SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

U-BOAT TYPE VIIC 41

Type VIIC/41 was a slightly modified version of the VIIC and had the same armament and engines. The difference was a stronger pressure hull giving them a deeper crush depth and lighter machinery to compensate for the added steel in the hull, making them slightly lighter than the VIIC. A total of 91 were built; all of them from U-1271 onwards lacked the fittings to handle mines.
Today one Type VIIC/41 still exists: U-995 is on display at Laboe (north of Kiel), the only surviving Type VII in the world.

Maldives 2015 in margin of sheet SgMS?, scott?
Source: Wikipedia

YURY DOLGORUKIY (K-535)

Built as a nuclear submarine by JSC.PO Sevmash shipyard in Severodvinsk for the Russian Navy.
02 November 1996 laid down.
13 February 2008 launched as the YURY DOLGORUKIY (K-535) one of the Borei-class submarines.
Displacement 14,720 ton surfaced, 24,000 ton submerged, dim. 170.08 x 13,47 x 10.03m. (draught)
Propulsion: 1 – OK-650B nuclear reactor which delivered steam to 1 AEU steam turbine, one shaft, speed 25 knots surface, submerged 32kn..
Armament: 16 - Bulava SLBMs missiles, 6 – SS-N-15 cruise missiles. 6 - 21 inch torpedo tubes.
Crew 130.
10 January 2013 commissioned.

K-535 YURIY DOLGORUKIY is the first Borei-class ballistic missile submarine of the Project 955 in service with the Russian Navy. Named after the founder of Moscow, Yuri Dolgoruki, it was laid down on November 2, 1996 and was first planned to enter service in 2001. However, the R-39M missile that the Borei class was supposed to carry was abandoned after several failed tests, and the submarine was redesigned for the Bulava missile. The Bulava missile is smaller than the original R-39M, and in the 2007 START treaty data exchange it was reported that all Borei-class submarines would carry 16 missiles instead of 12, as originally intended. As of January 2013 the submarine is active with the Russian Navy.
Deployment
The submarine was rolled out of its construction hall into a launch dock on 15 April 2007 in Severodvinsk, when it was about 82% complete. The Russian government has allocated nearly 5 billion rubles, or 40% of the Navy's 2007 weapons budget, for the completion of the submarine.
There was some speculation that YURIY DOLGORUKIY would be rushed through the rest of its production and testing phases in order to be ready for the 2008 Russian presidential elections. Much of the ship's equipment remained uninstalled and untested, a process that would normally take over a year to complete.
On 13 February 2008 YURIY DOLGORUKIY was finally launched from its floating dock in Severodvinsk where the final outfitting took place. The submarine's reactor was first activated on 21 November 2008. and the submarine began its sea trials on 19 June 2009.
Sea Trials
In July 2010 the ship passed the first of several company sea trials, in which navigation systems, buoyancy control system, and some other characteristics were tested at sea. All company tests were completed by the end of September 2010 and she was then preparing for state trials. It was initially planned to conduct the first torpedo launches during the ongoing state trials in December 2010 and then in same month conduct the first launch of the main weapon system, the R-30 (RSM-56) Bulava missile. The plan was then postponed to mid-summer 2011 due to ice conditions in White Sea. It was expected to be commissioned to Russian Pacific Fleet in the first half of 2011, but in December 2010 it was announced that the submarine had technical defects and would be laid up for repairs. The work will take at least six months, and after this the submarine would continue the Bulava missile tests and could be ready for active duty by the later half of 2011. On 7 June 2011 the submarine left the Sevmash shipyard to continue sea trials and on 28 June the first SLBM (RSM-56 Bulava) was successfully launched.
On 12 January 2012 it was reported the submarine had successfully finished state trials and that it would get ready for commissioning within the next couple of months. It was later reported that both YURI DOLGORUKIY and ALEXANDER NEVSKY would enter service in the summer of 2012. Dmitry Rogozin later confirmed that the submarine will be transferred to the Russian navy on July 29, 2012. YURY DOLGORUKIY was expected to join the Russian Navy by the end of the year, but tests carried out during the latest sea trials revealed a number of technical flaws. Software glitches in the automated launch control system prevented further tests of the Bulava ballistic missile, the submarine’s main weapon. “We are expecting the YURY DOLGORUKIY submarine to enter service in 2013,” defense minister Serdyukov told Russian lawmakers at a meeting on defense issues.
The second Borei class submarine, ALEXANDER NEVSKY, could join Russia’s Pacific Fleet in 2014, the minister said. Sevmash shipyard claimed RUR 30 mln from Russian defense ministry for non-accepting YURY DOLGORUKIY because it has to maintain the submarine, since defense minister Anatoly Serdiukov decided to postpone commissioning of the sub and, therefore, deferral of all maintenance expenditures. According to the source, non-accepting of the submarine is related to the non-availability of mooring quays, primarily at Kamchatka where the first two Borei-class subs, YURY DOLGORUKIY and ALEXANDER NEVSKY will be stationed.
Finally YURY DOLGORUKIY joined the Russian Navy on 10 January 2013. The official ceremony of raising the Russian Navy colors on the submarine was led by Russian Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu. The Defense Minister, speaking via video-link, informed the President (Vladimir Putin) that St. Andrew's ensign had been raised on the submarine, symbolically marking its introduction into the Russian Navy. Commenting on the news on Twitter, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, posted: “Tremble, bourgeoisie! You’re done with!”. In 2014 after a series of exercises, the submarine is fully operational.

