SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

RINALDO HMS 1901

Built as a steel sloop under yard No 636 by Laird Bross, Birkenhead for the Royal Navy.
08 November 1898 laid down.
29 May 1900 launched as the HMS RINALDO one of the Condor-class.
Displacement 980 ton, dim. 62 x 9.9 x 3.51m draught, length bpp. 55 m.
Powered by 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engines, 1,400 hp, twin shafts, speed 13 knots.
Range 3,000 mile by a speed of 10 knots. Bunker capacity 160 ton coal.
First barque rigged later altered to Barquentine and in the end complete removed.
Armament: 6 – QF 4 inch, 4 – QF 3pdr guns and 1 MG.
Crew 120-130.
26 November 1901 commissioned.

First used in South East Asia.
August 1904 she was given medical assistance to Brunei during an outbreak of smallpox there.
1914 Was she tender and training ship to HMS VIVID, Devonport Royal Naval Reserve.
When First World War broke out patrols along the Belgium Coast.
1915 In service on West, South and East Africa till May 1919.
07 May 1919 arrived at Plymouth from Africa.
? Decommissioned.
21 October 1921 sold to W. Thomas, Anglesey for scrapping.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
Sources: ships of the Royal Navy by J.J. Colledge. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Wikipedia. http://www.naval-history.net/OWShips-WW ... inaldo.htm

POLYNESIAN VOYAGE CANOE

The stamp has the inscription “The Polynesians the earliest of the Pacific explores”. And shows us a double hulled dug-out voyage canoe.
The Polynesian primary voyage craft was the double canoe made of two hulls connected by lashing crossbeams. The two hulls gave this craft stability and the capacity to carry heavy loads of migrating families and all their supplies and equipment, while a central platform laid over the crossbeams provided the needed working, living and storage space. Sails made of matting drove this ancient forerunner of the modern catamaran swiftly trough the seas, and long steering paddles enabled Polynesian mariners to keep it sailing on course.
A medium-size voyage canoe with a length of 50 to 60 feet could accommodate two dozen or so migrants, their food supplies, livestock and planting materials.

Grenada 1991 25c sg2224, scott1953.
Source: http://www.pbs.org/wayfinders/polynesian2.html

STONE FISHING

Stone fishing is a centuries-old tradition in Tahiti that is still occasionally practiced today. In the past, this particular method of fishing allowed small islands to catch enough fish to feed everyone in the community. Now, some of the islands still perform the ritual during grand occasions as a way to celebrate the tradition and invite everyone to partake in the feast that follows.
In French, the technique is called “la pêche aux cailloux.” In Tahitian, it’s known as “te tautai taora ofa’i” (tautai means “fishing instrument,” taora means “thrown,” and ofa’i is the Tahitian word for “stone”).

How Does it Work?
Stone fishing is similar to a cattle drive except the animals being “herded” are underneath the water. Powered by canoes, the locals start by beating the surface of the lagoon with heavy stones tied to ropes made of coconut fiber. This creates a frenzy that frightens the fish, coercing them toward the shore.
Once in shallow water, the canoes form a circle and drop a long line of coconut leaves around the perimeter. With a physical barrier in place, the fish are contained and therefore much easier to catch. Traditionally, the fish were collected in woven baskets made from coconut palms; but today, the fish are also sometimes speared.
The Island of Maupiti
Maupiti, a small island located west of Bora Bora, is home to approximately 1,200 inhabitants. Once every ten years, the entire population of the island takes part in a traditional stone fishing event with over 200 canoes on the water. Check out this video from the event in 2000. Although the narrative is in French, it will give you a great idea of what stone fishing is like.
The island’s most recent stone fishing celebration was the conclusion of a South Pacific UNESCO conference on sustainable development. Afterward, all the fish were released except for one caught by French Senator Richard Tuheiava, a Maupiti native.

