SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

EXPLORER cruise vessel 2002

For the International Philatelic Havana Cuba Cup 2014, Cuba issued a miniature sheet with in the margin a cruise vessel entering the port of Havana.
The only cruise ship I can find with a blue hull which visited Havana is the EXPLORER and compare the stamp with a photo I believe she is depict. She has a sister but she never visited Cuba so far I can find.
Built under yard No 962 as a cruise vessel by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany for the Royal Olympic Cruises, Piraeus, Greece.
10 July 1999 keel laid down.
19 May 2000 launched as the OLYMPIC EXPLORER, one sister the OLYMPIC VOYAGER.
Tonnage 24,318 grt, 2,500 dwt, dim. 180.40 x 25.50 x 7.30m. (draught), length bpp. 155.0m.
Powered by four Wärtsilä 9L46C diesel engines, 37,800 kW, twin shafts, speed 28 knots. With only two diesel engines running she still can make a speed of 22 knots.
Accommodation for 800 passengers.
09 March 2001 trials.
April 2001 renamed in OLYMPIA EXPLORER.
24 April 2001 sailed out with shipyard workers for a guest cruise.
27 April 2001 the owner refused the ship due to severe vibration problems, but if this was the reason or financial problems by the owner.
25 April 2002 at least was she delivered to Royal Olympic Cruises at Piraeus, under Gibraltar flag.
The same year the company changed his name to Royal Olympia Cruises.

First used for cruises in the Mediterranean, during the winter season she crossed the Atlantic to Port Canaveral, then used for cruises from there to the Caribbean. And east coast of Brazil.
15 January 2003 she passed the Panama Canal from the east to the west for the first time. After a voyage from Los Angeles around Cape Horn to Ft Lauderdale she returned back to the Mediterranean for the summer season commencing on 20 April 2003.
November 2003 she returned again to the USA but after September 11th the cruise industry got a problem with a lack of passengers and due to financial problems the OLYMPIA EXPLORER cancelled her December voyage to Hawaii. In March 2004 the OLYMPIA EXPLORER was seized in Los Angeles and moved to the Long Beach Harbour anchorage.
24 March 2004 she was auctioned and bought by the mortgage holder the German KfW bank, who bought the ship for US$82.7 million.
She was thereafter laid up while the new owner sought a buyer.
28 June 2004 bought by Stella Maritime LLC, Nassau, Bahamas (Management Institute for Shipboard Education, Pittsburgh, USA and renamed EXPLORER.
December 2007 sold to Explorer Maritime LLC, Monte Carlo, Monaco, under Bahamas flag and registry with homeport Nassau.
Used for Semester at Sea and with students she makes voyages which takes about 100 to 110 days around the world in spring and autumn. The summer voyages are mostly shorter between 65 to 70 days. Between the semesters the EXPLORER is used for short voyages between 20 and 30 days.
2015 In service same name and owner, managed by V Ships Leisure SAM, Monaco. IMO No 9183518.

Cuba 2014 1.00p sgMS?, scott?
http://maritimematters.com/2011/04/expl ... niversity/ Equasis. http://www.faktaomfartyg.se/olympia_explorer_2002.htm

