SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TUNE VIKING SHIP

150th Anniversary of the Tune Viking Ship Finds
150 years have passed since the first Viking ship was excavated in Norway. Archaeologist Oluf Rygh excavated the Tune ship in only 14 days from the ship burial mound in Tune. Archaeologist Even Ballangrud Andersen describes the ship: “The ship is made from clinkered oak planks, a style that was common to the Nordics. Its mast was placed just behind midship and both stern posts were raised. A special chamber had been built for the man interred in the ship and all of his burial gifts and weaponry.”
By analysing the growth rings, the ship was dated to between 905 and 910 A. D. After the ship was excavated in 1867, it was placed on a barge and sent to Fredrikstad before continuing on to Christiania. After many years in poor storage, it was moved in 1930 to its permanent home at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. Later research has concluded that the ship most likely had twelve strakes and was a fast warship used to quickly transport people.
In terms of Norway’s maritime history, the Tune ship was the first indication that the stories passed orally through the years were true. Today the Viking ships stand as iconic witnesses to more than 1,000 years on the seven seas.

Norway 2017 inland mail sg?, scott?
http://wopa-stamps.com/index.php?contro ... e&id=35767

Clipper ship RACER 1851

The era of the clipper ships was dominated by a sense of romance, competition, national pride and innovative technology. The sleek and graceful ships were a symbol of modernity in America and a fundamental part of the expanding global economy. Their design concentrated on speed instead of cargo capacity, which was a great benefit to shipping companies eager to transport goods quickly. Often ship owners or Captains would commission portraits to commemorate their vessels. The RACER was a 1700 ton ship built in 1851 by Currier & Townsend at Newburyport, Massachusetts under the superintendence of her experienced commander, Capt. R. W. Steele, formerly of the packet ship Andrew Foster, and previously of the U. S. Navy. She is 207 feet long, has 42-1/2 feet breadth of beam, 28 feet depth of hold, is 7 feet high between decks . It was the first and largest ship to be built specifically for the trade route between New York and Liverpool for the St George Line. The Racer is well known from her having made the fastest passage between New York and Liverpool. Her best day's run has been 394 miles. It was fitted out with passenger accommodation and cargo space in the hold for freight. She is provided also with large loading ports, one on each side in the upper, and two on a side in the lower between decks. The RACER involved in freight and passenger transport to Australia. The “Racer” sank in 1856, after going ashore on Arklow Bank. Fortunately, all five hundred passengers and crew members were rescued. The design stamp is made after painting of Dawson, Montague
Djibouti 2013;300f.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37454888?q&versionId=48848168. http://www.maritimeheritage.org/ships/C ... html#Racer. https://springfieldmuseums.org/collecti ... l-currier/

DIANA packet ship

The stamp of Belize shows us a brig and as given on the stamp the packet ship DIANA is depict.
Lloyds Registry was not so helpful there were around that time 2 or 3 pages in Lloyds with the ships name DIANA but nowhere by that name was given if it was a packet vessel.
If she is the DIANA which is depict is doubtful I could not find any image of the ship, but the Falmouth Post Office packet ships were mostly brig rigged, and the stamp shows us a ship of that time. It looks that she was chartered by the Post Office as a packet but when and till in service I could not find.

The book “The Falmouth Packets 1689-1851 by Tony Pawlyn mentioned her twice
In 1810 she parted her anchor cable during a severe storm over the West of England, and was nearly driven ashore.
22 September 1811 she sailed for Martinique.

In 1806 the DIANA was under command of Gibbons.
1813 Her captain is given as Parsons, 190 ton and owned by Capt. & Co, Whitehaven. Till 1818 was he the captain. Built in New York?.
1819 Her owner given as Symonds and under command of Captain Sleeman
1822 Same name, owner and captain.
1824 Lloyds Registry don’t mentioned her more.

Belize 1985 75c sg849, scott?
Source: Lloyds Registry 1813-1824.

