SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

RAMSEY HMS 1895

Built as a passenger ship under yard No 243 by Naval Construction & Armament Comp., Barrow-in-Furness, U.K. for the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway & London & North Western Railway Cos., Fleetwood.
9 May 1895 launched as the DUKE OF LANCASTER.
Tonnage 1,520 gross, dim. 94.5 x 11.3 x 4.9m.
Powered by two triple expansion 6-cyl. steam engines, 5,300 shp, twin screws, speed 19 knots.
Capacity for 1162 day passengers.
August 1995 in service, homeport Fleetwood.
TSS THE RAMSEY was a passenger steamer operated by the London and North Western Railway from 1895 to 1911 as the DUKE OF LANCASTER. The vessel was then acquired by an organisation referred to as the "Turkish Patriotic Committee". However the acquisition was not completed, and she was subsequently sold to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.
Construction
DUKE OF LANCASTER was launched on 9 May 1895 at the Barrow-in-Furness yard of the Naval Construction and Armament Company Ltd, who also constructed the engines and boilers. The vessel initially had a tonnage of 1,546 grt; length 310'2"; beam 37'1"; depth 16'4". DUKE OF LANCASTER had an operating speed of 19 knots.
Service life
DUKE OF LANCASTER entered service with the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company who operated her with the London & North Western Railway Company on the Fleetwood - Belfast service.
In March 1911, DUKE OF LANCASTER was sold to Abrihim & Edhen, Istanbul an organisation called the Turkish Patriotic Committee, who had the engines and boilers renovated at Cammell Laird.
However, the outbreak of the Italo-Turkish War in September 1911, prevented the purchasers from taking delivery, and the vessel was sold in 1912 to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.
Isle of Man Steam Packet Company
The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company took delivery of the vessel in July 1912, and immediately changed the vessel's name to THE RAMSEY. She had an uneventful career with the company as she established herself within the Steam Packet fleet.
RAMSEY 's service with the company was one of the shortest of any ship in its history, and concluded at the end of the 1914 season.
War Service & loss
The RAMSEY was the third of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company's ships to be called up for service in the Great War. On 28 October 1914 she was requisitioned and fitted out as an Armed Boarding Vessel by Cammell Larid's with two 12-pounder guns and a ship's company of 98, and renamed simply HMS RAMSEY.
Ramsey was based at Scapa Flow and her work consisted of night patrols. She was usually accompanying two destroyers. It was dangerous work, directed by radio from headquarters, carried out without navigation lights and with manned guns throughout. In the course of a few months RAMSEY intercepted and challenged many ships, sometimes putting a prize crew aboard and taking the suspect into port.
On her last patrol she had steamed for 12 hours when, after dawn on 8 August 1915, smoke was seen from over the horizon. RAMSEY gave chase and came upon a steamer flying the Russian flag. RAMSEY proceeded alongside the vessel, which had duly stopped. The suspect, which was the German auxiliary minelayer SMS METEOR then hoisted the German flag and fired at what amounted to point-blank range, killing the Commander and crew members on the bridge of RAMSEY.
At the same time the raider, fired a torpedo, shattering RAMSEY’s stern. Fifty five of the crew were killed; 43 were picked up by the METEOR after RAMSEY went down in five minutes. Her wreck position is given as lat:59°36'N. long:001°25'W.
The next day British Forces overwhelmed the METEOR, whose prisoners were transferred to neutral ships before she was scuttled.

Isle of Man 2015 75p sg?, scott?
Source: Register of Merchants Ships completed in 1896. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_The_Ramsey

TRADING SLOOP

On the Christmas stamp of Anguilla 1986 10c there is not a name given of the sloop depict, only that it is a “trading sloop”.

The book Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft gives on the sloops used in the West Indies.
The sloop of the Windward and Leeward Islands in the West Indies is widely used to carry freight, passengers and for fishing. Most are rigged with a gaff, jib-headed or gunter mainsail, and 1 -2 headsails; has an exceptionally long boom. Most roughly built with carvel planking, usually of pitch pine above the waterline, greenheart below; natural crook frames of cedar.
Counter or raked transom stern; curved or straight raked stern; bluff bow; full body amidships; strong sheer.
Larger boats decked, often with a trunk cabin in the after part. Northern boats that engage in fishing may have a wet well, but in the southern islands, the fish are dried in the rigging. Those with auxiliaries engines have a double sternpost, the rudder hung from the after post.
Crew of 3 plus a boy.
Reported lengths 7 – 30m; e.g. length 8.2m, beam 2,4m, depth 1,2m.