Maldives 2015 Fr22, sg?, scott?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_su ... kiy_(K-535)

CABALLITO DE TOTORA

Caballito de totora: Is a one man reed craft found on several mountain lakes. Constructed of 3 bundles of totora reeds, the central keel bundle bound tightly to form a lightly upturned point at the bow; the outer 2 bundles create the sides; truncated stern. Platform of reeds laid on the after half. Paddle has a very slender loom to which a spade shaped blade is attached.
Length ca. 2.5m.

Peru 2014 $/7.00 sg?, scott?
Source: Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft

Kasturi KD (Kasturi Class Corvette) 1984

KD Kasturi is one of the two Kasturi-class corvettes of the Royal Malaysian Navy, Her hull number is (F-25) and name of her sister ship is KD Lekir (F-26). They were acquired in the mid-1980s. The two ships constitute the Malaysian Navy's 22nd Corvette Squadron, their homeport being Lumut. After about 25 years of service, they underwent an extensive modernisation known as Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) starting in 2009, enabling them to be employed for another 10 to 15 years. They have since been returned to active duty.

The two ships of the class are named after Hang Kasturi and Hang Lekir, two heroic figures from the Malay 15th-century epic narrative Hikayat Hang Tuah. They share this characteristic with the two Lekiu-class frigates KD Lekiu and KD Jebat, as well as the old frigate-turned-trainingship KD Hang Tuah, all of which are named after figures from the epic as well.

The class was ordered in February 1981, and built by the German Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft (HDW) shipyard. Both ships were simultaneously launched on 14 May 1983 and commissioned on 15 August 1984. Two more were planned, but were never ordered. The Kasturi class is based off HDW's FS 1500 design. The two ships constitute the Royal Malaysian Navy's 22nd Corvette Squadron. Their homeport is Lumut at the west coast of the Malayan Peninsula, facing the Strait of Malacca and the Indian Ocean.

In August 2009, a Service Life Extension Programme (SLEP) was awarded to Boustead Heavy Industries to overhaul the aging corvettes, with work to be carried out locally at the Boustead Naval Shipyard in Lumut. By this time, the KD Kasturi had reportedly not been operational since 2007, and it would eventually take almost seven years for her to resume operational status in early 2014. The KD Lekiu against that remained in active duty until the SLEP work on her began in October 2011 and was completed in November 2014. The SLEP is estimated to have extended the corvettes' service life by around 15 years.

Despite the work being incomplete on the KD Lekiu at that time, both ships participated in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in March 2014.

The SLEP modernisation comprised extensive changes to the original configuration of the ships, aimed at both extending their service life as well as improving combat capabilities. The TACTICOS Combat Management System from Thales replaced the older Signaal SEWACO MA command system and the DR3000S Electronic Support Measures suite including the Therma SKWS Decoy Launching System was installed. The DA-08 search radar and the WM22 fire control radar were overhauled, and the Thales MIRADOR electro-optical sensor replaced the Signaal LIOD optronic director. A DSQS-24C hull-mounted sonar from Atlas Elektronik was installed to complement the new torpedo-launch capabilities.