BAEK MA GANG (North Korea)

Built in 1979 by Nampo Shipyard, for Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. Nampo.
General Cargo, Dw:2740, Nt:1429, Dw:4309, Loa:100,26m. B:14m. Draft:6,40m. 1 diesel: hp.? 4x2 derricks, IMO.7944683.
20-03-2010 transferred to Paekmagang Shipping Co. Ltd. Pyongyang, renamed PAEK MA GANG.
2013 By Korea Suhyang Shipping Co. Ltd. sold to Chinese breakers and arrived Shidao, Shandong on 16-04-2013.

(North Korea 2013, 15 Won, StG.?)
Internet + LR97/98

JACQUELINE- four-masted barque 1897.

A splendid four-masted steel barque, the Jacqueline a representative vessel of French build, launched in February 1897 from the yards of Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterranean at La Seyne for the wealthy firm of Paris shipowners A D Bordes and Sons and registered at Dun-kirk. Rigged with royal sails over double top and topgallant sails. Used in the South American nitrate trade.The vessel is from Marseilles and has done some fine sailing. She left on May 23,1897 sailed from Mareilles to Australia with a cargo of tiles, she had contrary weather to clearing Gibraltar June 10. After that crossed the equator July 1 in 32 38 W. Poor S E trades were met. On July 8 in 17° S , the new ship was hove to in a S S W gale for 30 hours, and it was nine days later when thev shaped east.Then commenced some excellent running. Captain Leonetti, having a new ship under himn was anxious to find what she was capable of doing with the result that tho ship is stated to have logged 15 knots per hour for four days.The prime meridian was crossed on July 24, and S S W to N W winds were carried right along to August 21 to Tasmania. Here she was becalmed and met with head winds,but it will be seen that the ship sailedI from Greenwich meridian to Tasmania in 28 days, or over 5 degrees per day right through or a 13 knot speed for the 28 days. After a most tedious time off Tasmania she picked up a sou'-wester on September 1. On that date at 8pm a sailor named Sahun fell overboard from the foreyard, A lifebuoy was thrown, and it was caught, and the man was rescued under circumstances given elsewhere. A fine run was made up the coast. The ship is an excptionally fine one being fitted up for saloon passengers in very handsome cabins which are aft, and are constructel of mahognnv, birdsoyo maple and violet ebony. The cargo-workmg appliances and the navigating deck gear are of tho most modern labour-saving kind. A running flying bridge from the poop to the foremast is built over all and the crew have most comfortable quarters in deck-houses. There are two engines - one for cargo working and tho other connected with the ballast tanks and with condensing apparatus. She is 322ft long, 45ft 7in beam and 25ft 4in deep and it is an ideal of the proportions of this most handsome vessel. 1906 sailed from Barry to Iquique in 72 days. 1907 towed against the Loup lighthouse in the Bristol Channel by two tugs which straddled the lighthouse. The Jacqueline damaged the bowsprit which was repaired at Falmouth. 1917 July 1 Left Iquique under Captain Y. Niolas with a cargo of nitrate for La Pallice. 1917 September 25 The British steamship Victoria warned the captain of the Jacqueline for submarines in position 46°25'N, 13°10'W. After the war it was established that she had been sunk by the German submarine U-101 in the Bay of Biscay the following morning. The design stamp is made after painting of John Bentham Dinsdale. .
Malawi 2013;250k.
Source:http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14120744. http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships ... eline(1897).html.

BRIG-SCHOONER

The stamp inscription gives “brig-schooner” but she is rigged as a hermaphrodite brig, a term used in the late 18th centuries for a vessel that carried as many as 5 square sails on the foremast and a fore-and-aft mainsail with a gaff topsail. Numerous staysails between the masts and jibs to a long bowsprit. The type is now usually called a brigantine.

Somalia Republic 1998 300 SH SO sg?, scott?
Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

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Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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