Anguilla 1986 10c sg734, scott?

BIG BILLFISH TOURNAMENT

The Big Billfish Tournament, which attracts the sports-fishing elite from the United States, Canada and Europe, is held annually in the Turks & Caicos Islands in the West Indies. The term "billfish" includes any of the large species with a prominent bill, such as sailfish, swordfish and various marlins (white, blue and black).
To hail the 1988 Billfish Tournament, the Turks & Caicos issued four new stamps and a souvenir sheet.
The 8-cent depicts a giant swordfish jumping into the air after being hooked by an angler from the deck of a fishing boat, a 28-foot Aquasport 270 Express Fisherman.
The 10-cent shows the captain of the boat, the swordfish and the angler having their picture taken.
The 70-cent illustrates the fishing boat leaving port for the big fish area.
The $1 pictures a large blue marlin underwater.
The $2 MS depict in the margin also a sport fishing boat.

The 8c stamp depict an Aquasport 270 Express Fisherman. The type was built by Aquasport in Sarasota, Florida, USA.
Dimensions: 8.71 x 3.05 x 0.76m. (draught)
Weight 2,721 kg.
Powered by two inboard gasoline engines of 220 hp, speed 20 knots, maximum 28 knots.
Sleeping accommodation for three persons.

Turks & Caicos Islands 1988 8c/$1 sg930/33, scott753/5. MSsg?, scott756.
Source: Internet.

CUMBERLAND QUEEN schooner 1919

I found in it Suralco Magazine 2014 page 55 that the first shipment of bauxite from Moengo, Surinam to the United States of America was loaded on board the schooner CUMBERLAND QUEEN in 1922. The 730c stamps shows a four-mast schooner and I believe she is depict.
By the article was given a photo which looks she is the vessel depict on the stamp.
The CUMBERLAND QUEEN a four-mast wooden schooner was built by Robinson & Pugsley in Diligent River N.B., Canada, could not find an owner.
Tonnage 634 tons, dim. 179.0 x 38.0 x 13.2ft.
1919 Completed.
The first time I found her in Lloyds Registry was in 1930/31.
There is given her name as EMERETT ex CUMBERLAND QUEEN and she was then owned by M.Dacosta Roberts, with homeport Baltimore, USA. Tonnage given as 659 ton.
L.R. 1931/32 gives that she is damaged in port, and then she is not more mentioned in L.R.
So most probably too expensive too repair, and scrapped.

Suriname 1996 750c sg1704, scott1070.
Source: various internet sites and Lloyds Registry.

IBN KHALDOON ?? 1976

Mr. Niewenhuijzen did say the cargo/training vessel IBN KHALDOON completed in 1978, is not the ship depict on the stamp issued by Iraq in 1981, and he gives, the stamp shows a vessel with a stulcken mast while the IBN KHALDOON has a bi-pod mast.
I agree that she is not the vessel, by searching around on the internet I found another IBN KHALDOON, (Stanley Gibbons gives that she is IBN KHALDOON, but I can’t find if this is true. Navicula gives that she is a K-class vessel.) Comparing the stamp and photos of that ships class on the internet, I agree with Navicula she is a K-class vessel.
Which vessel is depict is doubtful the name on the stamp when you enlarge the stamp is not readable, but one of the ships of that class of 52 ships is the IBN KHALDOON completed in 1976.
That class was built in the U.K and South Korea. The details of the ships are almost all the same.
The IBN KHALDOON was built as a cargo vessel under yard No 2320 by Hyundai at Ulsan, South Korea for the United Arab Shipping Co, S.A.G. Kuwait.
05 March 1976 laid down.
06 August 1976 launched as the IBN KHALDOON.
Tonnage 15,446 grt, 23,618 dwt, dim. 175.32 x 23.98 x 10.40 (draught), length bpp. 168.10m
One 6-cyl. B&W 6K74EF diesel engine, 15,000 hp, one shaft, speed 16 knots.
The class was more a conventional cargo ship but it was possible to carry 434 TEU’s containers.
December 1976 completed. Under Kuwait flag and registry.

