SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

«Arthur James»-fishing schooner

Fishing schooner «Arthur James» had been built in 1905. She had seen sixteen seasons and four collisions, the most recent in 1916 off Castle Island, where she sank in fifty feet of water after being run down by steamer. Every spring around March, the seiners of the mackerel fleet would fit out and prepare to head south to meet the schools of mackerel off the Carolina capes. Then, through the summer, the fleet would pursue the schools north along the coast, finding them by autumn off Nova Scotia. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “This is a view of the schooner "Arthur James" leaving Gloucester just after the turn of the century. She is heading out of the harbor at sunrise with a blustery northwest wind. Behind her is the fort section of town. Around her, at anchor and throughout the harbor, the fleet prepares to get under way. With a full load of salt and one seine boat on deck and another towing astern, the "Arthur James" is bound south.”
Somalia 2010;2500. Source: http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/details/default. asp?p=87&a=10&t. https://books. google. ru/ books?id=s2mBTh6mC.

RANKIN HMAS

Built as a guided missile submarine by Australian Submarine Corp., Port Adelaide for the Australian Navy.
12 May 1995 laid down.
07 November 2001 launched as the HMAS RANKIN (S-78), christened by Ms Patricia Rankin. She is one of the Collins class.
Displacement 3,100 ton surfaced, 3,407 ton surfaced, dim. 77.8 x 7.8 x 7m, (draught surfaced)
Powered diesel electric by 3 Hedemora/Garden Island Type V18B/14 diesels for surface speed and 3 Jeumont Schneider generators for submerged speed who deliver power to a single shaft. Hp?
1 Mac Taggart Scott DM 43,006 hydraulic motor for emergency propulsion.
Armament: Missiles, McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, torpedoes McDonald Douglas Sub Harpoon Block 1B (UGM 84C) active radar homing, or 44 mines in lieu of torpedoes.
Crew 48 plus trainees.
29 March 2009 commissioned.

HMAS RANKIN is the sixth and final submarine of the Collins class, which are operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, the boat was laid down in 1995, and commissioned into the RAN in March 2003, following major delays.
Early in her career, RANKIN was the subject of a documentary series and a coffee table book. She was the first submarine since 1987 to be awarded the Gloucester Cup.