The Kasturi class' original armament was heavily altered by the 2009 modernisation as well. The 57 mm Bofors was moved from the aft to the bow, where it replaced the 100 mm gun as the main gun. No new aft gun was installed. The two manually operated Emerlec 30 mm twin-barrel anti-air guns were replaced with 30 mm single-barrel MSI DS30B guns. Anti-submarine capabilities were enhanced by replacing the dated Bofors 375 mm anti-submarine rocket launcher with two EuroTorp B515 triple torpedo launchers equipped with Whitehead A244-S torpedoes. The launchers however were reportedly salvaged from the Laksamana-class corvettes, which thereby lost their anti-submarine capabilities.

There are conflicting reports about the Exocet anti-ship missiles. Some sources state that the Kasturi class prior to the SLEP had been equipped with the Exocet MM38, an old variant of the missile, and that the modernisation included an upgrade to the newer and more capable Exocet MM40 Block II variant. Other sources state that the ships had been equipped with MM40 Block II missiles straight from the beginning.

The Kasturi class is powered by a CODAD propulsion system, provided by four MTU diesels driving two shafts and developing 23,460 horsepower (17,490 kW) driving two controllable pitch propellers. This gives a maximum speed of 28 knots (52 km/h; 32 mph), and a range of 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 14 knots (26 km/h; 16 mph).

The Kasturi class has a helideck aft suitable for the Malaysian Navy's Super Lynx 300 and Fennec helicopters. Lacking a hangar, it does not carry an embarked helicopter.

Malaysia 1993, S.G.?, Scott: 493.

Source: Wikipedia.

BALSA RAFT

Balsa raft was already mentioned by early travellers, in use from southern Colombia to central Peru. She were all made of Ecuadorian balsa logs.
Size, shape and rigging varied, indicating adaptations to meet special uses and geographical conditions. Modified by the colonial Spanish, who found them useful as river craft in lowland Ecuador, where they were sometimes 24m long and outfitted for comfortable travel. Some only a skeletal framework others solidly built surfaces of 2 layers of logs; 2 deck seagoing rafts also reported. Small balsas used mainly for ferrying and cargo transport, and some constructed as 1-way timber rafts that floated downstream. Many equipped with sails and 2 masted types were seen. The mast often the inverted “V” type. Then as now the sailing balsa used one or more daggerboards at each end to control direction under sail. On the smaller unrigged craft, a plank aft maneuverer in a sculling motion propels the craft. Recent balsas are recorded as having 5 -11 logs and up to 18m long, but most are shorter. Shaped bows on some; others squared off. On the sailing craft, the mast placed in a hardwood step and sets either a lug, sprit or gaff sail. A light spar may extend the lugsail. Large Ecuadorian balsas were in use until about 1920, often aiding in lightering from ships.

Thanks for the history of the raft Anatol: see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12644

Ecuador 2006 $1.00 sg?, scott?
Source, Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

INDEPENDENCE LNG tanker

At the very beginning of 2015, Lithuania Post released the first pre-paid postcards of the current year. The postcard was released to commemorate one of the most important energy projects – the liquefied natural gas terminal (LNG) - launched during the period of independent Lithuania, and make Lithuania independent from the Russian energy supply to that country.
The vessel depict is the INDEPENDENCE a Floating Storage & Regasification Unit (FSRU) which was built under yard No 2549 by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea, for Leif Hoegh LNG Klaipeda Pte. Ltd, Oslo, Norway.
2012 Keel laid down.
Launched as the INDEPENDENCE, she was christened by Mrs. Dalia Grybauskaite, President of Lithuania.
Tonnage 109,793 grt, 36,732 nrt, 82,028 dwt, dim. 294.07 x 50,0 x 46.0m., length bpp 282,02m, draught 12.6m.
Powered: Dual-fuel Propulsion System (DFDE) (Diesel electric) by Wärtsilä-Hyundai engines, speed 18 knots.
Cargo capacity in four LNG tanks, 170,132m³.
12 May 2014 delivered to owners. Building cost ca. 330 million US$. Registered in Singapore. Managed by Hoegh LNG AS, Oslo.
27 October 2014 arrived at Klaipeda, where she was moored as a LNG storage and regasification unit and LNG import terminal.
2015 Same name and owner, IMO No 9629536.