1987 Sold to Goddard Shipping Co., Cyprus and renamed ZEBRA.
1989 Sold to Trade Fir Shipping Inc., Cyprus, renamed TRADE FIR.
1994 Sold to Temple Services Ltd., St Vincent and renamed KRISTEN STAR.
20 December 2000 arrived Chittagong for demolition.
2015 The ships of this class has all been scrapped or deleted from Lloyds Registry

Iraq 1981 50f/120f sg1507/08 scott1032/33.
Source: Marine News. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz Internet.

FREMANTLE HMAS (203)

Built as a patrol boat under yard No 422 by Brooke Marine, Lowestoft South, England for the Australian Navy.
October 1977 laid down.
16 February 1979 launched as the HMAS FREMANTLE (203) the lead ship of her class.
Displacement 220 tons standard, 245 tons full load, dim. 41.9 x 7.70 x 1.75m. (draught)
Powered by 2 MTU series 538 diesel engines, 3,200 shp, twin shafts, speed 30 knots.
Range by a speed of 5 knots, 5,000 mile.
Armament 1 – 40/60mm Bofors gun, 2 – 12.7mm MG, 1 81mm mortar who was later removed..
Crew 22
17 March 1980 commissioned, homeport Coonawarra.
HMAS FREMANTLE (FCPB 203), named for the city of Fremantle, Western Australia, was the lead ship of the Fremantle class patrol boats, entering service in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in 1980 and decommissioning in 2006. Fremantle was the only ship of the class not constructed in Australia, and it is claimed that her delivery voyage was the longest ever made by a patrol boat.
Main article: Fremantle class patrol boat
Starting in the late 1960s, planning began for a new class of patrol boat to replace the Attack class, with designs calling for improved seakeeping capability, and updated weapons and equipment. In 1976, Brooke Marine of the United Kingdom won the contract to produce the lead ship.
The FREMANTLE had a full load displacement of 220 tonnes (220 long tons; 240 short tons), were 137.6 feet (41.9 m) long overall, had a beam of 24.25 feet (7.39 m), and a maximum draught of 5.75 feet (1.75 m). Main propulsion machinery consisted of two MTU series 538 diesel engines, which supplied 3,200 shaft horsepower (2,400 kW) to the two propeller shafts. Exhaust was not expelled through a funnel, like most ships, but through vents below the waterline. The patrol boat could reach a maximum speed of 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph), and had a maximum range of 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph). The ship's company consisted of 22 personnel. Each patrol boat was armed with a single 40 mm Bofors gun as main armament, supplemented by two .50 cal Browning machineguns and an 81-mm mortar, although the mortar was removed from all ships sometime in the late 1990s. The main weapon was originally to be two 30-mm guns on a twin-mount, but the reconditioned Bofors were selected to keep costs down; provision was made to install an updated weapon later in the class' service life, but this did not eventuate.
Construction
Construction of FREMANTLE began in October 1977, and she was launched on 16 February 1979. During sea trials, FREMANTLE was revealed to be 20 tons over the contract's proscribed weight, leading to unpopularity in the media. However, the design proved its worth when it was diverted from trial to successfully rescue a British sailor thrown from a fishing trawler. Because of the sea trials, FREMANTLE was not commissioned until 17 March 1980.
Delivery of previous Brooke Marine patrol boats to the client nations was normally done by loading the craft on a heavy lift ship. It was instead decided in 1979 to sail FREMANTLE to Australia; the RAN wanted to learn as much about the capabilities of the new design as quickly as possible, and the loss of an Omani Navy patrol vessel from a heavy lift ship during a storm was a cause of concern. On 7 June 1980, FREMANTLE left Lowestoft, England on the delivery voyage to Australia. The voyage took 82 days, 48 spent at sea. During this voyage, FREMANTLE travelled through the Mediterranean Sea, Suez Canal, Red Sea, along the coast of India, through Maritime Southeast Asia, then down the east coast of Australia to Sydney.[ During this voyage, FREMANTLE was tested to limits; encountering windstoms reaching Force 6, a sandstorm in the Red Sea, high-temperature and -humidity conditions, and a monsoon. By the time FREMANTLE arrived in Australia on 27 August 1980, she had already sailed 14,509 nautical miles (26,871 km). This is claimed to be the longest voyage undertaken by a single patrol boat.
Operational history
During her career, FREMANTLE was primarily involved in operations against illegal fishing and illegal immigration, and supporting Australian Coastwatch and the Australian Customs Service.
Decommissioning and fate
On 11 August 2006, HMAS FREMANTLE was decommissioned at HMAS Coonawarra, Darwin. FREMANTLE was the eighth ship of her class to be decommissioned. FREMANTLE was in service for 26 years, and travelled a distance of 535,705 nautical miles (992,126 km; 616,478 mi) from commissioning. The patrol boat was broken up for scrap in Darwin during 2006 and 2007, at a cost of $450,000 to the Australian government.