FLETCHER CHRISTIAN

This set of stamps issued by Pitcairn Island depict scenes from the film” Mutiny on the Bounty”. Only one stamp shows us a sailing vessel, which is the replica BOUNTY built in 1962. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12613&p=13701&hilit=bounty+replica#p13701
Fletcher Christian was born on 25 September 1764, in Eaglesfield, in Cumberland. He came from old gentry, a landed family with estates both on the Isle of Man and in Cumberland. After his lawyer father’s death when Fletcher was just three and a half years old, his mother got into financial difficulties and ran up a large debt. To avoid debtors’ prison she fled with Fletcher and his siblings to Douglas on the Isle of Man.
He went to sea at the age of 18, joining the HMS CAMBRIDGE on which William Bligh was sixth lieutenant. Since Christian was enrolled as just a ship’s boy, it is unlikely that the two had much contact and on returning Christian was discharged. On April 25, 1783, Fletcher signed on as midshipman on board HMS EURYDICE sailing for India. Christian, through seamanship competence, was made acting lieutenant after only one year’s service. By June 1785 however, the EURYDICE was back home and Christian was paid off. Looking for employment, he used his family connection with the Bethams, the family of Elizabeth Bligh, and saw Christian join the merchant ship BRITANNIA, owned by Elizabeth’s uncle and commanded by William Bligh. They sailed together on two voyages to the West Indies. On the first, Christian sailed as an ordinary seaman and on the second, Bligh made him second mate.
Christian joined the HMAV BOUNTY, on Bligh's recommendation, for the ship's breadfruit expedition to Tahiti and during the voyage Bligh appointed him acting lieutenant. Five months after arriving, the BOUNTY left Tahiti in April 1789 and headed for the Tongan Islands, but the luxurious months on the idyllic island had made the crew soft, forcing Bligh to marshal out strict punishments to bring them into line. Severely discontented by a series of brutal floggings and suffering the loss of their female companions, eighteen members of the crew, led by Christian, conspired to mutiny. On April 28th Christian and several of his followers entered Bligh’s cabin, took him captive and soon cast him and eighteen others adrift in a small boat which took them on an epic, and now famous, 3,168 nautical mile voyage.
Following the mutiny, Christian attempted to build a colony on Tubai but being unsuccessful he returned briefly to Tahiti where he married a local chief’s daughter, Maimiti, on 16 June 1789. While on Tahiti, he dropped off sixteen crewmen including four Bligh loyalists who had been left behind on BOUNTY the remaining nine mutineers, six Tahitian men and eleven Tahitian women then sailed eastward. They headed for the uncharted Pitcairn Island where they stripped BOUNTY of all that could be floated ashore before setting the ship on fire and stranding themselves. Difficult times followed with the resulting sexual imbalance, combining with the effective enslavement of the Tahitian men by the mutineers, leading to insurrection and the deaths of most of the men.
The American ship TOPAZ visited Pitcairn in 1808 and found only one man, John Adams, still alive, along with nine Tahitian women. Maimiti claimed Christian had been murdered in 1793, along with four remaining mutineers and all six of the Tahitian men. Christian was survived by Maimiti and his sons, Thursday October Christian (born 1790), and Charles Christian (born 1792) and a daughter Mary-Ann Christian (born 1793).
Christian, possibly the world’s most famous mutineer, was well thought of by his men. All of them saw their misfortunes as having been brought about by Bligh. There is no portrait or drawing of Fletcher Christian from a real life study. Bligh described Christian as…"5 ft. 9 in. high, blackish or of very dark complexion. Hair - blackish or very dark brown. Make - strong. A star tattooed (sic) on his left breast, and tattooed on the backside. His knees stand a little out and he may be called a little bow legged. He is subject to violent perspiration, particularly in his hand, so that he soils anything he handles".
All others who knew Christian agreed that he was handsome and of an athletic build. He seems to have been an honest and forthright man, normally with a happy and friendly disposition, very charming and liked by most on board the BOUNTY.

Rumours have persisted for more than two hundred years that Christian's murder may have been faked, that he had left the island and that he made his way back to England around 1808. Although highly unlikely, this claim has led to speculation that will probably never cease. Many scholars believe that the rumours of Christian returning to England helped to inspire Samuel Taylor Coleridge in writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

Pitcairn Island 2014 20c/3.00 sg?, scott?
http://www.stamps.gov.pn/FletcherChristian.html

SANDHAYAK INS J-18

Built in 1980-'81 by Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers, Goa Shipyard Ltd.
Survey ship, Displecment:1929 tonnes, L:87,80m. B:12,80m. Draft:3,43m. 2 diesel engines:7720 hp. 16 kn. complement:178, armament:1-40mm./60 gun, helicopter deck.

