43, and used also as a training ship by the company for sailors and cadets.
She was the first Yugoslavian vessel which made a call at Tsingtao, China.
During a typhoon in the Pacific in February 1956, she lost a crew member and was damaged, made a call at Hakodate on Hokkaido Island , Japan for repairs.
1966 Sold to Wm Brandts (Leasing) Ltd., Hong Kong and renamed MILLS TRIDENT.
23 January 1969 arrived by Keun Hwa Iron & Steel Works, Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping.

Slovenia 2015 1.33 Euro sg?, scott?
Source: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Various internet sites.

WILHELM KAISEN lifeboat

The German Maritime Search and Rescue Service (German: Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger - DGzRS) is responsible for Search and Rescue in German territorial waters in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, including the Exclusive Economic Zone.
The DGzRS operates 61 vessels on 54 stations in the North Sea and Baltic. 20 of which are seagoing cruisers between 20 m and 46 m of length and 41 vessels are classified as inshore lifeboats.
A feature of the cruisers is that all but the 20-m class carry a fully equipped small lifeboat on deck which can quickly be released through a gate in the aft for conducting operations in shallow waters. This principle was developed by DGzRS in the 1950s. The 20-m class uses a rigid-hulled inflatable boat instead.
More than 80,000 people has already been rescued from dangerous situations since its creation in 1865 the DGzRS. They operate thanks to donations. Visit their website. You never know when YOU might need them to be ready.
http://collectorzpedia.blogspot.co.nz/2 ... PEDIA.html

The stamp depict the WILHELM KAISEN.
Built as a lifeboat under yard No 6430 by Schweers at Bardenfleth (on the Weser River) for the Deutschen Gesellschaft zur Retting Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS).(German Society for Sea Rescue.)
06 April 1987 christened in Bardenfleth as the WILHELM KAISEN (KRS11) named after a long serving mayor of the town Bremen. She was one of the 44-m class.
Displacement 185 ton, dim. 44.2 x 8.05 x 2.8m. (draught)
Powered by three diesel-engines 6,380 hp, three shafts, speed maximum 30 knots.
Crew 6.
She was also fitted out with a daughter boat built under yard No 6431 by the same yard which received the name HELEN (KRT11) she was named after the first name of the wife of the mayor.
Displacement 5.8 ton, dim. 8.5 x 2.7 x 0.9m (draught).
Powered by one diesel engine 240 hp. one shaft, speed 13 knots.

After completion based at the South harbour in Helgoland.
2000 Modernised and updated with the most modern nautical equipment, her crew quarters refitted and the hospital ward changed in a multipurpose room. The last can be used as additional accommodation or a meeting room.
Her stern section was widened mainly below the waterline to give her a better stability in the high seas from behind.
When a new lifeboat on 08 July 2003 took over the station in Helgoland, WILHELM KAISEN was relocated to Sassnitz on the island of Rügen in the Baltic.
18 May 2012 out of service.
22 October 2012 sold to Worldwide Procurement Serv Fze, Dubai, United Arab Emirates and renamed SHERRIE ANNE.
Registered under the Togo flag and used as security vessel against piracy off the East African coast.
She was refitted by Tamsen Maritim in Rostock, Germany as a security vessel, and sailed from Rostock on 21 December 2012.
2015 Her last position was in Dubai, IMO No 7700166, same name and owners, managed by Tier One Holdings Ltd., Dubai.

Source: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Kaisen_(Schiff)
Germany 2015 0.62 Euro sg?. Scott?
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

The full index of our ship stamp archive

UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

tmp144.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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