French Polynesia 1991 25f/62f sg621/23, scott571/573.
Downloaded from: https://blog.tahiti.com/2012/07/17/gone ... ian-style/ b

NIGHT HAWK HMT

Built as a steam trawler under yard no 645 by Cochrane & Sons, Selby for Pioneer Steam Fishing Co. Ltd., Grimsby.
14 August 1915 launched as the NIGHT HAWK.
Tonnage 307 gross, 150 net, dim. 40.23 x 7.31 x 3.90m.
Powered by one 3-cyl. triple expansion steam engine manufactured by C. D. Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull, 89 nhp, speed ?
January 1916 completed.

History
14.8.1915: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.645) for The Pioneer Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby as NIGHT HAWK.
1.1.1916: Registered at Grimsby (GY822).
3.1.1916: Completed (Alick (Alec) Black, manager).
2.1916: Sold to The Grimsby Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (George E. J. Moody, manager).
3.1916: Requisitioned for war service as a minesweeper (1-6pdr HA) (Ad.No.1936). Employed on escort duties. Based Devonport.
By 12.3.1919: Returned to owner at Grimsby.
1926: Sir George E. J. Moody appointed manager.
7.2.1934: On an Icelandic trip off Isafjord sustained damage after striking an ice flow.
1.1939: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, manager).
1.6.1940: Requisitioned for war service as an auxiliary patrol vessel (P.No.FY.1858) (Hire rate £86.19.8d/month).
10.1940: Fitted out as a minesweeper. Based Plymouth with M/S Group 76.
8.1941: Sold to North Star Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Aberdeen.
22.9.1941: Grimsby registry closed.
25.9.1941: Registered at Aberdeen (A517).
1944: Employed on auxiliary patrol duties.
1944: Sold to Parkholme Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood (Harvey Wilfred Wilson, Grimsby, manager). Aberdeen registry closed. Registered at Grimsby (GY15).
1945: Sold to Milford Fisheries Ltd, Milford Haven (Owen W. Limbrick, manager).
8.1946: Returned to owner.
24.8.1948: Landed at Fleetwood (Skipper Arthur Harvey) after nine day trip on herring, 1,350 boxes grossed £2,250.
6.1954: Laid up at Milford due to NCB further increase in price of bunker coal.
29.6.1956: Alongside in Milford. Two men scalded by steam when boiler door joint blew.
2.1959: Sold to Jacques Bakker en Zonen, Bruges for breaking up.
25.2.1959: Last landing at Milford.
28.2.1959: Sailed Milford for Zeebruges.
2.3.1959: Delivered Bruges, and broken up by J. Bakker & Zonen at Zelzate, Belgium, at that time she carried still the name NIGHT HAWK.

Liberia 2015 $30 sg?, scott?
http://www.fleetwood-trawlers.info/inde ... hawk-gy15/ http://www.llangibby.eclipse.co.uk/milf ... t_hawk.htm

Padi.Bangladesh

Padi is used for transportation of red clay for pottery in the Barisal area. Heavy block ends, both tall and truncat¬ed on top. Very low freeboard amidships. Covered area over most of the hull. Quarter rudder. Mast stepped in forward third. Crew of 2. Length ca. 13m.

Bangladesh2013;100,0; Ms.SG? Source: A Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra.

Panshi Bangladesh/India

Water-taxi, fishing boat, ferryboat, and produce carrier of the Ganges River and Delta. Carvel planking fastened with staples; sides teak, bottom ironwood; rounded hull without keel. Long, overhanging spoon bow and stern formed from heavy, squared stem and sternpost; bow low, stern higher and broader. Generally undecked except at the ends. Those carrying jute and rice have a large, built-up house; cargo area lined with tin sheets; sides and roof of bamboo. Passenger panshis have a cabin with sides of wood or tin; a large type may be called a kuthir-pansi. Steered with either an oar or tall, balanced rudder; steering platform built above the cabin. Rowed by 6 oarsmen seated forward,poled,or sailed, setting 1-2 square sails. Average 5-6 in crew: Reported lengths 6-20m; West Bengal fishing panshi length 8.2m, beam 2.28m, depth 0.9m; shallow draft. The Pabna panshi is a long, narrow boat used in local: boat races.

Bangladesh2013;100,0; Ms.SG? Source: A Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra.
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

tmp144.jpg
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Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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