Construction
RANKIN was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation on 12 May 1995. The boat was launched on 7 November 2001. She was delivered to the RAN on 18 March 2003 and commissioned on 29 March 2003, 41 months behind schedule, after major delays in the completion and fitting out of the boat due to the diversion of resources to the "fast track" submarines DECHAINEUX and SHEEEAN and repeated cannibalisation for parts to repair the other five Collins-class boats.
RANKIN was named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William RANKIN, who died when the ship he commanded, HMAS YARRA, engaged a force of five Japanese warships on 4 March 1942, to allow an Allied convoy to escape. The boat is nicknamed "The Black Knight".
Characteristics
The Collins class is an enlarged version of the Västergötland-class submarine designed by Kockums. At 77.42 metres (254.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.8 metres (26 ft) and a waterline depth of 7 metres (23 ft), displacing 3,051 tonnes when surfaced, and 3,353 tonnes when submerged, they are the largest conventionally powered submarines in the world. The hull is constructed from high-tensile micro-alloy steel, and are covered in a skin of anechoic tiles to minimise detection by sonar. The depth that they can dive to is classified: most sources claim that it is over 180 metres (590 ft),
The submarine is armed with six 21-inch (530 mm) torpedo tubes, and carry a standard payload of 22 torpedoes: originally a mix of Gould Mark 48 Mod 4 torpedoes and UGM-84C Sub-Harpoon, with the Mark 48s later upgraded to the Mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) version.
The submarine is equipped with three Garden Island-Hedemora HV V18b/15Ub (VB210) 18-cylinder diesel engines, which are each connected to a 1,400 kW, 440-volt DC Jeumont-Schneider generator. The electricity generated is stored in batteries, then supplied to a single Jeumont-Schneider DC motor, which provides 7,200 shaft horsepower to a single, seven-bladed, 4.22-metre (13.8 ft) diameter skewback propeller. The Collins class has a speed of 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph) when surfaced and at snorkel depth, and can reach 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph) underwater. The submarines have a range of 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km; 13,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) when surfaced, 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) at snorkel depth. When submerged completely, a Collins class submarine can travel 32.6 nautical miles (60.4 km; 37.5 mi) at maximum speed, or 480 nautical miles (890 km; 550 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph). Each boat has an endurance of 70 days.
Operational history
During a multinational exercise in September 2003, which was attended by RANKIN and sister boat WALLER, RANKIN successfully "sank" a Singaporean anti-submarine warfare vessel.
In 2004, a film crew was embarked aboard RANKIN for the creation of Submariners, a six-part documentary aired by SBS in 2005 and depicting life aboard a submarine. The film crew was on board from February to April 2004, during which the boat completed pre-deployment trials, participated in the submarine rescue exercise Pacific Reach, and made a diplomatic visit to Kure, Japan. They later rejoined RANKIN during the submarine's deployment to Hawaii for RIMPAC 04 in June and July. Later that year, RANKIN was also the subject of the book Beneath Southern Seas. The coffee table book, which encompasses the history of the Royal Australian Navy Submarine Service, was primarily based on photographs and interviews of RANKIN and those aboard taken by the authors during a twelve-day voyage from Sydney to Fremantle, concluding the six-month deployment started during the filming of Submariners. The 20,000 nautical miles (37,000 km; 23,000 mi) voyage—the longest undertaken by a Collins-class submarine to that date—began with workups in February, and saw the submarine visit Korea, Japan, and Hawaii, and participate in various multinational exercises before returning to Fremantle via Sydney. RANKIN was at sea for 126 days, 80% of which was spent underwater.
On 10 June 2005, RANKIN was presented with the Gloucester Cup. Presented to the RAN vessel with the greatest overall efficiency over the previous twelve months, RANKIN was the first Collins-class submarine to earn the Cup, and the first submarine to receive it since ORION in 1987. The award was again presented to RANKIN in 2008.
RANKIN was docked for a long maintenance period in 2008, but workforce shortages and malfunctions on other submarines requiring urgent attention have drawn this out: in 2010 RAN and ASC officials predicted that she would not be back in service until 2013. At the end of the works on RANKIN, personnel were transferred from HMAS FARNCOMB (which was commencing a similar period of maintenance and upgrades), and RANKIN arrived at Fleet Base West on 1 October 2014.
2018 In active service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_RANKIN_(SSG_78) and internet
Solomon Islands 2016 $35 sgMS?, scott?

SEAWOLF CLASS submarine

The class was built as a nuclear attack submarine by General Dynamics Electro Boat Co., Groton for the USA Navy. Of this class three were built commissioned between 1997 and 2005. The last JIMMY CARTER had another tonnage and dim.
Displacement 7,460 tons standard, 9,137 tons full load, dim. 1007.6 x 12.9 x 11m. (draught).
Powered by one S6W PWR nuclear reactor, 52,000 shp, one shaft, pumpjet propulsor, speed + 35 knots.
Range, unlimited, endurance, till food supplies run out.
Diving depth + 800 feet.
Armament: 8 – 26 inch torpedo tubes, 40 torpedoes, 50 missiles or 100 mines.
Crew 140.
More on this class of three ships is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf-class_submarine
2018 Al three are in active service.

I believe the USS CONNECTICUT is depict on this stamp. See photo and stamp. When I am correct the tugboat is the harbour tug USS NATCHITOCHES (799).

Solomon Islands 2016 $12.00 sg?, scott?