Solomon Islands 2014 in margin of MS. Sg?, scott? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_Fremantle_(FCPB_203)
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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

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UNIMAK USS seaplane tender

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Sep 13, 2009 8:54 pm

tmp144.jpg
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Built as a seaplane tender by Associated Shipbuilders Inc.,Harbor Island, Seattle, Washington for the USA Navy.
15 February 1942 laid down.
27 May 1942 launched as the USS UNIMAK (AVP-31), sponsored by Mrs. H.B. Berry the wife of Captain H.B.Berry, the personnel officer of the 13th Naval District. Named after the Unimak Bay on the southern side of Unimak Island, Alaska. She was one of the Barnegat class.
Displacement 1.766 tons light, 2.592 tons full load. Dim. 94.7 x 12.5 x 4.1m. (draught).
Powered by two Fairbanks-Morse diesels, 6.080 bhp, twin shafts, speed 18 knots.
Armament 1 – 5 inch, 4 – 40mm AA, 8 – 20mm AA guns, 2 – depth charge tracks and 2 Mousetrap depth charge projectors.
Crew 215 without aviation unit.
31 December 1943 commissioned under command of Commander Hilfort C. Owen.

She carried supplies, spare parts, repairs and berthing for some seaplanes squadron. Aviation bunkers 302.833 liters.
Following shakedown and fitting-out into late January 1944, the small seaplane tender departed San Diego, Calif., on 20 March, bound for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Balboa eight days later, the seaplane tender operated on the Pacific coast of Central America into April, providing logistics support to advanced seaplane bases at Santa Elena Bay, Ecuador, and at Aeolian Bay, Battra Island, in the Galapagos group. She soon shifted to Coco Solo on the Caribbean side of the Canal and transported men and materiel to Barranquilla’s Colombia, arriving there on 25 April.
After escorting SS GENEVIEVE LYKES back to Coco Solo on 23 and 24 June, UNIMAK conducted routine exercises with patrol planes into July. On 4 July, she received reports that a tanker near her position had been torpedoed and headed for the damaged ship. When she arrived on the scene late that day, she found the tanker still underway, making for the Panama coast. She immediately commenced screening the disabled ship and, aided by an escort of Army and Navy planes, shepherded the tanker safely to Colon late on the following afternoon.
Soon thereafter, UNIMAK shaped her course towards the last reported position of Navy blimp K-58. At 1532 on 9 July the seaplane tender sighted two yellow rubber rafts and the wreckage of the crashed blimp floating on the water. At 1558, UNIMAK took on board nine survivors and sank the unsalvageable blimp by collapsing the bag with 40-millimeter gunfire; the ship then landed the survivors at Portland Bight, Jamaica.
A few days later, on 12 July, UNIMAK joined with JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216) in hunting for a submarine reported to be lurking nearby. Within a few days, word of a crashed plane sent the two ships speeding for the last reported position of an aircraft. UNIMAK located only wreckage and one body and buried it at sea on 16 July.
UNIMAK remained in the Caribbean through the autumn, tending patrol planes, conducting logistics support missions for advanced seaplane bases, and occasionally towing targets for the patrol planes training in the area. On 15 December, ROCKAWAY (AVP-29) relieved UNIMAK, releasing her to steam north via Norfolk to Boston, Mass.
Arriving there at the end of December 1944, UNIMAK underwent availability at the Boston Navy Yard for the entire month of January 1945. She got underway for England on 14 February, but an engineering casualty forced the ship to return to Boston for a major propeller shaft alignment which lasted into March.