Lithuania 2015 pre-paid postcard
Source: Wikipedia and various internet sites.
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Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

Postby john sefton » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:05 pm

SG414.jpg
SG414
Click image to view full size
HMS PHEASANT. 1819. A sloop of 18 guns.
Built by Edwards at Shoreham 14.4.1798.
Was present at capture of Montevideo on 3.2.1807.
Sold 11.7.1827 to be broken up.
N.B. This was 3rd ship of name, between 1761 and 1963. Eight ships bore the name.

Log Book November 1986.
Ascension SG414
john sefton
 
Posts: 1644
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Re: Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

Postby aukepalmhof » Sat Nov 14, 2009 8:35 pm

Built as gun-sloop by the yard of Edwards, Shoreham for the Royal Navy.
24 January 1795 ordered.
June 1795 keel laid down.
25 March 1796 launched under the name HMS PHEASANT one of the Merlin class, she was the third ship in the Royal Navy with this name.
Tonnage 373 ton (bm), dim 106.1 x 28.3 x 13.9ft., draught 10.3ft.
Armament 16 – 6 pdrs. upperdeck, 4 – 12 pdrs. guns quarter deck, fore-castle 2 – 12 pdrs. carronades
Crew 121.
28 April 1796 completed at yard, then moved to Portsmouth for fitting out.
June 1798 commissioned under command of Commander William Skipsey.
08 August 1798 completed. Building cost £8.087.


The class was later rearmed with: Upperdeck 14 – 32pdr. carronades, quarter deck 4 – 12 pdr. and fore-castle 2 – 12 pdr. carronades.

August 1798 sailed for Halifax.
From 1800 till 1804 under command of Commander Henry Carew.
22 August 1803 returned to the U.K.
1804 Under command of Commander Robert Paul, 01 September 1804 sailed for Jamaica. Commander Paul died at Barbados early 1805.
1805 Under command of Commander Robert Henderson in the Leeward Islands, Caribbean.
16 December 1805 he retook the English ship CLIO laden with merchandise.
January 1806 under command of Commander John Palmer, he was her commander untill 1814.
August 1806 the PHEASANT was in the U.K.
28 September 1806 sailed for South America.
1807 She bombarded Montevideo with other British warships, and on 03 February took part in the storming of the town, which was taken on 04 February 1807.
June 1807 took part in the siege on Buenos Aires.
1808 In service in the Channel Fleet and she took the French privateers Le TROPARD (5 guns) on 08 May 1808, and Le COMTE DE HUNEBOURG (14 guns) from St Malo on 03 February 1810, and the Le HÉROS (6 guns) on 17 June 1811.

From July till September 1812 repair and refit in Plymouth, repair bill £11.587.
05 January 1813 arrived from Oporto in Plymouth.
12 March 1813 took together with the HMS WARSPITE the American privateer WILLIAM BAYNARD (4 gun).
06 May 1813 brought in the American brig FOX 98 guns) which carried a letter of marquee; she was captured by HMS PHEASANT, WHITING and SCYLLA after a chase of over 100 miles. The FOX was underway from Bordeaux to Philadelphia.
05 June 1813 sailed from Torbay with an outward bound convoy for Newfoundland.
28 December 1813 sailed from Newfoundland with a convoy to the U.K.

October 1814 command was taken over by Commander Edmund Waller, used in the Channel Fleet.
November 1815 paid off into ordinary at Plymouth.
Refitted at Plymouth from September till December 1818 and re-commissioned on September 1818, under command of Commander Benedictus Kelly.
After her refit sailed for the Africa Station.
30 July 1819 she captured the slave vessel NOVA FELICIDAD, the same year she lost her Captain Kelly, surgeon, gunner and quartermaster on most probably malaria, not given of one of the lower ranks lost there live, but most probably yes.
September 1821 under command of Commander Douglas Clavering, at the Africa Station.
November 1822 she sailed via Havana and New York back to England.
De-commissioned and fitted out as a receiving ship at Woolwich, in service as so from August 1823 till November 1824.

11 July 1827 sold at Deptford for £1.250 to John Small Sedger, Rotherhithe, for breaking up.

Source: Log Book. British Warships in the age of sails 1793- 1817. www.cronab.demon.co.uk
Some other web-sites.
aukepalmhof
 
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