«Allerton»- iron full-rigged ship

An iron full-rigged ship built in 1884 by Oswald, Mordaunt & Co., Southampton, as Yard No. 224. Dimensions 83,17×12,23×7,50 meters and 1936 tons under deck.
In 1885 the Captain J. Gyllencreutz was appointed.
In 1910 sold to owners in Valparaiso, Chile, for £ 2600 and converted into a hulk.
The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom. In the picture we see: “The year is 1897 and the iron hull rigger "Allerton" makes her way up the East River, viewed from the piers of South Street. The last of the late afternoon sun just catches her toward her berth. The crew of the "Allerton" stands by on the fo-c'sle while some bystanders watch with perhaps some professional curiosity.” "Allerton" was typical of many latter day sailing ships being squeezed out of business by the competition with steam.
Somalia 2010;2500. Source:http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships/Merchant/Sail/A/Allerton(1884). http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/detail ... ype=artist.

Boston Navy Yard

The earliest naval shipbuilding activities in Charlestown, Massachusettsacross the Charles River and Boston harbor to the north from the city of Boston , began during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The land for the Charlestown Navy Yard was purchased by the United States government in 1800 and the yard itself established shortly thereafter. The yard built the first US ship of the line , "USS Independence" , but was primarily a repair and storage facility until the 1890s, when it started to build steel ships for the "New Navy". By then, it was called the Boston Navy Yard. Forty-six ships have been constructed in the Boston Navy Yard, the first vessel launched being the sloop of war Frolic in 1813, and the latest the Whitney, a destroyer tender, launched in 1923. Additional vessels have been constructed for other governmental departments. No. 1 drydock, built of granite, completed in 1833 was the first drydock built in this country, and the first vessel to enter it was the famous frigate Constitution. The U. S. S. Constitution, or "Old Ironsides" as it is commonly referred to, was built by the act of Congress which authorized the building of six frigates in the year 1793. Work has commenced on the frigate at "Moulton's Point," former name of the navy yard, in 1794 and she was launched in 1797. This famous old ship participated in forty battles and never suffered defeat. In 1927 work of rebuilding her was undertaken at this yard. The necessary funds for the rebuilding were raised by popular subscription, in addition to an appropriation of three hundred thousand dollars authorized by Congress in 1930 to complete the work. In the late 1880s and 1890s, the Navy began expanding again bringing into service new modern steel hulled steam-powered warships and that brought new life to the Yard. The design stamp is made after painting of Christopher Blossom.
Somalia 2010;2500.
Sources:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Navy_Yard. https://www.mca-marines.org/leatherneck ... e-barracks

DOLPHIN INS submarine

This stamp shows us a Dolphin class submarine of the Israeli Navy, the stamp is designed after a few design alternations were made in the design after a photo on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin-class_submarine and shows us the DOLPHIN the lead ship of her class.

Built as a submarine by Thyssen Nordsee Werke in Emden, Germany for the Israeli Navy.
07 October 1994 keel laid down.
12 April 1996 launched as the INS DOLPHIN.
Displacement 1,640 ton surface, 1,900 ton submerged, dim. 57.3 x 6.8 x 6.2m (draught).
Powered: Diesel electric by 3 diesels, 4,243 shp, 3,164 kW., one shaft, speed 20 knots.
Test depth more as 350m.
Armament: 6 – 533mm torpedo tubes and 4 – 650mm torpedo tubes. She has the capacity to carry anti-ship missiles, mines, decoys and stn Atlas wire-guided DM2A3 torpedoes. The surface-to—surface missile is the submarine launched Harpoon which delivers a 227 kg warhead to a range of 130 km at high subsonic speed.
Crew 35 and 10 additional.
She was fitted out at the HDW yard in Kiel, Germany, and completed on 31 July 1999.


2018 Still a unit of the Israeli Navy and in service.

Source: Wikipedia and internet.
Solomon Island 2016 $12 sg?, scott?
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DISCOVERY HMS 1791 (Vancouver)

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DISCOVERY HMS 1791 (Vancouver)

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:48 pm

CA021.07.jpg
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Discovery 1791 (Small).jpg
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SG1303 (Small).jpg
SG1303
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To celebrate the 250th anniversary of Captain Vancouver’s birth and honour his accomplishments on 22 June 2007, Canada Post issued a single international rate stamp. The stamp depict Captain George Vancouver standing by the railing of the DISCOVERY looking to the coast.