The Sandhayak class of survey ships is a serie of eight vessels built by Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata and Goa Shipyard, Ltd., Vasco for the Indian Navy. The vessels are powered by two diesel engines and have a top speed of 16 knots.
Sandhayak-class survey ships are equipped with a range of surveying, navigational and communication systems. The ships are designed to undertake shallow coastal and deep oceanic hydrographic survey and collect oceanographic and geophysical data required for the production of digital navigational charts and publications. Besides carrying out their primary role of hydrographic survey, they can also assist in times of war and natural calamities as troop transports and casualty holding ships.
(India 2006, 5 R. StG.?) ship on the left.
Internet

SPIRIT OF HELA LNG tanker

The ship serves on the ExxonMobil-led PNG LNG Project, Papua New Guinea’s first project to liquefy and export natural gas. On May 25, 2014, the vessel loaded the first LNG cargo at a terminal near the capital city Port Moresby, then departed for the Futtsu Terminal of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The cargo was discharged safely the next month.

The SPIRIT OF HELA will support Papua New Guinea’s move into the LNG export market for many years. The introduction of postage stamps featuring the ship clearly reflects the national importance of this project.
Built as a Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) tanker under yard No 324 by Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Jeollanam-do, South Korea for Nefertiti LNG Shipping Co.Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
Launched as the BEN BADIS.
Tonnage: 114,277 grt, 34,283 nrt, 87,130 dwt., dim. 298.43 x 46 x 25.8m, length bpp.285m, draught 13 m.
Tank capacity: 177,409 m³.
Powered, diesel electric, manufactured by Converteam Ltd, Rugby, GBR. 29,040 kW (39,456hp), (2) Electrical propulsion 14,520 kW, one shaft, speed 19.5 knots.
Bunker capacity 7.585 m³.
05 November 2010 delivered to owners. Under Bahamas flag and registry.

April 2014 renamed in SPIRIT OF HELA.
2015 Same name, owner and in service, IMO No 9361639, managed by Mitsui Osk Lines Ltd, Tokyo

Papua New Guinea 2014 4 stamps and two souvenir sheets. Sg?, scott?
Source: Internet, Bureau Veritas.

Tennessee USS (Armored Cruiser ACR-10) 1906

The second USS Tennessee (ACR-10), also referred to "Armored Cruiser No. 10", and later renamed Memphis and renumbered CA-10, was a United States Navy armored cruiser, the lead ship of her class of four. She had a very unusual end.

She was laid down by the Cramp Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 20 June 1903, launched on 3 December 1904, sponsored by Ms. Annie K. Frazier (daughter of Governor James B. Frazier of Tennessee and later the foundress of the Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy), and commissioned at thePhiladelphia Navy Yard on 17 July 1906, Captain Albert Gleaves Berry in command.

The new armored cruiser departed Hampton Roads on 8 November 1906 as escort for Louisiana in which President Theodore Roosevelt had embarked for a cruise to Panama to check on the progress of work constructing the Panama Canal. After a brief visit to Puerto Rico on the return voyage, the warships arrived back at Hampton Roads on 26 November. Tennessee was present for the Jamestown Exposition held in 1907 to commemorate the tricentennial of the founding of the first English settlement in America.

On 14 June, Tennessee sailed for Europe and reached Royan, France on the 23rd for duty with the Special Service Squadron. She returned home in August but departed Hampton Roads on 12 October for the Pacific.

Tennessee then patrolled off the California coast until 24 August 1908 but suffered a boiler tube explosion on 5 June, which killed seven men, while steaming at full speed. The explosion occurred just after the rear admiral in charge of the squadron had visited on a tour of inspection; had the explosion taken place a few minutes earlier, he might have been among the casualties. Since the ship's 16 boilers were sub-divided into separate watertight compartments, the rest of the engineering section was not affected. Once repairs had been made and her tour had ended, Tennessee sailed for Samoa, arriving at Pago Pago on 23 September to resume service with the Pacific Fleet. On 15 May 1910, she arrived at Bahía Blanca to represent the United States at the centenary celebration of the independence of Argentina. On 8 November, the armored cruiser departed Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and proceeded to Charleston, South Carolina, to embark President William Howard Taft for a round trip voyage to Panama to inspect further progress on the canal. She returned to Hampton Roads on 22 November and then engaged in battle practice off the Virginia coast into February 1911. Following a Mardi Gras visit to New Orleans and a visit to New York early in March, the ship steamed to Cuban waters for two months of operations out of Guantanamo Bay.