On 7 April, UNIMAK got underway for the British Isles and proceeded, via Bahia Praia in the Azores, to Bristol, on the first of two voyages to England to bring back supplies and men from decommissioned Navy patrol plane squadrons in the British Isles. On the second voyage, from 5 to 15 June, UNIMAK transported the men and materiel of Patrol Bomber Squadrons 103 and 105 from Bristol to Norfolk.
Departing Hampton Roads on 20 July, bound for the west coast, the ship transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived at San Diego on 3 August. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on the 12th. The seaplane tender subsequently operated in the Hawaiian chain until 7 September when she headed for the Aleutians.
She operated in northern climes (calling at Adak, Kodiak, and Attu, Alaska; and once at Petropavlovsk Siberia) into November of 1945 before heading southward to prepare for inactivation. Subsequently reporting to Commander, 19th Fleet, in December, UNIMAK was decommissioned on 26 July 1946. She remained in reserve until transferred to the Coast Guard on 14 September 1948.
She served the Coast Guard as UNIMAK (WAVP-379).
The UNIMAK was home ported in Boston from 3 January 1949 to 1 September 1956 and used primarily for law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. In June 1956, she patrolled the Newport, RI to Bermuda race. She was subsequently stationed at Cape May, NJ from 1 September 1956 to 7 August 1972 and used primarily for training reservists, including training cruises to Brazil and Nova Scotia. She took part in the cadet cruise of August 1965. On 7 March 1967 she rescued six Cuban refugees in the Yucatan Channel. On 10 March 1967 she rescued survivors from F/V BUNKIE III in Florida waters. Five days later, she rescued 12 Cuban refugees who were stranded on an island. On 29 May 1969, UNIMAK towed the disabled F/V SIROCCO 35 miles east of Fort Pierce, FL, to safety. On 3 April 1970, UNIMAK stood by the grounded M/V VASSILIKI near Mayaguana Island until a commercial tug arrived.
From 7 August 1972 to 31 May 1975, the UNIMAK was stationed at Yorktown, VA, and was again used to train reservists. Between 31 May 1975 and August 1977 she was placed out of commission and stored at Curtis Bay. MD. On 22 August 1977, UNIMAK was reactivated and was home ported at New Bedford, MA, until 1988. She was used primarily for fishing patrol.
On 6 October 1980, she seized M/V JANETH 340 miles southeast of Miami, FL, carrying 500 bales of marijuana. On 14 October 1980, she seized P/C RESCUE carrying approximately 500 bales of marijuana and P/C SNAIL with two tons of marijuana in the Gulf of Mexico. Three days later, she seized M/V AMALAKA southwest of Key West, FL, carrying 1,000 bales of marijuana. On 19 October 1980, UNIMAK seized F/V WRIGHT’S PRIDE southwest of Key West, carrying 30 tons of marijuana. In March of 1981, while on an OCS training cruise, UNIMAK intercepted M/V MAYO with 40 tons of marijuana. On 9 December 1982, she towed the disabled F/V SACRED HEART away from Daid Banks, 45 miles east of Cape Cod, in 30-foot seas.
Between 28 January and 9 March 1983, the UNIMAK was again deployed to the Caribbean for law enforcement patrol. On 27 and 28 February 1983, she towed the dismasted WANDERING STAR to Mathew Town, Great Iguana. On 3 March 1983, she towed the disabled M/V YADRINA to Mathew Town. On 30 November 1984, UNIMAK seized the sailboat LOLA 100 miles north of Barranquilla, Colombia, carrying 1.5 tons of marijuana. Another drug bust occurred on 2 November 1985, when the UNIMAK seized tugboat ZEUS 3 and a barge 200 miles south of the Dominican Republic carrying 40 tons of marijuana.
After her return to the Navy in April of 1988, she was expended as an artificial reef off the Virginia coast.
Tuvalu 1990 30c sg579, scott544.
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. USA Coastguard web-site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Unimak_(AVP-31)
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