The Canada Post has the following info by the stamp.
http://www.canadapost.ca/personal/colle ... etail=2027

The first hint of Captain Vancouver’s desire to make history probably came when he was an ambitious 16 year-old seaman serving on Captain James Cook’s ship the RESOLUTION, during Cook’s second great voyage. Cook sailed with the intention of determining whether an Antarctic continent really existed by exploring the Antarctic region and the South Pacific. Just before RESOLUTION turned north after having sailed as far south as was possible, Vancouver climbed the bowsprit leaning out over the Antarctic sea toward the polar ice, and established his claim of having been “nearer the south pole than any other man”.
By his mid-twenties, he had narrowly escaped death on the island of Hawaii (the day before Captain James Cook was killed on the same island) sailed the world twice and gained his first commission.

As captain of the DISCOVERY, Vancouver is credited with undertaking the last of the great voyages of exploration embarked upon by 18th century European sailors.
During this expedition, he oversaw the return of British territory and property from the Spanish at Nootka and created the first accurate map of the northwest Pacific coast, exploring from the tip of Vancouver Island to the southern end of the Alaska panhandle. He bestowed almost 400 place names that are still used today, including the largest island on the west coast of North America and Canada’s largest west-coast city, which both carry the name Vancouver.

“The importance of Vancouver’s achievements, which went largely unnoticed until after his death, have significant bearing in today’s world,” explains stamp designer Niko Potton of Fleming Design in Vancouver.
“Despite being a long way from home and being treated poorly by the (British) Admiralty upon his return, Vancouver selflessly served his King and country by fulfilling his duty. It’s that self-sacrifice that to me is the mark of a great man with a great character. I wanted to create a design that focused on the man himself and captured the solitary and isolation position in which he found himself, geographically and personally.

The detail-oriented stamp features a solitary image of Vancouver standing onboard ship, gazing out toward the horizon. The stamp also features a stunning reproduction of Vancouver’s authenticate signature running vertical down the right-hand side of the stamp. Permission to use the signature comes courtesy of the British Columbia Archives.

Built in 1789 as a wooden merchant vessel by Randall & Co. Rotherhithe.
November 1789 bought by the British Admiralty.
Launched under the name HMS DISCOVERY.
Tonnage 330 ton (bm), dim. 99.2 x 28.3 x 12.4ft. (30.2 x 8.6 x 3.77m.)
Armament: 10 – 4pdrs. short, 10 - ½pdr. swivels.
Crew 100.
February 1791 commissioned under command of Cmdr. George Vancouver.

When trouble was brewing between Spain and Great Britain over control of lands in the Pacific Northwest in 1789, and after a favourable resolution for Great Britain was made of the Nootka Sound controversy in 1790, the English fitted out two ships the DISCOVERY and the tender CHATHAM to survey all the waters and inlets, and to look for a Northwest passage between Cape Mendocine (30ºN) and Cook Inlet (60ºN).

01 April 1791 the two ships sailed from Falmouth, and after making calls at Tenerife and Cape Town, she headed east making landfall at Cape Chatham, Australia on 28 September, made a surveys of the west coast of Australia, then Dusky Bay, New Zealand where she arrived on 02 November 1791.

Then the two ships headed for Tahiti, during bad visibility the two ships lost contact, and the CHATHAM discovered a group of islands east of New Zealand which she named after the ship Chatham Islands.

The Chatham joined the DISCOVERY again at Tahiti, and after a three week stay there together the two ships sailed to Hawaii, where she arrived early March, sailing mid-March bound for the west coast on North America. A month later the Oregon coast was sighted, where after the two ships headed north along the coast.
End April she were off the Juan de Fuca, and the two ships sailed to Discovery Bay for repairs.
From this base she explored Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands, and there they met the Spanish vessels SUTIL and MEXICANA also on a survey voyage, the relations between the British and Spanish vessels were friendly.
06 August 1792 at 4 a.m. the Discovery grounded on rocks in the Queen Charlotte’s Sound, after throwing overboard ballast, wood and water at least she got free again, without much damage.