Placed in reserve at the Portsmouth Navy Yard on 15 June 1911, she remained on the east coast for 18 months before departing Philadelphia on 12 November 1912 for the Mediterranean. Arriving off İzmir, Turkey on 1 December, she remained there protecting American citizens and property during the First Balkan War until 3 May 1913, when she headed home. After reaching Hampton Roads on the 23rd, Tennessee operated on the East Coast until entering the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia on 23 October. On 2 May 1914, she became receiving ship at the New York Navy Yard.

On 6 August, Tennessee sailed from New York for duty in Europe through the first half of 1915 supporting the American Relief Expedition by carrying gold bullion and other resources to assist in the extraction of American refugees from war-ravaged Europe. In August, she transported the 1st Regiment, Marine Expeditionary Force, and the Marine Artillery Battalion to Haiti. From 28 January-24 February 1916, the cruiser served as flagship of a cruiser squadron off Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In March, she embarked a group of dignitaries at Hampton Roads for a two-month, round trip cruise to Montevideo, Uruguay.

On 25 May, Tennessee was renamed Memphis, honoring a city of Tennessee, so that the name "Tennessee" could be reassigned to a new warship, Battleship No. 43. Third USS Tennessee.

See topic: “Tennessee USS (1919)”

In July 1916, under the command of Captain Edward L. Beach, Sr., she got underway for the Caribbean arriving at Santo Domingo on 23 July for peace-keeping patrol off the rebellion-torn Dominican Republic.

Memphis was at anchor .5 nmi off a rocky beach in 45 ft (14 m) of water in the harbor of Santo Domingo on the afternoon of 29 August 1916 with two of her 16 boilers operating in case she needed to get underway; the gunboat USS Castine also was anchored in the harbor. Shortly after 12:00, Memphis began to roll heavily and Captain Beach observed an unexpected heavy swell developing. Memphis and Castine both made preparations to leave the harbor and began to raise steam; Memphis expected to be able to get underway at about 16:35.

Conditions in the harbor had deteriorated badly by 15:45, when Memphis sighted an approaching 75 ft (23 m) wave of yellow water stretching along the entire horizon. By 16:00, the wave was closer, had turned ochre in color, and had reached about 100 ft (30 m) in height; at the same time, Memphis was rolling 45°, so heavily that large amounts of water cascaded into the ship via her gun ports and water even was entering the ship via ventilators 50 ft (15 m) above the waterline. By 16:25, water began to enter the ship via her funnels, 70 ft (21 m) above the waterline, putting out the fires in her boilers and preventing her from raising enough steam to get underway. She began to strike the rocky harbor bottom at 16:40, damaging her propellers just as she was raising enough steam to begin moving, and her engines lost steam pressure. At about this time, the giant wave Memphis had seen approaching over the past hour arrived; she rolled into a deep trough and was struck immediately by what proved to be three very large waves in rapid succession, the highest of them estimated by the crew to have been 70 ft (21 m) in height, completely swamping her except for her highest points, and washing crewmen overboard. The waves rolled her heavily, caused her to strike the harbor bottom, then pushed her to the beach .5 nmi away. By 17:00, she had been driven under cliffs along the coast of the harbor and was resting on the harbor bottom. She was battered into a complete wreck in 90 minutes.Castine, meanwhile, managed to reach safer waters by getting underway and putting to sea through the large waves, although damaged by them and at times in danger of capsizing.

Memphis 's casualties, including a boatload of her sailors returning from shore leave, numbered some 40 men dead or missing and 204 badly injured. Due to their heroic actions during this incident, Chief Machinist's Mate George William Rud, Lieutenant Claud Ashton Jones, and Machinist Charles H. Willey were awarded the Medal of Honor.