October 1792 the DISCOVERY sailed south leaving behind the CHATHAM.
14 November 1792 she arrived at Yerba Buena now San Francisco, she was the first non-Spanish ship to sail into San Francisco Bay.
15 January 1793 she sailed from Mendocino bound for Hawaii where she arrived on 12 February, she made a survey of the islands before she headed back to the North West coast of America.
20 May she arrived at Puget Sound, the two ships surveyed the Queen Charlotte Sound including Elcho Harbour on Dean Channel, by the end of the second season, Vancouver’s expedition had charted so far 1700 miles of coast from29 56N to about 56 N.
Then she headed back to Hawaii to finish the surveys of these islands.
Then the two ships sailed back to the North American coast, shortly after departing Hawaii the two ships separated, coming together again on 06 May.
DISCOVERY in the meantime sighted Chirikof Island and proceeded to the Cook’s Inlet on 12 April, after finding out that it was not a river the DISCOVERY sailed around the Kenai Peninsula and made a survey of the Prince William Sound.
In the end of the summer season she completed surveys and charted the northern end of the Alexander Archipelago, after a call at Cape Decision on the southern end of Chichagof Island in 1793, the two ships
Sailed for California.
02 December 1794 the two ships sailed from Monterey and after calling at Maria Magdalena, Cocos Island, the Galapagos and Valparaiso before passing Cape Horn and sailing in the Atlantic, arriving 03 July 1795 at St Helena.
At St Helena they were informed that Great Britain was in War with the Netherlands and thereafter she seized the Dutch East Indiaman MACASSAR who was underway from Cape Town to the Netherlands.
The CHATHAM was dispatched to Brazil as an escort.
15 July DISCOVERY sailed from St Helena, and she arrived at Shannon on 13 September 1795.
The DICOVERY and CHATHAM arrived Deptford in October 1795.
Of her original crew only 5 men died during the five year voyage.
Thereafter laid up.
1798 Fitted out as a bomb vessel.
July 1795 re-commissioned under command of Cmdr John Dick, October 1800 relieved by Cmdr. John Conn.
October 1801 decommissioned.
June 1803 re-commissioned under Cmdr. John Joyce, relieved on June 1804 by Cmdr. Charles Pickford.
1808 Fitted out as convict ship in Sheerness.
1818 At Woolwich as convict ship.
1834 Broken up.

More on Vancouver is given on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16035#!lightbox[gallery]/0/

Australia 1991 $1.05 sg1303, scott1226.
Canada 2007 $1.55, sg?, scott?

Source: Some web-sites. Voyages of Delusions by Glyn Williams. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine.
British Warships in the Age of Sail 1793-1817.
aukepalmhof
 
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Re: DISCOVERY HMS 1791 (Vancouver)

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Nov 27, 2017 6:38 pm

Discovery_1789_Vancouver.jpg
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1988 discovery.jpg
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In the 18th century, new scientific equipment allowed explorers to survey land and sea with greater accuracy than ever before. Some of George Vancouver's maps, in fact, are still in use today. Trained as map-maker under Captain James Cook, Vancouver undertook a round-the-world voyage from 1791 to 1795, covering 105,000 kilometres. He surveyed the west coast from 30o to 60o N., and was so intent on mapping the coastline that he missed the Columbia River. Nevertheless, he would eventually dispel the myth that a Northwest Passage existed at these latitudes. Artist Frederick Hagan of Newmarket, Ontario painted these four images, third in the series of Exploration stamps. Using a palette of vivid colours, he depicts the lands carted by four 18th century explorers. His imaginative backgrounds detail charts, map-making tools and the DISCOVERY, the ship Vancouver sailed on his voyage around the world.

Source: Canada Post Corporation. [Postage Stamp Press Release], 1988.
Canada 1988 37c sg 1286, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 5465
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am


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