In his 1966 account of the incident, The Wreck of the Memphis, Captain Beach 's son, Edward L. Beach, Jr., ascribed her loss to an unexpected tsunami exceeding 100 ft (30 m) in height, and this explanation has been carried forward by most sources discussing her loss. More recent research, however, has called this explanation into question. No record of any seismic event in the Caribbean on 29 August 1916 that could have triggered a tsunami has been found, and the rate of advance of the large wave Memphis reported — about an hour to cross the distance from the horizon to the ship — matches that of a wind-generated ocean wave (possibly a rogue wave); a tsunami, in contrast, would have covered the distance in only a few minutes. The periods of the three large waves that struck Memphis also are characteristic of large wind-generated waves rather than tsunamis.

A likely source for such large, wind-generated waves in Santo Domingo Harbor on 29 August 1916 does exist, in that three hurricanes...

Antão Gonçalves and Dinis Dias

ANTAN GONSALVE 1441:
Antão Gonçalves(on stamp to the left) was a 15th-century Portuguese explorer and slave trader who was the first European to buy Africans as slaves from black slave traders. In 1441, Gonçalves was sent by Henry the Navigator to explore the West African coast in an expedition under the command of Nuno Tristão . As Gonçalves was considerably younger than Tristão, his duty was less exploration than it was hunting the Mediterranean monk seals that inhabit West Africa. After he had filled his small vessel with seal skins, Gonçalves, on his own initiative, decided to buy some Africans to return to Portugal. With nine of his crewmen, Gonçalves bought an Azenegue Berber and a black tribesman who had worked as a slave for the Berbers. By this time, Tristão had arrived at the same place, and the two crews joined together for another purchasing trip, on which they bought 10 slaves, one of them an Azenegue chief. After this, Tristão continued exploration southwards while Gonçalves returned to Portugal. He embarked on another expedition in 1442, taking the Azenegue chief he had bought the year before. Gonçalves hoped to barter the chief for a number of the Azenegues' black slaves. He received 10 slaves, some gold dust and, curiously, a large number of ostrich eggs. However, this expedition contributed nothing to the cause of exploration; Gonçalves had not even sailed past the Río de Oro . He was granted a new Coat of Arms for his name. Not to be mistaken with another Antão Gonçalves, who coasted the Island of Madagascar at the beginnings of the 16th century.
DINIS DIAS 1445(Сape Verde):
Dinis Dias (on stamp to the right) was a Portuguese explorer of the 15th century. In 1445, Diaz, belonging to the well-known seaside family started to drive vehicles in his old age, and decided to do research because "he does not want to live in peace prosperity soft" and "wants to see and hear more than others" .He went out of Portugal and sailed along the West African coast, sailed past the mouth r.Senegal, set a new record, reaching a point about 800 km south of Cap Blanc. It is the westernmost part of the African continent, cape issued far out to sea and was overgrown with trees, he called Cap-Vert (Diaz called it Cape Verde, "Verde" by Portuguese "green", a reference to the lush vegetation in the area). Note that Diaz did not find the Cape Verde Islands, and in fact the Cape. He landed on both hills crowning the cape, set wooden crosses. The success of this expedition was possible because Diaz focused on exploration, rather than slaves, who were many Portuguese sailors in Africa, while in the spotlight. One expedition returns to Portugal with dozens of slaves, Diaz also only took four prisoners. Later that year, Dias sailed with the explorer Lançarote de Freitas in a large scale slaving expedition to Arguim . Medal - Portuguese navigator Dinis Dias- Vasco Berardo -1973-74.

Cabo Verde 1952;3,0e;SG352.
Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antão_Gonçalves. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinis_Dias
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Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

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Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

Postby john sefton » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:05 pm

SG414.jpg
SG414
Click image to view full size
HMS PHEASANT. 1819. A sloop of 18 guns.
Built by Edwards at Shoreham 14.4.1798.
Was present at capture of Montevideo on 3.2.1807.
Sold 11.7.1827 to be broken up.
N.B. This was 3rd ship of name, between 1761 and 1963. Eight ships bore the name.

Log Book November 1986.
Ascension SG414
john sefton
 
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Re: Pheasant HMS (sloop) c 1819

Postby aukepalmhof » Sat Nov 14, 2009 8:35 pm

Built as gun-sloop by the yard of Edwards, Shoreham for the Royal Navy.
24 January 1795 ordered.
June 1795 keel laid down.
25 March 1796 launched under the name HMS PHEASANT one of the Merlin class, she was the third ship in the Royal Navy with this name.
Tonnage 373 ton (bm), dim 106.1 x 28.3 x 13.9ft., draught 10.3ft.
Armament 16 – 6 pdrs. upperdeck, 4 – 12 pdrs. guns quarter deck, fore-castle 2 – 12 pdrs. carronades
Crew 121.
28 April 1796 completed at yard, then moved to Portsmouth for fitting out.
June 1798 commissioned under command of Commander William Skipsey.
08 August 1798 completed. Building cost £8.087.


The class was later rearmed with: Upperdeck 14 – 32pdr. carronades, quarter deck 4 – 12 pdr. and fore-castle 2 – 12 pdr. carronades.

August 1798 sailed for Halifax.
From 1800 till 1804 under command of Commander Henry Carew.
22 August 1803 returned to the U.K.
1804 Under command of Commander Robert Paul, 01 September 1804 sailed for Jamaica. Commander Paul died at Barbados early 1805.
1805 Under command of Commander Robert Henderson in the Leeward Islands, Caribbean.
16 December 1805 he retook the English ship CLIO laden with merchandise.
January 1806 under command of Commander John Palmer, he was her commander untill 1814.
August 1806 the PHEASANT was in the U.K.
28 September 1806 sailed for South America.
1807 She bombarded Montevideo with other British warships, and on 03 February took part in the storming of the town, which was taken on 04 February 1807.
June 1807 took part in the siege on Buenos Aires.
1808 In service in the Channel Fleet and she took the French privateers Le TROPARD (5 guns) on 08 May 1808, and Le COMTE DE HUNEBOURG (14 guns) from St Malo on 03 February 1810, and the Le HÉROS (6 guns) on 17 June 1811.

From July till September 1812 repair and refit in Plymouth, repair bill £11.587.
05 January 1813 arrived from Oporto in Plymouth.
12 March 1813 took together with the HMS WARSPITE the American privateer WILLIAM BAYNARD (4 gun).
06 May 1813 brought in the American brig FOX 98 guns) which carried a letter of marquee; she was captured by HMS PHEASANT, WHITING and SCYLLA after a chase of over 100 miles. The FOX was underway from Bordeaux to Philadelphia.
05 June 1813 sailed from Torbay with an outward bound convoy for Newfoundland.
28 December 1813 sailed from Newfoundland with a convoy to the U.K.

October 1814 command was taken over by Commander Edmund Waller, used in the Channel Fleet.
November 1815 paid off into ordinary at Plymouth.
Refitted at Plymouth from September till December 1818 and re-commissioned on September 1818, under command of Commander Benedictus Kelly.
After her refit sailed for the Africa Station.
30 July 1819 she captured the slave vessel NOVA FELICIDAD, the same year she lost her Captain Kelly, surgeon, gunner and quartermaster on most probably malaria, not given of one of the lower ranks lost there live, but most probably yes.
September 1821 under command of Commander Douglas Clavering, at the Africa Station.
November 1822 she sailed via Havana and New York back to England.
De-commissioned and fitted out as a receiving ship at Woolwich, in service as so from August 1823 till November 1824.

11 July 1827 sold at Deptford for £1.250 to John Small Sedger, Rotherhithe, for breaking up.

Source: Log Book. British Warships in the age of sails 1793- 1817. www.cronab.demon.co.uk
Some other web-sites.
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